Data Cart

Your data extract

0 variables
0 samples
View Cart



Republic of Venezuela
Ministry of Development

Head Office of National Statistics and Census

Eleventh General Housing and Population Census
Enumerator's Manual
(M-10)
[1981]

[Pages 1-26 were not translated into English]

[p. 27]

Chapter 5

Census materials for the enumeration

Description and application

1. Presentation of the materials

To carry out the process of Enumeration, the following materials are used:

1st General Enumeration Questionnaire

What is the principal instrument of the Census?

This questionnaire represents the principal instrument for the enumeration. It consists of a set of templates that contain all of the necessary questions for the elaboration of dwelling and population census information.

2nd Individual Enumeration Questionnaires

What are the questionnaires for the individual enumeration?

These questionnaires are simpler than the General Enumeration Questionnaire; they are identified by colors and are used in the following cases:

a. To complete information of usual residents not present at the time of the Census (in white color).

b. For non-residents (Persons who have a place of usual residence in another locality) (in blue color).

c. For usual residents of collectives (in yellow color).

3rd General Enumeration Book [binder]

This is used to keep the questionnaires and conserve them in good condition.

[Pages 28-35 were not translated into English]

[Pages 29-35 contain a general description of the questionnaires, with graphics, including descriptions of how to fill in the ovals and write down the information.]

[p. 36]

2.4 Specific instructions for the use of the questionnaire

Section I - Dwelling identification

[A graphic at the beginning of this section shows the enumeration form]

Information concerning the location of the enumerated dwelling is recorded in this section:

1) Municipality

2) District

3) Federal Entity

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4 on the census form]

In the 4th item the assigned Enumeration Area Number is recorded. Later, the area is identified as either Urban or Rural.

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4a on the census form]

If urban, an "X" is marked in the appropriate box:

Urbanization or [made up of] huts/shacks (ranchos).

Later, segment number, block number, name of the locality, and the name of the urbanization or neighborhood [is recorded].

The enumerator should be careful to change the Block number when finishing the enumeration of one block and beginning another.

If a new block, not registered in the respective map, is encountered in the enumeration area, "S/N" [without number] should be written down. The immediate supervisor should be notified.

If enumerating an area with dwellings not organized into blocks, "S/N" [without number] should also be written down.

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4b on the census form]

If rural, an "X" is marked in this section and the name of the populated area is recorded.

The enumerator should be careful to change the name of the populated area when finishing the enumeration of one populated area and beginning another.

[p. 37]

Definition of populated areas [localities]

A populated area [locality] is every place or site made up of 3 or more dwellings, separated by a distance of no more than 500 meters, with a proper name by which it is commonly known. Borders and boundaries are also present to separate or differentiate it from other neighboring or close populated areas. Examples include: cities, towns, small villages, hamlets, neighborhoods, ranches (haciendas), country estate/large farms (fundos), mining bases, agricultural operations, pasture land (sitios), etc.

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 5 on the census form]

The number corresponding to the sequence order of visits is recorded in question 5, e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.

Important: The information for items 1-4 will be provided by the immediate supervisor and should be transcribed onto each questionnaire before beginning the interview.

Important warning

[These instructions refer to a graphic titled Advertencia Importante on the census form]

Two very important questions are presented in this part of the questionnaire. It should be indicated whether the persons living in the dwelling where the interview takes place make up "one or various households".

To answer this question it is necessary to be aware of the following basic concepts:

1) Dwelling: For the purposes of the census, a dwelling is:

-- Every building or premises that is structurally independent and separate and that has been constructed, built, converted, or made available for permanent or temporary shelter for people.

-- Buildings not constructed for human habitation, but at the time of the Census are found to be inhabited, temporarily or permanently, by persons.
[p. 38]
-- Any type of shelter, fixed or mobile (cave, tent, bridge, boat/vessel, trailer, etc.), that is occupied as a place of shelter, temporarily or permanently, the night before the Census Day.
Important: A building or any other location used for commercial, industrial, or service purposes is not considered to be a dwelling unless it contains a space occupied as a place of abode for one or more persons. In this case, the part of the building occupied by these persons constitutes a dwelling unit.

2) Household: A group of people with or without family relationships that share the same dwelling (or live under the same roof) living together within a family lifestyle, sharing the same services and especially sharing principal meals (olla común).

Households can be classified into two types:

a) One-person household: Formed by one person that lives alone in all or part of a dwelling, or a person who lives as a renter occupying one or more rooms in a dwelling while not sharing meals (olla común).

b) Multi-person household: Formed by two or more people, with or without a family relationship, who occupy all or part of a dwelling and who cover their principal basic needs together (olla común).

[Page 38 contains cartoon-style graphics illustrating the two types of households]

3) Collective: A group of persons usually residing in the same dwelling. The members are usually not related but they live together for reasons of health, education, discipline, religion, work, etc.

4) Dwelling unit: All or part of a dwelling that is used exclusively and only by one household or by one collective.

[p. 39]

Question I

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1 on the census form]

-- How many families live in this dwelling?

There are three alternative answers to this question:

-- One family (one household): Only one household is considered to reside in a dwelling when the group making up [the household] shares the same dwelling and eats principal meals together.

If the answer is "only one", mark the corresponding box with an "x" and proceed to Section II to fill out the questionnaire for this family.

-- Two or more families: If two or more families live in a dwelling, they can form one, two, or more households. If the answer is "two or more families", mark the corresponding box with an "x" and continue to question II to find out if the families live together or if they live with "independent arrangements" and determine how many households exist in the dwelling.

-- Collective: A collective resides in a dwelling when a group of unrelated persons who live together in the dwelling for various reasons (health, discipline, education, etc.).

If the answer is "a collective", mark the corresponding box with an "x" and proceed to Section II, filling out the questionnaire for this collective.

[A cartoon-style graphic in the left margin illustrates an example of a collective dwelling]

[p. 40]

Important:

1) In the case that the owners, administrators, or employees of a collective live with their families independently, that is, they have arrangements separate from the rest of the collective, each one of them, with their families, is considered to be a separate household and the rest of the persons form the collective.

[A graphic in the left margin shows an example of an administrator of a collective]

2) In the case of a family boarding house (pension familiar)with 5 or more guests with board and room (they eat and sleep in the dwelling), the family household is considered to be a collective.

[From the left margin]

A collective: the family who has 5 guests (the Perez family) is a family boarding house that is considered to be a collective.

Question II

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question II on the census form and to graphics demonstrating "living together" and "independent arrangements"]

-- Do these families live together or do they have separate arrangements?

This question is designed to determine how many households live in the dwelling and how they live.

It is necessary to understand the following concepts to answer this question:

- Live together (one household): Two or more families "live together" when they share the same dwelling unit and principal meals. This means that all of the members of these families, in reality, form "one household". If the answer is "live together", mark the corresponding box with an "x" and continue with Section II of the questionnaire, considering the families to be only one household.

-- Separate arrangements: Two or more families live with "separate arrangements" when each family prepares its own principal meals independently, even when sharing the same structure. A family has independent arrangements generally because it has a stove or kitchen appliances separate from the principal household for exclusive use.
[p. 41]
If the answer is "separate arrangements", mark the corresponding box with an "x" and ask for the exact number of households living in the dwelling. A General Enumeration Questionnaire is filled out for each of the households living with independent arrangements.
Important:
1) When there are various households living with "separate arrangements" in the dwelling, a General Enumeration Questionnaire is filled out for each and every one of the households living with independent arrangements.

Care should be taken in writing in Section I, box 5, "Order number of dwelling"; the consecutive order number that corresponds to the dwelling unit of each of these households.

2) The questions in this "important warning" should be presented after Section I is filled out and necessarily before beginning Section II.

For Office Use Only

No mark or annotation is made in this section.

This space is used by certain Census workers for recording part of the census information.

[A graphic in the left margin shows the space "for office use only" on the Census form]

[p. 41]

Section II - Dwelling information

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section II on the census form]

This section is designed to find out about the general aspects, predominant materials, installations and equipment of the dwelling.

The 14 questions that make up this section are grouped into a logical order, which should be respected. Therefore, the first question asked is about the type of dwelling, then occupancy, the number of rooms, and so forth successively.

Important: When more than one General Enumeration Questionnaire is used for a household, Section I "Dwelling Identification" is filled out but the information corresponding to this section [section II] is not repeated.

[p. 43]

General Aspects

Question 1

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1 on the census form]

-- Dwelling type

This question identifies the type of family dwelling or collective where the enumerated person normally lives. The following categories are used for this question:

Types of Family Dwellings:

-- House or Quinta [house with garden]

-- Apartment in a building, house, or quinta

-- Room in a house, quinta, or apartment

-- Room in a tenement

-- Peasant hut (rural type) (Rancho campesino)

-- Urban hut (rancho urbano)

-- Other class

In order to answer this question, the following concepts need to be explained:

A. Family dwelling

Any building or premises used, or meant to be used, as a separate and independent domicile or place of abode for one or more families or other group of persons, related or not, but living together in a family-like system or, in exceptional cases, a person who lives alone at the time of the census.

House or quinta [house with garden]

An independent and unique structure, usually with various rooms or areas, that is permanent in character and has exclusive toilet facilities. Usually constructed of resistant materials such as: cinder block, brick, stone, adobe, concrete, sawn wood, and bamboo and mud (bahareque) (when plastered).

This type of structure can be inhabited by more than one family or part of the house can also be used as a place of work (e.g. beauty salon, medical office, hardware store, store, etc.).

[p. 44]

Apartment in a building, house, or quinta

A place made up of one or more rooms located in a structure of a building, house, or quinta, equipped with its own toilet services and kitchen. It has access from the exterior or from a common area of circulation.

Room in a house, quinta, or apartment

The room or area used as a separate family dwelling, possibly equipped with its own toilet services, but generally without a kitchen.

Usually does not have direct access from the exterior, rather through the principal entrance of the dwelling.

These are enumerated only when occupied.

Room in a tenement

This is a room used as a family dwelling in which toilet facilities and water storage is usually found outside of the room and is for common use. It does not have direct access from the exterior, rather through an internal hallway or a common circulation area.

A tenement is a place of abode that contains various family dwellings, each one constituted by one single room called a "room in a tenement". Generally these are found in towns and cities.

Rustic dwelling (Peasant shack (rancho))

This is a structure with a straw or palm roof; bamboo and mud (bahareque), straw, and palm walls; and a dirt floor. It is still considered a rancho even if a part of the roof or floor has been improved. This type of dwelling usually exists in rural areas and in certain villages.

Urban shack [improvised]

This is a family dwelling generally built by the occupants with discarded/waste materials (planks, cardboard, tin, etc.) and usually without toilet facilities. This type of dwelling is usually built on hills, gullies/ravines, underneath bridges, or in other places in so-called marginal neighborhoods and in precarious conditions of inhabitability.

[p. 45]

Other type of dwelling

This is any kind of shelter not constructed as a dwelling that is being used for this purpose at the time of the census: trailers, wagons, railcars, caves, tents, caneyes (rudimentary dwelling roofed with palm trees), boats/vessels, or other similar shelters used temporarily or permanently.

Also included in this category are workplaces (industrial, commercial, etc.). E.g.: the place used by a guard who normally lives at the place of work.

[A graphic in the left margin illustrates a guard living at his place of work]

Fill in the oval corresponding to the dwelling type.

B. Collective dwelling

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question B Vivienda Colectiva on the census form]

The type and name of the collective dwelling being enumerated should be recorded here.

This is the building or group of buildings meant to be a place of abode for a group of persons, usually not related, that generally live together for reasons of health, education, religion, discipline, work, or other reasons.

These dwellings generally have common services for the occupants, e.g. kitchen, toilet, bathrooms, and living rooms or bedrooms.

Important: Collective dwellings with less than 30 occupants are enumerated by the regular enumerator.

Collective dwellings with 30 or more occupants are enumerated by special enumerators.

If a regular enumerator encounters a large collective (30 or more occupants), the immediate supervisor should be notified.

Collective dwellings are classified in the following manner:

Institutional

Correctional and penal:

Reformatories and Correctional
Penitentiaries, Prisons, and Penal Colonies

Homes or schools for the disabled:

Homes or schools for the blind
Schools for the deaf and mute
Schools for the physically disabled
[p.46]

Medical institutions:

Mental hospitals
Nursing homes for the mentally ill
Hospitals for cancer patients
Hospitals for tuberculosis patients
Hospitals, clinics, and sanatoriums for the chronically ill

Other types of institutions:

Orphanages and children's homes
Institutions for homeless (pobres de solemnidad)
Nursing homes
Boarding schools and dormitories
Convents, seminaries, and religious congregations
Non-institutions

Group shelter:

Hotels
Family boarding houses
Shelters (Hospedaje)
Police barracks, correctional or penal facilities for those temporarily detained

General hospitals and clinics:

General hospitals
Private clinics

Other collectives:

Vessels
Encampments (excluding military)
Military collectives

Barracks, encampments, and Garrisons

Question 2

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 2 on the census form]

Occupancy

This question puts forward 3 possibilities:

A. Occupied.

In this case it can be:

- Permanent: This means that people permanently reside in the dwelling. If this is the answer, fill in the corresponding oval and skip to Question 3.
[p.47]
[A cartoon-style graphic illustrates a person who lives in a dwelling temporarily]

- Occasional use: This means that the persons inhabiting the dwelling live there temporarily. E.g. for vacation, weekends, seasonal employment.

When the answer is "occasional use" and is for a family dwelling, proceed in the following manner:

Skip to question 3 and complete Section II. If the persons that temporarily inhabit the dwelling maintain a usual place of residence in another locality, record the information of each of these persons using a blue Individual Enumeration Questionnaire (only for non-residents).

For occupied collective dwellings with fewer than 30 occupants:

-- Skip to section III of the questionnaire and proceed to list the persons in the collective in Column 1.

-- Then, fill in the information for each person in Columns 2-5.

-- Continue with the control question number 4.

-- Skip to section IV (individual characteristics), and proceed to fill in the template for each person listed in section III.

For occupied collective dwellings with 30 or more occupants:

-- Skip to section III, control question number 4. Proceed to fill out the yellow Individual Enumeration Questionnaire.

-- For those who have a place of usual residence in another dwelling, use the blue Individual Enumeration Questionnaire.
B. Unoccupied

[These instructions refer to a graphic of point B, unoccupied, on the census form]

For unoccupied family dwellings or collectives, the reason for the vacancy should be verified and the corresponding oval filled in. This ends the interview.

In unoccupied dwellings, ask in the nearby houses or apartments about the uses for the dwelling. When the owner, administrator, or any other source can provide the information, ask about the occupants.

[p. 48]

C. Dwelling under construction

[These instructions refer to a graphic of point C, under construction, on the census form]

This is the family dwelling or collective that is in the process of being built and that is almost finished at the time of the Census. If this is the case, fill in the corresponding oval and end the interview.

When an apartment building that is unoccupied or under construction is encountered, a General Enumeration Questionnaire should be filled out, up to Section II, question 2, for each apartment.

When a dwelling is not in condition to be permanently or temporarily inhabited by persons because of the degree of deterioration, it is not included in the census because unoccupied dwellings are not counted.

Question 3

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 3 on the census form]

-- Number of rooms

This question is designed to find out the total number of rooms and the number of rooms used for sleeping.

Important: Bathrooms, washrooms, hallways, and kitchens are not counted in the total number of rooms, unless they are permanently used for sleeping.

[A graphic in the left margin illustrates an enumerator explaining what is not counted as a room]

Rooms in the dwelling used exclusively for professional, commercial, or industrial purposes are not counted in the total number of rooms. E.g. lawyer's office, office, hair salon, workshop, etc.

[p. 49]

In order to answer this question, the following concepts need to be explained:

Room:

A room is every compartment, room or area that forms part of the dwelling. Rooms are enclosed or separated by fixed walls and include living rooms, "recibos" [entryways], dining rooms, sleeping rooms, studies, recreation rooms, and service rooms.

-- When a room is divided by folding screens, screens, or partitions, it is considered to be one room and not separate rooms.

Sleeping room:

Every room or area used principally for sleeping.

For the purposes of the census, this also includes any living room, entryway (recibo), dining room, recreation room, garage, shed, basement, and granary that is usually used as a place to sleep.

-- When the sleeping room is also used for other purposes during the day it should be included in the "total number of rooms" as one that is "used for sleeping".

-- If more than one household is present in the dwelling, each household should be assigned the total number of rooms and total number of sleeping rooms specifically occupied by that household.

-- Once the total number of "rooms" and "sleeping rooms" is identified, the information should be written in the spaces provided.

Question 4

-- Tenure

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4 on the census form]

This question refers to the form of tenancy [tenure] of the dwelling. Tenure is the form of possession of the dwelling inhabited at the time of the Census.

Three alternatives exist:

A. Owned

-- Completely paid

-- Still in payment

Monthly payment in Bs. [Bolivares]
[p. 50]

Important: Those dwellings that have been personally built by the occupants are considered to be "completely paid".

If the dwelling is still being paid for, the monthly payment, in Bolivares, should be indicated.

B. Rented

[These instructions refer to a graphic of point B, rented, on the census form]

If the dwelling is rented, the corresponding oval should be filled in and the monthly rent payment, in Bolivares, is written down in the space provided.

C. Other form

[These instructions refer to a graphic of point C, other form, on the census form]

This is when the dwelling is provided as part of a salary or provided without charge by a relative or friend etc. This can also be any other form of system that is not ownership or rent.

Important: If there is more than one household in a dwelling, write down the form of tenure corresponding to each household.

[Example exercises for determining tenure have not been translated into English - pg. 50-51]

[p. 51]

Predominant materials

Question 5

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 5 on the census form]

-- Exterior walls

The material used in most of the dwelling's exterior walls is indicated.

If more than one type of material is used in the exterior walls of a dwelling, only the predominant material is recorded, that is, the material used most. Reminder: only mark one oval.

Question 6

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 6 on the census form]

-- Roof

The material used as a roof, or that covers the dwelling, is indicated.

If more than one type of material is used in the roof of a dwelling, only the predominant material is recorded (that is, the material used most).

In every roof in which a roof slab (platabanda) and tile appear, mark the first as the predominant material.

Question 7

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 7 on the census form]

-- Floor

The material that covers most of the floors in all of the dwelling is recorded here.

If more than one type of material is used in the floor of a dwelling, only the predominant material is recorded (that is, the material used most).

Important: The enumerator can make the annotations for the questions dealing with predominant materials (5, 6, 7) by direct observation.

Only one oval is filled out for each question.

[p. 52]

Installations and equipment

Question 8

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 8 on the census form]

-- Where is the piped water system located?

This question refers to whether the dwelling has indoor or outdoor plumbing, or if it does not have running water.

Question 9

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 9 on the census form]

-- How is water normally supplied [to the dwelling]?

The method for supplying water to the dwelling is recorded here.

If the dwelling has more than one water supply, the one used most frequently is written down. If the dwelling is not connected to the aqueduct (public system), the water supply is considered to come from the public fountain, tanker truck, or other sources.

[Graphics in the left margin show examples of water supplies from a public fountain and from a river - other sources]

Question 10

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 10 on the census form]

-- How many rooms with a shower are in the dwelling?

The number of bathrooms with shower is indicated here.

Bathroom facilities:

A dwelling has a bathroom when it provides a private space within the dwelling with a shower meant especially for bathing.

If the dwelling "room in a house, quinta, or apartment" has a bathroom for exclusive use for the household occupying the room, this bathroom is recorded for this household. If the bathroom is not exclusive, the bathrooms are assigned to the household identified as the principal resident of the apartment, building, house, or quinta.

[p. 53]

For the dwelling "room in a tenement", the oval corresponding to "does not have" is filled in.

When more than one household lives in a dwelling, care must be taken in assigning only those bathrooms used exclusively by those households.

Question 11

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 11 on the census form]

-- Does this dwelling have?

Mark [the appropriate oval] if the dwelling has:

-- Toilet connected to sewer
-- Toilet connected to septic tank
-- Pit toilet or latrine
or
-- No toilet

Question 12

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 12 on the census form]

-- What type of lighting does the dwelling have?

The origin of the lighting used by the dwelling is indicated here.

If more than one type of lighting is used in a dwelling, for example: electricity and kerosene or gasoline lamps, the most important is written down: electric lighting.

Question 13

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 13 on the census form]

-- What fuel is used for cooking?

The most frequently used fuel used for cooking is noted here.

In the case that various fuels are used, record only the one used most frequently for cooking.

For all of the questions (8-13) that refer to installations and equipment, only one oval is filled in.

[p. 54]

Question 14

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 14 on the census form]

-- Household equipment (mark down all that apply)

The number of vehicles and domestic appliances in the enumerated household is indicated here.

Concerning "family use vehicles (cars)", the oval corresponding to the number of vehicles owned by the household for private use is filled in. If the household does not posses any vehicles (cars) for family use, no oval is filled in.

Concerning appliances, the ovals are filled in according what the informant claims to posses.

When the household does not posse any of the appliances listed, the oval "Does not have any" is filled in.

Broken appliances are not counted here, unless they are under repair.

More than one answer can be indicated for this question; various ovals can be filled in according to what the household has.

[p. 55]

Section III - Household composition

[A graphic at the beginning of this section shows the enumeration form]

Section III is made up of two parts, the first is 5 columns, 16 lines, where the information of the members of the household who have their Usual Residence in the dwelling being enumerated is recorded.

The second part is made up of 5 questions: 4 control questions which are designed to help the enumerator verify the register of persons who should be included as usual household residents. Question 5a. is directed to indigenous areas predetermined by the Census Office.

It is expedient that some concepts that will help the enumerator obtain the requested information be defined in this section:

[p. 56]

[The left margin of page 56 contains three cartoon-style drawings illustrating examples of Usual Residents. The captions summaries of the definitions listed below and are not translated]

1. Type of Census:

The Eleventh General Housing and Population Census is a de Jure census with the fundamental characteristic being that the usual place of residence is used as a criterion.

2. Usual [place of] residence

"Is the dwelling and its corresponding geographical location where the enumerated person both permanently lives or resides, and normally carries out his/her principal family, social, and economic activities."

[Quotations are used to denote a definition of the term is given]

3. Household member:

The person who normally lives in the household and who can be present or absent at the time of the interview.

General rules of residency

Household members [who are] usual residents

The following persons are listed as household members in this Section III, "household composition":

1. Those persons who are usual residents of the household and are present at the time of the interview.

2. Usual residents who are not present at the time of the interview for the following reasons:
a) they are on vacation, in or outside of the country.

b) they are working, in or outside of the country, but who generally sleep in the dwelling.
The head of household or his/her spouse or partner is considered to be a usual resident of the household, even if they live outside of it during all or part of the week because of work. This only applies if they commonly return to the household for weekends.
c) They are temporarily in or outside of the country because of an illness or surgical operation, but will return the home as soon as this circumstance passes.

d) They are temporarily detained for minor infractions or offenses not yet tried in the courts.

e) They are studying abroad but depend economically on persons or institutions in Venezuela.
Those present in the household but who do not have a place of usual residence in another place at the time of the interview.

[p. 57]

Treatment of the most common cases

Type of person Enumerate in
1. One who normally resides in the dwelling and is present at the time of the interview. The dwelling where they normally live.
2. One who resides in the dwelling but is temporarily absent at the time of the interview The dwelling where they normally live.
3. One who is in the dwelling on the Census Day and does not have a normal place of residence in another place The dwelling where found at the time of the Census.
4. One who resides most of the time in a collective such as a hospital, military base, welfare institution, convent, prison. The collective where residing.
5. A student living in Venezuela who does not live with parents because of education. Institution or dwelling where residing because of education.
6. A Venezuelan student living abroad who economically depends on persons or institutions in Venezuela. The dwelling of usual residence in Venezuela.
7. "Head of Household", spouse or companion, who sleeps and eats in the place of work but who spends weekends at home. The dwelling where the weekend is spent.
8. A person who lives mostly at a place of work and spends weekends at home but is not the head of household or spouse. The dwelling in which they live while working.
9. A Venezuelan permanently living abroad. Do not enumerate
10. A foreigner in the country for vacation or business (for less than 4 months). Do not enumerate.
11. A foreigner, resident of Venezuela. The dwelling where they normally reside.
12. A recently arrived foreigner in the process of establishing residence. The dwelling where found at the time of the Census.
13. A person who lives in more than one dwelling and splits time between the two. The dwelling where they sleep most of the time.
14. A person temporarily detained for minor infractions or offenses. The dwelling where they normally reside.
15. A person living in a vacation home. The dwelling where they reside [text missing in original]
16. A person based at a military installation but lives outside of the base. The dwelling where they live.
17. A person based permanently at a military installation. The military collective.

[p. 58]

Column 1

[These instructions refer to a graphic of column 1 on the census form]

Resident identification

Column 1 should be filled in for each person who is a member of the household. The surname and the name of the resident are written here.

In the case that a resident has various names, write down the complete first name and then the initials of the following names.

Indicate the order of the residents in the following manner:

1. Head of household. A member of the Household, man or woman, who the other members of the household consider to be the head. This may be for reasons of dependence, relationship, age, authority, or respect. If no member of the Household is considered the head then choose the oldest.

2. Wife (or partner). The person who lives in a state of matrimony with the Head of Household, whether or not they are legally married.

3. Unmarried children (from oldest to youngest). The unmarried persons who are legitimate, natural, adopted, and recognized children of the Head of Household.

4. Married children and their families. Children of the Head of Household, married or in union, who share the dwelling and do not constitute an independent household.

5. Other relatives of the head of household. These can be parents, siblings, aunts/uncles, mother/father in-law, etc.

6. Non-relatives. Those who normally sleep in the dwelling of the Head of household, such as guests, friends, and employees. This excludes domestic employees who have a separate classification.

[p. 59]

Important: In the case of a dwelling made up entirely of persons not related to each other, the person considered to be the "head" is written down as such and the other residents are considered "non-relatives".

Also:

1. Those born before the 21st of October are included.

2. Those that passed away before the 21st of October are not included.

3. Those that passed away on the 21st of October or later are included.

4. Those born on the 21st of October and later are not included.

[Page 59 contains two cartoon-style graphics summarizing the above information]

[p. 60]

Column 2

Relationship

[These instructions refer to a graphic of column 2 on the census form, including an example of how to fill in the form with instructions for that particular example]

The relationship to the head of household is established in this column as the persons are being listed in column 1. The categories of relationships to the head of household are the following:

Spouse or partner

Child (children)
Father and Mother
Father/Mother in-law
Grandchild
Son/Daughter in-law
Sibling
Grandparent
Great-grandparent
Great-grandchild
Aunt/Uncle
Cousin
Brother/Sister in-law
Nephew/Niece
Domestic Employee
No relation

For members of collectives with fewer than 30 occupants, the letter "C" is written down for all occupants.

Column 3

[These instructions refer to a graphic of column 3 on the census form]

After the relationship is recorded, the sex (male or female) is recorded for each person included in the list.

The question should be asked since the person's sex cannot be determined by the name only. There are names that are common for both [sexes].

[p. 61]

Column 4

[These instructions refer to a graphic of column 4 on the census form]

Mark whether the person is present or absent.

This question requests that the person indicate the condition of presence for each usual resident.

Presence condition

Each usual resident who is found to be present at the time of the interview is marked as "present". The exceptions, who will also be marked as present, are the usual residents in one of the following situations:

1. One who, at the time of the interview, is in the same locality, at the factory, office, business, school, or workshop, etc.

2. One who is admitted to a hospital or clinic in the same locality for a temporary illness [not chronic], surgical operation, giving birth, or medical checkup for a short period of time.

3. One who is temporarily detained in the same locality for a minor offense or infraction.

4. One who regularly sleeps in the dwelling but who spends the majority of the day in another home because of work (domestic employee, chauffeur, etc.) or because of school attendance.

Those who are wandering the streets on the Census day and do not have a place of residence (beggars, insane persons, etc), should be enumerated in the place where they are found. The space for "observations" in Section III "Household Composition" of the General Enumeration Questionnaire is used to make the pertinent annotations in such cases.

[p. 62]

Absence condition

[Page 62 contains a cartoon-style graphic summarizing the below information]

Each Usual Resident found to be in one of the following situations at the time of the interview is marked as "Absent":

1. Absent from the dwelling because of vacation, tourism, business, or work that presupposes the absence of one or more nights and a return within a short period of time.

2. Admitted to a hospital or clinic, outside of the locality, for a temporary illness [not chronic], surgical operation, giving birth, or medical checkup for a short period of time.

3. Temporarily detained in a different locality for a minor offense or infraction.

4. Studying abroad but economically dependent on people or institutions in Venezuela.
Reminder: if a usual resident is not present at the time of the interview but will return on the same day, the "present" oval is filled in and an individual questionnaire (white) is left in the case not all information can be collected.

Column 5

[These instructions refer to a graphic of column 5 on the census form]

This column is completed after control questions 1, 2, and 3 have been presented.

Each person in the household is identified with a number; therefore, each one should be assigned a number starting with 1. If a second questionnaire is used because there are more than 16 household members, the numbering should be continued because it is the same household. This means that the first line of the second questionnaire begins with 17 and the information from Section I (dwelling identification) is copied into the new questionnaire.

[p. 63]

Control questions:

These questions are used to verify that all usual resident members of the household are listed, even when absent at the time of the interview.

They also verify that all persons present at the time of the interview who are not members of the enumerated household are excluded.

These questions only apply to family households. These questions do not apply to "Collectives", with the exception of question 4 in which the total number of residents is indicated.

1st Question

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the first control question on the census form]

--Besides members of this household, is there anyone who is temporarily residing here who is part of a different household located outside of this locality?

In the case of an affirmative answer, the appropriate oval is filled in and "How many?" is asked. Then, a blue Individual Questionnaire is filled out for each of these persons. If the person's information is filled out in column 1, the information in the corresponding line is erased and then question 2 is asked.

If the answer is No, fill in the appropriate oval and proceed to control question 2.

2nd Question

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the second control question on the census form]

-- Besides the following people (read the list of names found in column 1), is there any other person who usually lives here but is temporarily absent (for vacation, work or business, sickness, etc.)?

If a usual resident is missing, fill in the appropriate oval and record this person's information in columns 1-4.

If the answer is No, fill in the appropriate oval and proceed to control question 3.

[p. 64]

3rd Question

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the third control question on the census form]

-- I have recorded _______ persons who usual reside here as members of the household. Has any member of this household been left out of the list?

This question is designed to confirm with the interviewed person if the usual resident household members have been recorded according to the residency rules of the Census.

If the answer is Yes, fill in the oval and consult the rules of residency. If the person is a usual resident of the household, the information is recorded in columns 1-4.

If the answer is No, fill in the oval and proceed to number the persons listed as household members in column 5.

4th Question

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the fourth control question on the census form]

-- Number of persons recorded in this household.

As the final control, the number of males and females is recorded in the spaces provided and then a grand total is recorded.

The information regarding the number of males and females is indicated in column 3.

Important: None of the numbered ovals should be filled in.

5th Question

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the fifth control question on the census form]

Only asked in zones specially indicated by the Census Office.

This question is designed to identify the dwelling units in which persons belonging to any indigenous group of the country reside. A special census will take place for this part of the Venezuelan population.

The Yes oval is filled in when a person listed (at least one) speaks (or spoke), from childhood, an indigenous tongue or language and was born in Venezuela or a neighboring country (Brazil, Colombia, and Guyana). Otherwise, the No oval is filled in.

Observations

At the bottom of Section III there is a space for necessary observations to be written.

[p. 65]

Section IV - Individual characteristics

[A graphic at the beginning of this section shows the enumeration form]

The object of this section is to find out the general, educational, fertility, and economic characteristics of the population.

Section IV contains the following:

Identification information of the individual:

Part A., General Characteristics: 9 Questions
Part B., Educational Characteristics: 5 Questions
Part C., Fertility Characteristics: 3 Questions
Part D., Economic Characteristics: 13 Questions

Total: 30 Questions
Important: Each General Questionnaire permits the enumeration of a maximum of 10 persons in each household or collective with fewer than 30 occupants. When more than 10 persons are in a household, the necessary number of questionnaires is used to enumerate the rest of the household, repeating only Section I "Dwelling Identification" and leaving blank Section II "Dwelling Information" and skipping directly to Section IV.

[p. 66]

Identification information

In this part of the questionnaire, the enumerator should write down the complete name of the enumerated person, their "presence" condition, their number assigned in Section III, "Household Composition", and the total number of members in the household.

Any information missing from the questions or an error in following the logical sequence can affect the entire Questionnaire.

Part A - General characteristics

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Part A, Section IV, on the census form]

This part contains 9 questions that investigate information on sex, age, marital status, nationality, place of origin, etc.

It is fundamental for the Census that the questions are presented to every usual resident of the household being enumerated. These questions are asked to each one of these persons. In the case of children, the questions should be directed to the Head of Household or any other competent member of the family who can provide the information.

Important: The information for questions 1 and 2 is transcribed from Section III, columns 2 and 3.

Starting with question 3, each question is presented to every enumerated person.

Reminder: These questions record the basic information of the person and therefore, should be asked of each and every enumerated person.

[Page 66 contains a cartoon-style graphic summarizing the above information]

[p. 67]

A - General characteristics

Question 1

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1 on the census form]

-- What is the relationship to the head of household?

This question refers to the relationship that the person has with the head of household.

The information for this question should be taken from Section III, column 2.

For occupants of collective dwellings with fewer than 30 occupants, the "person in collective dwelling" oval is filled in.

Reminder: A "domestic employee" who eats and sleeps in the enumerated dwelling should be included and identified in the corresponding oval unless he/she is the Head of Household, spouse or partner [of Head] of another household.

Important: Each household should have a head who can be either a man or a woman.

Question 2

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 2 on the census form]

-- Sex

The sex of the person is indicated here. The information for this question should be obtained from Section III, column 3.

Question 3

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 3 on the census form]

-- What is the date of birth (or age completed)?

The day, month, and year of birth should be requested. Then ask the number of years completed.

In the case that the person does not remember the date of birth, indicate the age [number of years] completed.

In the case of children under the age of one, the number of months completed since birth should be recorded.

Question 4

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4 on the census form]

-- What is the current marital status?

Depending on circumstances, the marital status of the person can be:

[p. 68]

-- In union: One who is not legally married but lives with another forming a stable conjugal union.

-- Married:One who has entered into marriage according to the Law and lives with his/her spouse.

-- Separated:A married person who is separated from his/her spouse, whether in the process of divorce or not.

-- Widowed:The person who has not remarried or entered into a consensual union with another person after the death of his/her spouse.

-- Single:The person who has never entered into a legal marriage, whose first marriage has been annulled, or who currently does not live with another person in a state of matrimony.

-- Divorced:One whose marriage has been legally dissolved and has not remarried or who currently does not live with another person in a state of matrimony.

Only one oval should be marked for this question.

Question 5

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 5 on the census form]

-- Where was the person born?

This question requests the place of birth of the interviewed person, whether it is in Venezuela or abroad. In the case that is in Venezuela, the state and municipality is indicated and questions 6 and 7 are skipped. Only the country of birth is indicated for those born abroad and then question 6 is asked.

Question 6

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 6 on the census form]

-- What is the person's current legal nationality [citizenship]?

This question is only presented to those born abroad. Three alternatives should be provided:

-- Naturalized Venezuelan: when this has been legally conferred.

-- Born abroad to Venezuelan parents.

-- Foreigner: born abroad, not a child of Venezuelans, and not a naturalized Venezuelan.

Question 7

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 7 on the census form]

-- How long has the person lived in the country?

This question is only presented to those born abroad.

In the case of one or more years of residence, the number of years living in the country should be indicated.

[p. 69]

Important: The total number of years of residence in Venezuela is interrupted when the person leaves for more than 2 years. In this case, the total time of residence in the country is counted from the last entrance.

Trips abroad for short periods of time (less than 2 years) do no interrupt the total number of years of residency in Venezuela.

If the person has less than one year, fill in the appropriate oval. If more than one year, write down the number of years.

Question 8

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 8 on the census form]

-- How long has the person lived in the populated area [locality]?

This question refers to the uninterrupted time that the person has spent living in the populated area where they usually reside.

If the answer is that they have always lived here, skip to question 10. Otherwise, fill in the oval corresponding to the number of years of continuous residence in the locality and proceed to question 9.

The number of times the person has changed dwellings in the same populated area is not important since it does not interrupt the time of residence there.

Care should be taken to not mark "20 years or more" if the person has lived there all their life.

Question 9

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 9 on the census form]

-- Where did the person live before establishing residence in this populated area [locality]?

This question is designed to find out where the person lived before establishing residence in the populated area [locality] of enumeration.

If in Venezuela, the state and municipality should be recorded.

If abroad, only the corresponding oval is filled out.

If the person lived in the same state that is being enumerated but in another city or populated area, the name of the state is recorded in the space provided and then the name of the populated area indicated by the person is written down.

[p. 70]

B - Educational characteristics

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Part B, Section IV, on the census form]

This part of the questionnaire is made up of 5 questions designed to find out about the level of education of the enumerated person. These questions are only presented to those persons 5 years of age or older.

[p. 71]

Question 10

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 10 on the census form]

-- Does the person know how to read and write?

When the person is capable of reading and writing a simple paragraph in any language the answer should be in the affirmative.

Question 11

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 11 on the census form]

-- What was the last grade, year, or semester completed, and at what educational level?

The last grade, year, or semester completed, and the educational level corresponding to completed studies is requested of the enumerated person

There are three educational levels:

Primary education [Elementary]

The education provided by elementary or primary schools with the purpose of providing a solid base of reading, writing, and arithmetic.

Intermediate education [Secondary]

The education provided by institutions of intermediate education: High schools, middle schools, technical schools, teaching school (Escuelas Normales), etc. The prerequisite for entering these schools is the completion of the last grade in elementary.

Superior education

The education provided by National and Private Universities, University Institutes, Teacher's Schools, Polytechnic Universities, Technical Colleges, Colegios Universitarios, Private University Institutes, and Military Institutes where the minimum requirement for entrance is the completion of the last grade in intermediate education.

Important: This question refers to the last year, grade, or semester completed and not one that was interrupted or one that is currently being studied. When the person declares not to have completed any grade or year, the oval corresponding to "none" should be filled out.

This includes those who are in and not yet completed preschool or the first grade of elementary school.

[Page 71 contains a cartoon-style graphic providing an example of educational levels]

Question 12

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 12 on the census form]

-- Does the person study in preschool, primary [elementary], intermediate, or superior education?

If the person is studying in a preschool, primary [elementary], intermediate, or superior education institution, fill in the corresponding oval and skip to question 14.

Otherwise, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 13.

[p. 72]

Preschool education:

Education with the object to guide the first childhood experiences. It is designed for children between 4 and 6 years of age and is carried out in Kindergartens.

A person is "currently a student" in preschool, primary [elementary], intermediate, or superior when he/she is registered or studying in a public or private institution (including correspondence courses that conform to primary, intermediate, or superior education), even if he/she is not taking classes at the time of the census for occasional reasons such as: vacation, illness, strike, momentary withdrawal, or if the courses have adjourned and the person is waiting for the school year to begin.

Question 13

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 13 on the census form]

-- If the person is between the ages of 5 and 24, why are they currently not studying?

[This includes those 5 and 24 years of age]

This question is designed to determine the causes limiting the studies of the population between 5 and 24 years of age. This question is presented only to those between 5 and 24 who are not studying in any type of education listed in question 12.

All of the alternative answers should be read to the enumerated person and only one answer, the most important to the person, should be marked.

[Page 72 contains cartoon-style graphics illustrating reasons for not attending school]

[p.73]

Question 14

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 14 on the census form]

-- If the person studied at the superior level, was a degree obtained?

It should be indicated if the person graduated from the Superior level of education and received a corresponding degree. In the affirmative case, write down the degree obtained.

When the person answers in the negative, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to the next question.

Some of the degrees (títulos) given by Superior Education are:

Universities: Degree in Chemistry, Geology, Civil Engineering, Medicine, Economics, Graduate in (Lic. - licenciado) Education, Statistics, Sociology, etc.

Pedagogical university institutes: Title/degree of Chemistry professor, Physical Education professor, professor of Languages, etc.

Polytechnic university institutes: Title/degree of Chemical Engineer, Electric Engineer, Electronic Engineer, etc.

Technical university institutes: Title/degree of specialist (Técnico Superior) in Information Technology, [business] administration, Livestock Technology, Agricultural Technology, etc.

Colleges: Title/degree of specialist (Técnico Superior) in [business] administration.

Military Institutes: Title of Naval, National Guard (Fuerzas Armadas de Cooperación), Air Force, and Army Officer.
Important: For those who have received more than one "Superior" degree in different areas, the degree the person considers to be most important for their professional life should be written down. There is only space to record one degree.

[Page 73 contains a cartoon-style graphic providing an example of the above information]

[p. 74]

C - Fertility characteristics.

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Part C, Section IV, on the census form]

These questions are designed to find out the fertility characteristics of the feminine population. These question only apply to those women 12 years of age or older.

It is important that the enumerator proceed in a discreet, polite, and cautious manner, especially with very young unmarried women. In these cases (young women 12-17), the enumerator can warn, before asking question 15, that it is very important and necessary for the country to study the birthrate through the census, and therefore that it is essential to ask a few questions that may seem indiscreet.

[p. 75]

Question 15

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 15 on the census form]

-- How many total children born alive has the woman had?

The total number of children born alive, including those that passed away immediately after birth, is recorded here.

In order to answer this question, it is important to be aware of the following concept:

Child born alive:

A child who, when born, breathed or showed any other sign of life, even if passing away immediately after birth. If the child did not show any of the previously mentioned signs, it is considered to be a child born dead and is not counted in the number of children born alive.

If the informant has had one or more children born alive, clearly write the number in the space provided and proceed to question 16.

If the informant has not had any children born alive, fill in the "none" oval and skip to question 18.

The total number of children born alive should refer to all children born alive, of any age, that the woman had up until the time of the interview, whether they live with her or not and including those who have passed away.

Question 16

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 16 on the census form]

-- Of all children born alive, how many are currently alive?

The total number of the person's live children at the time of the census, whether they live with her or not.

The enumerator should insist in finding out about live children living in another place since there is a tendency to omit those who are absent.

[p. 76]

Question 17

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 17 on the census form as well as a cartoon-style example of the question]

-- Between October 1, 1980 and September 30, 1981, did the woman give birth to any children born alive?

The question is designed to find out how many children the person had between October 1, 1980 and September 30, 1981. Only children born alive are counted.

If the informant responds affirmatively, the enumerator should ask: "How many?" and fill in the corresponding oval and then proceed to question 18.

If the woman had more than 4 children in this time period, the oval "3 or more" should be filled in.

If the woman responds No, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 18.

[p. 77]

D - Economic characteristics

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Part D, Section IV, on the census form]

This part contains 13 questions designed to find out about economic characteristics of the population.

The questions are presented to all persons 12 years of age and older. Therefore, children younger than 12 are not included.

Diverse ways to answer questions will be encountered in this section. For some questions, only one oval should be marked. In others, numbers will be recorded, for example for questions referring to levels of remuneration and hours worked.

Some questions require brief annotations, for example questions 25, 26, and 28 request the type of industry (actividad) and enterprise in which the person works.

To help the enumerator complete this section, the principal concepts used are defined below:

Last week: The complete calendar week, Monday to Sunday, prior to the week in which the enumeration takes place.

Remuneration: The pay a person receives for completing a certain job or for lending a service. This pay is generally known as a wage, salary, or daily wage (jornal) and can be paid in money.

Remuneration can also be paid in-kind; e.g. food, clothing, agricultural tools, etc.; or in services, dwelling, transportation, education, or other benefits that favor the person who receives them in some way, e.g. life, accident, or funeral insurance, etc.

[p. 78]

Question 18

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 18 on the census form]

[Page 78 contains 3 cartoon-style graphics illustrating the categories explained below]

-- In which of the following situations did you find yourself last week?

In which of the following situations did the informant find himself last week?

Working:

This oval is filled in when the person carried out a productive activity last week:

-- For a daily or regular salary.
-- For pay in-kind (food, clothing, supplies, etc.) received in place of cash.
-- For pay in services (dwelling, transportation, etc.).
-- For active service in the Armed Forces.
-- For activity in the person's own business.
-- For a professional practice.
-- For own-account work.
-- For part-time work in any productive activity.
-- In the person's own home for a third party or company, for pay in money, such as: dressmaking, domestic production (elaboración) of products for sale, ironing, washing, etc.

Domestic employees who complete household duties are considered to be working because they are receiving remuneration or a benefit. Similarly, the housewife who carries out remunerated work in the home is also considered to be "working".

Not working, but employed

This corresponds to those who did not carry out their labor activities in the last week, but who have a job, employment, or business from which they were temporarily absent because of diverse circumstances such as illness, vacation, leave, labor conflict, etc.

Those who are temporarily sick who receive a wage or salary are counted in this category.

For those who respond to one of the previous categories, fill in the corresponding oval and skip to question 24.

Looking for work

Those who are looking for employment, either for the first time or because of unemployment, are included in this category.

The person who is working and looking for a new job is not included here, they are considered to be "working".

[p. 79]

[Page 79 contains 3 cartoon-style graphics illustrating the categories explained below]

Household duties:

This refers to those who were dedicated mainly to the care of their [own] home and did not carry out a productive activity in the last week.

Studying:

This refers to those who were dedicated exclusively, in the last week, to studying and did not carry out a productive activity.

Important: For the purposes of the census, the person who is studying and working simultaneously is only considered to be "working". Similarly, the housewife who carries out "household duties" but also studies at the same time is only considered and marked down to be in the category of "household duties".

Rentier:

A person classified in this category is one who receives income exclusively from rents, interest or from economic participation in corporate benefits [profits] through capital investments, real estate, etc. It is understood that the only effort is to receive the above mentioned profits is through a third party, such as a bank, financial society, administrator, etc. Those who personally manage their own capital or assets are considered to be "working".

Pensioner or retired:

The person classified in this category is one whose only income comes from a pension that can be because of widowhood, orphanhood, disability, or retirement because of advanced age and years of service.

If the person also carries out any type of productive activity, he/she is considered to be "working".

Other situation:

The person classified in this category is one who carried out an activity in the last week that cannot be classified in any of the previous categories. For example, one who does not want to or is not interested in working, a person who works when they want to, and a person who cannot work because of a temporary illness or disability.

Permanently unable to work:

The person who, because of a permanent disability caused by illness, accident, or advanced age, cannot carry out a productive activity is included in this category.

If the person responds to any of the previous categories, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 19.

Only one oval is filled in for this question.

[p. 80]

Question 19

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 19 on the census form]

[Page 80 contains 2 cartoon-style graphics illustrating the categories explained below]

-- Did the person receive or will the person receive monetary compensation for work carried out in the home during the last week (such as for selling or producing a product, sewing, washing and ironing [another person's clothing], washing cars)?

This question is designed to find out if the person received or will receive monetary compensation for having carried out work in the home or even outside of it. Only the last week is considered as the work period. Activities such as sewing, washing and ironing for another person, washing cars, producing products, caring for children, etc. are included.

In the case of an affirmative answer, fill in the corresponding oval and skip to question 24.

In the case of a negative answer, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 20.

Question 20

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 20 on the census form]

-- Did the person carry out, during the last week, a job without remuneration in the home or in any other business, industry, workshop, agricultural/livestock operation, etc., that is owned by a family member?

This question is designed to find out if the person carried out any type of work without receiving any monetary compensation in the last week. An example of this situation would be the work carried out in a business, industry, workshop, farm, etc., that belongs to a family member.

In the case of an affirmative answer, fill in the corresponding oval and skip to question 24.

In the case of a negative answer, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 21.

[p. 81]

Question 21

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 21 on the census form]

-- Did the person make any effort during the last 30 days to find employment?

The person is asked if he/she made any effort in the last 30 days to find work. The following are considered to be efforts to find work:

-- Establishing contacts with public or private placement agencies, companies or organizations.
-- Publishing newspaper ads soliciting work.
-- Offering services.

Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 22.

Question 22

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 22 on the census form]

-- Has the person previously carried out any remunerated part or full-time work?

This question is designed to find out if the person had held a paid employment at one time, whether full or part-time.

In the case of an affirmative answer, fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 23.

In the case of a negative answer, meaning that the person has never previously worked for remuneration, end the interview and do not proceed with the rest of this section.

Question 23

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 23 on the census form]

-- How long has the person been without part or full-time paid employment?

This question seeks to find out how long the person has been without part or full-time paid employment.

Do not read the alternatives to the person.

According to the answer, fill in the corresponding oval.

If more than one year, end the interview.

[p. 82]

Question 24

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 24 on the census form]

[Page 82 contains 2 cartoon-style graphics illustrating the categories explained below]

-- How many hours per week did the person work (or how many hours per week are usually worked) in all of his/her jobs (or how many hours per week were worked regularly for the last job or employment)?

This question requests the following:

a) Ask the person who answered "working" for question 18 the number of hours worked in the last week for all jobs.

b) Ask the person who answered "not working but employed" for question 18 the number of hours usually worked during the week.

c) Ask the person who answered question 19 affirmatively the number of hours per week dedicated to this activity.

d) Ask the person who answered question 20 affirmatively the number of hours per week dedicated to this activity.

e) Ask the person who answered "up to 6 months" or "between 6 and 12 months" for question 23 the number of hours per week worked in the person's last job.

For the person who worked more than one job "last week", the number of hours worked for each job should be added up and the total recorded in the space provided.

Once the number of hours is recorded, proceed to question 25.

[p. 83]

Question 25

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 25 on the census form]
[Page 83 contains 2 cartoon-style graphics illustrating the categories explained below]

-- What is produced, what service is offered, or what does the organization, enterprise, establishment, or business where the person works do?

The product produced, the service offered, or the activity of the company, organization, or institution where the person currently works, or previously worked, should be recorded here.

Do not write down the name of the owner, company, or organization where the person works or worked. Only the principal activity or the purpose of the company or organization should be recorded. In the case of large Ministries, Corporations, Governments, and public and private companies, the specific function of the agency [or department] in which the person works or worked should be recorded.

If the person works in various sites [has more than one employment], only the function or purpose of the work that brings in the most income is recorded.

When the person performs more than one function or activity, only the principal activity is recorded.

If the person performs the activity in the home, the activity is recorded as if it were that of a regular company or establishment (washing clothes, selling food, making clothes, selling clothes, etc.).

Examples of possible answers:

If the person claims to be a nurse and to work in the medical service of an iron/steel works company, write down: medical service - iron/steel industry.

If the person is a shorthand typist who claims to have worked in an engineers office in his/her last employment, write down: engineering office.

If the person is a carpenter in a furniture store (mueblería), ask the person to specify the activity of the business. If the answer is furniture manufacturing, then write down: furniture manufacturing.

If the person claims to be a public employee and works for the Ministry of the Treasury, ask the person to specify the agency. If the answer is "taxes", write down: income tax.

If the person is a peasant who milks cows in a farm that produces milk, write down: milk farm.

If the person washes clothing for other people in the home, write down: laundry woman (lavandera) in the home.

[p. 84]

If the person is a domestic employee, write down: family home.

If the person is a member of the military, write down: armed forces.

Question 26

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 26 on the census form]

-- What is the occupation, trade, or type of work carried out in the organization, company, establishment, or business in which the person works (or worked)?

In this question, the principal labor or professional activity performed by the enumerated person should be written down in concrete terms.

The trade or profession should not be recorded generically, e.g. engineer, agent, professor, worker, rather the specific activity should be indicated in the following way: Chemical Engineer, Insurance Agent, Math Professor, Janitor, etc.

If the person claims to perform more than one occupation or profession, the one that produces the most income is recorded. If the incomes are the same, the occupation where the person spends the most time is recorded.

The following are possible answers:

If the person answers: technician, ask: "what kind?" If the response is "radio", write down: radio technician.

If the person affirms to be a lawyer, ask him/her what he/she does. If the answer is Sales Manager of a company, write down: sales manager.

If the person claims to be a mechanic, ask the specialty. If the answer is cars, write down: automotive mechanic.

If the person is in a workshop learning operate a lathe, write down: lathe apprentice.

If the person claims to work in agriculture, ask the area. If the answer is cultivating vegetables, write down: vegetable cultivator.

If the person claims to be the boss of a farm and to take care of the payments and expenditures of the farm, write down: farm administrator.

If the person claims to manage the workers on a farm, write down: farm supervisor.

If the person is a farm worker, write down: farm worker.

If the person cuts cane [sugar cane], indicate: sugarcane cutter.

If the person harvests coffee, indicate: coffee harvester.

[p. 85]

Question 27

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 27 on the census form]

-- In this job you are (or were) ?

This question requests the employment status in the job in which the person carries out his/her principal remunerated employment.

In order to answer this question, the following concepts need to be explained:

Public employee.

A person who works in Public Administration, Ministries, other Organizations within the National, Regional, State, and Municipal Public Administration - Municipal Councils, Governments, etc.; Universities and Institutions of Higher Educational of the Venezuelan State; Companies whose capital is mostly owned by the State; petroleum and petrochemistry, etc. Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 28.

Private sector employee.

A person who works for a company whose capital mainly comes from private sources.

These companies can be for-profit or non-profit. Included in this category are: Incorporated Enterprises, Limited Liability Corporations, Family Enterprises, Cooperatives, Non-profit organizations (scouts, church, etc.). Also included are activities in a family residence providing services other than household duties. Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 28.

Manual laborer.

A person, in the public or private sector, whose income is calculated on a daily rate and is usually paid at the end of each week, is classified in this category.

Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 28.

Domestic employee.

The person who claims to work permanently and exclusively for a family household carrying out household duties for which a bi-weekly or monthly salary is received. Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 29.

Employer.

Those who direct their own company. They should have at least one salaried employee (white-collar) or laborer in their employment.

Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 29.

[p. 86]

Worker on own-account.

A person who does not depend on an employer and who directly offers and charges for services with no intermediaries, also does not have employees (white-collar) or laborers in their employment. This includes plumbers, electricians, taxi drivers, etc. who offer their services individually and privately.

Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 29.

Cooperative member.

A person who works as an active member of one or more cooperatives: transportation, agricultural, etc.

Fill in the corresponding oval and proceed to question 29.

Unpaid family worker.

Works in the company of a family member and does not receive compensation in the form of money.

If the person claims to be an "unpaid family worker", fill in the corresponding oval and ask if the person looked for other work, filling in the appropriate oval according to the answer and proceed to question 30.

Question 28

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 28 on the census form]

-- What is the name of the organization, institution, company, or business for which the person works (or worked in their last employment)?

The name of the organization, institution, company, or business for which the person currently carries out their principal labor activity should be recorded in this space. In the case that the person is unemployed, write down the name of the last place of employment.

Use abbreviations for those organizations that have them:

C.V.G. - Corporación Venezolana de Guayana
C.V.P. - Corporación Venezolana de Petróleo
I.P.S.F.A. - Instituto de Previsión Social de las Fuerzas Armadas
I.V.S.S. - Instituto Venezolano de los Seguros Sociales
P.S.V.S.A. - Petróleos de Venezuela, Sociedad Anónima
SIDOR - Siderúrgica del Orinoco

[p. 87]

Question 29

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 29 on the census form]

-- How much [money] did the person make in salary or wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses during the last month (or in the last month worked)?

This question refers to income, either monthly, weekly, or daily, that the person received in the month of September (or in the month last worked), including salary or wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses in all of the employments.

Fill in the corresponding oval according to the answer given.

Important: If the person only is paid in-kind and/or services, write down "E.S." in the space provided for "paid bi-weekly or monthly".

Question 30

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 30 on the census form]

-- How many weeks did the person work, part or full-time, between October 1980 and September 1981? (Include vacation and leave).

The total number of weeks worked between October 1st, 1980 and September 30, 1981 should be recorded here.

If the person did not work, fill in the corresponding oval.

[p. 88]

3. Individual Enumeration Questionnaires

Description and application

-- What are the Individual Enumeration Questionnaires?

These questionnaires are forms that are simpler than the General Questionnaire; they are identified by color and are used to collect census information in the following cases:

-- White questionnaire

1) To collect information of usual residents who could not be interviewed, for any reason, at the time of the enumeration.

This questionnaire is only used in family households and in collectives with fewer than 30 occupants.
-- Blue questionnaire
2) To enumerate those who are present in any household or collective at the time of the census but do not have their usual place of residence there.
-- Yellow questionnaire
3) To enumerate the usual residents of large collectives (30 or more residents).

Answers are recorded in the following manners:

-- Marking the corresponding box with an "x".
-- Writing down one or more numbers.
-- Writing in text answers.

[p. 89]

Individual Enumeration Questionnaire

3.1 Only for usual residents not present at the time of the interview (L-02)

(White)

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the white individual census form]

This questionnaire is used to provisionally collect the information of "Usual Residents" of the family household or collective, with fewer than 30 occupants, who were not present at the time of the interview but who will return the same day.

In these cases, the enumerator should try to collect all of the absent "usual resident's" information from other household members. Only when this is not possible the enumerator should leave the white Individual Questionnaire, which should be completed by the person when he/she returns.

[p. 90]

Section I

Dwelling identification

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section I of the Individual Questionnaire]

Items 1-5 of this section correspond to Section I of the General Questionnaire.

Items 6 and 7 correspond to Question 1 (Dwelling Type) of Section II (Dwelling Information) of the General Questionnaire.

The information should be copied from the General Questionnaire.

[Page 91 contains an example of how to fill out the census form and was not translated into English]

[p. 92]

Identification of the person

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the census form]

This part contains three questions to identify the person:

1. Names and surnames of the person: This refers to the identification of the person who is found to be missing complete census information. This should correspond to the name and surname of this person as listed in Section III, Column 1, "Household Composition", in the General Questionnaire.

2. Book #_____: This refers to the Book number of the General Questionnaire. This number is used to easily find where the Questionnaire is stored.

3. Section: This refers to the number of the Area of Enumeration assigned to each enumerator.

4. Address: This refers to the address of the dwelling being enumerated.

Observations: This space is used by the enumerator to make pertinent annotations.

[Last paragraph of p. 92 was not translated into English]

[p. 93]

Section IV

Individual characteristics

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section IV on the individual census form]

The questions in this section are the same as in Section IV "Individual Characteristics" of the General Questionnaire.

[Last two paragraphs of page 93 were not translated into English]

[p. 94]

Instructions

The enumerator should point out the existence of instructions each time a white Individual Questionnaire is left. These instructions will help the absent person to fill in the information.

Transcription of information

1. In the rural area:

The enumerator will personally return to collect the white Individual Questionnaire. At this time the enumerator will verify that the form has been filled out correctly and completely, in the case that it has not, the enumerator will collect the missing information. The enumerator will then copy the information into the General Questionnaire corresponding to this household. Once this is completed, the Individual Questionnaire is destroyed.

2. In the urban area:

The enumerator will inform the area supervisor who is responsible for collecting and verifying the Individual Questionnaire and copying the information into the General Questionnaire.

The area supervisor will destroy the Individual Questionnaire.
[p. 95]

Individual Enumeration Questionnaire

3.2. Only for non-residents

(Those who have a place of usual residence in another place) (L-04)

(Blue)

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the blue census form]

This questionnaire is used to enumerate the person who is present at the time of the interview, but is not a usual resident of the enumerated household or collective. Once completed, the questionnaire is attached to the General Questionnaire corresponding to the enumerated household.

Cases when the blue Individual Enumeration Questionnaire should be used:

1. To enumerate the person who has a place of usual residence in another place but is temporarily staying in the household or collective that is being interviewed. E.g. a visitor who is staying for a few days in the enumerated dwelling, or a tourist or traveler staying in a hotel.

2. A person who, for work or other circumstances, is in the enumerated household or collective, but who has a place of usual residence in another populated area [locality] where they are considered to be the Head of household, Spouse or Partner [of the Head]. E.g. a domestic employee who sleeps in the dwelling where he/she works, but who has a household of which he/she is Head, Spouse, or Partner [of head].
[p. 96]

Section I - Dwelling identification

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section I of the blue individual census form]

Items 1-5 of this section correspond to Section I of the General Questionnaire. Items 6 and 7 correspond to Question 1 (Dwelling Type) of Section II (Dwelling Information) of the General Questionnaire.

The information should be copied from the General Questionnaire.

[p. 97]

Example

"This is the way it is written in the Individual Enumeration Questionnaire"

In order to record the type of dwelling, the enumerator should look at the answer for question 1 of Section II (Dwelling Information) in the General Questionnaire.

[Page 97 contains graphics of examples illustrating how to fill in the census form]

"This is the way it has to be copied in the blue Individual Enumeration Questionnaire"

[Graphic of examples illustrating how to fill in the census form]

"Only for office use"

In this part of the questionnaire, the enumerator will not make any annotations as it is for reserved use of the office.

[p. 98]

Location of the place of usual residence of the person

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the census form and a cartoon-style graphic emphasizing the importance of the information]

The geographic location of the household to which the present but non-resident person really belongs is recorded here.

This information allows the present but non-resident person to be assigned to his/her usual place of residence or to his/her real household.

In collectives with 30 or more occupants the enumerator will determine, with the Owner or Administrator, who are not usual residents, that is who is temporarily staying there.

Because of their importance, each question will be explained in detail.

[p. 99]

Question 1

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1 on the census form]

-- Name and surname of the person

Clearly write down the name and surname of the person.

Question 2

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 2 on the census form]

-- Usual resident in the country?

This question is designed to find out if the person present but non-resident has his/her usual residence in the national territory or abroad.

If the answer is Yes, meaning that the person lives in Venezuela, proceed to question 3.

If the answer is No, meaning that the person resides abroad, skip to question 6.

Question 3

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 3 on the census form]

-- Including the person, how many people live in the dwelling where the person usually resides?

Write down the number of Usual Residents that corresponds to the household of the present but non-resident person in his/her place of usual residence.

Question 4

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4 on the census form]

-- What is the name of the State, District, and Municipality where the person has his/her place of usual residence?

The name of the State, District, and Municipality where the person has his/her place of usual residence should be clearly written down in this space.

Important: This refers to the place of usual residence of the person and not the place where the interview takes place.

Question 5

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 5 on the census form]

-- What is the complete address of the dwelling where the person usually resides?

The complete address of the place of usual residence should be clearly written down here.

[p. 100]

a) Record the name of the city, populated area [locality] or area. When a rural area, write down the name of the area or hamlet; e.g. Sitio El Cocuy, Caserío Aguas Blancas, etc.

b) Urbanization or Neighborhood

c) Avenue, street, or highway

d) Name of the house or building

e) Municipal Number: if this number exists, it should be recorded.

If it does not exist, write down "s/n" [sin número - without number]

f) Apartment number.

In the case of a person who lives in Venezuela and according to the indicated sequence of questions, proceed directly to Section IV "Individual Characteristics".

Question 6

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 6 on the census form]

-- How long has the person been living in Venezuela?

If the person has been in Venezuela for less than 4 months, proceed to question 7.

If the person has been in Venezuela for 4 or more months, skip to Section IV "Individual Characteristics".

Question 7

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 7 on the census form]

-- What is the name of the country where the person usually resides?

Write down the name of the country where the person resides.

Question 8

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 8 on the census form]

-- Why is the person in Venezuela?

Record the reason the person who is a usual resident of another country is in Venezuela.

If the answer is "traveling", "tourist", "temporary work", or anther reason, end the interview.

If the answer is "to establish residence in the country", proceed to Section IV "Individual Characteristics".

[p. 101]

Section IV - Individual characteristics

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section IV of the blue census form]

This Section corresponds to Section IV of the General Questionnaire.

[p. 102]

3.3 Individual enumeration questionnaire for usual residents in collectives (L-03)

(Yellow)

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the yellow census form]

This questionnaire is used by the special enumerator to record the information of a Usual Resident of a collective dwelling or institution (30 or more occupants).

"Usual Residents of Collectives" are those who permanently reside in collective dwellings or institutions.

Usually these persons are not related and they live together for various reasons, such as: health, discipline, instruction, military service, religion, work, etc.

[p. 103]

Instructions for the enumeration of large collectives

(30 or more occupants)

1. Record the complete address, type, and name of the collective that was assigned in the "Control list of Enumerated Dwellings".

2. With the help of the administrator of the collective, identify the usual residents of the dwelling and employees who reside (sleep) there.

Each one of these persons will be recorded in a yellow Individual Questionnaire.

Those who usually reside in the collective but form part of a separate household are enumerated with a General Questionnaire. Such is the case of a "conserje" [superintendent/concierge/janitor] of a collective who lives there with his/her family.

[p. 104]

3. On the day of enumeration, the enumerator will stay at the collective, interviewing the people and helping them to fill out individual questionnaires

To enumerate the usual residents who are absent for various days, the enumerator will use the information provided by the Administrator of the Collective.

4. In some types of collectives it is not possible to interview each person individually, for example, in penal colonies, psychiatric hospitals, reformatories, welfare institutions, and similar institutions. In this case, it is more practical for the enumerator to obtain the information from the records of the institution, given authorization from the Director.

5. The enumeration of military collectives (bases, garrisons, etc.) is completed by the military authorities.

Section I - Dwelling identification

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section I of the yellow census form]

Items 1-5 of this section correspond to Section I of the General Questionnaire. Items 6 and 7 correspond to Question 1 (Dwelling Type) of Section II (Dwelling Information) of the General Questionnaire.

Item 6 is already marked since this is the yellow questionnaire that is only used for Usual Residents of Collective Dwellings.

The information should be copied from the General Questionnaire.

[p. 105]

In order to record the type of dwelling, the enumerator should look at the answer for question 1 of Section II (Dwelling Information) in the General Questionnaire.

[Page 105 contains graphics of examples illustrating how to fill in the census form]

[p. 106]

Identification of the person

[These instructions refer to a graphic of the census form]

This part contains three questions to identify the person:

1. Names and Surnames of the person: This refers to the identification of the person who is in the collective.

2. Book #_____: This refers to the Book number of the General Questionnaire, with which the collective will be enumerated.

3. Section: This refers to the Area of Enumeration number assigned to each enumerator.
Observations: This space is used by the enumerator to make pertinent annotations.

Section IV

Individual characteristics

[These instructions refer to a graphic of Section IV of the yellow census form]

The questions in this Section are similar to those in Section IV of the General Questionnaire.

[Pages 107 - 120 were not translated into English.]