Data Cart

Your data extract

0 variables
0 samples
View Cart



[Thailand]
Manual for field operation
The 2000 population and housing census

[Preface and contents pages in the original document are not presented here]

[p. 5]

Chapter 1

General Information

1.1 Meaning of Population and Housing Census
The Population and Housing Census is the collection and record of statistical data related to every person living in the same living unit called household. In addition, it includes data of the dwelling of that particular household obtained by the enumeration of every household within each area of the census boundary. Such census recorded data is obtained on the given date of the census. For this particular census the date was April 1, 2000.

1.2 Background
The collection and recording of population in Thailand was first conducted in 1909. Subsequent censuses were conducted in 1919, 1929, 1937, and 1947. During these five census years, the Ministry of Interior was solely responsible for registration of population in each of the administrative zones for the benefit of planning and executing the election. This process of the census is now called "Registration with Individuals' Details"

The National Statistical Office has been responsible for conducting the Population and Housing Census since 1960 according to Statistical Act of 1952. The census is conducted every 10 years as stated by the Statistical Act of 1965. The authority and right as stated in that particular act is in line with the recommendation of the United Nation, which suggested that all countries should collect and record information on demographic characteristics and their residential data in every 10 Christian years ending in 0, starting from 1970. This recommendation was put forth to enable the comparison of data from different countries accordingly. The National Statistical Office had conducted household enumeration at the same time as the census of the population in order to obtain the base information of the structural characteristics of the population and household. The 2000 Population and Housing census is the tenth population and the fourth household census enumeration in Thailand. At present, although the Registration with Individuals' Details is available, some individuals within the population have not resided as stated in the Registration. This presents difficulties with determining the exact population distribution in various areas of the country.

[p. 6]

Since most of the social and economic policy planning needs to consider several population characteristics and accurate residency information, the Population and Housing Census is required.

1.3 Objective of the 2000 Population and Housing Census
The Population and Housing Census is conducted in order to collect data on the number and characteristics of all individuals living in the country at the time of the census. The collection includes number and characteristics of individual households.

1.4 Benefits of the 2000 Population and Housing Census

1.4.1 Direct benefit

1. Providing a count of the population of the country as classified according to sex, age, religion, nationality, educational level, literacy, marital status, employment, economically active, fertility, and migration.
2. Providing a count of households, as classified according to characteristics and type of living quarters, tenure of living quarters and land, source of drinking water, water supply, type of cooking fuel, type of toilet facility closet, non-essential household appliances such as radio, television, automobile, etc.
1.4.2 Indirect benefit
1. The information collected can be used in preparation of the National Economic and Social Development Plan, and in evaluation and monitoring of various government and private sector projects.
2. It can be used to formulate policy or deriving solutions to various problems in relation to economic and social conditions of the population such as employment, education, elderly welfare, migration, fertility, residential areas, and environment. Furthermore, it can be used for public welfare and in population health improvement planning.
3. It can be used as the source of basic information in population projections for various future planning projects.
[p. 7]
4. It can be used in studies, analysis, and research of the population and households in various academic and research institutes within and outside the country.
5. It can be used as a model and framework for conducting various survey projects by the National Statistical Office and other related offices in the country.
6. It can be used for planning and assisting in policy formulation in any locality.
7. The 2000 population and Housing Census is considered as the baseline information at the starting point of the 21st century.
1.5 Census Coverage
Census coverage is defined as the scope of the census that is assigned for the type of population which has to be or not to be enumerated. According to the 2000 Population and Housing Census, the Census Coverage is given as follows:

1.5.1 Population covered
1. All Thai nationals residing in Thailand on the census date of April 1, 2000
2. Foreign civilians with permanent residence in Thailand or foreign civilians with temporary residence (lived for more than three months before the census date) in Thailand.
3. Any individual with (permanent residence) in Thailand but is away for educational purpose, military training, maneuvering, sailing, or residing abroad temporarily.
4. Thai civil/military diplomatic officers and families in foreign countries.

1.5.2 Population not included in the census coverage
1. Hill tribes that have no permanent residence (except those in well established villages).
2. Foreign military and diplomatic personnel and their families who have their offices in Thailand.
3. Foreign civilians who have resided in Thailand for less than 3 months prior to the beginning of the census or who arrived in Thailand after January 1, 2000
4. Refugees or illegal migrants living in migration camps according to the official order.

[p. 8]

1.5.3 Household coverage
The coverage of household of every individual who is in the enumerated scope

[Image omitted]

[p. 10]

Chapter 2

General concept in field operation

[Sections 2.1-2.2 in the original document are not presented here]

2.3 The method of operation and general principle during the interview
The data collection of the 2000 Population and Housing Census has been done by using the enumerator to interview the head or the member of a household. Therefore, the success of data collection depends upon the effectiveness of the interview conducted by the enumerator. The enumerators must understand clearly the type of work that they are doing and also understand the principle concept of the interview in order to be able to persuade and convince the interviewee to have trust and faith in the interviewer. Trust is important because it results in cooperation and obtaining complete information.

[p. 19]

The general principles of the interview which are stated below are regarded as suggestions. They can be further improved to suit the personality of each interviewer in different conditions and environments.

2.3.1 Words of introduction and statement of objectives
The enumerators must introduce themselves to the interviewee who is the head of the household or member of the household. The introduction statement includes the name of the enumerator, the office where he/she represented, and the purpose of visit. Furthermore, the enumerator must show his/her identification card and explain the objective of the 2000 Population and Housing Census. In addition, the enumerator should mention that the information obtained from the census will be used to benefit the general public. An introductory statement and the explanation of objectives must be done with simple wordings that can be easily understood.

Example of words of Introduction and Statement of Objectives:

"I am an officer from the National Statistical Office. I would like to ask you some information of people living in your house such as age, sex, educational level, occupation, and the type and characteristics of the housing. That information will be used by the government for planning purposes, improving the living condition of the population, and will be included into the National Development Plan. All information asked and obtained will be treated as confidential and will not be disclosed to any third parties. When this information is used, it will be coded and represented in form of numbers only."

It is important that the enumerators have their identification card with them at all times. The identification card will verify that they have been designated to this particular assignment.

2.3.2 Dressing/manner and behavior
The enumerators must dress properly and suitable for working in field conditions. They must be polite, cool, simple and friendly and not show any aggressiveness towards the interviewee. Furthermore, they must be patient with the interviewee, in case the latter is uncooperative, criticizes, or complains.

2.3.3 Asking question during the interview

[p. 20]

The enumerator must attempt to ask [the questions] to the interviewee exactly as worded in the questionnaire. In the case that the interviewee does not understand the question, then the interviewer should repeat the question. If the interviewee still does not understand, the interviewer must use simple wording to ask the questions, but must be careful that the meaning of the question remains the same as is given in the questionnaire. Avoid leading questions because they will influence the answers obtained. It is important that the enumerator not comment about or criticize the answers of the interviewee, in case that the enumerator feels the answer is wrong or does not reflect the truth. This may occur unintentionally. It is important that the interviewer find other means to make the interviewee give the appropriate answer at all times.

2.3.4 Advise for action in the case no cooperation
If the enumerator interviews any household and finds out that the person living in that house is not cooperative - for example, does not want to meet, does not want to be interviewed, or is giving misleading answers - the enumerator must attempt to again explain the objective and benefit of the census and affirm that all information obtained will be strictly confidential and will not be disclosed to any third parties.

If the person interviewed still refuses to cooperate, the enumerator must report to the supervisor or the provincial/Bangkok metropolis permanent officers, so that they act accordingly.

In the case the enumerator does not get any cooperation due to the fact that the interviewee is not ready - such as they are doing business or attending a traditional ceremony - the enumerator must either wait or proceed to other households before returning to that particular household at a later period.

2.3.5 Reviewing answers in the questionnaire
When the enumerator finishes the interview and has already recorded the data for the given household in all the listing and enumeration forms, it is important that the enumerator review all the questions asked and see that they have all been answered. In the case that the answers are not complete or enumerator is uncertain about the accuracy of the answers, they must repeat those particular questions again. The process of reviewing all asked questions before leaving the interviewed household will avoid returning to that particular household for re-interviewing.

[p. 21]

Once the review process is finished, it is important for the enumerator to express their appreciation to the household member for their cooperation with the government in carrying out the census.

2.3.6 Making an appointment for re-interview
Whenever the enumerator visits a house in which he/she did not find the interviewee or could not conduct the interview, the enumerator should make an appointment indicating the specific time and date for the interview and record them completely in the PHC4 form (interview appointment form). The enumerator should either leave the form in the mail box of that particular house, or alternatively ask a neighbor or other people living in household to give it to the head of the household. At the same time, the enumerator should record the date and place of such appointment in the listing form to remind him/herself to return to that particular household for the interview on the appointment date indicated.

2.3.7 When the interviewee answer "I do not know"
If the interviewee answers "I do not know" to any question during the interview this may indicate the following:

a) The interviewee did not understand the question.
b) The interviewee requires time to think about the answer to that specific question.
c) The interviewee does not want to answer the question ever though he/she knows the answer to the question.
d) The interviewee does not know the answer at all.

In this case, the enumerator should ask the specific question again or simplify the question and allocate certain time period for the interviewee to think about the answer. If interviewee still does not know the answer, then the enumerator should accept the answer of "I do not know" as the final answer.

2.4 Legal authority and responsibility of the personnel involved in the data collection

2.4.1 Authority of operation officer in collecting data

[p. 22]

Operation officers who worked for the 2000 Population and Housing Census and who have been appointed as the supervisor and enumerator have the right, according to the Statistical Acts of 1965 section 18, to enter the house or personal office in order to fill in the questionnaire, in between the time period of sunrise and sunset, with the purpose of asking the household leader or member of that household to produce evidence or document related to filling out the questionnaire. In this case, the head of the household or the member of such household must be available to those officers. Therefore, the operation officers must bear in mind at all times that the legal right is given to them to enter the household premises between the time period of sunrise and sunset. Entering people's households before or beyond these time period will not be covered by the legal right. In certain cases, the leader of the household may allow the officer to enter their houses at other times apart from the legal time given.

2.4.2 Function and punishment of household leader and operation officer
The head of the household and its members must be available to the field operation officer who enters the housing premises for work at the specific time period, as stated in section 2.4.1
It is the duty of the head of the household and its members to explain facts or give right answers to the officer. Violating or disobeying the legal act mentioned is regarded as an offense, and will be punished according to the Statistical Act of 1965, section 23 and 24, as follows:

Section 23: Anyone who fills out statements or numbers in the given questionnaire when such person realizes that those statements or numbers are false, or gives information or answers that are false to the operation officer or field operator will be imprisoned for up to 3 months, fined up to 500 baht, or receive both a fine and imprisonment, according to section 18.

Section 24: Section 21 states that "All statements or numbers filled in the questionnaire and relating to a specific person or specific case, including the question that needed to be asked, must be treated as strictly confidential". It is prohibited for the operation officer, according to this Statistical Act, to disclose such statements or numbers to anyone not entitled the function and responsibility of working in the census, as stated in the Act, except during the investigation or interrogation for a case where a particular person is prosecuted for providing false information, as stated by the Act. The punishment for violating this act is 6 months imprisonment, a fine of 1,000 baht, or both a fine and imprisonment.

2.4.3 Keeping the collected data secret
All data collected and compiled from the 2000 Population and Housing Census will be evaluated, summarized, and presented for each province, region, and the whole kingdom. They will be published and distributed to all government divisions and institutes, private sectors, and general public. It is prohibited to disclose any information in relation to a specific person, or to disclose any statements or numbers to anyone who is not directly involved in the census process, according to the Statistical Act, section 21. Therefore, the operation officer must be very careful and treat the collected information as strictly confidential. Moreover, the operation officer must explain to the head or the member of the household their protective right according to the law.

[Section 2.5 p. 23-25 in the original document not presented here]

2.7 Regulation and procedure of the 2000 population and housing census
The 2000 Population and Housing Census divided the operational area in 3 different categories as follows:

1. Bangkok Metropolis Area
2. Municipal Area
3. Non-Municipal Area

In working for the listing and enumeration of all areas, enumerator needs to complete each block/village for all the listing and enumeration as follows:

1) Private household
Record by using the PHC1 form (Listing Form) and enumerate by selecting the sample household at 20% of the entire private household as follows:

For households not classified as sample households, these are enumerated using the PHC2 form (Enumeration Form). [Enumerator is instructed to use columns S1-S16].

During listing and enumeration, the enumerator is responsible for selecting the sample household according to instructions given in Chapter 4 of the listing form for column 11 and 12.

2) Collection household (special and institute households)
The enumerator must list and enumerate all households without selection of the sample household.

The listing is done by using PHC1 form (Listing Form) and enumerating by using the PHC2 form (Enumeration Form) in every column. The household questions do not have to be enumerated.

[p. 26]

Chapter 3

Definitions

Section on population

1. Population and Housing Census
Population and housing census is the process of compiling data in relation to the population and housing for statistical benefit. The process is done through asking questions and collecting information from all units of the given area in any specific time period.

2. Listing
Listing is the act of counting and recording the number for every type of household, including all the buildings and construction structures within the block/village. The counted data are recorded in the listing form (PHC1)

3.Enumeration
Enumeration is the process where the officer interviews the head of the household in order to get detailed information of the persons living in the household, household characteristics, and living condition of the persons in that particular household. Such information are recorded in the enumerated form (PHC2)

4. Date of the census
This is the date designated for counting the population and households within the census area. The 2000 Population and Housing Census has designated April 1st, 2000 as the date of the census.

5. Time of the census
This is the time allocated for collecting facts on the date of the census. This particular time is used to decide whether facts need to be enumerated or not. The time of the 2000 Population and Housing Census was 00:00 hours on April 1st, 2000 (or 24:00 hours on March 31st, 2000).

[p. 27]

[Table summarizing census time period and enumeration is not presented here]

Census Time period and the enumeration:

  • An individual born on March 31st, 2000 and that is living through the beginning of the census is enumerated
  • An individual born at 00:00 hours on April 1st, 2000 is enumerated
  • An individual born after 00:00 hours on April 1st, 2000 is not enumerated
  • An individual born at 00:00 hours and simultaneously dies at that same time is enumerated
  • An individual that dies before 00:00 hours on April 1st, 2000 is not enumerated
  • An individual that dies at or after 00:00 hours on April 1st, 2000 is enumerated
6. Enumerated Period
This is the time period in which the enumerating personnel are working on counting and enumerating information.

7. Municipality areaIn the 2000 Population and Housing Census, the municipal area consists of:

7.1 Municipal area
A specific locality as issued by the royal decree to be a municipality, according to Municipality Act of 1953. Also, according to the 1998 Act, the Sanitation District was upgraded into sub-district municipality.
[p. 28]
The designated area and boundary of the sub district municipality is specified in the Act.
7.2 Bangkok metropolis
A locality assigned according to the Administrative Regulation Act of Bangkok Metropolis of 1985, which specifies the area and boundary of Bangkok Metropolis.
7.3 Pattaya city
A locality assigned according to the Administrative Regulation Act of Pattaya City of 1978, which specifies the area and boundary of Pattaya City.
8. Non-municipal area
This is the area outside the municipal area, which is also considered a village.

9. Census area/enumeration districtThis is the area in which enumerators are working in listing and enumeration. Normally one census area is composed of 350 to 400 households.

10. Grouped building/block
Grouped building refers to the subsection of the census area which is located within a municipality. The subsection is allocated for the purpose of simplifying record counting and enumeration.

11. House
House refers to a building or any construction structure, including boat, houseboat and truck, in which a person can live.

12. Household
Household refers to one or more persons living in the same house or construction structure. They seek for, consume and utilize all facilities together regardless of whether they are related or not. One house or construction structure may be composed of one or more households.

[p. 29]

Alternatively, one household may be composed of members living in more than one house, or living in several rooms of a single house but they need to stay in the same premises or room close to each other to be counted as a household.

13. Type of householdThere are two types of households: private household and collective household

13.1 Private household
Private household refers to a household that consists of one or several people living in the same house or construction structure. They seek, consume and utilize all facilities together, regardless of whether they are related or not. For a household where members are not related, there must be five members in that given household.
Examples of private household:

1. Mr. Pichai lives in a house
2. Mr. Wanchai rents a room from one family to live independently.
3. The house in which a father, mother, son or daughter and a servant live together
4. The house composed of one eldest brother/sister and three younger brothers/sisters. The eldest brother takes care, supports, and provides education for his/her brothers/sisters.
5. Miss Pang and four of her friends who are not related rent a house and live together, they share all living expenses.
6. One household composed of a husband, wife, two sons/daughters and four employees. All of them live in the same house. The wife cooks all meals for the employees. The employees have their meals separately from the employer.
7. Three houses located on the same area (with or without a fence) where the mother and father live in the first house while the other two houses are for two of their daughters to live in with their families, one family per house. All people living in the latter houses have their meals together with the parents at the first house, but not all of them share or contribute to the food expenses.
[p. 30]

13.2 Collective Household
Collective household refers to a household that is composed of several people living together because of rules or regulations which indicate that they must live together, or because members saw it beneficial to live together.

Types of collective households

a) Instituted household
The instituted household is a household that is composed of several people living together under certain rules and regulations which indicate that they must live together.
For example:
1. Monks, novices, nuns, followers and adherents who live together in a monastery or temple.
2. Patients who stay in the hospital for over three-month period (except in mental hospitals, where admitted patients are considered as member of the instituted household right away)
3. Pupils and teachers who live in a boarding school, medical student dormitory, nursing student dormitory
4. Those seeking relief or providing assistance in a relief institution or center. This includes a caretaker in such an institution who is not living in a separate house.
5. Prisoners in jail
6. Soldiers or policemen who stay in camps or barracks, including cadets and police cadets.
7. Customers who rent a room temporarily, permanently, or for at least three months in a hotel or guest house.
8. Those who stay or observe religious precepts in vegetarian houses for at least three months or more.
b) Special household
[p. 31]
A special household is a household in which people live together in the same place for a specific purpose such as:

1) "Hostels", where people rent rooms, are special households. This includes both registered and nonregistered hostels. It does not include student dormitories in schools, colleges or universities. Hostels must have a signboard to indicate that they are hostels where people can rent a room.

2) "Laborer households" [is a location where] at least six people or more (not including the family or household of the owner) are permanently staying in their working place, factory, or any working place where there is no arrangement for them to live separately. For those laborers who live in a place where the factory or any other working place have arranged for them to live separately as an individual family (it may be separate room or a separate house) away from other laborers, their household is classified as a private household. In such places, there may be relatives or other persons living together.
Examples of laborer households:

Example 1:

In one house with six rooms there are two or three waitresses living together in a single room. The owner of a restaurant rents this house in order to provide a boarding facility for laborers. Every laborer's meal is provided by the owner of the restaurant. In this case, all waitresses are counted as one special household type laborer.

Example 2:

One automobile accessories factory has a three-storey house. At each storey, there are ten rooms. In each room, one or two laborers live together. Among the rooms, there are three rooms where laborers can have their parents stay with them. Moreover, at that factory, there are four houses in which the foremen stay. In one of the four, a foreman brought his wife and son to live with him. In this particular case, count the room and the house where the laborer and the foremen brought their families to live with them as four private households and the rest as one special household type laborer.
[p. 32]
Example 3:
There is a rice mill where there are 10 unmarried laborers. The owner of the rice mill provides separate accommodation for each of the laborers. In this case, all 10 laborers are counted as one special household type laborer.

Example 4:
A similar rice mill as mentioned in example 3, where Mr. Kaew - the husband of Mrs. Noi, both of them rice mill laborers - live together is counted as a special household type laborer if their accommodation is arranged by the mill

3) "Other special households" refers to households with six persons or more living together and who are not related, or when not more than three persons are related. All people live together and share all expenses. "Relative" in this case refers to husband, wife, son, daughters, son-in law, daughter-in-law, grandson, granddaughter, father, mother, brother, sister, maternal and paternal grandfather, maternal and paternal grandmother, uncle, aunt, nephew, niece, maternal and paternal great grandfather of each spouse, maternal and paternal great grandmother of each spouse, cousins of each spouse.

Examples of other special households:

In a house where there are six people living together and all of them are not related at all but they share all the expenses, this is counted as one other type of special household.

If the same as Example 1, however there are three people who live in that house and every one shares all the expenses, this is counted as one other type of special household.
Exceptions of other special households
1) In the case of a household with six persons or more, in which only one person shoulders all or part of the expense for a group of three related persons, counts as a private household.

[p. 33]

Example:
In a household where eight people live together, three people are brothers and sisters and the eldest brother pays the expenses for his younger brothers and sisters, count them as a private household.

2) In a household where six persons or more live together and at least four persons are related, count them as private household. Sharing of expenses is not a sufficient factor for including the household in this case.

Example:
In a house where ten persons live together, five of them are related but everybody shares the housing expenses, count them as one private household.
Caution
The director's household, manager's household, prison or jail warder's household, officer of the confinement place, relief place, hotel personnel, workers in the hospital, and care taker of the student dormitories either at school or university, if living separately with their family, must be counted as private households.

In the case of people not living separately, consider the type of where they live or the housing where they live, and decide whether it is a private household or collective household.

In the case of soldiers, policemen who are staying at the barrack, camp, precinct or police station, if they live separately as a family, count them as private households. If they are not living separately by themselves or with their family, consider it as an instituted household.

For a private household that is located on temple premises, such as the temple treasurer's house, housing which is built on the temple's land, they are counted as private household, not counted as the institute household type temple or monastery.

Some examples are given to help decide the different kinds of households, especially when they are located in the same premises or within a given boundary.

Example 1:

[p. 34]

A particular weaving factory has two three-storey buildings, one for male laborers and the other building for female laborers. All laborers share the rooms, 10 people for each room. Furthermore, there is one two-storey building for married laborers to live with their families (not all member of the families are laborers). Each family lives in the ten separate rooms of the house. In addition, there is a house in which the factory owner and his family live.

For consideration of the households:

a) The two three-storey is a special household type laborer.
b) The one two-storey for married laborers is counted as 10 private households
c) The house of the factory owner and his family is counted as one private household.

Example 2:
In one hospital, there are three buildings that are used as patient wards, and six buildings used as medical and nursing students' dormitories where two students share a room in each particular dormitory. There are two hostels for doctors and nurses who work at the hospital where each of them occupy a separate room. There is a house with five rooms for custodians where custodians live with their families in the first three rooms (not all members of the families are custodians at the hospital). The two other rooms in the house are used for custodians without families. Five single custodians share the first room and other six single custodians share the second rooms. All single custodians have their meals through the arrangement of the hospital. In addition, there are three houses for married doctors.

Consideration of the households:

1) Three buildings used as patient wards are counted as one instituted household type hospital

2) Six buildings used as medical and nursing students' dormitories are counted as one instituted household type boarding school.

3) Each room in the two buildings used as hostels for doctors and nurses is counted as one private household

[p. 35]

4) Three rooms in the custodians' house where custodians live with their families are each counted as a private household.

5) Two rooms in the house where single custodians live are counted as one special household type laborers.

6) Each of the three houses where doctors reside with their families is counted as one private household.

Example 3:
PORNOR, which is an Islamic private school, serves both boarding and day students. For boarding students, there are those who live in separate houses and those who live as a family unit where a father, mother, and son/daughter live together.

Consideration of household

a) All those who stay overnight and in separate houses and do not live as a family are counted as one special household type other.

b) For all of those that stay at PORNOR as a family, each house is counted as one private household for each family.

14. Head of the household

14.1 Head of private household
This is a person who the members of a household accept and respect. Alternatively he/she has the biggest responsibility in managing, economically supporting, and ensuring the welfare of the rest of the household members.

Head of the household is not necessarily the owner of the house or the parent of a household member. He/she may be the person who the members of the household respect and agree upon on considering as the head of household, such as:

a) Husband or wife of the household where husband and wife live together.
b) Son/daughter or husband/wife of the household who parents who are old or disabled appoint to take care of other household members' welfare.
c) Elder brother/sister of a family in which brother/sister live together.
[p. 36]
d) Senior person of the household where friends live together.
14.2 Head of the collective household (special household/instituted household)
This is a person among those who live together. In certain cases, there is a particular person who already acts as the head of the people who live together. That person might as well be considered as the head of the collective household.

For example:
a) The abbot in the collective household of a temple or monastery.
b) Head of the laborers in the special household type laborer.
c) One prisoner in the prison or jail.
d) One patient in the relief center or hospital.
e) Head of pupils, student in a boarding school or dormitory.
f) Private or police private in a barrack or precinct.
g) Superintendent in the nursing student dormitory.
h) One customer who lives for over 3 months in a hotel
g) Resident of a hostel in a special household type hostel.
15. Relationship with household headIs defined as relationship between members of the household and the household head which can be classified as follows:

15.1 Private household
This consists of the head of household and the member of the household. The member of the household must be related to the household head as follows:

a) Wife or husband
b) Son/daughter, step son/step daughter, foster son/foster daughter
c) Son/daughter-in-law
d) Father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-law, grandfather and grandmother of paternal and maternal sides.
e) Other relatives such as brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, niece.
f) Dweller
g) Servant, gardener, driver, employee. etc.
15.2 Collective household (special household, instituted household)

[p. 37]

For the collective household, members of the household are not related with the household head.

16. AgeFull age counted at the last birthday before April 1st, 2000 (for the 2000 Population and Housing Census)

17. LiteracyThe reading and writing abilities of a person at least 5 years or older. In considering literacy, a person can read or write in any language, or an easy and simple sentence. If a person can only read but is not able to write, he/she is considered illiterate.

18. Marital statusRelationship between a man and a woman as husband and wife, which can be classified as:

a) Single: never married

b) Married, those who live with their partners as husband and wife, whether they have been legally married (having marital registration) or not. During the interview, a person may not live together with their husband/wife but still maintain a husband and wife relationship. For example, when the husband is away for work in the province or abroad but he still maintains the marital status.

c) Widowed: those whose husband/wife died and have not remarried.

d) Divorced: husband and wife who are legally divorced.

e) Separated: those who have not lived with their husbands/wives but have not legally divorced. Separated status includes those who are not legally married but live separately from their spouse.

f) Ever married: those who have been married but have unknown marital status at present.

g) Buddhist priest or monk: priest or monk in Buddhist religion only

19. Working Enterprise
An enterprise or an affair which has the following characteristics:

[p. 38]

19.1 Receipt of money or other things in return for an activity performed (such as food, clothing, or other things). In the case of wage or salary, it can be paid per month, week, day or job given.

19.2 A chance to obtain a profit, success, or certain benefits in return for an activity performed, such as merchandise, industrial factory etc.

19.3 A business activity that involves a member of household where the operator does not receive any wages or return profit. In such cases, the member of the household involved in the business is considered an employer or as running a private business.

Those who earn their living from bank interests, bonds, company dividends, and pensions without any formal career are considered as non-working persons.

Those who earn their living from loan interests, renting, or hiring property such as rented vehicles are considered as non-working persons.

20. Occupation
This refers to the type or kind of work in which a person is engaged in (such as boxer, newspaperman, secondary school teacher, subsistent rice farmer, commercial rice farmer, lotus paddy farmer, durian orchard farmer, corn farmers, dentist, or registered nurse).

21. Main occupation
This is the occupation for which a person spends most of his time in a given period.

21.1 Last week's occupation prior to the census date
This is work for which a person spent most of his time, between the dates of March 25th and March 31st, 2000.

21.2 Main occupation last year
This is work for which a person spent most of his time, between the dates of April 1st, 1999 and March 31st, 2000. In cases where there is more than one occupation, the guidelines for considering which occupation can be counted as the main one are:

a) The occupation for which a person spends more time than for other occupations.

[p. 39]

b) The occupation for which a person receives more income, in cases where the person spends equal amounts of time between two or more occupations.
c) Interviewee's response to the question asking about main occupation, in cases where time spent and income received are equal [between occupations].

22. Description of enterprise or type of the working place of the enterprise (industry)This refers to the type or kind of enterprise a person is working, such as construction company, soft drink factory, gunny bag weaving factory, retail shop, electrical wholesale shop, auto garage, hair dressing shop, restaurant, etc. In the case that the working place is a government office or enterprise, the title of the government office or enterprise is recorded, such as the Interior Commercial Department, National Statistical Office, Budget Department, Telephone Authority of Thailand, or District Office.

In other cases, it can be referred by the working description that a person in a private household provides (such as rice farming, corn growing, rumbutan growing, house painting, house building, transportation employee, etc).

23. Work statusThis refers to the status or position of a person working, which can be divided into:

23.1 Employer
Employer is a person who owns his/her business alone or with a partner for profit and employs other person(s) to work for him as employee(s). Employer in this case does not mean a person who hires other people to work for him in a household, which is not considered a business (such as a person hired to cook, clean or as laundry worker).
Example 1
Mr. Sompong has a restaurant and hires Miss Somjit to be a waitress in that restaurant. In this case, Mr. Sompong is regarded as Miss Somji's employer.
[p. 40]
Example 2
Mr. Supakorn is the owner of a hotel. He hires Miss Pitsamai to work as a receptionist and hires other people to work for various positions at the hotel. In this case, Mr. Supakorn is regarded as an employer.

Example 3
Mr. Surachai operates a grocery store and hires Miss Saithong to work as a cook for his family. In this case, Mr. Surachai is not regarded as an employer but he is classified as a person engaged in a personal business without employees.
23.2 Own account workerThis is a person who conducts business alone or may have other persons working in the business for profit or business partner but does not employ any employees. However, in some cases, there may be member(s) in his family or trainee(s) who help him in his work without receiving any wages or income in return for the work that they perform.

Example 1
Miss Pitsamai operates a beauty salon at her house and works in her business alone. Miss. Pisamai is regarded as own account worker.

Example 2
Mr. Boonmee opens an electrical accessories shop and asks Mr. Boonma to become a business partner for the operation. Both of them agree to divide the profit between themselves. Mr. Boonmee and Mr. Boonma are considered as own account workers.

Example 3
Mr. Sanya is doing wicker-work, such as baskets, at his house. He has his wife and daughter help him, but they do not receive any wages from Mr. Sanya. In this case, Mr. Sanya is regarded as own account worker.

Example 4 Mr. Peerakit operates a motorcycle repair shop and has two of his sons work with him, but they do not receive any wages. Mr. Peerakit is considered an own account worker.
23.3 EmployeeEmployees are those who work in return for a wage or income per month, per day, or per job. Alternatively, they may receive commission in return for the work or service they perform. The commission may be in the form of money or things.

Employees may be divided into three types:

a) Government employee

[p. 41]

This refers to a civil servant, municipality officer, officer of the Provincial Administration Organization, personnel of the International Organization. This classification includes temporary and permanent employees.

Example1
Mr. Panya is a civil servant working at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Mr. Panya is regarded as a governmental officer or civil servant.

Example 2
Miss Pim is a permanent employee of the International Organization as press relation officer. Miss Pim is regarded as a government employee.

Example 3
Miss Patcharin is a temporary employee of the National Statistical Office as Statistical Officer. Miss Patcharin is regarded as a government employee.

b) Government enterprise employeeThis refers to those who work for the government enterprise

Example 1
Miss Kanika is an air hostess of the Thai Airways International. Miss Kanika is regarded as a government enterprise employee.

Example 2
Mr.Vinai is a mechanic at the Electrical Generating Authority of Thailand. Mr. Vinai is regarded as a government enterprise employee.
c) Private employeePrivate employees are those who work for a person or private business including those who are hired for household chores such as laundry, baby sitting, cooking, and house cleaning.

Example1
Miss Kalaya is a servant in the house of Mr. Somchai. Miss Kalaya performs all house chores such as washing and ironing laundry, cooking, and cleaning the house. Miss Kalaya is regarded as a private employee.

Example2
Mr. Supaporn operates a la carte restaurant. She hires Miss Joy to work as a cook and Miss Ple as a waitress. Miss Joy and Miss. Ple are regarded as private employees.

Example 3
Mr. Dumrong is a manager of Thai Toy Co. Ltd, which produces dolls for children. Mr. Dumrong is regarded as a private employee.
23.4 Unpaid family worker
[p. 42]

This is a person who helps or works on a farm or business of a household member without receiving any wages or salary

Example 1
Mr. Sanoa's parents grow ornamental plants for sale. Mr. Sanao, who lives with his parents, helps in watering, cultivating, fertilizing and other activities without receiving any wage.

Example 2
Mr. Wason operates a motorcycle repair shop. He lives with his brother, Mr. Suthep, who helps him repair motorcycles however Mr. Suthep does not received any wages from Mr.Wason.

Example 3
Mr. Somchai rents a paddy field from Mr.Suthep. Mr.Somchai lives with his nephew, Mr. Chatchai in the same house. Mr. Chatchai helps planting rice without receiving any wages.

From the examples above, if Mr. Sanao, Mr. Suthep, [and Mr. Chatchai] received wages they would be counted as private employees.

23.5 Member of producers' cooperativeThis is a group in which each member has an equal right in the enterprise and participates at all levels of the business (such as investment, selling, and other activities). Members also participate in the division of profits for all members of the group as previously agreed.

Example 1
Mrs. Kamhorm Rakdee has organized a working group with her neighbors. The group manufactures shampoo from herbal plants, packages the shampoo into plastic bottles, and sells it to the cooperatives or sales representatives. All members of the group have equally contributed to the investment decision, manufacturing procedure, sales, and profit sharing

Example 2
Mrs. Malee Cheunbarn has organized a working group with her neighbors to produce and package dried bananas in plastic bags for sale. Everyone in the group participated in development of the working procedures, selling, and profit share for all members.
[p. 43]

24. Children ever bornThis refers to a child who was alive at birth, even though the child may not have lived after birth. For infants not breathing at birth, they are classified as dead before delivery or aborted. Step or foster children are not counted as children ever born.

24.1 Living children
These are children who were alive at delivery and at the time of the census.

24.2 Dead children
These are children who were alive at delivery but died before the census

24.3 New-born babies born in the last year
Any child born in the period between April 1st, 1999 and March 31st, 2000

25. MigrationMigration means the movement of people from one residing place to another, such as from one village or municipal area to another village or municipal area where the respondent is currently residing. Such movement must have occurred no less than five years before the census.

The following cases are not considered as migration
a) Change of respondent's municipal area or village due to expansion of the municipality area or division of a village into two or more when the respondent has not physically moved from their regular residence.

b) Respondents who move their residences into Bangkok metropolis and Pattaya city.

26. Agricultural Career
All activities involving crop or animal husbandry such as:

26.1 Crop production
This includes cultivation of crops such as rice, field crops, vegetables, ornamental crops, plantation crops, fruit trees, para rubber plantations, pasture grazing farming, plant propagation nursery, and mushroom culture.
26.2 Animal husbandry
This includes raising cattle, buffalo, swine, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, goose, and silk worm.
The following are not included as agricultural careers

[p. 44]

1) Forestry, forest planting, plant nursery for forestation
2) Aquaculture nursery
3) Fishery
4) Agricultural study (such as conducting research, competition, sport, recreation), and other projects (such as school lunch program, prison, and military barrack agricultural program).
5) Agricultural services (such as custom plough service, artificial insemination, egg hatching service, etc...).

27. Fresh water fishery
All economic activities involving catching, trapping, blocking, endangering, killing or picking up any live aquatic animals, using fishing tools or any other methods, from fresh water sources such as rivers, canals, reservoirs, streams, ponds and fish trapping ponds with the purpose of consumption, selling, or processing. It does not include fishing or catching for game, competitive sport or for recreation.

28. Fresh water nursery
All economic activities involved in nursing aquatic animals from the nursery to a desired mature stage in any given space or water source which is not connected to the sea. Animals must be nursed in a fresh water source such as ponds, paddy fields, orchard cannels, cages or pens under controlled conditions such as feeds may or may not be given etc.

In principle, fresh water nursery must occupy a certain space area regardless of land ownership. That particular land can be the same land where other agricultural activities are conducted.

Freshwater nursery does not include the following:
1) Breeding activities and nursing immature breeds of aquatic animal

2) Ornamental fish nursery

3) Aquatic animal trapping pond, where the pond is dug in public or private areas during the floods season in order to trap natural aquatic animals. In such cases, when water subsides, the natural aquatic animals captured are kept in that particular pond.

[p. 45]

At a suitable time, those aquatic animals are caught for consumption or selling

4) Nursery for studying, experimenting, recreation and other projects, such as aquatic animal nursery for school lunch program.

[List of still water animals including the different types of fishes typically found in freshwater nursery is not presented here]

[p. 46]

Section on Housing

1. Living place of a household
This refers to a particular structure a household lives in. It can be part of a house or several houses located within the same premises. It also includes space under a bridge where a family is constantly living.

2. Type of living placeThis is a description of the structure a given household resides in. It can be classified as:

2.1 Single house
A house that is built as a single structure and it contains a kitchen, garage, and servant's quarter. It is the house in which persons in the same household live together. Alternatively, it refers to several houses located in the same surrounding that have a strong protecting enclosure and where several people of the same household live together.

A Thai style house, where separate houses are joined together with a platform and used as a residence for people from the same household. In the case that separate houses in the Thai style have separate households residing in them, the Thai house is still considered as a single house.

A float house that is built on a pond or reservoir, if separately located, is also considered as a single house.

In the case that a house has no walls, if there are several households living together, the principal household is considered as a single house and other households as other houses.
2.2 Town house (including twin house)
Townhouse is a building with two units or more attached to one another by common walls on one or more sides. The building can be a single storey or multiple floors. In some cases, the building is located away from the edge of the road, leaving space for car parking or other purposes.

[p. 47]

2.3 Suite
A suite is a group of rooms that are part of a building that can be used by a household as a living place. A suite must consist of a kitchen, toilet and entrance walkway of one own. Examples of suites include apartments, flats, condominiums, mansions, and condotel. [A condotel as known as a condo hotel is a building that is used both as a condominium and hotel].
2.4 Row building, row house
This is a building, a room or a house used by the household to live in. This particular type of a house has two or more than two units in a row and has one or more than one common wall separating each unit. The building can be a single storey or multiple floors. Row houses or row buildings also include row floating houses of workers of the Royal Irrigation Department.
2.5 A room in the house
This is one or more rooms used as a living place for a household in a single house, where there are more than one households living in the house. There may be a kitchen, a toilet or an entrance walkway for the room. Alternatively, all the households may live in separate rooms but share a common kitchen, toilet and the entrance walkway.

If a single house has a principal household (a household that occupies a major portion of the house) and other households that use a partial area of the house, the living place of the principal household is considered a single house and that of other households as rooms in a single house. This allocation occurs regardless of whether a household belongs to the owner or a renter.
2.6 Living place in a building or office
This is a room or several rooms within a building, office or storage shade in which a particular household lives. Examples include the living quarters of an office watchman, and a timber warehouse in which laborers live.
2.7 Boat, floating house, or automobile
These are mobile structures in which a household can live.
2.8 Other private living place
These are other living places in which a household can live, but it cannot be a cave, a space underneath a bridge, or a temporary shade where a laborer lives temporarily.

[p. 48]

3. Descriptive characteristic of the living place

This refers to a living place classified according to the type of construction material used.


3.1 Building

This is any construction that uses concrete, concrete blocks, reinforced flat concrete, or bricks with or without whitewash.
3.2 A combination of cement and wooden house
This is a building where the lower level is constructed by using brick whitewash or concrete, while the upper level is constructed using wood. Otherwise, the building is constructed in brick and wood in equal proportions. It includes a house where the lower level is in concrete and the upper level has concrete walls.
3.3 Using permanent constructive materials
This means houses that use mostly permanent constructive materials during construction. Permanent constructive materials include hardwood such as teak wood, snake head wood, red wood etc. Others are concrete, block concrete, reinforced flat concrete, galvanized iron, and fire proofing brick.

The words "mostly permanent constructive materials" should take into consideration five important components of the building such as: post, floor, superstructure, wall and roof. If these constructive components are composed by more than half of permanent materials, the building is classified as constructed using permanent material.

For Example:
A house in which the post, floor and superstructure are made of hard wood but the wall is made of bamboo and roofing material is made of nipa palm, is considered as mostly made of permanent material.
3.4 A building which uses local but not permanent materials
Not permanent materials are defined as materials which are locally found such as flax, banana leaf, bamboo etc.

For Example:
A house in which the post and the superstructure are made of hardwood, while the wall and floor are made of bamboo and having nipa palm as a roofing material is considered as constructed using non-permanent materials found locally.
3.5 Using materials left over after use
This is the use of rickety such as wood pieces, galvanized iron and [other materials left over] to build a house.
[p. 49]
Note:
In cases where the living place of the household is composed of several single houses, descriptive characteristic of the living place should be based on the house where the head of the household lives.
4. Possession of household's living place (not including the land)
This refers to possession of the house for which people living in that particular household are owner, hire purchaser, renters, or live without paying rent because it is part of their wage. In all other cases, the owner allows a person to stay without paying rent.

4.1 Owner
This is a person in the household with legal right to live in a particular place. In the case that a buyer of a house has not paid the entire cost of the house to the seller but instead transfers his property right as mortgage in a bank, the buyer is considered owner of that particular place.
4.2 Hire purchasing
This is the buying of a living place which is paid for by installments according to a written agreement. When payment is completed, the buyer is considered owner of the living place.
4.3 Rent
This refers to a person living in the household without being the owner or hire purchaser and has to pay rent to the owner.
4.4 Staying without paying rent
This happens when:

a) Rent is part of the wage. Such is the case for officer's housing, night watcher's housing, factory housing, teacher's housing, railway officer's housing, soldier's and policeman's housing, or private housing where a government office or a private company rents for a government officer or governmental personnel. This includes a living quarter in the office or in a building.

b) Staying free of charge, this means living in a house or room without paying any money.

5. Land property ownershipThis means a person in the household has property right to owning the land.

5.1 Land owner
This is a person in the household with legal right to the land property such as:

a) In the case that a buyer of land has not paid the entire cost of the house to the seller but transfers his property right as a mortgage in a bank, the buyer is considered owner of that land.

b) In the case that a person gets a land mortgage from a bank, or has collateral with his name as owner of the land in a document, the person is considered land owner.

[p. 50]

c) In the case of a person who built a house on private land without notification, if living on that land for over 10 years even without paying land rent, the person is considered owner of the land. If staying fewer than 10 years, the person is considered as not paying land rent.

d) In the case of a person with a common right in land that has not been divided, the person is considered owner of the land.
5.2 Hire purchasing the land
This refers to the buying of land and paying in installments according to a written agreement. When payment is completed, then the buyer is considered owner of the land
5.3 Renting the land
This refers to construction of a house or other structures on land owned by others and where rent is paid to the owner of the land.
5.4 Not paying rent
This refers to a situation where the owner of the land allows a person to build a house or any other construction structure in his land free of charge. Not paying rent includes living on land owned by others, in a reserve forest or other public areas etc.
5.5 Other
This refers to owners of living places such as houseboat, boat or floating house which do not required land.

6. Appliances or utensils in possession
This refers to appliances or utensils that are used by a person. A person either owns or is in the process of owning the appliances or utensils. Appliances may be in good condition or in process of repair.

Goods that are sold or are being repaired in a shop or mending shop are not considered utensils or appliances in possession.

All appliances, utensils, or equipments and tools used for performing careers (such as rented vehicles, refrigerator in a drinking shop, or soda-fountain), if in some cases they are used for private purposes, they are counted as appliances in possession.

If a government vehicle of a particular person with high ranking position in the government is used by only one person, it is counted as a utensil in possession.

Automobile refers to a private car, a rented car or a pickup truck, and does not include a truck, freight car, coach or bus.

Equipment (for agricultural purpose) includes a water pump (in farming), tractor (either four-wheel or the garden type) including implemented equipments such as plough, harrow, cultivator, row and drill planters, seeder and combine harvester.

[p. 51]

Locally assembled truck refers to a truck with the primary power source assembled by the user such as villager or farmer. The primary power source can be used for other purposes such as for running water pump or for running tractor in land preparation process.

Guidelines for counting a person in the census
In order to count a person for the census, it is important to consider the place where the person lives. Normally, where a person stays overnight regularly can be used to indicate the place where he/she regularly live.

1. Regular living place of a person in a private household
The place in which a person regularly stays is counted. In the case that a person regularly stays at a different place, consider the following criteria:

a) Count the place at which a person stays most regularly as a regular living place

b) If the times when a person stays in different living places are equal, count the place where a person is staying at the day of the census as the regular living place

For Example:
1) Mr. A has a house in Bangkok and Nakorn Pathom. However, Mr. A stays in Bangkok more than at Nakorn Pathom. In this case, Bangkok is counted as the regular house of Mr. A.

In the case that Mr. A stays in Bangkok and Nakorn Pathom for the same amount of time, the regular house of Mr. A is the place where he is at the time of the census. If Mr. A is at Nakorn Pathom during the census, the regular housing of Mr. A is at Nakorn Pathom.

2) Miss Ice is a school teacher. She lives in a house at her school during weekdays and returns to her house only on weekends. In this case, the regular house of Miss Ice is the house at school

2. Regular or constant living place of a person in a collective household
A temple, barrack, fort, prison, mental hospital, or relieve institute are counted as the regular or constant living places of a monk, novice, nun, on duty soldier, prisoner, patient in the mental hospital, and those who receive relief treatments.

A person who lives in a regular or constant place can be classified as:

1. Permanently staying
a) Permanently staying in a house on the census date.
[p. 52]
b) Infant born or is being born at the time of census and has not been brought back home.
c) Those who stay temporarily in a house on the day of the census and who do not have any regular house. Alternatively, those who are staying temporarily in a house for over 3 months are also considered permanently staying.
d) Those who move into a house after the date of census with the intention of staying permanently and have never been enumerated at any other place before.
e) Servant, laborer or construction worker who are staying at a particular place for fewer than 3 months.
2. Temporarily absent
a) Those who stay permanently in a house, but on the census date, are temporarily absent for fewer than 3 months before the census.
b) Those who are absent for drilling, maneuvering, sailing, went to the forest, hunting, sea fishing, and also sales persons who have not been enumerated in other areas before and are temporarily absent for more than 3 months.
3. Travel abroad temporarily
This refers to a person who went abroad for a certain purpose such as for education, training, monitoring or working abroad for a certain time period without any intention of staying abroad permanently even when they are away for over 3 months.

[Tables summarizing criteria for counting persons in private and collective households, p. 53-56, are not presented here]

[p. 57]

Chapter 4

Recording of listing form

4.1 Objective
The Listing Form is used as a roll or list of household in each area of the census. This list is used to check for completeness of the enumeration and as a framework in the selection of the sample private household. Listing forms are for all types of households and construction structures within a certain block/village.

4.2 Description of Listing Form (PHC1)
This form is used for counting and recording all types of households, by showing the location of households, types of households, number of household members, description of the members living in the household, and for selecting sample private households.

4.3 Working on the counted record
The enumerator has to go through all the list [to check] whether it is an empty house, warehouse of the government office or any business place where people no longer live

[Instructions for filling out listing forms and assigning operational areas, p. 58 not presented here]

[p. 59]

4.4 The method of listing (use the PHC1 form)

1. Recording the front cover
The enumerator must record the front cover of the PHC1 form for every set as follows:

1.1 Recording the heading of the form
[Image of the front cover of the listing form not presented here]
Record the date and month of the listing's start and the finish for each block/village on the heading of the listing form on every page.
1.2 Recording the location of the multi-household/village

[Image of the front cover of the listing form not presented here]
a) Region
b) Province
c) District
d) Sub-district
e) Administrative area
Municipal area code 1
Non-municipal area code 2
f) Enumeration district
g) No. block/village no.
Name of village
In a b, c, and d: Record the name of the region, province, district, and sub-district in the space provided. Record the region code in the REG check box, the provincial code in the CWD check box, the district code in the AMP check box, and the sub-district code in the TMB check box according to the codes assigned by the supervisor and indicated in the PHC3 form (Job assignment and job submission form).
[p. 60]
For e: If the operational area is within the municipal area, record the name of the municipality on the space provided, and also record code "1" in the Area check box. If the area is located in the non-municipal area, record code "2" in Area
For f: Record the number of enumeration district which is a 3-digit number in the ED check box provided
For g: Record the number of block or the number of village by using a 2-digit number in the BLK-VIL check boxes. If it is a village, record the name of the village in the space provided.

[Administrative instructions to the enumerator and the supervisor not presented here]

2. Recording the sheet number among the total of sheets (for the block/village)
Record all sheets of the form used, in order to be able to indicate the sheet number among the total number of sheets used for this particular block/village, such as: this particular block use up to 3 sheets of the listing form. In order to record this, it should be done as:

Sheet no. 1 for the total of 3 sheets
Sheet no. 2 for the total of 3 sheets
Sheet no. 3 for the total of 3 sheets

[Image of the front cover of listing form not presented here]

3.Recording details on different columns

Column C1: Series number

[Table with column C1 not presented here]

[p. 61]

Objective
In order to check the number of a house or building that is located within the operational area. It is also used to check the completeness of the listing operation

Procedure for recording the form

1. Record the series number of all houses, buildings or other construction structures that are located within the operation area, including empty houses in which no person lives.

2. Record the series number in sequence, beginning from the first house until the last house or building of that particular block/village. When beginning a new block/village, record the series number in sequence, coding the first house of the new block/village again as no.1

3. For a new village that is divided into several enumeration districts, record the series number of the house, building or other construction structure that are located in the assigned enumeration district only, recording the series number starting from no.1,2,3 until the last series number of house in that assigned census area.
Columns C2, C3: Location
C2. Name of street, lane, alley, waterway or housing vicinity
C3. House number

[Table summarizing columns C2 and C3 not presented here]

Objective
For the purpose of showing or indicating the location of a house, building or construction structure within the operational area and use it for checking the completeness of the listing operation

Procedure for recording the form

Column C2: Name of street, lane, alley, waterway, or housing vicinity

1. Record the location of the house, building or other construction structure and make sure to have all the details recorded. The most important is the name of the street, lane, alley, waterway (such as canal or river), housing vicinity, or any place that can be easily located closest to the house
[p. 62]
2. If there is a sub-walkway or alley extend from the street, record the name of the sub-walkway or alley. If there is no name available for the sub-walkway or alley, record in detail the main street or land in which the sub-walkway or alley extends from, including any particular place which can be used as a land mark. This detail should appear in column 27: "Note"

3. If that particular house or place has a name, record the name of the house and the place such as "Chong Chareon shop, Ladprarol street."

4. If the households listed are located in line on the road, lane, alley, waterway or located within the same housing vicinity, list in vertical manner whenever you start listing a new road, lane, alley, waterway or new housing vicinity. Draw a line to separate them in order to make things more understandable.

5. For the boat, floating house, bus or mobile home where people live, record the place where the boat, floating house, bus or mobile home are located or the areas closeby, such as "Bang Luang canal, Taksin Road, close to Pin Klao Hospital, etc."
Column 3: The house number
1. Record the number of the house, building, government office, other business office and other places, regardless of whether people are living there or not.

2. House for which there is no number assigned, record the housing number using the nearest housing as reference, such as if the house that has no assigned number is locate nearest to the house number 25, record the number of the house for which there was no number assigned as 25-01. If found that other houses in the sequence also have no numbers, record their number as house no.25-02 and house no.25-03 respectively.

3. If there are several houses or several rooms in the building located in the same premises, or those houses are in rows and have different house numbers but only one household is occupied, record all the house numbers and buildings.
[p. 63]
4. If one house has several households living together, record the house number of the first household of that house

5. If there is a boat, floating house, bus or mobile home where there are people living permanently, record the registration number of the boat, floating house, bus or mobile home.
Column C4, C5, C6: In general, whether there are people living in the particular house, building or other construction structure or not
In general, there are people living in the house, building or other construction structure.
C4. If "No", record the function of the building or other construction structure, such as National Statistical Office, Royal Forestry Department, school, empty house. "End of the Record"

If "Yes", record whether people who live together have the meals together or not (record only one column)
C5. Have their meals together: put a check mark
C6. Do not have their meals together: record the number of household

[Table summarizing columns C4, C5 and C6 not presented here]

Objective

[p. 64]

For the purpose of knowing whether the house, building or other construction structure has been used as a living place or not, or if it is used for other purposes. If the house or building is used as a living place, how many households are living in that particular house or building.

Procedures for recording the form
The enumerator needs to observe or ask people whom he meets at the house, building or other construction structure. Alternatively, the officer may ask the people in the neighborhood whether the house, building or the construction structure has people living in it or not.

1. The house, building or the construction structure has no person living in it (such as office building, trading center, merchandize shop, government office, educational place). People come and work during the daytime but at night time there is no person staying. Alternatively, it can be a warehouse or an empty house where no person is staying.

An "Empty house" means a house used as a living place or in the process of [being inhabited]. However, on the date of the census, there is no person living in it (such as a rented house in which there is no person renting on the census date, newly constructed house where people have not moved in, etc.)

If there are many empty houses, buildings or row buildings that have several rooms where all construction is finished, but during the listing there are no people living in them, record all numbers of the houses, buildings and rooms in one line without separating each room.

Example:
In one row building, there are 10 rooms having room number 20/1 through 20/10. Record them as:
C3. 20/1 - 20/10
C4. 10 empty houses
If the house is a resort or a summer house and there is no person living there, record "Resort or summer house" in column C4.
[p. 65]
If the house, building or construction structure that is about to be listed as having no person living, record the function of that place (such as National Statistical Office, school, warehouse, office, empty room, empty house) and end the recording for that particular house, builder or the construction structure.

2. If the house, building or construction structure has a person living there, ask the question for each household living in that particular house, and also ask whether "people who live in that house have their meals together". If the people living in that house have their meals together, put a check mark in column 5, which means that there is one household in that house.

If people who live together in the house do not have their meals together, ask for the detail in order to correctly allocate the number of households in that particular house (see the explanation about households in Chapter 3: Definition, section on population no.13) and record the number of household of that particular house in column C6. If found that household members do not have meal together, such as in one collective household (special household or instituted household), record "1" in column C6.

In the case that there are many houses, or the building has several rooms on the same premises, or there are several rooms attached to each other and there is only one household living in it, record the house number of every houses or every buildings in column C3 and put a check mark in column C5.

For Example:
There are three houses number 21, 22, and 23 located on the same premises and all members who live together are related and they have their meals together. In this case, count it as one household by recording:
C3. 21, 22, 23
C4. Put a check mark
Column C7, C8, C9: Type of household
C7. Private household
C8. Special collective household
C9. Institute collective household

[Table summarizing type of household not presented here]

[p. 66]

Objective
For the purpose of knowing whether the household that has been listed belongs to any type of household (such as private household, collective household, special household or instituted household).

Procedure for recording the form

Record by putting a check mark on the line of the household listed.

Mark on one line of each household, such as:
Private household: put a check mark in column C7
Special household: put a check mark in column C8
Instituted household: put a check mark in column C9

Example:
A house with house number 123 has many rooms for rent. In the first room there are two people living together, husband and wife. In the second room only one person is staying, and in the third room seven people who are laborers are staying because their employer rented the room for them.

When the enumerator asks for details, it appears that the people living in that house do not have their meals together. There are two private households in the house and there is one collective household, type: special household living together in the house.

Record at the column C4, C5, C6 and C7, C8, C9 as:

C3. 123
C4. Leave blank
C5. Leave blank
C6. 3
C7. Put check marks in two top cells
C8. Put a check mark on third cell
C9. Leave blank

[Table summarizing columns C3-C9 not presented here]

[p. 67]

Column C10 -- C14: Series number of household

Private household
C10. Record the series number of household if C7 is marked

Method for selecting sample private household:
C11. If C10 has a series number, record the letter a, b, c, d or e and circle the letter "a"
C12. If C11 has the letter "a" circled, record the series number of household
Special collective household
C13. Record the series number of household if C8 is marked
Instituted collective household
C14. Record the series number of household, if C9 is marked

[Table summarizing columns C10-C14 not presented here]

Objective
For the purpose of knowing the number of each household classified according to the type of household listed in each block or village, and use it as a framework in selecting a sample of private households.

Procedure for recording the form
Column C10, C13, C14 (Number of private household, special household and instituted households in order or sequence)

[p. 67]

1. Record the series number of household in order of 1, 2, or 3 in the space provided until finishing off the block/village or the enumeration district (in the case the village is large in size).

2. In order to arrange the households in sequence, arrange the households in order of the type that have been classified as:

Private household, record the series number of the household in column C10
Special household, record the series number of the household in column C13
Instituted household, record the series number of the household in column C14

When starting the listing for the new block/village, the arrangement of the number of household in series has to begin with no.1 again.

In the case that a particular house or building has a person living, but the enumerator was not able to record the details in column C5-C25 in the PHC1 form, that particular house must be recorded as "not listed". No series number needs to be written in column 10-14

The house that has been assigned as "not listed" is the house where there is a person living on the census date. However, the enumerator is not able to interview [this person] for details throughout the operational period.

In the case that the house assigned as "not listed" had more than one household, and the enumerator was able to list only some households, consider the household that the interviewer could not cover throughout the operation period as "household not listed"

Guideline for action in case there is a "No listed household"

a) Record ["No listing"] in columns C1-C3 in the listing form (PHC1) to remind the operator.
b) Record the time when the listing could not be done as "No listing (first, second, third) time" in column C26
c) After going back for listing a third time or the officer cannot list that particular household throughout the operational period, record "No listing" in column C26
d) In case a particular house has more than one household, but the officer is not able to list all households during the interview.

[p. 69]

The officer must ask to a nearby household the questions concerning the type of the household in which the listing could not being done. Then put a check mark in either column C7 or C8 or C9, one line for each household.
Guideline for the house or household in which the interview cannot be done at first, but can be listed later
a) Record the last house in the listing form (PHC1) on a new line from the last house or building for which the listing was already done for that block/village. For the recording of the series number in order in column C1, it should be recorded from the last series number which has already recorded for that particular block/village.

b) Record the house number in column C3, and the number of household in column C6 on the line where the listing can be added.

c) Record the series number of the household that follows the series number of the last household of the same type, where the listed number was done for that particular block or village.
If it is a private household, record the series number of the household in column C10
If it is a special household, record the series number of the household in column C13
If it is an instituted household, record the series number of the household in column C14
d) Cross out the sentence "No listing for the time indicated" in column C26 and record the series number of the household where the listing was done (such as: the listing for household no.82 has been done in this case, so record "Listed for household no.82").
Column C11, C12: Selection of the private household at 20%
1. Check for the beginning letter of the enumeration district (ED), which was assigned by the supervisor before the beginning of the listing or enumeration on the job assignment form or job submission form (PHC3).
[p. 70]
Check whether the beginning letter of that enumeration district is an "a", "b", "c", "d" or "e".

2. Record the letter "a", "b", "c", "d" or "e" in the column C11. If on the Column 10 the series number has already been recorded, record the first letter followed by the beginning letter that was given in the PHC3 form (Job assignment or Job submission form) for every block/village. In the same enumeration district, there will be the same beginning letter, therefore record the beginning letter in column C11 on the line adjacent to household no. 1 in column C10. Record in this manner until you reach the letter "e", then start recording on the letter "a", "b", "c", "d" or "e" respectively. Repeat this procedure again until completing every household that has a series number on column C10.

3. Circle letter "a" in column C11

4. Record the series number of the household in column C12. If you find that a particular household in Column11 has "a" circled, count from no. 1 until completing all households that have "a" circled. The last number of the household that has letter "a" circled will indicate the number of sample private household in that particular block/village.
Column 15: Name and family name of the head of household
C15. Name and family name of the household's head. If it is the institution household, record the name of the institute, such as Wat Po, Siriraj hospital, etc.

[Table with column C15 not presented here]

Objective

[p. 72]

For the purpose of knowing the name or family name of the head of household, it is also used for checking the note that was made while recording the listing form (PHC1) and the enumerated form (PHC2).

Procedure for recording the form

1. If it is a private household or special household, record the rank, order of precedence (if any), word written in front of name, first name, family name of the head of household (such as Pol. Capt. Mr., Mrs., Miss, M.R., Master, Mistress, etc.)

2. If it is an institution household, record the name and type of the institute (such as Wat Po, Siriraj Hospital, Ramathibody Medical Student Dormitory, Klong Prem Male Prison etc.)
Column C16, C17, C18, C19: Number of person living permanently in the household, new-born baby, person who left the household temporarily and person who went abroad temporarily

[Table with columns C16-C19 not presented here]

Objective
For the purpose of checking the completeness of the listing of number of household members

[p. 73]

Procedure for recording the form

For column C16-C19, record the number, if none, record "0"
Column C16, Number of persons who stay permanently in this household and are present on the census date
Record the number of persons who live permanently at the household, such as:

1. Those who stay permanently and are present at the household on the census date (April 1st, 2000)
2. Those who move into the household after April 1st, 2000, intend to live permanently in this household, and have not been enumerated elsewhere before.
3. Those who stay in the household temporarily for more than 3 months and have not planned to stay permanently.
4. Servant, laborer, construction worker who has been staying at this household for fewer than 3 months.
Column C17 Number of new-born infants born before the census date and who have not been brought back home
[Question asked to the respondent]:"Is there any new-born baby who was born before April 1st, 2000, has not been brought back home, and the mother is a person staying in this household permanently?"
Record the number of new-born babies who were born before April 1st, 2000 and have not been brought back home.
Column C18: Number of persons who temporarily left the household for fewer than 3 months
[Question asked of respondent]: "Is there anybody who is permanently staying at this household but on April 1st, 2000 was not here because he went somewhere temporarily for fewer than 3 months?"
Record the number of those who went away temporarily such as:

1. Those that stay permanently at the household, but at the census date left to other places temporarily for fewer than 3 months

2. Those who were away for drilling, maneuvering, sailing ship, went away to find forest products, hunting, sea fishing, sale person, etc. who have not been enumerated elsewhere before, even though they have left for over 3 months.
Column C19: Persons traveled aboard temporarily
[Question asked of respondent]: "Is there anybody who has stayed permanently at the household but on April 1st, 2000 went abroad temporarily?"
Record the number of those who traveled abroad temporarily, such as those who went abroad for studying, training, monitoring tour, working in foreign country. However, you must have the definite return period, such as working in Brunei Durasaram, without any intention of being settled in the foreign land even though such person has been staying abroad for over 3 months.
Note:

1) If it is a collective household and the respondent could not answer the detail in column C16-C19, record the number of all household members in column C16 while in column C17- C19 record "0"

2. For pupils and students, consider their regular or normal living places as their permanent household or their parent or guardians permanent household. If on the census date they are in their permanent household, count the number and record in column C16. However, if on the census date they are not in their permanent household because they went away temporarily for fewer than 3 months or went away temporary abroad, record the number in column C18 or C19, depending upon each case.
Column C20-C22: Number of household member on April 1st, 2000
[Table summarizing columns C20-C22 not presented here]

Objective
For the purpose of knowing total number of people in household classified according to sex: male, female.

Procedure for recording the form

[p. 75]

Column C20, C22: record the number. If none, record "0"
1. Record the number of household member, separating by sex for male and female:

1.1 Record the number of all male household members in column C21
1.2 Record the number of all female household members in column C22
1.3 Record the total number of household members in column C20. The number recorded in C20 must be equal to the number recorded in C21 and C22 when added together.

2. The number showed in C20, which is the total number of household members, must be equal to the number in column C16+C17+C18+C19. If it is not equal to those mentioned, verify it by asking questions again and making the correction.
Column C23, C24, C25: A household in which one member of the household has an agricultural occupation, such as catching fresh water aquatic animal or raising fresh water aquatic animal
[Table summarizing columns C23-C25 not presented here]

Objective
For the purpose of preparing the frame of conducting Agricultural Census and Fishery Census.

Procedure for recording the form
Column 23

If throughout the last year (April 1st, 1999 to March 31st, 2000), one member of a household has an agricultural occupation by himself (crop farming or animal husbandry), put a check mark in column C23. If there is none, leave the space blank.

Column 24

[p. 76]

If throughout the last year (April 1st, 1999 to March 31st, 2000) one member of a household has the occupation of catching fresh water aquatic animal, put a check mark in column C24. If there is none, leave the space blank.

Column C25

If throughout the last year (April 1st, 1999 to March 31st, 2000) one member of a household has the occupation of raising fresh water aquatic animals, put a check mark in column C25. If there is none, leave the space blank.
See the explanation on agricultural career for catching fresh water aquatic animal and raising fresh water aquatic animal in Chapter 3 (Definition, section on population, number 26, 27 and 2, respectively).
Column C26: Record of the statement about the house, building or household that cannot be listed

Objective
For the purpose of the enumerator to make or statement about the house, building or household that cannot be listed, for the benefit of checking for the completeness of enumerator.

[Table summarizing columns C26 and C27 not presented here]

Procedure of recording the Form

Column C26 statement of the house, building or household that cannot be listed

When recording the detail about the house, building or construction structure, or household where the enumerator was not able to list during the entire period of the field operation. Or, alternatively, if the enumerator was not able to list during the first visit, but was able to do so during the second visit:
[p. 77]
Detail how to record in column C26, which has been explained in detail in column C10-C14.
Column C27: Note
1. If the listing was not done for that particular household but was not able to enumerated the detail in the enumerated form, record "unable to enumerated" in this column.

2. Record the detail such as the date, time of the interview appointment of the household where the listing and enumeration was not able to be done.
Summation of the number in different columns

When the listing is done for the block/village, the number should be listed as follows:

1. Count the number of empty houses, private households, special households, instituted households, total of number of households, total males, total females, number of agriculture households, number of households having the occupation of catching fresh water aquatic animal, households of raising fresh water aquatic animal, house building and household which cannot be listed, and record the number in the space for total in each sheet. If there is none, record "0"

2. Sum all the numbers in every sheet used for a particular block/village and record in the check box provided of first sheet of the PHC1 form. If there is no summation of the number in any column, record "0" in the check box provided but do not record for other sheets.

[Image of the PHC1 form not presented here]

[p. 80]

Chapter 5

Recording of the enumeration form

5.1 Objective

For the purpose of interviewing and recording the details of the population and housing by individual and household.

5.2 Description of the enumeration form

The Enumeration [form], or (PHC2), consisted of:

Part 1: Location of household

Part 2: Question on Population for the enumeration of the population by person, which consisted of:
Question on demography (column S1-S16)
Question on detail of population (column L17-L27)
Part 3: Question on Housing, for the enumeration of the detail of housing by household, which is asked only of the sample private household.

[Section 5.3 Enumeration operation not presented here]

[p. 81]

5.4 Principle of enumeration

5.4.1 Enumeration of population
Enumerate the population at their regular living places on the census date, except for pupils and students enumerated at the living places on the census date that can be at their regular living places or at the living places of their parents or guardians.

5.4.2 Enumeration of housing: Enumerate only the private households that have been selected as sample households.
5.5 Method of recording enumeration form (PHC2)

5.5.1 Part 1, Location of household

Recording the front cover of the form
The sheet number among sheets of the household is recorded.
Put a check mark in the space provided for every sheet of household that uses more than one sheet.
Record the number of enumeration forms in order to know the sheet number (as first, second, third, and so on) among the total number of sheets used for this household. Put a check mark in the check box provided in every sheet for the household in which more than one sheet of the form are being used.

One sheet of the PHC2 form is used to record the details of the household members for five persons, such as in a household in which there are 10 members, the enumerator has to use 2 sheets of PHC2 form, for example:

Sheet no. 1 of 2 sheets for this household
Sheet no. 2 of 2 sheets for this household

Region, Province, District, Sub-district

Record code of Region, Province, District, Sub-district in the check box provided, the same as in the PHC1 form. For example: region 2, province 56, district 01, sub-district 06 can be recorded as:
REG 2
CWD 56
AMP 01
TMB 06

[p. 82]

Part 1, Location of household

a) House number, road, lane, alley, waterway, housing vicinity (name of the place, if any) _____
Record the location of the household, such as: house number, name of the road, lane, alley, waterway, housing vicinity. If that place has a name, record the name also.

For example: 293 Chok Tawee shop, Rajvithee road, Santisuk, or 53 Sansap canal , etc.
b) This household is in the municipal area code "1"
Name of the municipality ____
Outside the municipal area code 2
If this house is in the municipal area, record code "1" in the AREA check box and record the name of the municipality in the space provided.

If this house is outside the municipal area, record code "2" in the AREA check box.

c) Enumeration district:

Record the number of the enumeration district by using the 3-digit number in the ED check boxes.

d) Block no./village no.
Name of the village _______
In the municipal area, record number of block using the 2-digit number in the BLK-VILL check boxes.

In the non-municipal area, record number of the village using the 2-digit number in the BLK-VIL check boxes. Also record the name of the village on the space provided.

e) Type of household:

[] 1 Private household
[] 2 Special household
[] 3 Instituted household
Record the type of household code in the HH-TYPE check boxes.
f) Household Series Number
Record the series number of household in the HH-NO check boxes, the same as those recorded in PHC1 form as follows:
[p. 83]
If it is a private household, the series number of households has to be the same as column C10 of the PHC1 form.

If it is a special household, the series number of households has to be the same as column C13 of the PHC1 form.

If it is an instituted household, the series number of households has to be the same as column C14 of the PHC1 form.
In recording the series number of households, you must write it on the right hand side (for example, in PHC1 form column C10, the series number of the household is 20. Therefore, in recording the series number of household in the PHC2 form, the record must be HH-NO 20 etc.)
g) Number of household members (record after finishing the enumeration)

Total_________persons
Male_________persons
Female________persons
Record total number of household members, total male and total female on the space provided and record total numbers in the TOTAL-MEM check boxes by recording the number on the right of the block. For example, there are 10 members in household, five males and five females, record as follows:

Total persons: 10 in the TOTAL-MEM check boxes
Male: 5 persons in the space provided
Female: 5 persons in the space provided
The number in g) is recorded after finishing the enumeration of PHC2 form, by counting the number of household members that were already recorded in part 2 of the PHC2 form. Then check to make sure that it is the same as column C20, C21 and C22 of the PHC1 form. If the number is not the same, it should be corrected as follows:

1. Correct the number in column C20, C21, C22 in the PHC1 form so that the number in those columns is the same as the number in g.

2. When the correction of the number of household members in column C20 of the PHC1 form is done, it is important to also correct the number in columns C16, C17, C18, C19
[p. 84]
of the PHC1 form, since the number of household members in column C20 must be equal to the number of columns C16, C17, C18, and C19 added together.
h) Language used in conversation among members of the household

[] 1Use only Thai language
[] 2 Use Thai and other languages
[] 3 Use other languages without using Thai
Other languages_____ (Specify)
"Languages spoken" means the language that persons in the household use in regular conversations. The language used may be differed from other speaking languages that is used by the household members when speaking to other persons, or it can be the same language.

Again, if the basic language is the same, consider the language spoken as counted for the basic language only. For example, the Northern dialect (excluding the hill tribe language), southern dialect (excluding the Malay and Yavee languages), Northeastern dialect (excluding Suai dialect and Khemer language): all of these dialects are counted as Thai language. The Hakka, Mandarin, Cantonese are counted as Chinese language, etc.

For other languages not counted as Thai languages, they must be clearly specified, such as the Karen, Moung, Malayan and Yavee languages.

The question that should be asked is: "What is the language that people in this household regularly speak?" Then it should be recorded as:
[] 1 Thai language only
Record code "1" in the LAGE-SPEAK check box
[] 2 Thai and Chinese
Record code "2" in the LAGE-SPEAK check box. Also record other languages spoken in the space provided
[] 3 Other languages but not using Thai
Record Code "3" in the LAGE-SPEAK check box. Also record other languages spoken in the space provided
i) Sample private households, special households, institution households: mark "X" (private household that is not the sample private household, leave the space blank)
If it is the sample private household, special household or institution household, mark "X" in the check box provided. If it is private household that is not the sample household, leave the space blank.

[Administrative instructions for enumerators and supervisors not presented here]

[Image of the PHC2 form is not presented here]

[p. 87]

5.5.2 Part 2: Questions on demography

Column S1-S9 Questioning and recording of everybody's details

Columns S1, S2, S3 Number, first name and family name, relationship with the head of household
[Table summarizing columns S1-S3 not presented here]

[p. 88]

Procedure for recording the form

Column S1 number in order

Record the number of every member of the household in the check box provided by starting to record the number on the right hand side of the block.

One sheet of the PHC2 form can record five members of the household. If there are more than five members, the number recordings must continue until completing all members of the household.
Column S2 First name and family name
Record the first name and the family name. Include all words in front of the name such as rank (if any) (for example, Mr., Mrs., Miss, Mistress, Master, Pol. Capt.) and arrange all the members of the household as follows:
[] Head of household

[] Wife or husband

[] Unmarried children (include step or adopted son /daughter), record unmarried children of the head of household first, from older to youngest, followed by step-son/ daughter, adopted son/ daughter, from older to youngest.

[] Married children and their spouses, include the children of [the head's] son or daughter by family. If there are many families in the same household, record the children of the head of household first, followed by step-son and /or step-daughter, adopted son and /or adopted daughter, from older to youngest.
[p. 89]
[] Father, mother, father/mother-in-law, grandfather and grandmother on both sides

[] Other relatives

[] Dweller and servant

[] For infants without a given name, record the nickname or record "male infant without name" or "female infant without name"

In case of relatives, dwellers and servants who have family living as many families in the same household, record each of the families together.
Column S3 Relationship with the head of household
Record code in the check box provided

Private household
[] 1 Head of household
Record code "1" in line 1
For other members of the household ask [respondents], "What is your relationship with the head of the household?"

Record code for the relationship with the head of household as follows:

[] 2 Wife or husband
Record code "2"
[] 3 Unmarried children (include step-son/daughter, adopted son/daughter)
Record code "3" from older to youngest.
[] 4 Married children (include step-son/daughter, adopted son/daughter)
Record code "4" from older to youngest.
[] 5 Son/daughter-in-law
Record Code "5"
[] 6 Grandchild
Record Code "6"
[] 7 Father, mother, father/mother-in-law, grandfather/grandmother on both sides
Record Code "7"
[] 8 Other relatives
Record Code "8"
[] 9 Dweller and servant
Record Code "9"
Collective household (Special household/Instituted household)
[] 1 Head of household
Record Code "1" in line 1
[p. 90]
[] 0 Member of household
Record code "0"
When interviewer [reaches] column S2 and S3, the interview and record must be done simultaneously until completing all the members of the household.
Column S4, S5, S6 and S7: Sex, age, month and year of birth
[Table summarizing columns S4-S7 not presented here]

Procedure for Recording the Form

Column S4 Sex

[] 1 Male
Record Code "1" in the check box provided
[] 2 Female
Record Code "2" in the check box provided

Column S5 Age
[p. 91]

Ask [respondents]: "How old are you?"
Record the full age by counting the last birthday before the April 1st, 2000 in the check boxes provided, use two digits as follows:

If less than 1 year, record "00"

If older than 98 years and over, record "98"

3. If the answer is in the lunar month (which is the way of counting day, month, year by using the asterism year) ask approximately for the age, check the age from the comparable table provided to see whether the age coincides with any year. Record the age in the check boxes provided.

For example, for a person born on the twelfth month, in the year of the great snake, the age is approximately 40 or over. Check at the comparable table for the age in the year of the great snake, record the age of 47 years in the check boxes provided.

4. If the answer is the month and year of solar way of counting, check the comparable table and record the age in the check boxes provided.

5. If [the respondent] does not know the month and year of birth, ask the respondent to estimate his age and record the age according to the answer, such as approximately 22 years, and record "22" in the check boxes provided

6. If the age is unknown, record "99"

Column S6 and S7: Month and year of birth

The question asked the respondent will be: "What month and year were you born?"
When knowing the month and year, transform [them] into the code by checking the Age Transformation Table in which the code for the month and the year of birth are as follows:

1. If the respondent answer the birthday question using the month of the solar system and Buddhist Era.
Check the age in the table providing the age in the month and year code. Set no.1 and record the month code in the check boxes using the 2-digit number in column S6, and record the Buddhist Era code in the check boxes using the last 3-digit number in column S7.

For example:
If the birth month and year is January in the year of Buddhist Era of 2533, record 01 in column S6 and record 533 in column S7.
2. If the person answers the birthday question using the month of the lunar system and the Asterism year
Look for the age in the table providing the age in the month and year code

[p. 92]

Set no.2 and record the month code in the check boxes using the 2-digit number in column S6, and record the year code in check boxes using the 3-digit number in column S7

For Example:
If the birth month is month no. 9 in the year of cock, record code 29 in column S6 and record code 006 in column S7
If the person cannot remember his/her birthday, ask that person for his/her copy of the house registration, otherwise ask for the birth certificate.

Column S8, S9: Religion and nationality

[Table summarizing columns S8-S9 is not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form
Column S8: Religion

The question asked [to the respondent] will be "What is your religion?"
Record the code in the check box provided

[] 1 Buddhism
Record code "1"
[] 2 Islam
Record code "2"
[] 3 Christianity
Record code "3"
[] 4 Hindu
Record code "4"
[] 5 Confucianism
Record code "5"
[] 6 Others
Record code "6"

[p. 93]

[] 7 No religion
Record code "7"
If the father and mother have different religions and the child cannot answer the question, consider the child's religion to be the same as the religion of either the father or the mother, and record in the check box provided.

Column S9: Nationality
The question asked [to the respondent] will be "What is your nationality?"
Record the nationality of the respondent in column S9

Column S10, School attendance[Question was asked to persons aged 5-30 years old]

[Table summarizing column S10 is not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form

Question asked [of the respondent]: "What are you studying?"

Count up to January 1st, 2000.

Attending School: meaning a person is in the regular education [system], vocational education (either on the regular period or part-time), university level, academic level, vocational level in the close system and open universities. In relation to short course vocational education in which there is no

[p. 94]

regular subjects offered (such as hair dressing, tailoring, car driving, radio repairing) [respondents] are not considered as attending or in schooling.

1. If a person is attending school
Record the grade of schooling
Procedure of recording the grade or year of studying

1.1 A person who is attending a regular education or those who are studying at the level before primary education, at the primary education, junior secondary education and senior secondary education (high school)
Record the grade in which a person is studying, such as kindergarten level 2, primary school level 3, secondary school level 2, secondary school level 4 etc.
If a person is attending Adult Educational Program mature education school
Record the level of attending in that school, such as level 2, level 4, etc.
1.2 Those who attend vocational education or university
Count the year at which he/she is admitted
Record the number of years, level of education and the name of the institute where a person is studying, such as:

Year 1
Vocational Education
Patumwan Mechanical College
Year 2
Higher Vocational Education
Chiang Mai Commercial School
Year 1
General Vocational Education
Samut Prakarn Technological School
Year 2
Bachelor's Degree
Chiang Mai University
Year 1
Bachelor's Degree
Rajapat University at Suan Dusit
Year 3
Bachelor's Degree
Sukhothai Thammatiraj Open University
Year 4
Bachelor's Degree
Thammasat University
Year 2
Medium Level Dramatical Arts
College of Dramatical Arts
1.3 Those who are studying in professional education or university education in specific curriculum or part-time curriculum
Apart from recording in the same way as number 1.2, also record the number of years required for completion of that particular curriculum, such as:

[p. 95]

a) Higher Vocational Education, which requires 2 years for completing the requirement. However, for the part-time program, it may require 3 years for completion.
Record 3 years of higher vocational education (3 years curriculum) at Patumwan Mechanical College.
b) For the Bachelor's Degree, it requires 4 years for completion in general. However, in some courses, a person who has finished the diploma level can complete the particular course in 2 years.
Record 2 years, Bachelor's Degree (2 years curriculum) at Rajapat University in Suan Sunanta.
c) For the Bachelor's Degree Curriculum, which require more than 4 years to complete
Record the years of studying the same as number 1.2 and write the number of years of that curriculum in parenthesis.
d) Those studying and completing the course more than the requirement years of the curriculum
Record the year at which the person is studying as equivalent to the year of the curriculum.

For example

A person is studying at Ramkamhang University for 6 years already but has not graduated, record year 4 Bachelor's Degree, Ramkamhang University.
2. Not studying, record "No"
3. In the case that it is known that the respondent is studying, but the level of schooling or the year in college/university is not known - only the level of education:
Record the level of education as known, follow by the name of the education institute.
4. In the case that it is known that the respondent is studying, but the level of schooling, the year in college/university, or the educational level is not known:
Record "Studying - details not known"
5. In the case of an International School where the arrangement of the year of schooling is called "Grade"
Record the level of schooling as "Grade"
Column S11 and S12 ask only persons 5 years and over[Questions S11 and S12 were asked of persons 5 years and over]

[p. 96]

[Table summarizing column S11 not presented here]
Column S11: LiteracyProcedure for recording the form:

"Literacy" means the ability of a person 5 years of age or older to read and write in any language, [proven] by the ability to read and write a simple sentence. If a person can read but is not able to write, he/she is considered illiterate.

The question asked [to the respondent] will be "Are you able to read and write?"

[] 1 Literate
Record code "1" in the check box
[] 2 Illiterate
Record code "2" in the check box

Column S12 The highest level of education (up to January 1st, 2000).
[p. 97]

Procedure for recording the form

The highest level of education means the level or year when a person passed the last final exam. (Excludes short vocational courses where there are no regular subjects offered, such as hair dressing, tailoring, radio repairing, etc.) Count up to January 1st, 2000 in order to avoid the problem of a person who is studying and has already taken the final exams but does not know the result yet. Alternatively, the result of the exam has already been announced.

The question asked [of respondent] will be: "Considering up to January 1st, 2000, what is your highest level of education?"

Record the highest level of education that a person attained.

1. The person studies in a general education program, or the person studies in school before the primary education, junior secondary school, and senior secondary school
Record the last level where a person passed the exam, such as kindergarten, primary school grade 1, primary school grade 4, primary school grade 5, secondary school grade 4, secondary school grade 6, etc.
2. For those who graduated from the vocational education [system] or university, if the year of completion is the highest year requirement for that particular level, which means that a person is graduating from his/her education [system] and is receiving a certificate or degree diploma:
Record the name or abbreviation of the certificate or degree that a person obtained, such as Bachelor in Political Science, Advance Dramatic Arts, Advance Education Certificate, Vocational Education Certificate Advance Vocational Education Certificate, Technological Education Certificate, B.Sc, B.Ed, etc.
3. For those who attend vocational education or university, if the highest year a person completed is not the highest required year of that educational program:
Record the class or year that a person attained and the educational program in which a person is studying.
Procedure for recording the class or year of graduation

3.1 If a person is studying in a system where he/she must take and pass the final exam in order to be elevated to the higher level or year:
Record the level or year where a person last passed the final exam.
[p. 98]
For example:

Year 1 Advance Vocational Education, Year 2 Bachelor's degree, Chulalongkorn University.

Example 1: Mr. Kitti studied at Chulalongkorn University since 1957, but was expelled from the university in 1959 because he did not pass the course in year 2.
Record the highest education level of Mr. Kitti, which is year 1 Bachalor's degree, Chulalongkorn University.
Example 2: Mr. Sompong studied at Patumwan Machanical College during the academic year of 1959. He passed all the subjects of year 2 and was about to be elevated to year 3. However, there was some unavoidable event that made him unable to continue his study.
In this case, the highest education level of Mr. Sompong is year 2, Higher Vocational Education.
3.2 If the educational system is a credit system:
Count the number of years in which a person studied.

Example 1: Mr. Sukit studied at Chetupon Commercial College since the academic year of 1997. He was studying in year 3 of the Vocational Education Program on January 1st, 2000.
Record the highest education level of Mr. Sukit as year 2, Vocational Education Program.
Example 2: Miss Somboon studied at Sakon Nakon Commercial School since the academic year of 1999 and was studying in year 1, Vocational Education Program January 1st, 2000.
Record the education level in which Miss Somboon attained as secondary school 3.
3.3 In the case of the educational program where a person is studying in two programs, the regular program and the special program, alternatively full-time and part-time. Since the part-time or the special program requires a study period longer than the full-time or the normal hour program:
Record the highest educational level of a person according to the regulation mentioned, specify whether the program is the regular or the special one, and record the number of the years of the curriculums as well.

Example : Miss Pornthip is studying in the part-time program of the Higher Vocational Education at a college where the curriculum requires two years for completion if it is a regular program (normal hour). However, in the part-time program the requirement of the curriculum is 3 years for completion. Miss Pornthip is studying in year:
Record the educational level of Miss Pornthip as year 2, Higher Vocational Education (Part-time program, 3 years curriculum).
[p. 99]
3.4 For studying in the Bachelor's Degree level, some aspects of study assigned several curricula for students to select, such as 4 years curriculums for those who finished high schools (secondary school 6). Alternatively, there are 2 years curricula for those who finished the diploma or Higher Vocational Education Program, etc. In order to record the class or year of finishing education, in the case of 4 years or 2 years curriculum:
Record according to the regulation as mentioned earlier and specify the number of years required of that particular curriculum, such as year 1, Bachelor's Degree (two years curriculum) or record it as equivalent to 4 years curriculum year 3 Bachelor's Degree.
Caution: In recording the class or year of finishing the study: if it is not the class or year required for completion of a particular educational level, the class or year recorded must be less than the number of years required for completion of that educational level.

For example:
In the Vocational Education Program where there are 3-year curricula, the class or year at which a person finished must be recorded as year 2 Vocational Education Program. However, if a person completed year 3 Vocational Education Program, it must be recorded as certificate of Vocational Education, or Cert. Voc. Ed.

In the case of the Bachelor's Degree where there is a 4-year curriculum, the class or year at which a person finished must not be higher than year 3 Bachelor's Degree, even though that person spent more than 3 years studying. If record 4 years Bachelor's Degree, this means that a person already graduated or obtained a qualification from that particular educational level. In the latter case, record the name or the abbreviation of the degree. For the Bachelor's Degree that has more than 4-year curricula, record the highest year of education and write the number of years of the curriculum in parenthesis.

4. For those who graduated abroad, if the education level is basic:
Compare it with the Thai system of primary education (Pathom Suksa) or secondary education (Mathayom Suksa).
If the system is difficult to compare:
Specify the number of years of study in the basic education system.
For those who graduated from the vocational education, teacher training, and university
Record the name of the certificate, diploma, or degree received and write the equivalent of the Thai educational level in parenthesis.
[p. 100]
5. For those who received a certificate, diploma or degree at the same level but with different qualifications.
Record only one degree. However, if a person receives several degrees of the different levels, record only the highest degree.
6. For those who study religion
Record the religious qualification and the highest education level that the person attained, [putting] the non-religious qualification in parenthesis, such as:

Third grade religion
(Primary school 4)
Second grade religion
(Bachelor's Degree)
Buddhism Theology 4
(Vocational Education)
Buddhism Theology 9
(Secondary School 3)
7. For those who finished the Adult Educational Program:
Record the educational level at which a person passed the exam, such as level 3. Alternatively, record by comparing with the basic educational program, such as level 4 is equivalent to secondary school 3, then record secondary school 3, etc.
8. Never been educated, never finished any years, or never included in no class education (such as studying from the monk, studying the Chinese language, studying in the language institute in which the level of education cannot be identified, etc.)
Record "Never".
9. For the person who does not know anything related to his/her education"
Record "X"

Column S13-S16 and L17-L22[Ask persons age 13 years or older]
Column S13: Marital Status (on April 1st, 2000)
[Table summarizing column S13 not presented here]

Procedure for Recording the Form

The question asked [of respondent] will be: "What is your marital status?"
Record code in check box provided

[] 1 Single
[] 2 Married
[] 3 Widow
[] 4 Divorce
[] 5 Separated

[p. 101]

[] 6 Ever married but not knowing status
[] 7 Buddhism monk
If a couple do not live together but still maintain their status as husband and wife
Record code "2"
If a respondent is a nun, ask her whether she has ever been married. If never married:
Record code "1".
However, if she has ever been married, record code "6".

Column S14 Last year occupation (April 1st, 1999 - March 31st, 2000)[Question S14 was asked of persons age 13 years or older]

[Table summarizing column S14 in not presented here]

Procedure for Recording the Form

The question asked [of respondent] will be: "In the last year, on what kind of work did you spent most of your time?"
Record clearly the description of [the person's] occupation, job description, and position (such as accountant clerk, secretary, cashier, insurance sale representative, accountant, medical doctor, pharmacist, veterinarian, psychologist, musician, singer, lawyer, blacksmith, computer assistant, veterinarian assistant, radio announcer, television announcer, guide, cook, hair dresser, barber (hair maker), fire fighter, sale assistant, merchant, etc.)
For those who are working in connection with agriculture, consider [the respondent's] activity, whether it is involved with field crop production, vegetable production, fruit tree or plantation crop production, ornamental crops, plant propagation and nursery, mushroom culture, integrated farming, or animal production.

Consider also whether their way of farming is commercial - that is, the objective is economical benefit. Alternatively, it can also be subsistence farming, where the products of the farm are used for home consumption. Therefore, it must be recorded clearly to be able to describe the type of farming (such as commercial crop production, commercial vegetable growing, commercial rice farming or subsistent rice farming, commercial orchard grower, commercial poultry production, etc.)
[p. 103]
Craftsman
It is important to record clearly for this type of occupation (such as painter, blacksmith, mechanic and automobile mechanic, telegram installment mechanic, furniture builder, molder, etc.)
Teacher
Record the level of education he/she is teaching (such as primary school teacher, secondary school teacher, college instructor, university lecturer). If a person is teaching more than one level, record the level of teaching where the teacher spends more time than other levels.
Engineer
Record the type of engineering that a person is engaged in (such as civil engineer, electrical engineer, chemical engineer, mining engineer, etc.)
Mechanic
Record the type of technology a person is engaged in (such as mechanical civil engineering, mechanical electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, mechanical chemical engineering, mechanical mining engineering, mechanical electronic and telecommunication, etc.)
Medical doctor
Record the specialty of a doctor (such as, medicine, surgery, an anesthetic), and also specialists (such as ophthalmologist, obstetrician, dentist, etc.)
Nurse
Record the type of nurse (such as health care nurse, registered nurse, clinical nurse, etc.)
Driver
Record the type of automobile a person drives (such as truck driver, pickup driver, bus driver, hire car driver, tricycle driver, etc.)
Employee
Record the type of work a person is employed in (such as carrying things, dish washing, laundry, earth digging, etc.) If there is more than one occupation, record only the main occupation from last year, considering the following criteria:

The occupation where a person spent most of his time during the last year

If the person spent an equal among of time on [both] occupations, the occupation where a person earned the most income.

If the time spent and the income earned from [both] occupations are the same, ask the respondent to choose his/her main occupation.

[p. 104]

If you know the occupation and job description, but do not know the position or there is no specific position for that occupation, put a dash in the space provided to record a person's occupation.

However, if you do not know the occupation and position, but it is known that this person is working, record "Working, but do not know occupation"

If [the respondent] is not working at all or did not have any occupation in the last year (such as a pensioner, having income from loan interest, etc.), record "Not working" and omit Columns S15 and S16.

Column S15 and S16Ask only for persons recorded occupation in column S14

Column S15: Type of work or type of business of the working place

[Table summarizing column S15 is not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form

[p. 105]

The question asked [of respondent will be] "What is your type of work in your business?", or "What are you producing?", or "What is your business?"
In recording the type of work or the type of business of the working place, the following guidelines must be followed:

1) Specify the type of business in the working place of a person.
Record the type of business clearly (such as medical clinic for ear, nose and throat, X-ray, service company, radio television repair shop, etc.)
2) If it is a company or the department store engaged in trading:
The record must specify whether the business is retail, wholesale, or both (such as retail radio company, Thai goods wholesale and retail shop, dish wholesale and retail shop, coffee and beverage shop, retail drug store, gold and jewelry retail shop, etc.)
3) The working place that belong to the government or government enterprise
Record the type of work or responsibility for which the office is responsible, or name of the working place (such as Interior Trading Department, Telephone Authority of Thailand, hospital, primary school, Thai goods retail shop of the Industrial Support Department, etc.) For the governmental office at the province level, record the name, division or office (such as District Educational Division, District Revenue Office, etc.)
4) In the case that an office is engaged in more than one types of business:
4.1 If each type of business has a separate office, record the type of business where a person is working (such as in a beer factory). If there are wholesale offices located separately from the factory, and if the person is engaged in the wholesale office of beer, record "Wholesale office for the beer factory".

4.2 If the business is in the working place but it is separated into divisions or sections separated from each other, record the type of business that is the most important in that working place, and also the section where the respondent is working. For example, if a person is working in the cloth dying section of the cloth weaving factory, record the cloth weaving factory, section cloth dying. If a person is working in the mechanic shop of the automobile selling company, record the automobile selling company, section mechanic shop, etc.

[p. 106]

Example:
Mr. A is working in the cloth printing section of the cloth weaving factory and Mr. B is working in the cloth dying section of the same factory. Record the type of business that is the working place of Mr. A as "Cloth weaving factory, section on cloth dying ". For Mr. B, record "Cloth weaving factory, cloth dying section".

4.3 If all the businesses are in the same office, have not been separated from each other into divisions or sections, and the person working at the office is not doing only one type of work, record the most important business. For example, [there is] a shoe producing shop where the activities of producing shoes involve retailing, wholesaling, and repairing, and are being done together. If the person selling the shoes is also the same person who makes and repairs the shoes, record the working place where the person is working as "Shoe producing shop" because the production of shoes is more important than the selling or repairing shoes.
5. Conducting business in a person's own house (such as tailor shop, lawyer's office, radio repair shop, laundry shop at one's own house).
In this case, count the house where a person lives as the business office. Record the job description or the type of business at the working place according to the kind of activity. For example, if Mr. B opened a radio repair shop at the house where he lives, record "Radio repair". Alternatively, if Miss A opened a laundry shop at her own house, record "Laundry service", etc.
6. In case a person does not have any specific office, or does not have a permanent office or working place for his business:
Record the type of business in which a person is engaged. For example, if Mr. A paints houses and buildings, record "House painting". Likewise, if Mr. B is a rice farmer, record "Subsistence rice farming" or "Commercial rice farming".
7. For a person driving a taxi, motor-tricycle or a bus - whether the taxi, bus or motor-tricycle belongs to him, is being rented, or is being used by [the respondent] as an employee of that business - the criteria for recording must be:
a) If it is a taxi, motor-tricycle or tricycle, record "Passenger transport"
b) If it is a bus, record "Bus service".
[p. 107]

8. For a person who drives a freight truck - whether the vehicle belongs to him, is rented, or is being used by [the respondent] as an employee, record "Freight transport".
In case a person drives the freight truck of a canned goods wholesale shop, record "Canned goods wholesale shop".
9. The employee who works in a private house, such as a servant:
Record the job description or the type of business at the working place as "Private service". For example, if Miss E works at the house of Mrs. A for laundry, record "Employee in private household".
10. For the laborer:
Record the job description or the type of business at the working place that a person had last year. The record of the job description or the type of business of a working place where a person was last year, must be the same as the main occupation in which a person engaged in the previous year.

Things to avoid in recording the job description or the type of business at the working place
Do not record the name of the company, the name of the department store, or the name of the shop without showing the type of business of a working place (such as Disco, Taew Aiew Hong shop, Chareonphan shop, etc.)

Column S16: Work status
[Table summarizing column S16 not presented here]

[p. 108]

Procedure for recording the form

The question asked [of respondent]: "What is your working status?"
[Question was asked of persons age 13 years or older]

Record code of the working status as follows:

[] 1 Employer
Record code "1"
[] 2 Own account worker
Record code "2"
[] 3 Government officer
Record code "3"
[] 4 Government employee
Record code "4"
[] 5 Government enterprise employee
Record code "5"
[] 6 Private employee
Record code "6"
[] 7 Unpaid family worker
Record code "7"
[] 8 Member of a producers' cooperative
Record code "8"
In recording the work status, record the code corresponding to the work status of a person, which must be the same as the main occupation a person did during the last year.

For those who work as laborers, carrying things such as rice sack, or carrying goods (they may have their own trolley) or other kinds of work that need labor and have no permanent employer service (they depend on a person to hire them for a job):
Count the work status of those people as "Private employee", and record using code "6"

Column L17-L27
[Ask only the sample private household, special household and instituted household]
Column L17, L18, L19: Last week work (25 -- 31 Mach, 2000)[Questions were asked of persons age 13 years or older]

[p. 109]

[Table summarizing columns L17-L19 not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form

Column L17: Last week occupation

The question asked [of respondent] "Between March 25th and March 31st, 2000, in what kind of occupation did you spend most of your time?"
If working:
Record clearly the occupation, job description, and position that a person had during the past 7 days before the census date (such as commercial rice farming, cassava planting, coconut growing, electrical appliance sales person, chief of the financial section, painter, molder, furniture carpenter, rice transport laborer, mail, earth digger, etc.)

(Note: do not record the occupation as government official, businessman because they are ambiguous).
For the occupations like craftsman, teacher, engineer, mechanic, medical doctor, nurse, driver, agricultural worker, employee:
Record their occupations [to be] the same as the record of last
[p. 110]
year's occupation (see the procedure for recording last year's occupation from the PHC2 form, column S14)
If in the week before the census date a person had more than one occupation, record only one occupation by considering the following criteria:
1. The occupation where a person spent most of his time in the past 7 days before the census date.
2. The occupation where a person earned higher wages or income than for other occupations - if a person spent equal amounts of time in both occupations.
3. Ask the respondent to select the occupation by himself, if a person spent equal time in [both] occupations and earned an equal amount of income from [both] occupation.
If the work is a permanent occupation, such as a primary school teacher in the government school or a typist in an automobile selling company:
1. If during the past 7 days (March 25th-31st, 2000) a person did not work because of sickness or taking a leave of absence, the occupation for that particular person during the previous week before the census date was his permanent work.

2. If during the past 7 days (March 25th-31st, 2000) a person did not work for his permanent occupation because of a leave of absence or school closing, but did another kind of work, the occupation in the previous 7 days before the census date was a different kind of work that [the one] he was doing at that time.

For Example:
Mr. A is a primary school teacher in the government school. During the March 25th-31st, 2000 week, the school was closed. Mr. A made bamboo baskets, to be sold at his house. Therefore, the occupation of Mr. A during the 7 days before the census date was "Bamboo basket maker".
Permanent job:

The specific meaning of this is a kind of occupation, in which a person receives wages, salary or anything in return on a regular basis - even though during the 7 days before the census date a person did not do the work - that person still maintains his position during that 7 days period before the date of the census.

If [the respondent] knows the occupation but not the position:
Record the occupation on the space provided and record a dash for the position.
[p. 111]
If [the respondent] does not know the occupation, job description, or the position, but the enumerator is sure that person is working:
Record "Working, but occupation not known".
If recording the occupation that a person had during the week before the census date:
Record "Working, but occupation not known" in column L17, leave columns L18 and L19 blank.
For those whose work status was recorded in column S16 as code "7" or "unpaid family worker": if during the past 7 days (March 25th-31st, 2000) a person did not work:
Record "Not working".
For those who are not working such as the pensioner, having income from loan interest, etc. they are considered not working
Record "not working".
If recorded "Not working" in column L17, continue asking [questions for] the next column.

Column L18: Looking for work and availability for work during the past week [Only for those who recoded "Not working" in column L17]

The question asked [of respondent]: "During the March 25th-31st, 2000 week, have you been looking for work?"
Record code in check box as follows:

[] 1 Looking for work
Record code "1"
Not looking for work
Ask [the respondent] this question: "During the March 25th-31st, 2000 week, were you available to work?" Available to work (readiness), meaning a person wants to work and is capable of working.

[] 2 Available to work
Record code "2"
[] 3 Not available to work
Record code "3" and continue to column L19.

Column L19: Reason for not being available for work during the previous week[Only for those who recorded code "3" in column L18]

The question asked [of respondents]: "Why you were not available to work during the March 25th-31st, 2000 week?"
Record the code of the reason for not being available to work in a check box as follows:

[] 1 Waiting for planting season
Record code "1"
[] 2 Waiting for the appropriate time
Record code "2"
[] 3 Studying
Record code "3"
[p. 112]
[] 4 Working for house chores, housewife
Record code "4"
[] 5 Childhood, old age
Record code "5"
[] 6 Unable to work due to illness, disability
Record code "6"
[] 7 Priest, monk
Record code "7"
[] 8 Others
Record code "8"

Examples of recording last year's occupation, job description, type of business at the working place, work status, or last week occupation:

[Table summarizing examples, p. 112-117 not presented here]

Example 1:
Mr. Somsak Yooyen is a civil engineer in a building construction company as senior manager

Name
Mr. Somsak Yooyen
Last year's occupation
Civil engineer
Last year's position
Senior manager
Job description or type of business at the working place
Building construction company
Work status
6
Last week's occupation
Civil engineer
Last week's position
Senior manager

Example 2:
Mrs. Somsri Meeskul opened a salon dressing shop with three hair dressers. Mrs. Somsri is a caretaker, managing the business on her own. During the week before the census date, she closed her shop for re-decoration.

Name
Mrs. Somsri Meeskul
Last year's occupation
Beauty salon dresser
Last year's position
Owner of the salon dressing shop
Job description or type of business at the working place
Salon dressing shop
Work status
1
Last week's occupation
Not working
Last week's position
[Leave blank]

Example 3:
Miss Malee Kerdboon is a secondary school teacher in a governmental secondary school. During the week before the census date, the school was closed. She did not teach and did not do anything during that period.

Name
Miss Malee Kerdboon
Last year's occupation
Secondary school teacher
Last year's position
Teacher 1, level 3
Job description or type of business at the working place
Secondary school
Work status
3
Last week's occupation
Secondary school teacher
Last week's position
Teacher 1, level 3
Column L20, L21, L22 Number of living children, number of children ever born who had died, number of new born babies last year (excluding step children and adopted children)
Ask only persons 13 years and over, recorded code 2 in column S4 and recorded code 2-6 in column S13.

[Table summarizing columns L20-L22 not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form

[p. 118]
Column L20: Number of living children

The question asked [of respondent]: "How many living children do you have?"
Record the number of living children in the check boxes provided on the line for that particular woman.

Column L21: Number of children ever born who died

The question asked [of respondent]: "How many of your children ever born died?"
Record number of children ever born who died in the check boxes provided on the line for that particular woman.

Column L22: Number of new-born baby last year (April 1st, 1999 - March 31st, 2000)[p. 119]

[Question L22 was asked of ever married women from 13 to 50 years old.]

New-born babies born last year are the children who survived at birth and were born between April 1st, 1999 and March 31st, 2000.

The question [of respondents]: "Do you have any children, who were born between April 1st, 1999 and March 31st, 2000?"
Record the number of new-born babies in the check box provided on the line for that particular woman.

For ever married women who had no children, record "00" in the check boxes provided on the line for that particular woman in column L20 and L21, and record "0" in column L22.
Ask only women who are not older than 50 years.
Column L23 --L27: Ask everybody
[Questions L23-L27 were asked to all persons]
Column L23: Place of birth[Table summarizing column L23 not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form

Question asked [of respondent]: "Where were you born?" or "What province in Thailand/what country where you were born in?"
Record the name of the province of birth of the person. If a person was born outside Thailand, record the name of the country, such as "United States of America", "United Kingdom", "China", etc.

For the person who was not born in the house that was the permanent living place of his/her mother:
Consider the province that is the permanent living place of the mother as the person's province of birth.
[p. 120]
For example: Mrs. Daen had her permanent living place in Kanchanaburi province. She came to visit relatives in Bangkok and delivered master Champ at Ramathibodee Hospital in Bangkok. Count the place of birth of master Champ as Kanchanaburi province, according to the permanent living place of his mother.

Column L24: Duration of present residence
[p. 121]

[Table summarizing column L24 in not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form

Question asked [of respondent]: "How many years have you been staying continuously in this village or in this municipality?"
Record the code for the number of years a person has lived continuously in the village or municipality until April 1st, 2000. If the answer is "Do not know", ask the person whether he/she has been staying here for fewer or more than 5 years.

[] 0 Less than 1 year
Record code "0"
[] 1 1 year
Record code "1"
[] 2 2 years
Record code "2"
[] 3 3 years
Record code "3"
[] 4 4 years
Record code "4"
[] 5 Less than 5 years
Record code "5"
[] 6 5 years and over
Record code "6"
[] 7 Children aged 0-4 years who living here since birth
Record code "7"
If record code "6" or "7", do not ask column L25-L27

Column L25, L26, L27: Migration[Ask only persons who recorded code "0 - 5" in column L24]

[p.122]

[Table summarizing columns L25-L27 not presented here]

Procedure for recording the form
Column L25: The last living place before moving into the present residence

Question asked [of respondent]: "What is the name of the last province you stayed before moving to this place?"

1. If moving or migration is done within the same province
Record the name of the district. It can be the same or a different district from the one in which the person is currently living. If [the respondent] does not know the name of the district, record "District not known".
2. If moving or migration is done from another province
Record the name of the province. If the name of the province is not known, record "Province not known".
3. If migrating from other country
Record the name of the country. If the name of the country is not known, record "Country not known".

Column L26: Moving from village or municipality[Ask only persons who migrated within Thailand]

Question asked [of respondent]: "Have you moved from a village or municipality?
[] 1 If moving from the village
Record code "1"
[] 2 If moving from the municipality
Record code "2"

Column L27: Reason for migration
[p. 123]
Question asked [of respondent]: "Why did you move to this place?"
Record code for the reason of migration into this village or municipality in the check boxes provided

[] 1 Looking for a job
Record code "1"
[] 2 Job transfer
Record code "2"
[] 3 Education
Record code "3"
[] 4 Following persons in household
Record code "4"
[] 5 Return to homeland
Record code "5"
[] 6 Moved residence
Record code "6"
[] 7 Move to other institutional household
Record code "7"
[] 8 Others
Record code "8"

5.5.3 Part 3 Questions on housing[Ask only for the sample private household]

The questions on housing ask about the living quarters of all private sample households.

In order to answer the questions on housing, [the enumerator] must enumerate the household but not the person. If a particular house contains several households, there is a main household that occupies the major portion area of the house, and there are other households living in the same place, the criteria for enumeration will be as follows:

If the main household is a sample household, enumerate the house on each item and consider the description of the living place, including all facilities of the main household only.

If the household is living in a room within the same living place as the main household that is selected to be the sample household, consider the description of the living place, including all the facilities of that particular household only so to ask each item on the housing form.

If a single household lives in more than one house within the same premises and is selected to be the sample household, consider the description of the living place where the head of household is staying (except the possession of appliances, which should be counted for all the houses) so to ask for each item of the housing form.

[p. 124]
If the private household selected as the sample household requires more than one sheet from the PHC2 form, use only the first sheet of that particular form when recording housing question in part 3.

In recording, write the code or the number in check box provided. If the answer is "Do not know", record code "9" in the check box.
H1: Type of living quarter(Determine from appearance of dwelling)

[Table summarizing column H1 not presented here]

1. Detached house
2. Townhouse
3. Apartment, flat, condominium and others
4. Row house
5. Concrete row house
6. Room
7. Office room
8. Boat, house boat or mobile home
9. Others
Procedure for recording the form
Record the codes that correspond to the type of living quarter in the check box. Consideration should be made based on the appearance of the house (for example: the house looks like the shade (no walls) and it contains several households living together). In consideration for the type of living quarters, the living place of the main household is the detached house, and other households have their living place classified as "Others".
H2: Type of construction material(For type of living quarter in H1 codes 1 - 5 only)

[Table summarizing column H2 not presented here]

1. Brick or cement
2. Combination of brick/cement with wood

[p. 125]

3. Using permanent materials construction
4. Using materials found locally
5. Constructed with used material and about to be destroyed
Procedure for recording the form
Record only households for which the type of living quarters has been recorded in item 1, using codes 1 to 5 only. Record the code in the check box for the type of construction material, using only one code. In the case that one household has several living places, consider only the place where the head of household is staying when considering the type of living quarters and their descriptions of the living place.
H3: Tenure of living quarter (excluding land)[Table summarizing column H3 is not presented here]

1. Owner
2. Hire purchaser
3. Rent
4. Live without paying rent, because it is part of wages
5. Owner allows [the respondent] to stay without paying rent
Procedure for recording the form
Record code corresponding to the answer in the check box provided

[p.126]

Question asked [of respondent]: "What is the position the person occupies when living in this house?"
If the type of living quarters recorded in item H1 was "7" (Room in the office), the code of tenure of living quarters in item H3 is "5", where the owner allows [the respondent] to stay without paying rent.

H4: Tenure of land for this household (Ask only those answered in H3, record code 1 or 2)

[Table summarizing column H4 is not presented here]

1. Owner
2. Hire purchaser
3. Rent
4. Rent free
5. Others
Procedure for recording the form
Ask only the households recorded as "1" or "2" - that is, [the respondent is] the owner or hire purchaser of the living quarter in item H3.

Question asked [of respondent]: "Do the person in the household own the land or is the hire purchaser of the land/rent the land/or rent free the land?"
Record code corresponding to the answer in the check box. If the type of living quarters of the household in item H1 was recorded as code "8" or "9" (boat, house boat, mobile home or others, etc.) and the possession of that particular living quarters in item H3 was recorded as code "1" or "2" (owner or hire purchaser) for the land ownership of the persons living in this household, [this quetion] must be recorded as code "5" - that is, "Other".

H5: What is the main type of cooking fuel used in this household?
[Table summarizing column H5 is not presented here]

1. Charcoal
2. Firewood
3. Gas
4. Electricity
5. Kerosene
6. Others
7. Not cooking
Procedure for recording the form

[p. 127]

Question asked [of respondent]: "In this household, what is the main type of fuel used for food preparation?
Record the code corresponding to the answer, using only one code in the check box

H6: What type of toilet facility is normally used in this household?
1. Flush
2. Molded bucket latrine
3. Flush and molded bucket latrine
4. Pits or others
5. None
Procedure for recording the form
Question asked [of respondent]: "What type of toilet facility is normally used in this household?"
Record the code corresponding to the answer, using only one code in the check box provided.

H7: What is the main source of drinking water?

H8: What is the main water supply for this household?

1. Tap water inside the house
2. Tap water outside the house
3. Tap water well or public well
4. Deep water well or non- public well
5. Rain water
6. River, canal, stream, waterfall
7. Drinking water in a bottle
8. Others
Procedure for recording the form
Question asked [of respondent]: "What is the main water supply for this household?"
[p.128]
Record the code corresponding to the given answer for drinking water and water used for utilities in the check boxes provided.
Tap water inside the house means there is a pipeline linking the house with a tap water supply.

Tap water outside the house means that a person in the household has to bring in the tap water from another house or from the public water supply outside the house. Alternatively, [the person] connects the water from the source outside the house to the house using a hose.

Drinking bottled water means drinking water that has passed [through] the purification process, either by disinfection or other method of water purification.

H9: Number of household appliances on April 1st, 2000 (Column 34-45)[Table summarizing column H9 is not presented here]

Television, color/black and white
Radio/radio and tape recorder
Refrigerator, freezer
Washing machine
Telephone
Air condition
Electric fan
Automobile
Motorcycle
Bicycle
Farm machinery
Locally made truck
Procedure for recording the form
Question asked [of respondent]: "On April 1st, 2000, persons in your household possessed these utilities?"
If yes
Record the number corresponding to the type of the utilities owned in the check box provided.
If no
Record "0"
If the number is 7 and over
Record "7"
If yes, but the number is not known
Record "8"
If do not know
Record "9"
[p.129]
With regard to the number of telephones, if the telephone is connected to the main telephone used in the household, do not count that connected telephone. However, if the telephone is connected to another household, count that connected telephone also.

5.6 The objective of the data collected can be briefly concluded as follows:

5.6.1 Data on the number of the population, and the number of households:

Provide the information on the number of the population of the country and the number of the population resides in each region, including the density of population in each locality. This information will assist in measuring the increase in population at each locality.

5.6.2 Number of the population by age group and sex:

These are the basic data that provide information on the number or structure of the population at different age groups, such as child-age population, schooling-age population, working-age population, female population at its reproductive age, and old-age population. This information is vital and beneficial in planning important projects of the government (such as in school expansion, working capability, public and social welfare, and security for the population in each group).

5.6.3 Data on religion and nationality:

These data are used to study the differences in religious belief of the population in each region. Moreover, they are used to study the number and description of foreigners coming to work in Thailand.

5.6.4 Data on education:

The data on education (such as number of literate persons, number of pupils and students attending school, and number of persons who graduated in each grade and level of education) are beneficial to the improvement of the educational plan for every level.

5.6.5 Data on working status (such as data on the number of unemployed people, number of those who are not in the labor force, number of employed persons by occupation and description of work or the type of business at their working place, working status as employer, employee, private business, etc.):

These data are a benefit to human resource planning, educational planning and training, work search, guidance for occupational development, news and press relations involving labor, statistical arrangements in relation to occupation, and can be used for consideration in labor policy planning.
[p.130]

5.6.6 Data on fertility (such as data on marital status, number of children ever born, number of new-born babies born last year) are important basic information in studying fertility:

These data provide the knowledge on the average [number] children born to Thai women, which are very important for population policies on family planning.

5.6.7 Data on mortality (such as the number of children ever born who died):

These data provide information on the mortality of children and infants, and also the life expectancy of the population, and are beneficial to public welfare planning.

5.6.8 Data on migration (such as the province of birth, province where a person lived before moving away in the last 5 years, migration from the municipal area and non-municipal area and the reason for migration, include moving in or out from one place to another):

This information is important when considering the population distribution policy, since migration into any area - if it occurs rapidly - will cause the problem of lacking dwellings and slums, and give rise to problems in public health, social services, unemployment, crime and education. Therefore, the number, pattern and description of migration for the whole Kingdom, classified by locality where this information can be obtained from the population and housing census, will be very important.

5.6.9 Data on the language used by the household to communicate.

This is the information used to study minority groups, which have different cultures from normal citizens (such as the hill tribes living in the northern regions, and Islamic Thais who use a Malay language), and are normally located in the southern province.

5.6.10 Data on housing (such as the description, type, living place procession, land ownership where the household is located, source of drinking water, water for general utilization, description of the lavatory, including the use of different kind of fuel for food preparation, procession of permanent utilities):

These data provide the differences in levels of quality living of the households.
[p.131]
Receiving this information will be beneficial to plan living condition development, the environment, lack of dwellings for the population, public welfare improvement, and population health and hygiene, etc.

[Chapters 6, 7, and 8 p. 132-160 describing the different forms used, maps, and working procedures of the enumerator are not presented here]

[p. 161]

Appendix

Name of government enterprise

[A list of government enterprise is not presented here]

[p. 176]

Tabulation between the asterism year, year of birth and age

[Table not presented here]

[p. 178]

[Image of types of households not presented here]

[p. 179]

Example of Map of Area of the 2000 Population and Housing Census

[Image excluded]

Example of Map of Area of the 2000 Population and Housing Census

[Image excluded]

Example of Map of Area of the 2000 Population and Housing Census

[Image excluded]