Data Cart

Your data extract

0 variables
0 samples
View Cart



[Vietnam]
Population and Housing Census 2009
Central Census Steering Committee
Enumerator's Manual

Used for Sample Enumeration Areas
Hanoi, November 2008

[Pages 1-3, covering enumerator logistics details, are omitted here]

[pg. 4]

Chapter II. Stipulations on Census Profession

I. Census Time Point
The 2009 Census time point is 00:00am hour 01 April, 2009.

During the data collection period, irrespective of the date and time that enumerator visits household to interview, he/she must use the time point of 0 hour 01 April, 2009 (or 12:00 hour at midnight of 31, March 2009) to identify the number of household usual residents and their personal characteristics to record in the questionnaire. For questions on migration and mortality, enumerator must use reference dates stipulated for each question to define a full coverage.

II. Enumeration Period
The enumeration period (or data collection period) of the 2009 Census begins at 7 am 01 April, 2009 and ends on 20 April, 2009 at the latest.

[The rest of section II and the whole of section III are omitted here]

[pg. 5]

IV. The Coverage
The coverage of the Census includes:

  • All Vietnamese who usually reside in the area of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam at the census time point; Vietnamese who were officially authorized to go abroad and are abroad within the authorized time duration
  • Deaths that had occurred in households from 01 Lunar New Year Mau Ty (7 February, 2008 in solar calendar) to 31 March, 2009
  • Houses of inhabited households

V. Data Collection Unit
The data collection unit is the household. A household includes a person living alone or a group of persons living together and sharing meals. For a household with 2 persons or more, its members may have or may not have a common fund; may have or may not have reproductive, marital or adoption relationships; or in combination of both.

A household often utilizes an entire or a part of a housing unit, but there are also households living in tents/camps/inns/hotels; or collective houses, barracks, campuses, etc., or not having a place to live.

In most cases, a household only includes persons who are related to each other, such as parents and children or multi-generation households. In a number of cases, persons living with long-distant relatives or no relatives are members of the household.

Servants, lodgers and non-related persons are also included as members of the household if they usually live in the household and share meals, and are defined as usual residents of the household that they do household work or are household's lodgers.

Normally, a household includes persons living in a housing unit. However, in a number of cases, when having two groups of families or more or having two groups of people or more, who are not related to each other but live together in a housing unit, and do not share meals, each such group forms a household.

A person who, although he/she lives in a housing unit with a household, cooks food by him/herself or has meals somewhere, is not defined as a member of the household, and he/she should be separated to form another household.

If there are two groups of people, although they share meals, sleep in two different housing units, then these two groups form two different households. In special cases, children who are economically dependent on their parents and sleep in housing unit(s) nearby (households with many living houses) are considered as members of their parents" household, and they are investigated in this household.

Note: Cadres, workers living alone in collective houses, tents in industrial zones, construction sites, mines, etc., or hiring rooms to stay (including pupils

[pg. 6]

of vocational training schools/vocational schools who are not staying in schools" campuses but renting rooms to stay), it is instructed that each room is an enumeration unit.

VI. Housing Unit, Dwellings

1. Housing unitA dwelling house is a construction with three main structures: wall, roof, and floor, and is used for habitation.

A housing unit is a separate and independent place of abode, hence, it is built, changed or rearranged, and is used for habitation by one household or more. It can be a building, a house, a flat or an apartment.

A part of a house (a room or suite of rooms) can also be a housing unit if it satisfies the following conditions:

a) Separate: That part of the house must have facilities for sleeping, preparing and taking meals, and persons residing in it can be isolated from other households living in that house by walls or partition/bulkhead.
b) Direct access: People can enter part of the house directly from outside. That is, the occupants can enter and leave without passing through another household's accommodation.

2. Living place
A living place is the place where people can live, take food and rest. That can be a housing unit or a living quarter.

A living quarters can be built, rebuilt or arranged for human habitation; or it can be a place used for habitation although not actually intended for habitation, such as a car, train, bridge, cave, etc.

VII. Household's Usual Residents

1. Household's usual residents: are those who usually reside in the household and by the time of the census they have lived in the household for 6 months or longer, and those who have just moved into the household to live permanently, irrespective of whether they have registered as usual residents or not.
The household usual residents include:
a. Persons who usually live in the household, and by the time of the census, they have lived for 6 months or longer, consisting of:

  • Persons who usually live in the household, and by the time of the census they have lived for 6 months or longer and they are still living there, irrespective of whether they have registered as usual residents or not. These do not include those who are working in the public security and army branches although they are usually living in their households (they will be enumerated by the Ministries of National Defense and Public Security according to their own plans), and foreigners who have not become
[pg. 7]
  • Vietnamese citizens, overseas Vietnamese who return to Vietnam to visit family, or pupils who are temporarily residing in the household to go to schools
  • Persons, although they had departure permission, but who by the time of the census have not left the household to move to a new place (army service call, school enrollment call, recruitment decision, change of working place, etc.)
  • Persons who are working for the army according to labor contracts (short and long) and currently living in the household
  • Persons who are working for the public security branch according to short term contracts, temporary recruitment, seasonal contracts and currently living in the household.

b. Persons who have just moved in the household to live permanently, including children born before 1 April 2009; consisting of:

  • Children born before the census time point
  • Persons who had left the old living place to move to live permanently in the household and had out-migration permission, irrespective of how long ago they had moved to live in the household and have been living in the household
  • Persons who had left the old living place, although they did not have any official documents to show their departure, but the enumerator identifies clearly that they moved to live permanently in the household, such as: returning to husband's/wife's house after marriage, returning to live with adopted parents, retired government staff, workers, army, police who return home to live with their family permanently, etc.
  • Army, police deserters (there were notifications of the agencies they were working for or a trusted base) who are living in the household
  • Persons who are living temporarily in the household, but they do not have any other place of usual residence

c. For persons who have left the household to go for work in other places, it is agreed:

  • If all household members move: they are enumerated at the place they are residing
  • One or some of household members move:
  • If by the time of the census they had left their family (old living place) for 6 months or more, they are enumerated at the place they are residing
  • If by the time of the census they had left their family (old living place) for less than 6 months, they are enumerated at their old living place. Particularly, for persons who are going on fishing on the sea, going on ocean vessels, going on missions, going on trading from afar, etc., and
[pg.8]

by the time of the census they had left their family for 6 months or more, they are also enumerated at their family (old living place).

d. The temporarily absent:
These include those who are usually living in their household, but by the time of the census they are temporarily absent from home, consisting of:

  • Persons who are going on summer holidays, festivals, short-term missions, tourists or in-country in under 1 year training courses
  • General education pupils who are living far from home for their school attendance; this excludes those who are residing in campuses of boarding general education schools, boarding vocational training and vocation schools, etc.
  • Persons who are going on overseas missions, training courses, disease cures, tourists, and by the time of the census they are still overseas within the permitted time duration (except those who are working for representative agencies of Vietnam abroad, cadres of the Military Attaché, Commercial Affairs, Labor Management Board and their accompaniers will be enumerated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs)
  • Persons who are in-patients in hospitals, sanatoriums (except those who are being treated in psychiatric hospitals, leprosy hospitals, drug rehabilitation clinics, etc., who will be enumerated by communes where such bases are located)
  • Persons who are temporarily arrested by the military/police
  • According to stipulations, temporarily arrested persons are those who are arrested and retained for 3 days by the military/police because of any reason, and their retention can be repeated not more than 2 times, with each retention 3 days long. According to the laws, the total number of temporarily arrested days of a temporary retention person cannot exceed 9 days. If it exceeds the above limit, it is called temporary detention (the Office of People's Control has placed the person under arrest).

The "temporary absent person" is the "temporary resident" in the area where he/she is present at the census date. All "temporary absent" and "temporary residents" must be enumerated at the area of which they are usual residents.

2. The following are not categorized as the household's usual residents:

  • Children who were born after the census time point
  • Persons who had died before the census time point
  • Persons who had left the household before the census time point
  • Persons who have just moved to live permanently in the household after the census time point
[pg.9]
  • Persons who have left home for seeking work in other areas and by the census time point they had left their family for 6 months or more (excluding those who are going fishing on the sea, going on ocean vessels, going on missions, going to trade from afar, etc., and by the time of the census they had left their family for 6 months or more)
  • Persons who reside permanently overseas (whether they have overseas departure permission or not), including those whose stay exceeds the permitted time duration
  • Persons who left their family (old residing place) to reside temporarily in the household for less than 6 months by the census time (excluding those who do not have any place of residence)
  • Visitors, pupils staying in household for schooling, etc.
  • Foreigners who are by the census time staying in the household but are not becoming Vietnamese citizens (citizens of other countries)
  • Persons who are working for representative agencies of Vietnam abroad (including: diplomatic representative agencies, consular agencies, standing representative commissions of Vietnam in international organizations, cadres of the Military Attaché, Commercial Affairs, Labor Management Board) and their accompaniers. These are enumerated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
  • Persons under the management of the Military branch, including:
  • Military men (officers, military professional officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers), and national defense staff, comprising: those who are usually living with their family, living in military camps or areas under the military control
  • Military men, national defense's staff who are studying in education and training bases within and outside the military management, who are going on overseas missions, training courses, etc. (except those who are working at the Vietnam's Military Attaché in overseas will be enumerated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs)
  • Persons who are working for the Military branch according to labor contracts and are living in military camps or areas under the military management. With regard to persons who are working for the Military branch according to labor contracts (short-term, long-term) but are living in population areas of communes/wards/district towns (it means living outside the military camps or areas under the military management), they will be enumerated by Provincial Census Steering Committees
  • Offenders who are staying in prisons, reeducation camps, disciplinary training centers under the military management, including those who are arrested by the army for detention (the Office of Military Control approved the detention order).
[pg.10]
  • Persons under the management of the Public Security branch, including:
  • Officers, non-commissioned officers, soldiers, workers, cadres belonging to staff of the Public Security branch, comprising: those who are usually living with their family, living in security camps or areas under the security management. In regard to persons who are working for the security branch according to short-term contracts, temporary recruitment, or seasonal labour, they will be enumerated by Provincial Census Steering Committees
  • Officers, non-commissioned officers, soldiers, workers, cadres belonging to staff of the Public Security branch who are studying in education and training bases within and outside the security management, who are going on overseas missions, training courses, etc.
  • Offenders who are staying in prisons, reeducation camps, disciplinary training centers under the security management
  • Convicts who are staying in detentions, reeducation camps, disciplinary training centers under the security management (the Office of People's Control approved the detention order)
  • Persons enumerated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as a separate enumeration plan, including:
  • Cadres who are working at Vietnam's representative agencies overseas (consisting of diplomatic representative agencies, consular agencies, Vietnam's standing representative commissions at international organizations) and their accompaniers;
  • Cadres of the Military Attaché, Commercial Affairs, Labor Management Board and their accompaniers
3. Notes on identification of household's usual residents
a. For persons with two or more residential places: these persons are identified as usual residents at the place they spend the most time for eating and sleeping (main living place):

  • If all the household's residential places are within the boundary of an enumeration area: they will be enumerated at the main living place;
  • If all the household's residential places are in different enumeration areas in the same commune/ward or in different communes/wards: At the census time point, persons whose main living place belongs to some enumeration area, then the enumerator responsible for that enumeration area will enumerate them

b. For persons who eat in one place and sleep in the other place: these persons are identified as usual residents at the place they sleep.

[Details of the enumeration area, comprising pg. 11, are omitted here]

[pg.12]

IX. Household's usual residents who had died during the period from 1st Lunar Calendar Festival, Mau Ty (on 7th February, 2008 in solar calendar) to 0:00 on 1st April, 2009.

It comprises:

  • Persons who were ever usual residents of the household (including new born babies, new comers), but had died during the period from 1st Lunar Calendar Festival Mau Ty (on 7th February, 2008 in solar calendar) to 0:00 on 1st April, 2009
  • Persons who had just moved in to the household to live temporarily but they did not have any other place of usual residence and died during the above period

[Pages 13 through 25, comprising enumerator instructions and tips for following the map, approaching the respondent, and correctly marking the form, are omitted here]

[pg.26]

Chapter IV. Guidelines on the method of interviewing and recording the census questionnaire

I. Introduction to the census questionnaires

Two forms of census questionnaire are used in the 2009 Population and Housing Census, including:

1. Complete enumeration questionnaire (also called the short form) which is used to ask persons residing in complete enumeration areas and special residents, includes 21 questions which are not numbered continuously to ensure an agreement in serial numbers of questions between the two forms of questionnaire: the short and long forms. The questionnaire is designed on a sheet of paper of A3 size and separated into 3 parts:

  • Identification, results and certification
  • Part 1: Population information
  • Part 3: Housing information
2. Sample enumeration questionnaire (also called the long form) is used to ask usual residents of sampled enumeration areas. It includes 57 interviewing and filtering questions, which are numbered consecutively from 1 to 57. Of these there are some questions numbered with supplement indexes a, b, c... (for example, Questions 33 and 34). Apart from questions as included in the short form, the long form also has other questions to collect information on labor and employment of persons age 15 or older, on reproductive history of women age 15 to 49 years, on mortality of the population, and on household living condition. It is bound into a set of 12 pages of A4 size and is divided into four parts:

  • Cover page: It includes identification information, interviewing results and certification
  • Part 1: Population information: It has 34 questions that are grouped in four groups:
  • Questions used to ask all household members (Questions 1 - 7)
  • Questions used to ask household members of ages 5 years old and over (Questions 8 - 16)
  • Questions used to ask household members of ages 15 years old and over (Questions 17 - 30)
  • Questions used to ask female household members of ages 15 - 49 years old and over (Questions 31 - 34b)
  • 3. Part 2: Mortality information (Questions 35 - 42)
  • 4. Part 3: Housing information (Questions 43 - 57)
[pg.27]

The following will present the method of interviewing and recording the long form.

As mentioned above, the long form has questions which are printed in capital letters on a dark background. These are filter questions, which the enumerator is instructed not to ask the respondent, but checks himself/herself as instructed to determine how to continue the interview with which questions.

On the top of each odd page of the long form is printed selected identification information as recorded on the cover page: "household number" and "questionnaire set number", and the enumerator is instructed to fill out these items to avoid questionnaire loss when it is cut to separate into sheets for the scanners to capture the data. Thus, repeating of the above information on the top of each odd page is compulsory to enumerators.

Note: Enumerator is not allowed to use the questionnaires right-tops of which were printed with the sentence "Questionnaire used for training" to record survey information.

II. How to fill out the cover page

The cover page of the long form is divided into three sections:

  • Identification
  • Interview result
  • Certification

1. How to fill out the Identification

(1) The lines "Province / city", "District / quarter / town / provincial city", "Commune / ward / district town": The enumerator fills out the name of province (or city), name of district (or quarter / town / provincial city), and name of commune (or ward / district town) on corresponding printed lines. Also, the enumerator must use the code of province (or city), code of district (or quarter / town / provincial city), and code of commune (or ward / district town) which were given by the Commune Census Steering Committee (during the assignment of enumeration areas to each of enumerators) to record the corresponding boxes.

(2) The line "Enumeration area number" and "Name of enumeration area": Enumerator must use the number of the enumeration area recorded on the map and household list to fill in three corresponding boxes, and name of EA to fill in the corresponding printed line.

(3) The line "Urban / rural": If the EA belongs to a ward or district town, then the enumerator puts "1"; if the EA belongs to a commune then the enumerator puts "2" in the corresponding box.
Because the above mentioned identification information are the same for all households in an EA, in order to reduce the interviewing time in a household, the enumerator should fill out the above information in advance.

[pg.28]

(4) The lines "Household number", "Name of household head", and "Household address" must be recorded when the enumerator visits the household to meet with the household head or a representative household member to determine whether the house/flat and name of household head are the same as those recorded in the household list or not. If yes, then enumerator must use the serial number for the household to fill in three boxes corresponding with the line "Household number"; use the name of the household head recorded on the household list to fill in the printed line corresponding with "Full name of household head". In case the name of the household head is different from that given in household list, then the enumerator must solve the difference. Record the household address on the printed-line corresponding to "Household address". The household address is the address that the household uses to send letters and should be the same as the household address given in the household list.

2. How to fill in the results

(1) The lines "Number of usual residents in this questionnaire set", "Number of males", and "Number of females" must be filled right after the completion of the interview and questionnaire checking, but before giving the questionnaire to the respondent to sign. The enumerator must count the total number of persons recorded in each questionnaire set and fill it in the box corresponding to "Number of usual residents in this questionnaire set"; count the number of males (Question 3) of the questionnaire set and fill it in box corresponding to "Number of males"; do the same for females. The enumerator is not allowed to look at the serial number of the last person in the questionnaire set and use that figure to fill in the box corresponding to "Number of usual residents in this questionnaire set."
Note: For households having to use more than one questionnaire set, the identification lines of the second set, third set, etc., must be filled in as done for the first set; the lines "Number of usual residents in this questionnaire set", "Number of males", and "Number of females" will be recorded according to the number of usual residents, number of males and number of females of each of questionnaire sets and not according to those of the household.

(2) The line "This is set _ _ in _ _ sets of the household": This is filled after finishing the interview and questionnaire check. Most households need only one questionnaire set, but some need two or more.

  • If a household needs only 1 questionnaire set, it is filled in as: "This is set 1 in 1 sets of the household"
  • If a household needs 2 questionnaire sets, it is filled in as: For the first set: "This is set 1 in 2 sets of the household"
[pg.29]

  • For the second set: "This is set 2 in 2 sets of the household".

A questionnaire set is designed for recording a household of not more than 6 persons, each person being recorded in a column with a printed serial number from 1 to 6. For households having to use more than one questionnaire set, then from the second set onward, the enumerator needs not change its serial numbers according to the number of household usual residents (in this case, a number of usual residents of the household will have the same serial number).

In case the enumerator has to cross out one (or more) columns (persons) in a questionnaire set, then he/she needs not to correct the serial number. In this case, serial numbers of usual residents of a household may not be in succession (irregular).

The way to cross out an incorrectly recorded column: use a ballpoint pen to draw a line across "Full name" of the usual resident in Question 1, for the remaining questions use erase tape to fully cover the written information, including the column's serial number printed inside the box in the first line.

3. Certification
After finishing the interview and checking the recorded information, the enumerator must read the most basic information he/she has recorded on questionnaire (the first 5 questions) to the respondent. Before leaving the household to go to the next household, the enumerator asks the respondent (household head or representative) to write his/her name and signature on the respondent-reserved place. Finally, the enumerator puts his/her name and signature on the enumerator-reserved place. Keep the supervisor-reserved place blank.

For households having to use 2 or more questionnaire sets, the writing of name and signature is required for the first set.

III. The method of interviewing and recording answers on the questionnaire, Part 1: Population Information

The interview and recording process includes the following:

  • Use the "Interview chart of household's usual resident definition" in Appendix 5 to define the total number of household's usual residents and record the name of each person in Question 1, relationship of that person to the household head in Question 2 and sex in Question 3. Ask and record these three questions simultaneously for each person (horizontal interview). After that, ask and record the remaining questions together for each person (vertical interview), finishing the interview of one person then moving to interview the next one, do the same for others until the last one.
  • Write the names of the household's usual residents in normal letters, one person per column. The household head is recorded in the first column (with serial number "1" on the top line). If the household needs 2 questionnaire sets or more, then the household head must be written in the first column of the first set.
[pg. 30]

  • Other household members will be recorded consecutively in the next columns of the questionnaire set in order of: wife/husband, children, nephew, father/mother, and lastly, others. If because of any reason the enumerator records incorrect information for one (or more) column(s) which need to be crossed out, then he/she does not need change the serial numbers printed on the top line of the questionnaire set.
  • The interview of mortality and housing information for households with 2 or more questionnaire sets will be recorded on the last set.
  • After finishing the recording of items "Full name" (Question 1), "Relationship to household head" (Question 2) and "Sex" (Question 3) for all household's usual residents, enumerator should:
  • Repeat the "Name" of each person on the printed line in the columns having the same serial numbers in consecutive pages of a questionnaire set. The repeat of "name" of household's usual residents on top lines of all pages of a questionnaire set is compulsory for every enumerator.
  • Based on identification information: Use "Household number" and "Questionnaire set number" on the cover page to fill in the boxes on the tops of odd pages.

Question 1 to Question 7: Ask about all household's usual residents

Question 1: Full name of each person usually residing in the household, starting with the household head
In order to accurately define the number of the household's usual residents, enumerator must apply the stipulations on the household's usual residents using the "Interview chart on definition of household usual residents" (Appendix 5) to interview.

The full name (including middle name) of each of the household's usual residents must be clearly written down in normal letters on the printed lines. For a new-born baby that his/her parents have not given name to, then the enumerator will record the family name of his/her father (or mother) followed by three dots (...).

[Graphic example omitted]

Note:

  • Each person has only one place of usual residence and he/she must be recorded at the place he/she usually resides and be only recorded there
[pg.31]

  • Place of usual residence of a person is the address that he/she usually lives or has just moved in to permanently stay
  • For persons, although they have just moved in to get work, moved into an entirely new household, persons whose interval of time from the date they left their family (departure place) up to the date of the 2009 Census is 6 months or longer, and persons who do not have any usual residence, they are enumerated at the place they are residing
  • In bordering districts there are some minorities with the habit of shifting cultivation and nomadic residence; the enumerator should pay attention to ask and record all "temporary absent" residents during the field work time

Question 2: Relationship to household headRelationship to household head includes the following categories:

Household head: is the representative of the household recognized by all household members.
The household head is always recorded in the column with serial number "1". If the household has to use two questionnaire sets or more, then household head will be recorded in the column with serial number "1" on the first set; columns with serial number "1" of the second or third sets will be still used to record other members in the household.
The household head here can be the same or different from that recorded in household register provided by police.
For a household for which the parents are under the management of the Ministry of National Defense or Ministry of Public Security and are recorded according to their own plans, but their children are recorded by the local authority, then these children are defined as a household. The household head will be the oldest child.

Wife/husband: (see the way of interviewing and recording from Question 18, defining "Married")
This includes those who have been recognized by law or local customs and habits as married (wife or husband), or living with a person of the opposite sex as a married couple.
Note: If a household head is living with 2 wives (husbands) or more in his/her household, then all these persons are defined as wives (husbands) of the household head.

Biological child: This includes those who were delivered by the household head himself/herself.

Grandchild: This includes those who were delivered by the biological child (son or daughter) of the household head.

Father/mother: This includes the household head's biological father/mother or the household head's father-in-law/mother-in-law. The adopted father/mother of the household head's wife/husband is also defined as father/mother.

[pg.32]

Others: This includes those who have a relationship other than wife/husband, biological child, biological father/mother, grandchild of the household head. For example, step-child of wife / husband, grandfather / grandmother, brother / sister, aunt / uncle, friend, maid, etc.

Question 3: Is [the respondent] male or female?For household members who are directly interviewed, or present at home during the time the enumerator is interviewing the household head or his/her representative, it is easy to define whether each of them is male or female and hence mark the appropriate small box. However, for small children and persons absent from home, the enumerator is not allowed to use their "middle name" to guess their sex, but have to ask the household head.

Question 4: In what solar calendar month and year was [the respondent] born?Month and year of birth are recorded in the solar calendar; they are the actual month and year of birth in the solar calendar and are not following any kind of document (identification card, population registration book, etc.).

If the respondent knows the month and year of birth in the solar calendar, then the enumerator records that month and year on the printed boxes. If he/she only remembers the month and year of birth in the lunar calendar, then the enumerator must use the "Conversion between lunar and solar calendar years" (Appendix 7) to convert the lunar calendar month and year to the solar calendar month and year.

Note: The solar calendar year often comes more than 1 month before the lunar calendar year; when converting month of birth in the lunar calendar to the solar calendar, the enumerator should add 1 to the month of birth in the lunar calendar. Thus, persons born from month 1 (thang gieng) to month 11 (thang mot) in the lunar calendar month will become the months of February to December of the same year. If they were born in month 12 (thang chap) in the lunar calendar, their month of birth in the solar calendar will be January of the next year.

If the respondent does not remember the month of birth, the enumerator must use a prompt: In what season was [the respondent] born? Born before or after the lunar calendar Tet, mid-lunar calendar month 7, mid-month 8, born before or after the date of the victory of Dien Bien Phu battle (7 May in the solar calendar), liberation of the South (30 April in the solar calendar), National Day 2 September, Uncle Ho's birthday (19 May in solar calendar), etc. to help the respondent remember the month of birth.

As the Census day is 1 April, those who have the same year of birth and month of birth from January to March will have the same way of calculating completed age, and those who have the same year of birth and month of birth from April to December will have the same way of calculating completed age. Therefore, in case the prompt was used but not successful, try to ask whether the respondent was born in the first three months or in the last nine months of the solar calendar year to select randomly one of the first three months, or of the last nine months to put into the corresponding two boxes.

[pg.33]

If after taking such an effort, the respondent is still unable to remember the month of birth, enumerator will put "98" into the corresponding two boxes and continue to ask about the year of birth.

If the respondent remembers the birth year in the lunar calendar, the enumerator will record that year into four printed boxes. For example, if the birth year is 1954, record "1954" into four boxes, 1 digit per 1 box.

If the respondent does not remember the birth year in the solar calendar, but remembers the birth year in the lunar calendar (for example Binh Ty, At Suu, etc., or even only remembering the animal age: Tiger, Cat, etc.), use the "Conversion between lunar calendar and solar calendar years" (Appendix 7) to choose a corresponding solar calendar year to fill in the corresponding four boxes, then move to ask Question 6, not Question 5.

Note, in using the "Conversion between lunar calendar and solar calendar years" to choose a solar calendar year for the respondent, there would be a difference of 12 years (if the respondent can only remember the age in the animal year: "chi") or 60 years (if the respondent can remember both "can" and "chi"), so it is necessary to ask an additional question "By this year, how old was [the respondent]?" in combination with looking at the face of the respondent to determine the true age to avoid confusion.

In case the respondent is unable to remember the year of birth, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to the code number "9999", then asks about Question 5 and leaves the boxes used to record the year of birth in the solar calendar blank.

Question 5: What was [the respondent]'s age at his/her last birthday?This question is only asked and recorded for those who did not remember their birth year. (In Question 5 marked (x) in the small box next to the code number "9999").

This aims to collect information on the respondent's age in the solar calendar. Thus, when the respondent gives his/her age, the enumerator must ask an additional question "Is that your age in the lunar or solar calendar?" If the answer is "in the lunar calendar", then before filling the age in the two printed boxes, the enumerator must subtract 1 from that age to get age in the solar calendar (because age in the lunar calendar is generally 1 year older than that in the solar calendar).

If the respondent's age in the solar calendar is greater than 95 years old, then the enumerator records "95" in the two printed boxes.

For those whose age in the calendar year is less than 1, the enumerator must fill "0" in the left box.

When the respondent is unable to remember his/her age, the enumerator can refer to related documents or discuss with other household members to obtain the age, or take prompts to make an estimate of age. The prompt can be done by comparing the age of the respondent with the age of any household member or the age of someone nearby knowing the exact age of that person.

[pg.34]

If the prompt is not successful, the enumerator must estimate the respondent's age by looking at his/her body: that is, to look at the outward body in combination with considering his/her children's age, his/her wife/husband's age, etc., to guess an approximation age for the respondent. It is noted that this is an unwilling way, and is only used when no prompt is successful. It is not allowed to put the code of "not stated" for the question of "age in calendar year".

Note: When interviewing and recording Questions 4 and 5, the enumerator must pay attention to find old persons age 100 or older (when Question 4 was recorded as March 1903 or before, or when asking Question 5, the respondent answered an age of 100 or more). If true, the enumerator must fill out the "Notification of persons with age of 100 years old or more" (use Appendix 6 to fill) to submit it to his/her supervisor.

Question 6: To what ethnic group does [the respondent] belong?If the respondent is Kinh, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1".

If the respondent is not Kinh, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2". After that, write down the name of the respondent's ethnic group on the printed line, and use the "List of ethnic groups in Vietnam" in Appendix 10 to choose the code corresponding to that ethnic group to fill in the 2 boxes.

[Graphic example omitted]

For a person who is a biological or adopted child of a married couple where the husband's ethnic group is different from the wife's one, then the ethnic group of their child is defined by an agreement of his/her parents. In case his/her parents did not reach an agreement, his/her ethnic group is taken according to his/her father's ethnic group (the Civil Law).

For ethnic groups that follow the matriarchy, record the ethnic group for the child according to that of his/her mother.

For the child of an unmarried woman, his/her ethnic group is recorded according to his/her mother's ethnic group. In case there is a man who recognizes the child as his child and agrees to record his name in the child's birth certificate, and this is accepted by the mother, then the ethnic group of the child is recorded according to the ethnic group of the father.

For a foreigner whose ethnic group is Vietnamese, then his/her ethnic group is recorded according to his/her original nationality.

[pg.35]

For example, if a person whose original nationality is American, then write down "American" in the space on the printed line.

Question 7: Does [the respondent] follow any faith/religion?The determination of whether a person follows any faith/religion or not is totally based on the answer of the respondent. If yes, what is that faith/religion? We are not concerned whether that person is a believer of the faith/religion or not.

If the answer is "Yes", enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then asks and records the name of the faith or religion that the respondent has answered on the printed line. After that, he/she uses Appendix 11 the "List of religions in Vietnam" to select a code for that faith or religion and fill it in the 2 printed boxes.

[Graphic example omitted]

If the answer is "No" (or "Luong"), the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2".

Question 8This is a filter question. The enumerator must check Question 4 or 5. If the respondent is 5 years old or more (Question 4 recorded a date ranging from March 2004 or before, or Question 5 recorded "05" or more), then ask Question 9. In contrast, if the respondent is less than 5 years old (Question 4 recorded a date ranging from April 2004 to March 2009, or Question 5 recorded a code number ranging from "00" to "04"), then end the interview of this person. After that the enumerator moves to ask and record the questionnaire for the next household member. If there is no member in that household, then the enumerator moves to ask and record Part 2: Mortality information.

Question 9: Where did [the respondent] usually reside five years ago (on 1 April, 2004)?
The concrete way of recording way is as follows: The respondent's place of usual residence 5 years earlier than the census date (on 1 April, 2004) can only be one of the following:

(i) Same commune/ward: If the respondent's place of usual residence 5 years earlier than the census date (on 1 April, 2004) is in the same commune (being recorded in the line "commune/ward" on questionnaire's cover page), then the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and moves to ask Question 11, not to ask Question 10.

(ii) Another commune/ward in the same district: If the respondent's place of usual residence 5 years earlier than the census date (on 1 April, 2004) is in a commune/ward different from the commune/ward of his/her current place of usual residence, but in the same district/quarter that he/she is usually residing, then enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and moves to ask Question 10.

(iii) Another district/quarter in the same province/city: If the respondent's district/quarter of usual residence 5 years earlier than the census date (on 1 April, 2004) is another one, but in the same province/city, then the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3", and at the same time writes down the name of that district/quarter on the printed line, checks its code number in the "List of administrative units of district level" to fill in the 3 boxes, then asks Question 10.

[Graphic example omitted]

(iv) Another province: If the respondents province/city of usual residence 5 years earlier than the census date (on 1 April, 2004) is different from the one that he/she is usually residing, then the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "4", and at the same time writes down the name of the province/city on the printed line. Check the code number of the province/city in Appendix 9 the "List of administrative units of provincial level" and fill it in the 2 boxes and moves to ask Question 10.

[pg.36]

[Graphic example omitted]

(v) Abroad: If the respondent's place of usual residence 5 years earlier than the census date (on 1 April, 2004) is abroad, then the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "5", and moves to ask Question 11, not to ask Question 10.

Note: If a person whose place of usual residence on 1 April, 2004 differs from his/her place of usual residence at the census date, but the name of the place of usual residence on 1 April, 2004 was changed because of adjustment or renaming of administration units, etc., the enumerator must record the name of the previous usual residence according to the current (new) name, not recording according to the previous (old) name.

In case the respondent does not know what the current name of the place of the previous residence is, the enumerator must ask neighbouring people to identify its current name to record.
For a person with no place of usual residence on 1 April, 2004, the enumerator records the name of the place where he/she was present on 1 April, 2004.

Question 10: Is the above-mentioned place of usual residence a ward, a district town or a commune?This question is only asked and recorded for those where Question 9 has mark (x) in one of 3 small boxes next to the codes: "2" or "3" or "4".

If the respondent's place of usual residence five years ago was "ward" or "district town", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1"; if the respondent's place of usual residence five years ago (1 April, 2004) was "commune", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2".

Note: Those in a "commune" on 1 April, 2004, but now has changed to a "ward" or "district town", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2".

[pg.37]

Contrarily, those in a "ward/district town" on 1 April, 2004, but now has changed to a "commune", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1".

For example: a man reported that on 1 April, 2004 he resided in Bien Giang commune, Thanh Oai district, but it is now changed to Bien Giang ward which belonged to Ha Dong quarter, the enumerator still marks (x) in the small box next to code "2".

Question 11: Does [the respondent] have any difficulty when...?This question aims at the collection of information on disabilities of the respondent. The question is divided into 4 sub-questions to ask the respondent of the four abilities of seeing (even if wearing glasses), hearing, walking, and remembering or attention concentration. Therefore the enumerator must ask each of the abilities individually (three dots in [...] will be replaced by each of the above-mentioned abilities when interviewing).

For example: firstly, the enumerator asks "Does [the respondent] have any difficulty when seeing, even if wearing glasses?" If the answer is "No", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1" (no difficulty), and asks the second ability "Does [the respondent] have any difficulty hearing?" If the answer is "Yes", the enumerator asks the respondent, "How difficult is it: difficult, very difficult or unable?" Basing on the answer of the respondent in combination with looking at the respondent (if he/she is present), the enumerator marks (x) in the appropriate small box. After that, the enumerator will ask about the next ability. Continue as such until the last ability, "Remembering or attention concentration".

[Graphic example omitted]

Note: Generally, the determination of the level of disability of the above-mentioned abilities is done by the respondent him/herself. However, a person who is clearly disabled cannot be classified as "No difficulty" on the ability that the person faces the problem, even he/she has answered "No difficulty". For example: a man with a bad eye cannot be classified as "No difficulty", even he answered that "he views things normally". Similarly, if a leg of the respondent is truncated, then that man cannot be classified as "No difficulty" even he answered that "he walks normally", etc.

[pg.38]

Question 12: At present, has [the respondent] been attending, ever attended or never attended schools?These are schools that respondents are attending or have completed, including both the regular and irregular schools.

Basing on the answer of the respondent, the enumerator marks (x) in the appropriate small box.

If the respondent answers he/she has never attended school, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3", and then moves to Question 16, not to ask Questions 13, 14 and 15.

Question 13: What is the highest level of education/training that [the respondent] is attending or has attained?This is asked only of those who are attending or have ever attended schools (Question 12 is marked (x) in the small box next to code "1" or "2").

The current education levels in Vietnam include:

1. Pre-school: This includes persons who are on the census day attending pre-primary schools or have completed pre-primary education as the highest education level.
If the highest education level of the respondent that he/she is attending or has completed is the pre-primary schools, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "00", and then moves to Question 16, not to ask Questions 14 and 15.

2. Primary education: This includes persons who are on the census day attending primary schools or have attended primary schools as the highest education level, consisting of:
- Persons who have completed or ever attended primary schools but not completed it yet, and persons who were attending any grade of primary school when dropping out.
- Persons who are attending any grade of primary schools.

3. Lower secondary education: This includes persons who are on the census day attending lower secondary schools or have attended lower secondary schools as the highest education level, consisting of:
  • Persons who have completed or ever attended lower secondary schools but not completed it yet, and persons who were attending any grade of lower secondary school when dropping out.
  • Persons who are attending any grade of lower secondary schools.


4. Short-term vocational training: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have completed vocational training school or vocational training courses of less than 3 months as the highest education level.

[pg.40]

Short-term vocational training includes those who are attending or have completed vocational training courses of 3 months to less than 12 months (1 year).

5. Higher secondary education: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have attended higher secondary schools as the highest education level, consisting of:
  • Persons who have completed or ever attended higher secondary schools but not completed it yet, and persons who were attending any grade of higher secondary schools but dropped out.
  • Persons who are attending any grade of higher secondary schools.


6. Secondary vocational training: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever attended (including those who had completed and those who had ever attended but dropped out) secondary vocational training schools.
Time duration of secondary vocational training: It is from 1 to 2 school years depending on the training field for persons who had completed higher secondary education, and from 3 to 4 school years depending on the training field for persons who had completed lower secondary education.

7. Secondary vocational education: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever attended (including those who had completed and those who had ever attended but dropped out) secondary vocational education schools.
Time duration of secondary vocational education: It is from 1 to 2 school years for persons who had completed higher secondary education, and from 3 to 4 school years for persons who had completed lower secondary education.

8. High vocational training [Trade college]: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever attended (including those who had completed and those who had ever attended but dropped out) high vocational training colleges.
Time duration of high vocational training: It is from 2 to 3 school years depending on the training field for persons who had completed higher secondary education; from 1 to 2 school-years depending on the training field for persons who had completed secondary vocational training schools of the same training field.

9. High vocational education [College]: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever attended (including those who had completed and those who had ever attended but dropped out) high vocational education colleges.
Time duration of high vocational education: It is from 2 to 3 school years depending on the training field for persons who had completed higher secondary education, and from 1 1/2 to 2 school-years depending on the training field for persons who had completed secondary vocational education of the same field.

[pg.41]

10. University (Bachelor): This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever attended (including those who had graduated and those who had attended but dropped out) university.
Time duration of university: It is from 4 to 6 school years depending on the field for persons who had completed higher secondary education or secondary vocational education; from 2 1/2 to 4 school years for persons who had completed secondary vocational education of the same training field; from 1 1/2 to 2 school years for persons who had completed high vocational education of the same training field.

11. Master: This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever attended (including those who had graduated and those who had attended but dropped out) master's degree education courses.
Time duration of master's education: It is from 1 to 2 school years for persons who had completed university education.

12. Ph.D. (Doctor): This includes persons who are on the census day attending or have ever-attended (including those who had graduated and those who had attended but dropped out) Ph.D. (doctoral) degree education courses.
Time duration of Ph.D. education: It is for 4 school years for persons who had graduated from university; from 2 to 3 school-years for persons who had obtained a master's degree. In special cases, the time duration of a Ph.D. education can be prolonged according to the stipulations of the Minister of Education and Training.

Note:
- For persons who were fostered with some vocational training after university or through post-university study, they are not classified as master/doctor levels. If necessary, the enumerator may request them to show their degree/diploma/certificate.
- For a person who had obtained degrees/diplomas/certificates of various education levels, the enumerator only marks (x) in the small box corresponding to the highest education level he had achieved. For example: If a man had both a bachelor's degree and a master's diploma, the enumerator only marks (x) in the small box next to code 10-Master.

Question 14: What is the highest grade/year of education/training [the respondent] is attending or has completed at the above mentioned level?For a person that is marked (x) on Question 13 in one of the small boxes next to code "01", "02", or "04", the enumerator records the highest general education grade (12-year system) that the person is currently attending or has finished its curriculum and moved on or passed the national examination required for that grade in the 2 printed boxes. In case the respondent has followed an educational system other than the current 12-year system, the enumerator must use the "Conversion of general education grade" in Appendix 8 to convert the grade of the other system to the 12 year system and record it in the 2 printed boxes.

[pg.42]

In case a person has finished the curriculum of a grade, but has not moved on or not passed the examination, or a person was attending a grade but dropped out, the enumerator must record the answer corresponding to the grade next to that grade (one grade lower). For example: a person who has finished grade 4's curriculum in the 12-year system, but he had to repeat it and dropped out, will be recorded "03" in the 2 printed boxes.
A person who has finished grade 1's curriculum but has not moved on yet will be recorded "00" in the 2 printed boxes.

For a person that is marked (x) on Question 13 in one of the small boxes next to code: "05", "06", "07", "08", "09", "10" or "11", if he/she was attending and then dropped out, the grade will be recorded according to the year he/she had completed.

[Graphic example omitted]

Example 1: The curriculum of business management of the National Economic University is 4 years. A student who spent 6 years to complete it (with 2 repeated years) will be coded "04" in the two printed boxes.

Example 2: A student who spent 3 years to complete the curriculum of the second year of the University of Natural Sciences, and then dropped out will be coded "02" in the two printed boxes

[Graphic example omitted]

For a person that is marked (x) on Question 13 in the small box next to code "03" (Short-term training): code "00" in the 2 printed boxes.

Question 15: This is a filter question. The enumerator checks Question 13. If Question 13 was marked (x) in the small box next to code "01", the numerator asks Question 16; if Question 13 was marked (x) in one of the other small boxes, the enumerator skips to ask Question 17, not to ask Question 16.

Question 16: At present, can [the respondent] read and write?
[pg.43]

This is only asked for 2 cases: (1) persons who never attended schools (Question 12 marked (x) in the small box next to code "3"), and (2) persons whose highest education levels are "pre-primary" or "primary" (Question 13 marked (x) in the small box next to codes "00" or "01").

The ability to read and write (literacy): It is the ability that a person can read and write a short, simple statement in Vietnamese, an ethnic or a foreign language in his/her daily life.

Question 17: This is a filter question. The enumerator checks Questions 4 or 5. If the respondent is 15 years old or more (on Question 4 recorded a date of birth from March, 1994 or before, or Question 5 recorded "15" or above), the enumerator will ask Question 18. On the contrary, if the respondent is under 15 years old (on Question 4 recorded a date of birth from April 1994 to March 2009, or Question 5 recorded between "00" and "14"), then the enumerator ends the interview for this person. After that the enumerator will move to ask and record the next household member. If the household has no other member, the enumerator will move to Part 2: Mortality information.

Question 18: What is the current marital status of [the respondent]?The current marital status (that is at the census time point) of a person can only be one of the following categories:

(1) Single, in other words, never married: A person is categorized "single" if he/she has never married or never lived with a person of the opposite sex as a married couple.

(2) Married: A person is categorized "married" if he/she is recognized by the marriage laws or customs of the locality as married or having lived with a person of the opposite sex as a married couple.

(3) Widowed: A person is categorized "widowed" if his/her wife/husband has died and he/she is currently not remarried.

(4) Divorced: A person is categorized "divorced" if he/she is recognized by the marriage laws of the country as divorced and is currently not remarried.

(5) Separated: A person is categorized "separated" if he/she is on record as having a wife/husband, but due to some reason is not currently living with his/her wife/husband as a married couple.

Note: There should be a clear difference between the "separated" and those who are living far from their wives/husbands because of, for example: going on fieldtrips, working far away home (even working abroad) for a long period of time, etc. These persons still belong to the category "married".

Question 19: What is the highest qualification that [the respondent] has attained?It is the highest qualification that the respondent had attained at a regular vocational education/training base, or irregular base such as: special courses, in-service training course, second diploma course, on-the-job training course, etc., including training at political, religious schools.

[pg.44]

A person can only belong to one of the following:

1. No qualification: This includes persons who had not passed any vocational training courses and therefore had not attained any vocational training certificates.

2. Short-term training: These are persons whose highest qualification was obtained from short-term training courses of less than 3 months.

3. Secondary vocational training
These are persons whose highest qualification was obtained from secondary vocational training.

4. Secondary vocational education
These are persons whose highest qualification was obtained from secondary vocational education courses.

5. High vocational training (trade college)
These are persons whose highest qualification was obtained from high vocational training.

6. High vocational education (college)
These are persons whose highest qualification was obtained from high vocational education courses.

7. University
These are persons who were educated at and graduated from universities.

8. Master
These are persons who were trained at and graduated from places with a master"s degree.

9. Doctor/PhD
These are persons who were trained at and graduated from places with a doctoral/PhD degree.

Questions from 20 to 30: These are questions on work during the last 7 days for persons of 15 years old or more. Thus, in order to collect exact information, the enumerator must have direct interviews with these persons.

Question 20: Now, let me ask about the work in the last 7 days: During the last 7 days, did you do any work to earn income?This question is asked to all persons of 15 years old or more.

Last 7 days are the 7 days before the date that the enumerator visits the household to conduct the interview. For example, if the enumerator conducts an interview on 5 April, 2009, then the last 7 days include: 4 April, 3 April, 2 April, 1 April, 31 March, 30 March, and 29 March.

[pg.45]
Work means all engagements in economic activities of at least one hour to earn income that is not prohibited by the laws.

Being classified as working in the last 7 days comprises all persons who, during 7 days prior to the date that enumerator visits the household to conduct the interview, have worked at least one hour to earn income, including those who worked for their family not requiring payment, such as: salary workers, businessmen or persons working on their gardens or farms.

For persons who are abroad and persons who are working in other places for less than 6 months since leaving their families (including those who are gone fishing, gone on ocean vessels, trading from afar, gone on business trips, etc.): if respondent cannot determine whether the person has been working or not during the last 7 days, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3", "Do not know" and then skips to ask Question 31, not to ask questions 21 to 30.

Note: A person is not considered as working if during the last 7 days he/she performed voluntary work, helped other persons (volunteer youths, helpers, etc.), caring for persons, etc.

If the respondent answers that during the last 7 days he/she only undertook work as mentioned above [in the note], the enumerator should ask the additional question: "Apart from that work (what the respondent has reported), did you have other work of 1 hour or more that earned you money?" If the respondent undertook other work of 1 hour or more to earn income, he/she is counted as working in the last seven days.

If during the last 7 days, the respondent has worked for at least 1 hour to earn income, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then asks Question 21.

Question 21: Did you still receive a wage/salary, even though you did not work?Those who answer "Yes" to this question are persons who had a permanent job, but due to some reason they temporarily did not work, and are still being paid by the employer, such as: working leave, maternity leave, sick leave, etc., and they have an assurance of a return to work following the end of the leave.

If the respondent is this type of person, answering "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then skips to ask Question 23, not to ask Question 22.

Persons who receive retirement or illness pensions are not counted as receiving a wage/salary persons.

If during the last seven days, the respondent did not do any work of at least one hour to earn income, and also did not pay, enumerator marks a slash (x) in small box next to code "2", and then asks Question 22.

Question 22: Do you have a job that you will return to work during the next 30 days?
[pg.46]
If during the last 7 days, the respondent did not do any work to earn income, and also was not paid by an employer, but he/she has a job and has an assurance of a return to work in the next 30 days, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1" ("Yes").

For example: a private carpenter accompanied his daughter to Hanoi for a national examination during the last 7 days, so he did not do woodwork and therefore did not do any work to earn money. He intended to return to do his woodwork in the next week (starting from the time the enumerator conducted the interview). Thus, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1" ("Yes").

If during the last 7 days, the respondent did not do any work to earn income; he/she did not receive a wage/salary, and he/she also did not have job to return to work during the following 30 days, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then moves to Question 28, not to ask Questions 23 - 27.

Question 23: This question is asked of persons having answered "Yes" (having marked (x) in the small box next to code "1") to either Question 20, Question 21, or Question 22.
If Question 20 was marked (x) in the small box next to code "1", the enumerator will ask Question 23a: "During the last 7 days, what was the main type of work you did and what position did you hold for the mentioned work (if available)?"

If Question 21 or Question 22 was marked (x) in the small box next to code "1", the enumerator will ask Question 23b: "During the 7 days before temporarily stopping work, what was the main type of work you did and what position did you hold for the mentioned work (if available)?"

The main type of work in the last 7 days is the name of the type of work for which he/she spent most of his/her working time in the 7 days before the interview.

The main work in the 7 days before temporarily stopping work is the name of work for which he/she spent most of his/her working time in the 7 days before temporarily stopping work (7 days before the respondent left the job for leave, maternity leave, own-work leave, etc.).

The enumerator must record in a very detailed manner the type of work that he/she did and the position (if available) he/she held in the 7 days prior to the interview date in the space above the printed lines. Leave the 3 boxes blank (the coder will fill in these 3 boxes later).

[Graphic examples on page 47 omitted]

[pg.48]

Note: For persons who are working as professional specialists and participating in the Party, mass union work (part-time, no salary, for the communism cause), their main jobs are those professional works and positions (if any) pertaining to those works, not the communism group in which they are taking part. For examples:

  • A woman who is head of the Organization Section of a Provincial Statistics Office and is secretary of the party branch of the Provincial Statistics Office (for the communism group, no salary), her main job is recorded as "head of the organization section"
  • A man who is a rice cultivator and party branch secretary of a village (for the communism group, no salary or with pension), his main job is recorded as "Rice cultivator"

For persons performing religious work, the enumerator must record clearly their positions. For instance: Buddhist priest, bishop, temple chief monk, missionary/priest, pastor/missionary, Buddhist novice, Buddhist monk, etc.

Question 24: With the above mentioned work, are you a contributing family worker, employee or work as another role?This question is asked of those with information in Question 23.

This question aims at collecting information on the status in employment of the respondent at the place they are working. Status in employment is classified into 3 main categories:

1. Contributing family worker: This includes persons who do work organized by their family members (usually father, mother, or both) to earn income/profit but they did not receive a wage or salary for it. In case the work is organized by the parents but the person did receive a wage/salary from his/her parents, they would not be counted as a family worker, but as an "employee". If the respondent is defined as a family worker, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then asks Question 25.

[pg.49]

2. Employee: This includes persons who are employed by organizations, other individuals according to contracts (labor contract, recruitment, etc.) in order to perform work with the aim of achieving purposes for those organizations, person who are paid in cash or in kind by those organizations, etc. If the respondent is defined as an employee, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then asks Question 25.

3. Other: This includes persons who are not defined as one of the above two categories. If the respondent is defined as "other", enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3", and then asks Question 25.

Question 25: Does the establishment where you did the above mentioned work belong to an individual, household of individual production and trade, collective, private, state, or foreign investment economic enterprise?The place at where a person is working can be only classified into one of the following 6 economic categories:

1. Individual: This includes individuals performing services without business registration according to the Government's decree number 88/2006/ND-CP, specifically:
  • Those who sell things on the streets, buy from afar, mobile business, individual services, except as specialized occupations such as medicine, pharmacy, etc.
  • Individuals who have free will work (he works by himself; he decides all), such as: bicycle repair, motorbike repair, Honda taxi driver, etc.). For a person who has defined his/her main work in the last 7 days as belonging to an individual, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1". He/she then moves to Question 31, not to ask Questions 26 - 30


2. Household of individual production and trade: This includes households who are doing agriculture/forest/fishing production and business, or non-agriculture/non-forest/non-fishing production and business headed by an individual, group of individuals, or a family household that have not registered as enterprises.

An individual production and trade household can produce more than one type of main product. For persons who participate in producing a type of main product, the enumerator records the name of the main product for Question 27.

[pg.50]

For a person who has defined his/her main work in the last 7 days as belonging to an individual production and trade household, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2". He/she then moves to Question 27, not to ask Question 26.

3. Collective: This includes:
  • Collective economic units, i.e. cooperatives, comprising: agriculture cooperatives, craft industrial cooperatives, construction cooperatives, trading cooperatives, service cooperatives, credit cooperatives (People's Credit Fund, etc.), etc., and their establishments are registered in accordance with the Cooperative Laws;
  • People's non-profit units: units of non-government social/occupational organizations and other non-government units. Budgets for activities of these units are contributed by their members.


For a person who has defined his/her main work in the last 7 days as belonging to a collective unit, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3". He/she then moves to Question 26.

4. Private: This includes enterprises which are established and operated in accordance with the Private Enterprise Law. Specifically it includes private limited companies, non-state joint stock companies, other private enterprises.
  • Private limited companies: companies where the owner(s) are private (100% private capital).
  • In-country joint stock companies companies where all of their shareholders are non-government organizations or individuals, or companies with government shareholders that do not hold control or special shares.
  • Joint state-private companies: these are enterprises, of which:
  • Should have at least two joint members; apart from joint members there could be capital-sharing members;
  • Each joint member should be an individual with high qualifications and high professional prestige, and is responsible for his/her property and the duties of the company;
  • Each capital-sharing member is responsible for his/her shared capital.
Joint state-private companies are not allowed to issue any kind of stocks.
  • Private enterprise: is an enterprise headed by an individual who is responsible by him/herself for all his/her property on all duties of the enterprise.
The type "private" also includes joint companies between one or more units belonging to Vietnam's private economy and foreign enterprises, organizations, or individuals. All owners and workers employed by private enterprises are classified as the type "private".
[pg.51]
For a person who has defined his/her main work in the last 7 days as belonging to a private unit, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "4". He/she then moves to Question 26.
5. State: This includes:
a. Enterprise: State enterprises, state limited companies, state joint stock companies.
  • State enterprises are enterprises which are registered and operated in accordance with the State Enterprise Laws, comprising: state enterprises organized under the form of an independent enterprise, Corporations, enterprises of Corporations with 100% Government capital, joint companies whose members are in the Government.
  • State limited companies are one-member limited companies which were converted from state enterprises, or enterprises of the state's political or sociopolitical organizations.
  • State joint stock companies are joint stock companies where the Government is the shareholder with majority control stock holdings (Government stock accounts for over 50% of all stocks and is at least twice as great as the stock holdings of the other largest shareholder in the enterprise) or has special stock (Government does not have majority control stock holdings but has rights to decide some important issues of the enterprise according to agreements in the Enterprise Regulations).
b. Non-profit administration units, Party associations, mass organizations, other public associations: state offices, public administration units, semi-public administration units, units of political organization, sociopolitical organizations, socioeconomic organizations of the State.
  • State offices include legislative, judiciary and administrative offices.
  • Public non-profit units are units operating in the branches of health, education/training, culture, information, broadcast, television, or sport which were established on the basis of association between state organizations with non-state organizations or individuals. When established, all or part of a public unit was transferred to invest in the construction of material bases for managing and operating all activities in accordance with the laws.
  • Units of political organizations comprise offices of the Vietnam Communist Party.
  • Units of sociopolitical organizations comprise units whose main source of funds comes from the Government, such as: Fatherland Front, Trade Union, Women's Association, Youth Union, Veteran's Association, and Peasant's Association.
[pg.52]
  • Units of state socioeconomic associations comprise: Association of Letters and Arts, Association of Writers, Association of Theatrical Artists, Association of Lawyers, Medicine Association, etc., where their funds come mainly from the Government.
  • Units of other state associations comprise units other than the above mentioned units, such as: the Elderly Association; Association for Protection of Disability and Orphaned Children; Association for the Encouragement of Learning; Association of the Blind; Buddhist Association; other faith-based associations that have funds mainly coming from the Government.
For a person who has defined his/her main work in the last 7 days as belonging to a state unit (including those who are on the roll, contracted employees, and temporarily-recruited persons), the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "5".

For persons who are not on the commune's roll but are contracted to work for the Commune People's Committee (archiver, cashier, etc.) according to administrative working hours, they are counted as working for the state.

6. Foreign enterprise: comprises:
Enterprises with 100% foreign capital; representative offices of foreign agencies, companies, or enterprises; foreign and international organizations.

For a person who has defined his/her main work in the last 7 days as belonging to a foreign investment enterprise, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "6". He/she then moves to Question 26.

Question 26: What is the name of the establishment where you did the above-mentioned work and the name of its direct supervision organization (if available)?
This question is only asked of persons who marked (x) in one of the small boxes corresponding to code "3", "4", "5" or "6" in Question 25.

The name of the establishment is where the respondent is working at and the top management office (if available) of that establishment. The enumerator fills the name of the establishment where the respondent is working at on the space above the printed lines.

[pg.53]

[Graphic examples omitted]

Note: For a person who is working overseas, the enumerator writes the name of the country where he/she is living and working.

Question 27: What are the main responsibilities/products of the establishment where you did the above mentioned work?The main responsibilities/products of the office/establishment are the main work for which the top management branch or responsible authority assigns to the office/establishment. Main responsibilities of a production enterprise, business, or service unit are usually related to the main products or services of that unit.

For an "individual production and business household", the enumerator records the name of the main products or services which the "individual production and business household" has produced during the last 7 days.

[pg.54]

The enumerator fills the main responsibilities of the unit where the respondent is working in the space on the printed lines, and leaves 3 boxes blank (they will be filled by coders later).

[Graphic example omitted]

After filling in information for Question 27, the enumerator skips to Question 31, not to Questions 28 - 30.

Question 28: During the last 30 days, did you look for any work?This question is only asked of persons who answered "No" (marked (x) in the small box next to code "2") in Question 22.

Activities of seeking work include: registering name at a government or private employment office; submitting applications to employers; checking for jobs at establishments; checking for jobs on the radio/television/newspaper; finding help from relatives/friends, etc.

If the respondent answers "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then asks Question 29. If the respondent answers "No", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then skips to Question 30, not to ask Question 29.

Question 29: During the last 30 days, would you have been available for work if you had found suitable work?This question is only asked of persons who marked (x) in the small box next to code "1" in Question 28.

If the respondent answers "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then moves to Question 31, not to ask Question 30.

[pg.55]

If the respondent answers "No", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then asks Question 30.

Question 30This question is only asked of persons who marked (x) in the small box next to code "2" in Question 28 or marked (x) in the small box next to code "2" in Question 29.

If the respondent answers "No" to Question 28 (marked (x) in the small box next to code "2"), the enumerator asks: "Why didn't you look for work?"
If respondent answers "No" to Question 29 (marked (x) in the small box next to code "2"), the enumerator asks: "Why weren't you available for work?"

The choices for the main reason of a person not looking for work or not available for work are:

No suitable work / don't know where: are persons who believe that even if they look for work, there would be no work suitable to their career, or they do not know where they can find work.

Illness / personal matter / wait for job application's result: are persons who are ill, are busy with own tasks, such as: taking care of an ill person, looking after the aged, having a newborn baby, in a period of mourning, busy with a wedding ceremony, etc., or who have gone to sit for interviews to ask for a job and are waiting for interview results. This also includes persons who have received a new job and will start that job in the future, but the starting date is over 30 days from the interview day.

Bad weather / off-season: are persons who are temporarily absent from work because of bad weather/off-season, and the temporarily absent time duration is over 30 days since the interview day.

Attending school: are persons who did not work because they were going to school (general education schools, vocational schools, vocational training schools, colleges, universities or other schools).

Housework: are persons who spent most of their time doing household work for their family and did not receive any payment. Note: Persons who do household work for other families to earn money are counted as "working".

Disabled: are persons who had health problems and/or mental issues and are therefore unable to work, such as being physically disabled, long-term illness, etc.

[pg.56]

Not willing to work: are persons not wanting to work because they have another living source such as: retired pension, taken care by relatives or society, etc.

Other: are persons who gave reasons for "not looking for work" and for being "not available for work" other from those described above.

Question 31: This is a filter question. The enumerator checks Question 3 and Question 4 (or Question 5). If the respondent is a female (Question 3 marked (x) in the small box on the line with the word "Female") aged 15 - 49 years old (Question 4 has recorded for the month and year of birth between April 1959 to March 1994, or Question 5 recorded from "15" to "49"), the enumerator then asks Question 32.
Thus, the following persons will not be asked the subsequent questions; the enumerator will move to ask and record the questionnaire for the next household member. If the household does not have any more members, the enumerator will move to ask and record the questionnaire for Part 2: Mortality information:

  • All men (Question 3 marked (x) in the small box next to code "1");
  • Women that for Question 3 marked (x) in the small box next to code "2", but their months and years of birth in Question 4 were recorded from March 1959 and before (or Question 5 was recorded from "50" - "95");
  • Women that for Question 3 marked (x) in the small box next to code "2", but their months and years of birth in Question 4 were recorded from April 1994 to March 2009 (or Question 5 was recorded from "00" - "14").
The enumerator must meet with women of ages 15 - 49 years old in each household to ask them questions on their reproduction histories.

Question 32: Have you ever given birth?Women who have given birth are those who have given births to live children (that is after delivering, the child shows at least one sign of being alive such as: crying, breathing, heartbeat, placenta cord moving, etc.), not including stillbirths (died in mother"s womb).

If the answer is "Yes" (ever given birth), the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then asks questions 33a to 34b. If the answer is "No" (never given birth), the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then moves to interview the next person. If the household has no other persons, the enumerator moves to ask and record Part 2: Mortality information.

Question 33a: How many children to whom you have given birth are currently living with you in this household?This question is only asked to persons that for Question 32 marked (x) in the small box next to code "1" (ever given birth).

[pg.57]

Enter the number of biological children (children ever borne alive by the respondent) who are living in the same household with the respondent (their names were written in Question 1) in two printed boxes. If the number of children ever born by the respondent who are living in the same household is less than 10, the enumerator must enter "0" in the left hand box and the number of children in right hand box. If there are no children born alive by the respondent who are living in the same household, the enumerator enters "00" in the two printed boxes.

Children living overseas for the permitted time duration (before going abroad, these children were living in the same household with their mother), are considered as children currently living in the same household with their mother (these children are regarded as the mother's household's usual residents, and their names were listed in Question 1).

Question 33b: How many children to whom you have given birth aren't currently living with you in this household (living elsewhere)?Enter the number of biological children (number of children ever borne alive by the respondent) who are not living in the same household with the respondent (either living in the same house but not sharing meals, or living elsewhere); the enumerator fills the respondent's answer in the two printed boxes. If the number of children ever borne by the respondent who are not living in the same household is less than 10, the enumerator must enter "0" in the left hand box and the number of children in the right hand box. If there are no children born alive by the respondent who are not living in the same household, the enumerator enters "00" in the two printed boxes.

Question 33c: Have you ever given birth to a boy or a girl who was born alive but later died?The number of children died is the number of births delivered by the respondent (children born alive) but who had died before the census date. The guide on recording the number of children died is similar to that in Question 33b.

Question 34a: What is the solar calendar month and year of your last birth?The last birth is the "live" birth of the respondent closest to the census day, irrespective of whether the child is still living or had died, and irrespective of whether the child is currently living in the same or in a different household. The guide on asking and recording Question 34a is the same as that on asking and recording Question 4 "Calendar month and year of birth" (see the guide on asking and recording Question 4).

Question 34b: How many sons and daughters have you given in your last birth?Ask and write the number of sons and the number of daughters in the respondent's last birth in printed boxes. It is not allowed to leave any box blank.

[Graphic example omitted]

[pg.58]

Part 2: Mortality Information

In the 2009 Population and Housing Census, mortality information is collected for deaths which occurred during the time interval of 1 Tet Mau Ty (on 7 February 2008 in the solar calendar) to 0:00, 1 April, 2009.

This part is asked for the whole household. A questionnaire set is designed to record up to 3 deaths; each is recorded in a column. For a household with 4 deaths or more, the enumerator will use a second set without changing its serial numbers.

In case a household has to use 2 or more questionnaire sets, the "Mortality information" is recorded in the last set.

Generally, it is difficult to collect mortality information, primarily those on child and infant deaths, especially deaths occurring during the first week after the birth. Thus, in order to fully and exactly collect this information, the enumerator must be skillful to ask prompt questions to receive exact answers.

Note: If it is found that there are households where all members had died during the interval from 1 Tet Mau Ty (on 7 February, 2008 in the solar calendar) to 0:00, 1 April, 2009, the enumerator must have an indirect interview (through local cadres, relatives of the deceased, or available vital registration documents, etc.) to record information for Part 2: "Mortality information, and leave the remaining questions in the other two parts (Population information and Housing information) blank. The enumerator enters "00" in the printed boxes corresponding to "Number of usual residents in this questionnaire set", "Number of males" and "Number of females". In addition, he/she writes the phrase "household with all members dead" on the left hand side of the top of the cover page of the questionnaire set.
The "household with all members dead" can be simply the case where a person living alone (one-person household) died during the specified time interval.

Question 35: From the first of Lunar New Year Mau Ty (on 7 February, 2008 in the solar calendar) to 0:00 on 1 April, 2009, were there any adult or infant deaths in your household?

This question aims at determining whether the any usual resident of the household died during the interval from 1 Tet Mau Ty (on 7 February, 2008 in the solar calendar) to 0:00, 1 April, 2009.

Before asking and filling in the information for each death, the enumerator must ask the household head and his/her usual residents to determine whether any usual resident of the household died during the above time interval.

[pg.59]

If the answer is "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", then moves to ask Question 36. If the answer is "No", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", then moves to Part 3 to collect housing information.

Question 36: Please give me the name of each death
The enumerator records the name of each of the deaths in the household on the printed line; record each death in a column. In case of having made mistakes where the column must be crossed out, the enumerator corrects the mistakes as per Part I: Population information" (Chapter IV, section III).

Question 37: Was [the deceased] male or female?
The asking and recording of this question is similar to that presented in Question 3, Part 1: Population information.

Question 38: In what solar calendar month and year did [the deceased] die?
The enumerator records 2 digits for the month in the solar calendar that the respondent died in the 2 boxes on the same line with the word "Month". If the month that the respondent died is less than 10, the enumerator enters "0" in the left hand box.

If the respondent died in 2008, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box on the same line with the words "Year 2008"; if the respondent died in 2009, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box on the same line with the words "Year 2009".

In our customs and traditions, people often remember the date of death of the respondent in the lunar calendar, thus, when the household head answers the month of death, the enumerator must ask whether that is the month in the lunar or solar calendar. If it is in the lunar calendar, then enumerator must add one to it to get the month of death in the solar calendar to fill in the questionnaire.

The enumerator must obtain the information on month and year of death in the solar calendar and is not allowed to leave this question blank.

Question 39: How old was [the deceased] at the date of his/her death?
The enumerator records the age of the respondent at the date of his/her death in the solar calendar to fill in the 2 printed boxes.

The way of asking and recording this question is similar to Question 5, Part 1: "Population information". If the age of the deceased was 95 and over, the enumerator records "95"; if the age of the deceased was less than 10, the enumerator records "0" in the left hand box;

[pg.60]

if the age of the deceased is less than 1 (under 12 months), the enumerator records "00" in the two printed boxes.

The enumerator is not allowed to record the code for "not stated" for this question; he/she must ask and obtain information on the age of the deceased in the solar calendar.

Question 40: What is the cause of [the deceased]'s death?
This question aims at obtaining information on the cause leading to the death of the person. The causes of death are categorized into the following five:

1. Diseases: This includes those who died due to diseases, such as: heart diseases, mental diseases, digestive diseases, breathing diseases, infectious diseases, etc. The death of an old person where we do not clearly know the cause (it is often called "dying from old age") is also grouped into this category.

2. On-the-job accident: These are deaths occurring during performance a job. For example: a construction worker fell down from a high place while working and died; an electric worker was shocked to death while repairing a high voltage line; a mining worker died while digging for coal because of an underground explosion, etc.

3. Transport accident: These are deaths caused while using a means of transportation or while taking part in transportation. For example: a person was knocked down by a car while walking on the road and died; a person riding a motorcycle, because of going too fast crashed into an electric pole on the road edge and died; etc.

4. Other accidents: This includes deaths caused by other accidents different from on-the job accidents and transport accidents, such as: drowning, house fire, electric shock (but not while working), earthquake, thunder, snake bites, etc.

5. Other causes: This includes deaths caused by other causes different from the mentioned ones above, such as: killed oneself, killed by other persons, etc.

Question 41: This is a filter question. The enumerator checks Questions 37, 39, and 40. If the deceased was female (Question 37 is marked (x) in the small box next to code "2"), was aged from 15 - 49 (Question 39 is recorded as a number from "15" to "49"), and did not die because of accident (Question 40 marked (x) in the small box next to code "1" or code "5"), then Question 42 is asked.

The enumerator will not continue to ask Question 42 in the following cases, but instead ask of the next death, or if the household does not have any more deaths, the enumerator moves to Part 3: Housing information:

  • The deceased is male (Question 37 is marked (x) in the small box next to code "1");
  • The deceased is female but under 15 years old or 50 years old or over (Question 39 is recorded as from 00-14, or from 50-95);
  • The deceased is female of 15-49 years old, but died due to accident (Question 40 is marked (x) in the small box next to codes "2", "3", or "4").

[pg.61]

Question 42: Did [the deceased] die during pregnancy?
The death of a woman is identified as "due to pregnancy" if she had died because of pregnancy, during or after childbirth.

Question 42 consists of four sub-questions and is used to identify whether the respondent died due to pregnancy or not. Thus, the enumerator must ask sub-questions individually until receiving the answer "Yes" to record it in the small box corresponding to the sub-question.

If the woman did not die due to pregnancy, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "5". After that, the enumerator moves to ask about the next death; if not any others, the enumerator skips to Part 3: Housing information.

The way of asking and recording:
Firstly, the enumerator asks: "Did [the deceased] die during pregnancy?" This means the death is due to reasons relating to pregnancy or pregnancy having made a disease more serious (excluding accidental reasons) while the woman was pregnant. If the answer is "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then skips to ask of the next death (if any). If the answer is "No", the enumerator asks:

"Did [the deceased] die during childbirth?" This means the death is due to reasons relating to childbirth or childbirth having made a disease more serious (excluding accidental reasons) during the delivery process. If the answer is "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then skips to ask of the next death (if any). If the answer is "No", the enumerator asks the next sub-question:

"Did [the deceased] die after miscarriage/abortion?" This means the death is due to reasons relating to miscarriage/abortion or having complications after a miscarriage/abortion. If the answer is "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3", and then skips to ask of the next death (if any). If the answer is "No", the enumerator asks the next sub-question:

"Did [the deceased] die within 42 days after childbirth or lost pregnancy?" This means the mother had died within 42 days from the time of childbirth (excluding accidental reasons) or within 42 days after the time of miscarriage, abortion, stillbirth, ruined pregnancy, etc. If the answer is "Yes", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "4", and then skips to ask of the next death (if any). If there are no more deaths, the enumerator skips to ask Part 3: Housing information. If the answer is "No", the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "5" (No), and then skips to ask of the next death (if any). If there are no more deaths, the enumerator skips to ask Part 3: Housing information.

Part 3: Housing Information

This part is asked for the whole household. It comprises questions aimed at the collection of information on the type of house, type of structure of the house, the year that the house was put into use, and a number of household living facilities.

[pg.62]

In case a household has to use 2 or more questionnaire sets, the "Housing information" section is recorded in the last set.

Question 43: Household has the dwelling or not?The enumerator does not ask this question but views the house by him/herself to determine whether the household has the dwelling or not to mark (x) in the appropriate small box.

Concept of dwelling: A dwelling is a type of construction piece intended for human habitation, it includes three components: walls, roof and ... [remainder of definition cut off in original instructions]

If the household has the dwelling, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then asks Question 44. If the household does not have the dwelling, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2", and then skips to ask Question 53, not to ask Questions 44 through Question 52.

The concept of a household having a house for habitation ["having the dwelling"] in this Census is whether the household has a house/flat used for habitation or not (i.e. the household has the right of using that house/flat), and it does not concern to who owns the house/flat. It may be owned by the household or may not be owned by the household as in cases when the household hired or borrowed the house/flat of an office, an enterprise, a collective, a religious construction, or an illegal house (illegally occupied), etc.

Question 44: Is your household sharing the dwelling with others?The concept of "house-sharing household" ["sharing the dwelling"]: Households living in housing units which are not separate and independent structurally. They share a common housing area such as the guest room, toilet, entry way, etc.

For households that do not share the house: the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1", and then asks Question 45.
For house-sharing households: In order to avoid duplicating the recording of houses for those house/flats that are shared by households, it is stipulated that the interview and recording of housing questions (Questions 45 - 52) is only done for one household per house/flat, called the "representative household". The other remaining households will not have to answer the questions pertaining to that house/flat, but have to answer questions on the household's living means.

The way of questionnaire recording is as follows:
For representative households: The representative household is often the household of the person who owns or stands for using the house/flat, and is usually residing in the house/flat. If the household in question is the representative household, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2" (yes, sharing house with others), and then marks (x) in the small box next to code "1" (this is the representative household), and continues with Question 45.

[pg.63]

[Graphic example omitted]

For non-representative households: The enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2" (sharing house), then marks another (x) in the small box next to code "2" (recorded with other household), records the name of the household head of the representative household in the space above the printed line, enters the serial number of the representative household into the 3 boxes nearby, and moves to ask Question 53, not asking questions 45 to 52.

[Graphic example omitted]

Question 45: Is the dwelling of your household an apartment building or a single detached house?

1. Apartment building: is a building of two floors or more constructed for human habitation; it has many separate apartments/flats, entrances, staircases, and systems of technical infrastructure for common use.

2. Single detached house: is a house constructed on an independent premise for habitation; it has separate walls and a separate entrance. One-floor houses, which share common foundations and walls, are also regarded as single detached houses.

Note: Based on the types of dwellings identified in Question 45, three questions are asked for the dwelling (including both apartment buildings and single detached houses):
Question 48: Main materials used to construct the pillar (or column or load-bearing walls); Question 49: Main materials used to construct the roof; Question 50: Main materials used to construct the outer walls.

[pg.64]

Question 46: How many total rooms, and how many of these rooms are bedrooms are there in this house/flat?A dwelling room should be surrounded by walls and covered by a roof, creating a space independent from other rooms (a space isolated by movable curtains is not regarded as a room).

Rooms include: bedrooms, dining rooms, kitchens, guestrooms, studies, warehouses, business rooms (if these rooms are in the same house and used for habitation). A room should satisfy 2 conditions: (1) its walls should have a height of at least 2.1 meters and (2) a size of at least 4 square meters. The enumerator asks the question, in combination with viewing, to record the total number of rooms, and of those how many are bedrooms, in the appropriate boxes.

Question 47: How many square meters is the floor space of this house / flat?For a one-floor house, the enumerator records the floor space, including where there are walls (parts covered by a ceiling/roof); in case the house/flat has common walls/pillars with another dwelling, then only half of the space of the common walls/pillars is counted.

For a multi-floor house, the enumerator records the space (parts covered by a ceiling/roof) of all floors; in case each floor has common walls/pillars with another dwelling, then only half of the space of the common walls/pillars is counted.

The parts of the floors and ground which are not surrounded by walls/ceiling and not used for habitation will not be counted. In case there is a space with a height of 2.1 meters between the ground and ceiling/roof and is surrounded by walls/ceiling and used for habitation, it is counted. The enumerator asks the question, in combination with viewing, to record the total area (in square meters) of its floor space in the 3 printed boxes.

[Graphic example omitted]

[pg.65]

Note: In rural areas, people do not know the floor space of their houses. Hence, the enumerator must estimate the floor space to record the answer. The enumerator can estimate by counting the number of bricks (if the floor is covered by square bricks) and recording the width and length of a brick, converting the results into meters and then multiplying the width and length (in meters) to obtain the space. In case the floor is not covered by bricks, the enumerator can estimate by counting footsteps or using strings or sticks to measure.

Question 48: What are the main construction materials of the pillars (or columns or load bearing walls)?Pillars (or columns or load-bearing walls) are components constructed to hold the roof/ceiling. The enumerator asks the question, in combination with viewing, and marks (x) in the appropriate small box.

Question 49: What are the main construction materials of the roof)? For two (or more) roofs on the house, including the roof and layers that protect against heat or leaks (e.g. iron sheet, cement roofing sheet, plastic sheet, gypsum ceiling, etc.), the enumerator record the base roofing material, not the materials that protect against heat or leaks. For example, for a steel and concrete roof covered with cement-roofing sheets to protect against heat, the enumerator will record the steel and concrete roof. The enumerator asks the question, in combination with viewing, and marks (x) in the appropriate small box.

Question 50: What are the main construction materials of the outer walls?
[pg.66]

[Graphic illustration defining the roof, outer walls and pillars is omitted]

The enumerator asks the question, in combination with viewing, and marks (x) in the appropriate small box.

Question 51: In what year was the dwelling put in use?The enumerator records the year that the dwelling's construction was completed and put into use. If the dwelling includes many parts, each of which was completed and put into use in different years, the enumerator records the year that the main part (with the largest floor space) was completed and put into use for the habitation.

If the dwelling that the household is using for habitation was completed and put in use before 1975, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1"; from 1975 - 1999, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2"; from 2000 to present, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3", and at the same time, fills in the last digit of the year that the dwelling was completed and put into use for habitation in the printed box to the right of the figure "200".

[Graphic example omitted]

In case the household head does not remember what year the house was put into use, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "4".

[pg.67]

Question 52: To whom does this dwelling belong?The ownership of the dwelling is classified according to the following 7 categories:

Owner-occupied dwellings: this includes houses/flats that households constructed by themselves, bought, or were given/offered by others and are using for habitation.

Rented/borrowed from government: this comprises houses/flats where households have signed renting/borrowing contracts with government authorities, or where houses/flats that are owned by the government are distributed to government staff to use for habitation, but at the present the households have not bought it according to Government's Decree 61/CP. Houses/flats that households rented from the government as offices, factories, enterprises, etc. and were then transferred (or re-rented/sold) to others and currently are used for habitation, are counted as "Rented from government".

Rented from private: this comprises houses/flats that households rented/borrowed from private owners and are currently using for their habitation.

Cooperative ownership: this comprises houses/flats, which are under the ownership of cooperatives, production teams, groups of production cooperatives, etc., and are distributed to their members to use for habitation.

In ownership of religious organizations: this comprises houses/flats which are under the ownership of religious organizations and are distributed to their members to use for habitation.

Government and public joint ownership: this comprises houses/flats which were constructed by government organizations using both government funds and private funds, and are currently being used for habitation. In cases when houses/flats are under government ownership but rented by households, yet the household made some enlarging, renovating improvements, those houses/flats still belong to this type of ownership.

Unclear ownership: this comprises houses/flats which do not belong to one of the above mentioned categories such as: illegally occupied houses/flats and houses/flats where ownership is in dispute.

[pg.68]

Question 53: What is the main type of fuel (energy) your household is using for lighting?The main type of fuel (energy) used for lighting is the one that the household used the most for lighting in the last year (12 months prior to the census day).

Fuel (energy) used for lighting includes the following:

Network electricity: this includes national network electricity and network electricity of local management. Normally, network electricity has to transfer from electric power production stations to consumption places through high-voltage wires and transformer stations to increase/reduce the voltage. Households who use electricity from local electric generation stations for lighting are also counted as using network electricity. If the household uses network electricity for lighting, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "1";

Generator electricity: this includes electricity released by generators using petrol/gasoline or water power (small hydro-electric plants). Households who use electricity from electric power-generated stations (including thermo- and hydro- electricity) which were constructed by individuals and sold for their use, are also counted as using "generator electricity". If the household uses generator electricity for lighting, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "2";

Kerosene: If the household uses kerosene/petrol for lighting, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "3";

Gas: If the household uses gas for lighting, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "4";

Other: this includes households who use fuels for lighting different from those listed above (candles, caster-oil/kerosene lamp, wood, etc.); the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "5". He/she then fills in the name of that fuel in the space above the printed line.

In case that during the last year the household used different types of fuels (energies) for lighting, the main type of fuel (energy) is the one that the household spent the most time using.

Question 54: What is the main type of fuel (energy) your household is using for cooking?Cooking includes the cooking of rice, foods, and boiling of drinking water. The main type of fuel (energy) used for cooking is the one that the household used most for cooking in the last year (12 months prior to the census day).

Based on the answer of the respondent, the enumerator marks (x) in the appropriate small box. The fuel (energy) used for cooking comprises the following: electricity, kerosene, gas, wood, and others. In actual situations, there would be households who did not use any types of fuels to cook foods for long periods of time. They are used to eating at restaurants or canteens. In this case, the enumerator marks (x) in the small box next to code "7".

[pg.69]

Question 55: What is the main source of cooking/drinking water of your household?The main source of cooking/drinking water is the one that household used most for cooking and drinking, regardless of where it came from. Based on the answer of the respondent, the enumerator marks (x) in the appropriate small box.

The main source of cooking/drinking water have the following choices:

Indoor tap water: is tap water which is produced according to industrial technology and is linked with a system of taps installed inside or outside the house but within its premise.

Public tap water: is tap water which is produced according to industrial technology and is linked with a system of taps installed in public places for common use.

Drilled well: water is taken from deeply-drilled wells to take ground water through a small hole with a protected tube; water is often taken up through a system of pumps. "Tower water" is also counted as drilled well water. Tower water also looks, if we view it from the outside, like tap water, and is also taken from drilled wells and brought up to a tall tower. Then there is a system of tubes to lead it to each household for use. However, before being consumed, it is not processed according to an industrial process (raining sieves, filter system, pasteurization, filtration pools).

Protected dig well: water from a dig well-constructed with bricks (or other protected materials) to block unclean water from soaking into the well, and on the ground there is a wall to prevent things from falling down into the well.

Unprotected dig well: water from a dig well without brick construction and walls to block unclean water from soaking into the well, or to prevent things from falling in.

Protected slot water: slot water comes from the upper reaches of rivers and streams, and is poured from artesian water (slots) of mountains (land- or rock-mountains). Protected slot water is the water taken from slots, which are protected to block unclean things to fall into the slots.

Unprotected slot water: slot water that is not protected and cannot prevent unclean thins from falling into the slots. They are often slots without pools.

Rain water: rain water which is collected and kept in storage (water tanks, pools, etc.) to use.

Other: is the water not listed above, such as: pool water, lakes, canals, rivers, stream water, etc.

Question 56. What kind of toilet facility is your household using most?This question is to collect information on what kind of toilet facility was used by the household the most in the past year (12 months prior to the census day), regardless of the ownership of the toilet facility. If the household has used several kinds of toilet facilities in the past year, only one box will be marked according to the kind of toilet facility used most by the household.

[pg.70]

Toilet facilities include:

Indoor flush/semi flush toilet: this is the facility located inside the house which uses water to remove feces to a tank (also named a septic tank which comprises between one to three sections; one section contains feces and one or two segments filter feces before draining it to the sewer) regardless of where the water comes from that is used to flush.

Outdoor flush/semi toilet: this is the facility located outside of the house (separated area)

Others: facilities which are not characterized by the two mentioned above. They include: filtered toilet, one-compartment toilet, two-compartment toilet, and the simplest form of toilet such as a hole in the ground. These kinds of toilet facilities also include where water is used to drain feces, but do not include septic tanks, simple tanks, ponds, etc.

No toilet: Household does not use any of the above mentioned toilets and always defecates on the ground, in a field, bush, etc.

Question 57: At present, is your household using any of the following appliances: (TV, radio/radio cassette, telephone, computer, washing machine, refrigerator, air conditioner, motorcycle)?This question is to collect information on the appliance usage of the household, regardless of the ownership of the appliances. The enumerator asks the head or representative of the household to verify one by one the listed appliances from top to bottom. For each appliance, if the interviewee says "Yes", the enumerator will mark the box in the row next to code "1"; if the interviewee says "No", the enumerator marks the box next to code "2".

Landline telephone includes wireless telephones also.

After filling in question 57, the enumerator turns to the back cover of the question form to fill in "Result" and "Signature".

[Various appendices, comprising pages 71-81, which are made up of enumerator reference materials and conversion charts, are omitted here]