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Republic of Uruguay
General Committee of Statistics and Censuses
Enumerator's Manual
VI General Population Census IV of Dwellings
[1985]

[Pages 1-3, which explain the census and the role and responsibilities of the enumerator, have been omitted.]

[p. 4]

Plan of work

[The first paragraph on this subsection is omitted]

We give to you the definitions of dwelling and home that are the most important of those that will be used in this Census.

Dwelling
It is any lodging, fixed or mobile, separate and independent, that has been built or transformed to lodge people in permanent or temporary forms.

[p. 5]

Buildings under construction are always considered dwellings if they have finished roofs and vertical enclosures even though they are not occupied. In the case that they do not have a finished roof or vertical enclosures, they are not considered unless they are understood to be so in the following private definition.

For the Census, any lodging in general, fixed or mobile, where someone has spent the night the night before the "Day of the Census".

Private home
It is a person or group of people (relatives or not) who live under the same roof and, at least for their meals, depend on a common fund (they participate in a "common pot").

Collective home
It is a group of people, normally not tied by the binds of relations, who share the same dwelling for reasons of: work, medical attention, studies, military, religious, punishment, etc.

Boarding homes, hotels, hospitals, sanatoriums, the interned, barracks, religious communities, jails, among others, are collective homes.

Private dwelling
It is one that is occupied by one or more private homes.

Collective dwelling
It is one that is occupied by a collective home.

In order to do your mission with success, you should complete a series of activities before the day of the Census and on the day of the Census.

Before the day of the census

[Some paragraphs have been omitted]

[p. 7]

A sector formed by only part of a city block can consist of a half block, one side of a street, a single building and, including, part of a building.

[Some parts are omitted here]

The most common case is of apartment buildings; they are also present in businesses (Storage rooms, bars, drug stores, etc.). Remember that, although it may be a business, people can inhabit there or, at least, someone could have spent the night in it the night before the "Day of the Census".

In the case of some building existing with this characteristic, communicate it to your Head of Segment to be able to determine which of the Sectors this building belongs to.

[p. 8]

Non-city block zones
Non-city block zones are characterized by not having streets correctly drawn and the distribution of the houses, shacks, storage houses, etc. is irregular and unorganized.

Non-city block zones present bigger difficulties of enumerating.

You should plan the order of making your visits ahead of time, identifying each building or dwelling with the purpose of not omitting anything.

Each dwelling should be perfectly identified. To such effect, you should refer to them by their distance from any street, route or principal road.

In the map adjoined to your census folder, you will leave a drawing in detail of the route and the location of the dwellings.

The day of the census
On the "Day of the Census" at the hour of 8 o'clock, the enumeration of the population will begin in each one of the census sectors of the Republic.

The enumeration will continue until it is completely finished.

In the urban sectors, you will go to your respective headquarters of the segment before the aforementioned time.

In rural sectors, you will proceed according to the directions of the head of segment.

Before going into detail about how to proceed in filling out the Census documents and control sheets, you should take into account some considerations with respect to the interviews.

1. How to approach the interviews
All people will be told about doing the interviews and the importance of the Census and, in a larger or smaller level, all will know the questions that you will ask in each home.

[p. 9]

When presenting yourself and your documents, stress the confidential nature of the information that they give to you, if you find resistance in responding to some of the questions, point out to the head of household that it is obligatory to give the information.

You should not hurry at your duty, but also do not take too much unnecessary time. Avoid making any conversation about political, religious or sporting themes and in general anything that does not refer specifically to the Census.

At every moment you should show respect, common sense, patience and tact. Make sure that every question is understood. Every time it is not understood, repeat it, without acting bothered. If some clarification is needed, try to explain briefly, without suggesting the answers to the informant.

The person to be interviewed is the person who should respond, and you should concentrate on registering exactly what an informant says.

If you doubt the truth of any information, clarify it in "Observation", adding your point of view.

When finishing your interview, before leaving, verify that the Census document is complete and thank your informants for their collaboration.

2. Refusal of the interview
If in any home you find total resistance to giving the information, try to persuade with good manners, the head of household, explaining the objectives of the Census.

If you are not successful, fill out the part A. Identification of the Census document and give details about the situation in "Observations". Do not forget to register this home in the control sheet. Finally, communicate this fact personally to your Head of Segment.

If in a Home they inform you that they have been enumerated, you should make sure that this is so. Write down the fact in "Observations" of the control sheet and in the Census document and consult with your Head of Segment.

3. How to proceed when in a dwelling they do not respond to your call
When you do not get a response to your call in a dwelling you should find out, consulting the neighbors or through your own observation, if it is a dwelling inhabited occasionally, uninhabited, or if, instead, it concerns a momentary absence of its inhabitants. If it is a momentary absence, write down in the Census document its corresponding number and leave this dwelling to be enumerated later. Keep in mind that you should return as many times as necessary, until you succeed in enumerating its inhabitants.

[p. 10]

If it is an unoccupied dwelling write down this fact in "Observations" on the control sheet.

4. People without a dwelling
If in your route you find a person without a dwelling (vagabond, traveler), register their information in the Census document and leave proof that no dwelling exists in the part meant for "Observations".

The Census questionnaires

The questionnaires that you will fill out during the enumeration are:

a) The control sheet of enumeration
b) The Census document

After the Enumeration, you will fill out a "Preliminary recount card of dwellings, homes and people of the enumerator".

The control sheet
The control sheet of the enumeration is the questionnaire that helps you orderly enumerate your sector of enumeration. You will register in it all places on your route, if they are inhabited or not and if they have or have not served as a place of lodging the night before the "Day of the Census".

After beginning the enumeration, transfer the information about identification to the control sheet, so they appear in the sleeve of your folder. Also write down the number of the department and of the place or locality that corresponds, specifying what category it has, that is to say, it is a city, villa, village, hamlet, rural place, etc.

[p. 11]

You will dedicate a line on the control sheet to each dwelling and home and to each place not meant to be a dwelling including buildings under construction that you find in your route, writing down in each column the corresponding information.

If on any of the streets that you count no dwellings exist, equally write down their name on a line on the control sheet and leave proof of the fact in the column meant for "Observations".

If a single place is meant for more than one use at the same time (for example, storage and dwelling) it will be registered in a single line on the control sheet.

If a place is not a dwelling, you will only dedicate columns 1 to 5 of the control sheet to it and it will not correspond to the Census document. If it is a dwelling or any place not meant to be a dwelling but in which a person spent the night the night before the "Day of the Census", you will continue filling out the rest of the columns and it will correspond to a Census document.

In column 6 you will assign a number in correlative order beginning with No. 1, to each house, apartment, or place where, at least the night before the "Day of the Census", one or more person has spent the night.

You should also consider, for assigning the aforementioned correlated number, dwellings that are uninhabited at the moment of the Census.

In the case of buildings under construction that have finished roofs and vertical enclosures, find out how many apartments they have and consider them as unoccupied dwellings finishing construction or repair and assign to each unit an order number of the dwelling and its corresponding Census document.

On the other hand, if a building does not have a finished roof or vertical enclosures, only register it on the control sheet, recording that it is a work under construction and writing down the number of apartments without assigning an order number to the dwelling. Do not fill out a Census document.

In column 7 you will write down the number of the Census document that corresponds to a home that you are enumerating, numbering it in correlated order, starting with No. 1 in each sector. This number will not be repeated within a sector.

[p. 12]

In the case of a dwelling that is shared by more than one home, each home will be registered in its corresponding Census document. However, on the control sheet a line will be designated for each home.

In each one of the lines you will put the same order number of the dwelling (because the dwelling is the same) but the number of the Census document will be different.

Let us complete the control sheet up to column 7, for the following example.

[The example has been omitted]

[p. 13]

The census document

The document has four grey zones. You should not make any notation in them: they are for the exclusive use of the office.

The Census document is divided into seven sections

A. Identification

B. Condition of occupation of the dwelling

C. Type of dwelling

D. Homes in the private dwelling

E. Information about the occupied private dwelling

F. Information about the private home

G. Information about the people
[p. 14]

From Section D on, the questionnaire was designed so that the enumerator asks the questions as they are written, you should not change the form of questioning. Remember that the best way to ask the question has been looked for.

A. Identification
This section is meant to identify each Census document. Filling it out will be done in stages.

I) Before beginning your route transfer the information from the sleeve of your folder to each of the Census documents, in the following way:

Transfer the identification numbers in the established order:
  • Department
  • Census section
  • Segment
  • Zone
Order No. of the enumerator within a zone
Write down the name and the category of the locality and its codes.

In number 7 ("Area") mark with a cross the same box that is marked in the sleeve of your folder.

If you marked urban, cross out item 8 since it is only for rural areas.

II) Before beginning every interview, complete the rest of the identification of the Census document in the following way.

Number the dwellings consecutively, beginning with "01", writing down the same number for each one on the control sheet.

Number the documents consecutively, beginning with "01" according to the number that you put in the control sheet.

[p. 15]

Write down the address of a dwelling.

The address should identify a dwelling in such a manner that it is distinguished from any other dwelling or place.

If a dwelling does not have a street number, or is not on a street, road or highway, some fixed point that serves as a reference should be mentioned (a close intersection of streets or routes, distance to a street, route, railroad, geographic feature and in general, any other point of reference that is permanent).

The address of a document should coincide with what is put down on the control sheet.

If your zone is a rural area, you should, then, ask the head of household:

Is the piece of land where this dwelling is found involved in agricultural and livestock production? (number 8)

If a head responds yes, ask: "Does it measure less than a hectare?"

If a response is affirmative, mark box "1", if it is negative, mark box "2" (measures one or more hectare).

If a piece of land is not involved in agricultural or livestock production, mark box "3".

B. Condition of occupation of the dwelling

Put special care in registering all dwellings of your sector, occupied or not.

Occupied dwelling with inhabitants present (box "0") is where at least one person has spent the night the night before the "Day of the Census".

It can be occupied by one or more homes.

Occupied dwelling with inhabitants absent is a habitual residence of a home whose members did not spend the night in it the night before the "Day of the Census".

Whenever you cannot get it in a dwelling, find out what the situation is from the neighbors. If they tell you that the occupants of this dwelling will return at the end of the day, register this dwelling as occupied with inhabitants present and return later.

[p. 16]

Unoccupied dwelling is one in which no one has spent the night the night before the "Day of the Census" and is not a habitual residence of a home.

Seasonally unoccupied is a sporadic dwelling or lodging of a home. Typical cases are rest houses and summer homes.

Unoccupied finishing construction or repair is a dwelling that has a roof ("planchada superior") and vertical enclosures (walls, windows, doors). Register "Unoccupied dwelling" on the control sheet and fill out a Census document. Mark unoccupied finishing construction or repair. If it is an apartment building, fill out a Census document for each apartment.

Unoccupied, other (for sale, rent, etc.) are all the rest of the unoccupied dwellings. Those that are completely finished but are not yet occupied are included.

In all the cases of unoccupied dwelling fill out only Sections B (Condition of occupation of the dwelling) and C (Type of dwelling) in the Census document.

Like all dwellings, the unoccupied ones should be registered on the control sheet. Fill out columns 1 to 7 and write down in observations: dwelling, "Unoccupied".

Any building under construction in which anyone has spent the night before the "Day of the Census" will be considered an occupied dwelling with inhabitants present (box "0").

C. Type of dwelling

A home can be: private or collective. By extension, dwellings are classified also as: private or collective.

Private home
It is a person or group of people (related or not) who live under the same roof and at least for meals, depend on a common fund (they participate in a "common pot").

[p. 17]

Generally this group is made up of a head of household, spouse and children. It can also be formed by a single person.

Collective home
It is a group of people, normally not tied by binds of relation, who share the same dwelling for reasons of: work, medical attention, studies, military, religion, punishment, etc.

Hotels, boarding houses with 6 or more lodgers, hospitals, jails, barracks, convents are cases of collective homes.

Private dwellings
A private dwelling is occupied by one or more private homes.

Definitions of types of private dwellings.

House
It is a private dwelling with direct and exclusive entrance to the outside. You will not have difficulties in registering in this type: chalets, bungalows, and isolated houses.

Apartment
It is a group of independent rooms that, within a building, constitute a single private dwelling. This building is always understood to be more than one of these private dwellings.

The entrance to an apartment always comes from a corridor, hall or any other common space with one or more other apartments.

[p. 18]

F. Information about the private home

Once the dwelling part is finished, you will ask questions referring to the Census home.

Remember that in a dwelling inhabited by more than one private home you should fill out as many documents as there are homes.

Write in each one of the documents the information about each of the homes. You should not repeat information in Section E. Information of the private dwelling.

Cancel this section upon enumerating the second and following homes that share this dwelling.

1. Order number of the home within the dwelling
When a dwelling is shared by more than one home, write down 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. according to the order that corresponds to a home that is enumerated.

When a dwelling is shared by a single home, write down "1".

Remember that this order number is for each dwelling, that is, in each dwelling you will begin with "1".

2. Sanitary service

Do you have a water "taza turca" [squat toilet], latrine, etc.?

Ask the question and mark the box corresponding to the answer you receive.

2.1 Use of sanitary service

Is the use of sanitary services: private to this home?

The use will be private when the sanitary service is used only by members of a family that you are enumerating.

When it is shared with members of one or more other homes you will mark box 6.

[p. 29]

In general, when a dwelling is shared by many homes, you will find if they use the sanitary service in common.

If a dwelling does not have sanitary service, go to question No. 3 and do not make notations in use or in disposal of sewage.

2.2 Disposal of the sewage
Ask the questions, reading the different alternatives, until you get an affirmative response.

[p. 30]

[An example has been omitted.]

[p. 31]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 32]

3. Cooking service
3.1 -- Habit of cooking in the home

The members of this home, "Do they cook in the home?"

You should ask this question in its natural form. If the answer is "Yes", mark box "1". In the contrary case, mark box "0".

When at least one meal is cooked in a home, you should mark box "1".

Appropriate place to cook with a kitchen sink and faucet:

In this home, "Is there any appropriate place for cooking with a kitchen sink and faucet?"

You will consider that a home has an appropriate place for cooking when it has a room or place reserved for cooking with a kitchen sink and faucet.

You will mark box 7 if the aforementioned appropriate place is private to a home. Box 8 corresponds to when it is shared with other homes. Box "0" corresponds to when there is no appropriate place for cooking with kitchen sink and faucet.

When enumerating a home, they inform you that they prepare meals in the only room in the dwelling, in which they also eat and sleep. Register the situation about this home.

[Below the text is a form with the box "No" marked]

[p. 33]

4. Sources of energy
4.1 What is the principal source of energy used for cooking?

This question is mean to find out what is the principal source of energy that members of a house use, if they cook at all.

You should highlight only one box; when more than one type of energy is used, find out what is used most.

4.2. System of heating

Do you use any means of heating your rooms?

Central heating: It is the system of heating in which the release of heat (combustion) is centralized in one place but many rooms are heated by means of radiators, radiant heating, or similar means. The heat is transported through an agent, generally water.

To this respect it interests us to distinguish when it is common with other homes, for example: in apartment buildings, from when it is unique to the home.

Stove: Appliance that releases heat into a room where it is found.

Conditioner: Electric appliance that heats or cools the air of a room.

4.3 What is the principal source of energy used to heat rooms?

This question will be asked only in the cases in which boxes 1 to 3 have been marked from the previous question.

[p. 34]

4. Tenancy

Ask the question, reading the possible responses until getting an affirmative answer.

The cases in which a home is property of a dwelling, that is, they are paying for it (prominent buyer or mortgage debt) or that it had been paid for (aforementioned prominent buyer), also when they are a member of a dwelling cooperative (therefore the home is not the property of a dwelling, but rather of a cooperative) or paid rent or occupation without paying rent (with or without permission of the owner of the dwelling or the territory where the dwelling is built), do not need explanations.

Medianero o mediero:
It is the situation of a home that inhabits a dwelling as part of a contract or agreement (written or word), by which it occupies or uses a good or exploitation, for half the goods produced, by said good or exploitation.

4. Rooms of the home
A room will be considered all spaces within a dwelling that are closed off by walls from a height not more than two meters and that has sufficient room to contain an adult's bed.
[p. 35]
Rooms of a home are considered: bedrooms, dining rooms, living rooms, rooms for service personnel and the rest of the separated spaces, used for lodging people.

Bathrooms, halls, corridors, garages, or rooms used habitually with non-residential purposes (for example: commercial, professional places, etc.) will not be considered rooms of a home.

Number of rooms used for sleeping
Include here: bedrooms, bedrooms of guests and all rooms that are used normally for sleeping, even when during the day they have another purpose (living room, dining room, pantry, etc.).

Write down the number of these bedrooms on the dotted line.

Number of rooms used for other residential purposes
Register on the dotted line the number of the rest of the rooms of the home that are not normally used for sleeping.

[An example has been omitted]
[p. 36]
The room used for other residential purposes corresponds to the living room.

7. Comfort and equipment of the home

7.1 Vehicles of the home

Does this home have its own vehicle (car or truck) for private use only?

The purpose of this question is to know if a home has a car or truck, for exclusive personal or family use and not for vehicles for primarily work use.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 37]

7.2 Appliances of the home

Does this home have any of the following appliances?

You should read the listed appliances one by one, waiting for a response. If a home has an appliance, mark the box corresponding to "It has"; if it does not have it, mark the box ("Does not have").

Appliances that are not there because of momentary repair service, etc., should be written down in the box corresponding to "It has".

Some specifications:

Refrigerator: Appliance for keeping food and beverages preserved. If they say refrigerator with freezer, mark only "Refrigerator".

Freezer: It is an independent appliance that keeps products frozen and also makes ice.

[p. 38]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 39]

G. Information about the people

After registering information about the home, ask the questions of this section to every one of the people you should enumerate.

When possible, you should try to make each person provide you with their own information. Only in the case of children or of those unable to respond, or of any person who is absent at the moment of the interview (but slept in this home the night before the "Day of the Census"), will you ask for information from another person.

In each home, you will enumerate all people who slept in it the night before the "Day of the Census" or who, being absent this night for reasons of work, return to the home on this day.

In such form, a doctor who did not sleep in their house because of being on call in a hospital will be enumerated in their home.

On the contrary, a traveler who spent many days away from their home will be enumerated in the place slept in during the night before the "Day of the Census".

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 40]

To get an exact count of the population of the country, the criterion is to enumerate all children born before zero hour of the "Day of the Census".

Following the same criteria, those who died after zero hour on the "Day of the Census" will be enumerated.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 41]

Look at the Census document.

The section information of the people is divided into four chapters.

I. General characteristics of all people

II. Educational characteristics -- for persons age 6 or older

III. Occupational characteristics -- for persons age 12 or older

IV. Other characteristics -- for women age 15 or older
I -- General characteristics -- all persons

The questions included in this chapter have the purpose of knowing the distribution of the population by sex, age and civil state; their territorial distribution and movements made within the country in the last 5 years.

You should ask the questions in this chapter to all people who are to be enumerated in the home, including also small children and little babies.

First, locate the head of household.

Head of household: It is the person recognized as such by the other members of the home.

The first question that you will ask will be: What is the name and surname of every one of the people who slept last night in this home?

Begin with the head of household.

[p. 42]

Following this, you will write down the names and surnames of all people, insisting on finding out if there are any young children not written down.

Remember to clarify also, that any person for work reasons did not sleep there the night before the "Day of the Census", and returned or returns today, should be enumerated in this home.

When possible, while writing down the names and surnames try to maintain the correct order, following from the head:

1. Spouse or companion of the head
2. Child of the head
3. Son or daughter in-law of the head
4. Parents and mother or father in-laws of the head
5. Other relatives of the head
6. Domestic servants
7. Others not related

In all cases you should write down the first name plus the paternal surname.

When it is a married woman, write down the first name, paternal surname and the surname of the husband.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 43]

In collective homes you should distinguish those people who are members of the collective home, from those others who, having been passing the night in it for reasons of work, have their own private home, where they will return on the "Day of the Census".

In collective homes there will not be a head of household, there will only be members of the collective home and you will enumerate them beginning with any of them.

Then write down the names and surnames of all people who are to be enumerated in the home, you will complete, for each one of them, the rest of the questions vertically.

[p. 44]

For question No. 2, "What relation or relationship do you have with the head of household?", you should mark the corresponding box, according to the obtained answer.

In the case of collective homes you will mark the box "Member of the collective home" for all people.

For question no. 3, "Are you man or woman?", you should mark the box corresponding to the sex of the enumerated person.

Never think that by having written the name of a person, it is not necessary to mark "Man" or "Woman". Always register if man or woman, or male or female, in the case of children and little babies.

Do not be guided by the name of a person: always ask the question as it is written in the Census document.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 45]

For question No. 4 "How old are you?", you should write down the age in completed years at zero hour of the "Day of the Census".

[An example has been omitted]

It is very important to write down the exact age of each person, so you should be very careful with this respect and not omit it in any case.

For question No. 5 "What is your de facto civil or marital state?" you should read the list of possible responses, one by one, and in the order in which they are presented in the Census document, waiting for an affirmative response.

When you get it, mark the corresponding box with an "X" and do not read the rest of the alternatives.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 46]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 47]

For question No. 6 "In what locality or place do you live habitually?", you should write down the response in the following manner:

If a person lives in the same locality or place in which they are being enumerated, mark the box "Here".

If a person lives habitually in another place in this country, you should write down the department and locality or place in which the person lives habitually.

If a person lives habitually in another country, you will write the name of this country, (Argentina, Brazil, Spain, etc.).

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 48]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 49]

Question No. 7 is: "In what locality or place did you begin living habitually when you were born?"

With this question we look to get information about the locality or place that constituted the first habitual residence of a person being enumerated.

To register information corresponding to this question, follow the same criteria as for No. 6, insisting on getting the name of the locality or place. If a person does not know the name, write this down in observations.

[An example has been omitted]

In the case of people born abroad, you should write down the country and ask "In what year did you arrive in Uruguay in order to reside in it?"

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 50]

For question No. 8 "In which locality or place were you living habitually five years ago, on this date?" you will write down the place where the person you are enumerating was living in October 1980.

In order to register information corresponding to this question, follow the same criteria as No. 6.

Take special care in writing down exactly the department and locality.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 51]

Remember that the movements within the same city should not be registered, since the interest of this question is to determine movements from one city to another, from a rural place to a city or vice versa, or between rural places, like from outside this country to our country, done in the last 5 years.

For this reason, in the case of a person who moved in the same city, locality or place, you should mark "Here".

Question No. 8 is the last of the chapter "General characteristics."

If a person that you are enumerating is younger than 6, you should not ask any more questions; cross out with a diagonal line the questions of Chapters II, III, and IV and go to the next person.

II. Educational characteristics -- for persons age 6 or older

The questions of this chapter are for the purpose of knowing the educational level of the population and its specialization in different disciplines, acquired from regular courses.

The first question of this chapter is "Do you know how to read and write?" You should mark the corresponding box.

Mark "Yes" if a person reads and writes in our language or another.

If a person only reads or writes, mark "No".

Question No. 10 "Do you or did you attend any establishment of regular education?"

Attendance at educational establishments is understood to be attendance at an establishment of regular, public or private education, in order to systematically study at the primary, secondary, university or other level either in this country or abroad.

[p. 52]

If a person that you are enumerating tells you that they never attended an educational establishment, do not ask questions 11, 12, 13 and 14; cross them out with a diagonal line and go directly to Chapter III -- Occupational characteristics, if necessary.

If you marked attends or does not attend but attended go to question No. 11.

Question No. 11, "What is the highest level that you attend or attended in establishments of regular education?", should be asked to all people who attend or attended educational establishments a one time .

Educational level will be understood to mean each one of the categories included in the Census document.

This classification is divided into two parts, A and B.

Look at the Census document.

When a person declares more than one level to you, you should find out which of them would be considered superior to the other.

For example, one cannot apply to high school without having finished primary school, therefore, it will be second secondary level.

Remember that in this case you should write down only the highest level finished.

If a person attended two equal courses, mark the one considered more important and register the other in the space meant for "Observations".

For question No. 12 "Did you finish this level?", you should mark "Yes" if an enumerated person passed the level answered in question No. 11.

Make the notation corresponding to a student who studies 2nd year of high school in questions 10, 11 and 12 of the Census document.

[p. 53]

In question No. 13, "What is the last grade or year passed in this level?", you should mark the box corresponding to the last grade or year passed in the level that you marked for question No. 11.

If they did not even pass the first year, mark "0" (zero).

[An example has been omitted.]

[p. 54]

Question No. 14 "What is the major or career that you study or studied?", should only be asked to those who answered within part B of question No. 11.

[An example has been omitted.]

[p. 55]

Consider in military the courses for officials in military, naval or aeronautical schools. In Other all the other specialties not considered in the previous, writing down what they are (Examples: "Private institutes of higher education", "National School of Police", etc.).

[p. 56]

If a person who you are enumerating is younger than 12, do not ask any more questions. Cross out with a diagonal line the questions of chapters III and IV and go the next person. On the contrary, if a person is age 12 or older, you will ask the questions that correspond to chapter III.

III. Occupational characteristics -- for persons age 12 or older

With the questions from this chapter, we look to fundamentally quantify the active population and determine what the activities that are done are.

For question No. 15 "Of the following types of activities, which did you do last week?", you should read the list of possible answers, one by one and in the order that is presented in the Census document, waiting for an affirmative answer.

When you get it, mark the corresponding box with an "X", and do not read the following alternatives.

It is considered that a person worked if something was done for more than one hour the previous week.

The week before is the one that ended the Sunday before the "Day of the Census".

As you will observe, the series of possible answers is divided into two parts: A and B.

If a person being enumerated answers part A, you will ask the rest of the following questions from the chapter.

On the contrary, if a person answers part B, do not ask the rest of the questions from chapter III; cross them out with a diagonal line and go to chapter IV if it is necessary.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 57]

Question No. 16 is: "What is the occupation, profession or office that provides you the most income?"

Here you should write down as exactly as possible the occupation of the person being enumerated.

In the case of people who did not work the previous week, but answered part A of question No. 15, you should write down the occupation, profession or class of work that was done the last time they worked.

In the case in which an enumerated person has more than one occupation, write down the principal, that is to say, the one that provides the largest income.

Never write down vague answers, like: public employee, worker, farm worker, etc.

Your notation should give a precise idea of the duty that the enumerated person really does.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 58]

Avoid vague answers like worker, employee, farm worker, etc.

If a person tells you that he is a worker in a factory, you should determine exactly what is the specific task done.

Question No. 17 is "What is principally done in the establishment in which you work or worked the last time?"

The answer to this question should be as explicit as possible since it concerns the economic activity that is done in the establishment in which a person works or work for the last time.

[An example has been omitted]

People who work in a traveling form should be considered an individual establishment. So a newspaper seller, who works alone and is self-employed, should be written down as "Sale of newspapers" in question No. 17.

If an enumerated person is a public employee, of a centralized, decentralized or autonomous organization, you will write down the name of the governmental department where they work.

[p. 59]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 60]

If a person works in an establishment that does two or more different activities, you will write down the activity with which the person is most directly linked.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 61]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 62]

[p. 63]

For question No. 18: "Of the following, what is the category of the occupation that you indicated?" you should read the list of possible answers, one by one in the order presented in the Census document, waiting for an affirmative answer.

When you get it, mark the corresponding box with an "X" and do not read the rest of the alternatives.

In case an interviewed person has doubts and asks for clarifications, you should have the following definitions present.

"Boss or employer" is a person who does their own economic enterprise and who has one or more employees by salary or daily pay.

"Worker for their own account" is a person who, without depending on a boss, does their own economic enterprise, without having any remunerated workers.

"Employee or worker" is a person who works for a boss or employee, public or private, and who receives remuneration in the form of paycheck, salary, daily pay or commissions paid item for item or in kind.

All people who work in central administration, decentralized services, state companies, that is to say, those cases in which the employer is the State, are considered public employees.

"Non-remunerated family worker" is a person who works in a company or business whose owner is related and does not receive any remuneration.

"Member of a production cooperative" is a person who is an active member of an economic company that functions under cooperative rules (it is a social cooperative).

If a person has a job whose category is not present in the Census document, write it down in the "Other" [category] as exactly as possible.

[p. 64]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 65]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 66]

Remember that when asking what is the occupation, profession or office that provides the largest income, you should make sure that the enumerated person clearly specifies what was done.

[p. 67]

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 68]

IV. Other characteristics -- for women age 15 or older

This is the last chapter of the form, but is not the least important. From the exactitude and seriousness that you ask and write down the results of these questions, now unknown aspects about the birth rate, death rate and international migration of our country will be known.

Review the previous questions; if a person that you are enumerating is a woman and is 15 years of age or older, you should ask her the questions of Chapter IV.

If it is a man or a woman younger than 15, you will not ask any more questions, cross out with a diagonal line questions No. 19, 20 and 21 and go to the next person.

Do not forget that the result of your work will be useful only if the question is answered by all women age 15 or older, whatever their married state is.

Make sure to ask the questions directly to the enumerated woman, and write down all the responses that you get.

For question No. 19 "How many total children born alive have you had?", you should write down the number corresponding to the response you get.

When you ask the question "How many total children born alive have you had?," it refers to all children born alive during the life of the enumerated woman up to the day of the census, whether legitimate or natural, from a marriage, current union or any other previous state. Because it concerns children born alive, stillborn children should not be included, but those who were born alive and died soon thereafter should be included.

If a woman had any children, you should continue the interview.

On the contrary, that is to say, if she did not have children, write down "0" (zero) in question No. 19; do not ask questions No. 20 and 21; cross them out with a diagonal line and go to the next person.

[p. 69]

Question No. 20 is:

Of your children born alive, how many currently live in this country?

How many currently live abroad?

How many have died?

Pause between questions, with the purpose of getting the answer and writing it down in the corresponding place.

When a woman tells you that she has children who live abroad, ask how many of these children are men and how many are women [males or females].

Only if the answer to any of the questions is none, write down "0" (zero).

You should always ask the question as they are worded in the document, never imply an answer.

[An example has been omitted]

[p. 70]

Question No. 21, "How many were born in the last 12 months?", refers to children born in the last 12 months before the "Day of the Census", that is, children born from October 23, 1984 to 0 hour of the "Day of the Census".

If she answers that none of her children were born in the last 12 months, write down "0" (zero).

[p. 71]

[An example has been omitted]

General considerations
In a Census document, the information of up to six people can be registered.

When a home, private or collective, is formed by more members, use as many documents as is necessary.

In each one of the documents after the first one that you use for this home, proceed in the following manner:

a) Repeat the same number of the document and the same information from the first document of this home.

b) Cross out with diagonal lines the Sections referring to dwelling (B, C, D and E) and to home (F).

c) If it is a private home, cross out with a diagonal line the column for the first person and continue, registering the seventh and following people starting at the second column. The first column is crossed out because it is reserved for the head of the private home.
[p. 72]
d) If it is a collective home, continue registering in the first column of the second and the rest of the documents that you need, because there is no head of household; all members are "Members of the collective home".

Ask all questions as they are written in a Census document and never leave a question to be implied.

After you have enumerated all the people of a home, review the document: there should not be any question remaining without its corresponding answer.

Every question that does not need to be asked should be crossed out with a diagonal line. There are any without an answer, observe if it is an omission of yours in asking it, or that it does not need to be asked.

If you forgot to ask a question, ask it now and complete the document.

It can occur in some cases that during an interview some people who slept there the night before are not present; another person will respond for anyone who is momentarily absent.

It is probable that this person will not know how to respond to some of the questions.

In this case, you should write down in the Census document, in the column, "Observations" that you should return to this home to complete the interview of this person.

Summary of the people of the home
After finishing the interview you should recount the people in the home, separating them by sex and you will transfer this information in the part "Summary of people of the home", which is located in the lower right corner of the first page of the Census document.

[p. 73]

Finally, before finishing the interview of this home, you should put the information of the "Summary of the people of the home", in the place meant for this purpose in the control sheet of the enumeration (columns 8, 9 and 10).

Then sign the Census document, thank the enumerated people for their collaboration and go to the next home.

When you have finished the enumerating of your sector of enumeration, total, on the back of the control sheet, columns 8, 9 and 10.

Your last duty before turning in your folder to the head of segment will be to fill out the "Preliminary recount of dwellings, homes and people card".

Preliminary recount of dwellings, homes and people
The Preliminary recount card consists of two parts:

a) Identification

b) Total number of population, dwellings and homes in your sector of enumeration.

The identification will be filled out, copying it from the folder.

The total number of population will be those who you wrote down on the back of the control sheet, upon totaling columns 8, 9 and 10.

The total number of dwellings will coincide with the order number of the last dwelling enumerated.

The total number of homes will be found by counting the lines from your control sheet in which you have written down homes. (That is to say, you have written down the number of people).

Do not forget to sign and write your name on all the census documents that you use.

Once you have come to this point, you have completed your mission.

We hope you complete it happily and with it is assured the success of the Census, success that, we repeat, depends fundamentally on you.