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Republic of South Sudan
Fifth Population and Housing Census

Census enumerator's manual
Long questionnaire

December 2007

[Table of contents not presented here]

1. Population and Housing Census
A Population and Housing Census is a complete count of all persons and households in a country at a specific date. Interviewers, called census enumerators, visit all persons and households in the country, conduct interviews, and record answers on questionnaires. The census provides information on the number, geographical distribution, social, economic, and demographic characteristics of the population.

1.1. Fifth Population and Housing Census of Sudan overview
This is the Fifth Population and Housing Census to be conducted in Sudan. According to the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) is responsible for overseeing census activities in the 15 northern states of Sudan and the Southern Sudan Commission for Census, Statistics and Evaluation (SSCCSE) is responsible for overseeing census activities in the 10 southern states of Sudan.

The Fifth Population and Housing Census of Sudan is a national census that will be conducted in both northern and southern states at the same time. Both the north and the south will use the same tools, methodologies, and procedures.

The Sudan census will capture all the people that are present in Sudan at a single moment in time -- like taking a snapshot of the entire country of Sudan. This moment of time will be at midnight on census night, also known as the census reference night.

As an enumerator, you report to a supervisor. The supervisor reports to the field officer. The field officer reports to the field coordinator. There will be many census staff in the field and you may encounter observers and other, higher level census staff during your work.

1.2. Why is this Census important for Sudan?
The Population and Housing Census will provide data on the population and housing situation of every person in every town and village in Sudan. This information will enable policy makers, the government and international agencies to make informed decisions when planning the services that will improve the lives of all people in Sudan.

[Section 2 on enumerator responsibilities is not presented here]

3. Use of EA maps in the census
An enumeration area (EA) is an area that can be covered by one enumerator during the enumeration period. It is a statistical area that is contained within the lowest administrative unit: the boma or popular administrative unit. An EA can contain part of a village, several villages, or part of an urban area.

[The rest of section 2 is not presented here]

4. House numbering/household listing
After you have verified your EA boundaries and discussed your EA map with local authorities and your supervisor, you have to number and list all buildings/compounds and households in your EA. You will use the census listing book to complete your listing before enumeration. During listing, you must make sure that all the buildings/compounds and households listed by you belong to your EA, particularly in areas that border another EA to avoid double counting or skipping households.

A building is any independent, freestanding structure comprised of one or more rooms covered by a roof with external walls or dividing walls that extend from the foundations to the roof. A building can be a house, a building with apartments, a store, or an office building.

A compound consists of one or more buildings/huts with a common entrance enclosed by a wall or fence or without a wall or fence enclosure. While one or two buildings/huts are used as the main residence or office, other buildings/huts may be used for sleeping, kitchen, or storage.
A compound can be a hostel, family dwelling, NGO compound, hospital, or school. Compounds should be numbered as one building even though there may be several buildings inside the compound.

A household consists of one or more related or unrelated persons sharing living arrangements and pooling their resources -- "eating from one pot". A household should be located in one building or compound which has one or more rooms and cooking facilities of some kind. However, there may be more than one household in a building or compound. You must count all households separately.
A household can be a husband and wife renting a tukul/room in another family's compound/building. A single man who works as a security guard and has a small room in a building/compound as part of his salary is also a household. A doctor and his family who have a house or apartment on the hospital grounds is a household.

You should visit the local authorities before you begin listing to introduce yourself, explain the work that you will be doing, answer any questions they may have, and ask for their cooperation. You must visit every building/compound in your EA and number the building/compound in a conspicuous place on the gate/wall of the building/compound with marker pen/spray paint. The first building/compound number will be 1 and you should number all buildings/compounds along your enumeration path until you reach the last building/compound in your EA. For example, if there were 150 buildings/compounds in your EA, the buildings/compounds will be numbered 1, 2, 3…148, 149, 150.

[Instructions on the route for assigning numbers to buildings/compounds are note presented here]

4.1. Census listing book/form
The census listing book serves the following primary functions:

  • Complete listing of all buildings/compounds in the EA.
  • Complete listing of all households within the buildings/compounds.
  • Ensures complete coverage of the entire EA during enumeration.
  • Prevents duplications or omissions in your EA and with neighboring EAs.
  • Provide a quick count of buildings/compounds and households in the EA.
  • Enables you and your supervisor to keep track of your daily progress.

The census listing book sections should be completed as follows:

  • Three days prior to enumeration:
  • Complete the geographical information section using the EA map.
  • Columns 1-5 of the census listing book pages.
  • During enumeration:
  • Columns 6 and 7 of the census listing book pages after interviewing each household.
  • At the end of enumeration:
  • Count the total number of households per page.
  • Complete the summary section on the front page.
  • Sign the certification section on the front page.

4.2. Census listing book geographical identification
You must enter the correct geographical information provided to you during the training and on your EA map.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form for the geographical identification section]

4.3. Census listing book columns 1-5
You will complete columns 1-5 of the listing form during listing as you number each building/compound. Ask at each building/compound about persons who live in the compound (households) and number each household within the building/compound. The remaining columns (6 and 7) will be completed after each household is interviewed.

Column 1: Building/compound number
This column is where you write the number you have marked/painted on the buildings / compounds in your EA, starting with the first building/compound (1) up to the last building / compound. On the census listing book page, each building/compound number is to be given in three digits. For building/compound numbers 1-9, two zeros are added (001). For numbers 10-99, one zero is added (010). These are called "leading zeros". Use leading zeros for columns 1, 3, and 4.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing columns 1-5]

Column 2: Main purpose for which building/compound is used

  • Residential: the entire compound/building is a residence used by one or more households.
  • Business: the entire compound/building is used for business/office/industrial activities and no one lives in the building/compound (no households).
  • Residential-cum-business: used for both residential (households) and business purposes. A compound with a small tukul used as a shop or offices with a live-in night guard.
  • Institutional: occupied by unrelated persons together for a common purpose with shared facilities. These include military installations, prisons, boarding schools, hostels or camps, NGO compounds, and hospitals. Persons staying in institutions are not considered a household; however, there may be workers or private households who live on the grounds.
  • Your supervisor should give you a list of institutions in your area. You are to list the institutions but they will be enumerated/interviewed by special short form questionnaire (SFQ) enumerators. Notify your supervisor of any institutions you find during listing. Especially those not included on the list of institutions.
  • Incomplete building: a building under construction. Remember that construction workers may be living on site and should be counted as a household.
  • Religious: building/compound used for worship such as a mosque or church - may contain households.
  • Unoccupied: building/compounds that are not occupied (no households).
  • Other, specify: if you encounter a building/compound that does not fit into the above categories, write "8" on the line and provide an explanation. For example, when listing a cattle camp, mark the entire camp as a "building/compound" and list the cattle camp leaders individually as households. Special enumerators using a short form questionnaire should enumerate cattle camps. Notify your supervisor of any cattle camps in your EA.

Also note and inform your supervisor of any place where homeless persons are staying or any places that may transport people at night such as bus stations, boat launches, airstrips, or train stations. These persons should be captured on census night by special SFQ enumerators. These places are not listing in your census listing book but the total population enumerated will be summarized for your EA after census night.

Write the code for the main use of the building / compound listed. If it is used for multiple purposes, then choose from codes 3 to 6, the best description for how the building/compound is used. Note that 1 is only residential, 2 is only business, and 7 is only unoccupied. If you cannot find the correct code, use 8 and describe how the building/compound is used.

Column 3: Household serial number within building/compound
For every building / compound you number and list in column 1, ask if anyone lives there. If there are persons living there, ask questions to determine the number of households in the building / compound.

If there is one household in a building/compound, write "001" in column 3. If there are two households, repeat the building/compound number in column 1 and purpose in column 2, and write "002" in column 3 for the second household.

In multi-storey buildings the household serial number should start from the ground floor up to the highest floor. In buildings / compounds with no households, the column is to be marked with a dash (-).

If you discover a building/compound during enumeration that you skipped during listing, mark it with the next available building/compound number in the EA, and list it on the next available line in your census listing book.

Column 4: Household serial number within EA
In this column all households listed in the EA should be numbered sequentially starting from the first household in the first building/compound to the last household in the last building/compound.

Column 5: Name of head of household / name of the institution

  • Write the full name of the head of household (first, middle, last name).
  • If the building/compound is also used as a business, institution, or religious place, write the name of the business/institution/religious place after the name of the head of household.
  • If the building/compound is a business / institution / religious place and has no households, simply write the name of the place in column 5.
  • If the building/compound is unoccupied, write "vacant" in column 5.

If you discover a household during enumeration that you missed during listing:

  • Go to the next available line in your Census Listing Book.
  • Copy the number of the building/compound and main purpose on the next available line.
  • Write the number of the household within the building/compound in column 3.
  • Give the household(s) the next available household numbers in the EA in column 4.

4.4. Census listing book columns 6-7
Column 6: Date of visit
During enumeration, you must note the date of each visit you make to a household to complete an interview. You may have to callback on a household several times to complete an interview.

If the interview is completed on the first visit, write down the date in the first sub-column and mark the other two sub-columns with dash (-). For building/compounds that have no households, mark the three sub-columns with dash (-). In the example below days are used but you will write the date, not the day, during listing.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing columns 6-7. This illustration is omitted here]

Column 7: For completed interview / for incomplete interview
In the first column, "for completed interview," write down the date on which the interview was completed. If the interview were completed on the fourth, fifth, or sixth visit, the date of completion would be after the date of the first three visits. If you fail to conduct an interview with a household, mark the column with dash (-).

In the second column, "for incomplete interview," record the code for the reason for not completing the interview. If a building / compound does not contain a household, simply write "vacant" in the second sub-column.

You must complete all seven columns for each building/compound and household listed by the end of enumeration. Do not leave any column or row blank.

4.5. Census listing book summary
The summary should be filled after you have completely enumerated your entire EA.

  • Count the number of households on each page of your census listing book and write the total at the bottom of each page.
  • Count the number of households interviewed and write the total at the bottom of each page.
  • Add the number of households listed, using the page totals, and write this in row (1).
  • Add the number of households interviewed, using the page totals, and write this in row (2).
  • Divide the number in row (2) by the number in row (1) and multiply by 100. Write this number as a percentage in the last row.
  • If you have any difficulty in calculating the percentage, consult your supervisor and ask her/him to complete the last row for you.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing the census listing book summary. This illustration is omitted here]

Certification box
Once you have completed enumeration in your entire EA and checked all your work, sign your name and put the date in the certification box. Your supervisor will sign when he/she reviews your work and declares your EA complete.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing the certification box. This illustration is omitted here]

5. How to conduct interviews

[Section 5.1 is not presented here]

5.2. Who is an acceptable respondent?
You need to interview a responsible member of the household who spent census night in the house and who is able to speak for other members of the household.

Usually you will speak with the head of household when you visit a house and explain the reason for your visit. If the head of household did not spend census night in the house or is not available, then you should ask to interview the head of household's spouse that spent census night in the house.

If the spouse of the head of household did not spend census night or is unavailable, then you should ask to speak to a member of the head of household's family that spent census night in the house (this person must be at least 15 years of age).

If no family member spent census night or is available, you should ask for the eldest non-relative member of the household (at least 15 years of age) who spent census night in the household.

If not one of the acceptable respondents described above is available, ask when you can return to speak with one of these persons. Fill out a household callback form and note the date of the visit in the census listing book.

Acceptable respondents in order of preference:

1. Head of household who spent census night in the housing unit.
2. Head's spouse who spent census night in the housing unit.
3. Eldest resident relative of the head (15 years old or over) who spent census night in the housing unit.
4. Eldest non-relative resident of the housing unit (15 years old or over) who spent census night in the housing unit.

When interviewing, try to ask questions of adult household members directly when they are present. In cases where head household or any adult member provides the particulars of the children, you should try to see the children if they are present at the time of interview.

5.3. Persons counted in the household
You should enumerate (list and interview) all persons who spent census night in the house or with the household. However, there will be some persons who live with the household who worked census night. Night workers should be counted with the household where they usually sleep.

Examples of night workers include:

  • Persons working a night shift, such as doctors, nurses, security guards, and factory workers.
  • Fishermen on rivers and sea within the territorial waters of Sudan.
  • Hunters who spent census night out hunting.
  • Herdsmen out with cattle and livestock, except for those in cattle camps. Persons in cattle camps are counted separately at the cattle camp.

5.4. Persons not counted in the household

  • Household members who may be present at the time of enumeration but who spent census night and day away from the household.
  • Persons who died before census night.
  • Babies born after census night.
  • Household members living in school hostels.
  • Household members who spent census night in a hospital.
  • Household members living outside Sudan.

5.5. Persons likely to be missed
Remember that your duty is to enumerate all persons that spent census night in your enumeration area. Pay special attention to the following types of persons because they are often missed or forgotten:

  • Persons who died after census night but who spent census night in the household or institution.
  • Household guests who may not be present at the time of enumeration but spent census night with the household or institution.
  • Newly born babies who were born alive before census night, even if they have died since census night.
  • House servants.
  • Physically or mentally sick persons.
  • Old women and men.

5.6. Households without acceptable respondents
If an acceptable respondent cannot be found, ask a neighbor when you might be able to find the responsible members of the family or an acceptable respondent at home. Then complete a household callback form indicating when you plan to return, leave it at the housing unit and note the date of the visit in the census listing book.

You are required to make a minimum of three attempts to interview every household. If you are unable to make contact with an acceptable respondent after three attempts then inform your supervisor. Your supervisor will assist you in completing the interview.

5.7. Household callback form
If you arrive at a household to complete an interview and you cannot find an acceptable respondent at home, ask a neighbor when the household is likely to be at home. If the neighbor is unable to tell you, ask a local community leader when you may find the household members at home.

Use the recommended date and time provided by the neighbors or community leader as your return visit date and time. Complete a household callback form (see Annex 1) and leave it at the household and inform a neighbor when you will return so that they may inform the household.

6. The short form questionnaire

6.1. Who is enumerated on the short form questionnaire?
The short form questionnaire (SFQ) will be administered to all households in 90 percent of the EAs. The SFQ will also be used to enumerate special populations. Special populations include: institutions, homeless, cattle camps, and night travelers.

A long form questionnaire (LFQ) will be administered to all households in 10 percent of the EAs and all nomad camps. You will be assigned a LFQ EA and your supervisor will inform you if you need to assist in enumerating nomad camps in a neighboring EA using the LFQ or if you must assist in enumerating special populations using the SFQ.

6.2. Special population enumeration

Special populations enumerated census night:
1. Homeless persons and those traveling at night (night travelers). Persons without lodging or residence on census night. These include persons sleeping in market places, street children, persons moving for several days on foot and sleeping in the open. These persons will be enumerated using the short form questionnaire on census night. It may be necessary to have local security officials accompany enumerators involved in this operation. Locations may include market places, roadblocks, airports, ports, train stations, taxi stands, and boat launches.

  • Homeless persons and night travelers are enumerated on short form questionnaires only.
  • Since these groups have no household number assigned in the listing book, they will all be given household number 999.
  • Eight persons should be listed on each SFQ.
  • Make sure the population type is marked correctly as either homeless or night traveler.
  • The relationship of each person will be coded as non-related.
  • Each person interviewed should be given an interview verification card to prevent double counting.
  • At the end of census night enumeration, enumerators should count the number of questionnaires and the number of persons on each form and write this summary by population type (homeless or night traveler) on the next available line their census listing book.
2. Institutions are places occupied by unrelated persons together for a common purpose with shared facilities. Institutions will be enumerated as close to census night as possible. Census night enumeration assignments will be based on the type and number of institutions found in each EA.

  • Institutions are enumerated on short form questionnaires only
  • Hotels, hostels, campgrounds, and compounds with guest accommodations (public and private) should be covered census night/morning since persons arrive and leave these places often.
  • Hospitals, clinics, prisons, military training centers, and boarding schools should be covered census night/day since people often arrive and leave these places frequently.
  • Use the household number 998 for these institutions.
  • Eight persons should be listed on each SFQ.
  • Make sure the population type is marked correctly as "institutional household".
  • The relationship of each person will be coded as non-related.
  • Each person interviewed should be given an interview verification card to prevent double counting.
  • At the end of census night enumeration, the enumerators should count the number of questionnaires and the number of persons on each form and write this summary by population type (Institution) on the next available line in their census listing book.
  • Remember: During listing building/compound numbers were assigned for institutions but not household numbers except in cases where a private household was located on the grounds or employees lived on the grounds.
Special populations enumerated during enumeration period
Special Populations such as cattle camps, refugees, and internally displaced persons are treated as normal households according to the following guidelines:

1. Cattle camps are semi-permanent camps where members of a community keep their cattle during certain seasons.

  • During listing, the enumerator should have assigned a household number to the different leaders in the cattle camp.
  • Cattle camps are enumerated on the short form questionnaire only.
  • Eight persons should be listed on each SFQ.
  • Relationship should be marked as non-relative.
  • Make sure that the enumerator marks the population type correctly as "Cattle camp."
  • The enumerator should give each person interviewed an interview verification card to prevent double-counting
2. IDP and refugees can be found as households living either in camps or in normal households in towns or villages.

  • During listing, the enumerator should have assigned a household number to the different families/households in the refugee/IDP camp.
  • Interview each household using the household number assigned to them in the census listing book.
  • Use either the short or long questionnaire depending on the type of EA where they are located (SFQ or LFQ).
  • Make sure that the enumerator marks the population type correctly as "internally displaced or refugee."
  • The enumerator should give each family interviewed an interview verification card to prevent double-counting.

If IDPs or refugees are in a household:

  • During interviews at households, enumerators may encounter households that identify themselves as either internally displaced or refugee households.
  • The only action needed is to mark the correct population type as identified by the household "internally displaced or refugee."

6.3. Nomad enumeration on long form questionnaires
Nomads are tribes who live in mobile houses (tents or temporary huts usually made of wool or hide). They raise livestock and are continuously moving in search of water and pasture, and do not stay in specified areas for very long. Nomads are listed and interviewed at the same time since they do not have permanent households. This procedure is called list/enumerate.

  • SFQ or LFQ enumerators (depending on the type of EA) write one building/compound number for one nomad camp during listing and note the estimated number of families/households in the camp.
  • SFQ enumerators then notify their supervisors of the location, building/compound number and estimated number of families in the nomad camp as soon as possible so that a nomad LFQ enumerator can be deployed.
  • The nomad LFQ enumerator (or LFQ enumerator if it is a LFQ EA) assigns a household number to each family in their census listing book using the nomad camp building/compound number assigned by the SFQ enumerator and interviews each family using the long form questionnaire.
  • The interview takes place immediately after a family is listed.
  • The nomad/regular LFQ enumerator must make sure to mark the population type correctly as "nomad."
  • The nomad/regular LFQ enumerator must give each person interviewed an interview verification card to prevent double-counting.

6.4. Interview verification card
You may be assigned to enumerate a special population such as homeless persons, night travelers, cattle camps, or institution. These populations are enumerated on a short form questionnaire and given interview verification cards to prevent double counting.

For example, if a man is away for a conference at a hotel in Khartoum during census night and returns to his household four days later, an enumerator may find him in his household. If the man has an interview verification card it reminds him that he was already counted and serves as proof to the enumerator that they should not include this man in the list of persons who were in the household on census night.

When interviewing special populations, be sure to complete an interview verification card (see annex 2) for each individual and instruct them to keep it with them for the next three weeks.

[Section 6.5 is not presented here]

7. The long form questionnaire

7.1. Completing the front page of the LFQ before interviews

Enumerator number: The number on your identification card or the number assigned to you by your supervisor. Write your enumerator number in the boxes then shade the corresponding number in the column below each number. Make sure that all six spaces are filled - if your enumerator number is less than six numbers be sure to use leading zeros.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing the enumerator number]

Geographical Information: These seven numbers, uniquely identifies your EA and the questionnaire. Use the codes printed on your EA map. Always complete this section for every questionnaire. The household number should be copied from the census listing book.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing geographical information. This illustration is omitted here]

7.2. LFQ interview questions 1-10

Population group/type of household: Sometimes the population group/type of household will be evident (homeless, nomads, or cattle camp), while at other times you need to ask the head of household, or other acceptable respondent to identify the type of household (internally displaced or refugees). Refer to the previous definitions of institutions to identify institutional households. If you are unsure, note the household number and situation in your notebook and ask your supervisor.

[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing the population group/type of household. This illustration is omitted here]

Names of persons in household on census night: Once you have identified an acceptable respondent, begin by asking the respondent who is the head of household and if he/she spent census night with the household. If not, ask who was in charge of the household census night. This person is the "head of household" for census purposes and is the first person to be listed.

Guide for listing names on the questionnaire:

1. Head of household (person in charge and present census night)
2. Spouse of person listed as head (husband or wife)
3. Never married children of the above listed couple from eldest to youngest
4. Eldest married child of the head and spouse (son/daughter)
5. Spouse of eldest child (wife of son/husband of daughter)
6. Children of eldest child and their spouse from eldest to youngest
7. List any other married children of head, their spouse, and their children from eldest to youngest
8. Second wife of head (if any), assuming the head is male. If first wife is head for the census, second wife is marked as "other relative"
9. Parents/parent-in-law of the head
10. Brother/sister of the head from eldest to youngest
11. Grandchildren of head
12. Niece or nephew of head
13. Any other relatives like cousins, aunts, etc., mark as "other relative"
14. Non-relatives/guests
15. Servants, marked as "non-relatives"

Note: for newborn babies without names, write, "new born". For members of institutional households, mark all as "non-relative".

  • When the respondent gives you a name, ask what is the person's relationship to the "head of household" and sex
  • Shade in the serial number for each person listed
  • Enter the name of each person in the rows under Question 1 (Q1)
  • Write names in full (tripled: name of person, father and grandfather). If the respondent is reluctant to give you the name of a person, write the relationship of the person to another whose name is given. For example: "wife of [respondent]" or "sister of [respondent]"

[Below the text is a form showing questions 1-3. This illustration is omitted here]

  • Mark the relationship (Q2) for each person as they are named.
  • Children should always be listed after their mothers, starting with the eldest child.
  • Mark the sex (Q3) for each person as they are named.
  • Ask the respondent to name everyone who spent census night with the household. Shade the serial number, write the name in full, and mark the relationship and sex as each person is listed.
  • If the respondent names more than eight persons who were in the housing unit on census night, you will need to ask them to pause while you get out another questionnaire.
  • When the respondent finishes listing persons, ask if they are sure they have listed all persons who spent census night with the household, especially babies and elderly persons.
  • Ask the respondent if there were any household members working census night such as night-shift workers or hunters away for one night.

Continuation questionnaires: If the respondent listed more than 8 persons in the household, then you need to copy the exact same geographical information on all questionnaires used for the household. Including the same household number, since it is one household.

  • Mark the first questionnaire used for the household as "1"
  • Mark the second questionnaire used for the household as "2"
  • Continue until all questionnaires for the household are marked as continuation questionnaires and numbered
  • This only applies for continuation questionnaires. If a household has 8 or fewer members, then only use one questionnaire and leave this box blank

[Below the text is a form showing the question on continuation sheet. This illustration is omitted here]

Q4 "What is [respondent's] age in completed years?"

  • Starting with the first person listed "Person 01"; ask, "What is [respondent's] age in completed years?"
  • You must record the person's exact age in completed years on census night.
  • For babies less than one year, write and shade "00" because the child has not yet lived one complete year.
  • If the person is over 94 years of age, write and shade "95". For example, if a person is 98 years old, write and shade "95".
  • In recording the age of a person check whether any documentary evidence such as birth certificate, age assessment certificate, passport, identity card, etc. is available and use it.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 4. This illustration is omitted here]

  • If the respondent does not know the age of a person, ask them to estimate the age using the calendar of historical events, ask them if the person was born around some event listed or what events the person remembers.
  • Historical calendar example with ages of persons born in the last column:

The following is a table showing examples of historical events [table]:

[Column headings:]
(A) Event description
(B) Month
(C) Year
(D) Age/duration in years

Event description: Independence
Month: Blank
Year: 1956
Age/duration in years: 51

Event description: Coup by General Abboud
Month: Blank
Year: 1957
Age/duration in years: 50

Event description: Juba and Wau massacre
Month: Blank
Year: 1965
Age/duration in years: 42

  • Do a quick check to make sure the ages given make sense in relation to the age of other household members. For example, if a child's age is 15 years and the parent's age is 25, then this would mean that the parent was 10 years old when the child was born.
  • If an age seems incorrect, ask the respondent if the information seems correct and work with the respondent to get the correct ages of all persons.

Sex, relationship, and age should never be left blank.

Q5 "What is [respondent's] nationality?"

  • Every person is a national or citizen of a country. You should start with the first person listed ("Person 01"); ask, "What is [the respondent's] nationality?"
  • Write the appropriate code for the response given using your nationality code list in the boxes, and then shade the corresponding numbers as you did with age.

[Below the text is a form showing question 5 and a list of nationality codes. This illustration is omitted here]

Q6 "To what regional group does [the respondent] belong?"

  • If the person says they are northern Sudanese mark code "1", if southern Sudanese mark code "2". If non-Sudanese mark code "3". For persons who are not able or refuse to answer this question mark code "4"
  • Mark a response for all persons

Q7 "What is [the respondent's] region of origin?"

  • You may want to read the code list of the nine regions to the respondent to help them provide correct answers
  • Some respondents may give you the name of a village or a state name. For reference purpose, the names of the states in each region are given in the following box
  • If a person does not originate in Sudan, shade "10" for "not Sudan"
  • If a person cannot or refuses to answer, shade "11" for "no response"

[Below the text is a form showing questions 6-7 and a list of region and state codes. This illustration is omitted here]

Q8 "In what state was [the respondent] born?"

  • If the person was born in Sudan, enter the appropriate state code in the first and second lines from the state code list provided and shade the corresponding digits.
  • If the respondent states that the person was not born in Sudan, write code "99" and shade the corresponding digits.
  • Never assume a person's place of birth.

[Below the text is a form showing question 8. This illustration is omitted here]

Q9 "What is [the respondent's] current state and county/mahaliya of usual residence?"

  • The place of usual residence is where a person lives and sleeps at least 6 out of the last 12 months or intends to live 6 out of the next 12 months.
  • Write the two digit state codes in the first and second boxes and shade the corresponding digits.
  • Write the two digit county/mahaliya codes in the next two boxes and shade the corresponding digits.
  • If a person is a foreign visitor without a usual residence in Sudan, write "99" in both the state and county/mahaliya boxes and shade the corresponding digits.
  • Never assume that a person's state and county of usual residence is the place where they spent census night.
  • Please see annex 6 for the complete list of state and county codes.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 9-10 and a list of state codes. This illustration is omitted here]

Q10 "How many years has [the respondent] lived continuously in the state of usual residence?"

  • You may refer back to the state and county mentioned in question 9, "How many years has [the respondent] lived in Wulu county in Lakes State?" for example.
  • Write the number of years of residence as of census night in the boxes provided and shade the corresponding digits.
  • If the person has lived in the state for less than one year, write code "00" and shade the corresponding digits.
  • If the person is a visitor and has no usual state of residence, write "99" and shade the corresponding digits.

Be sure to check the duration of residence with the age of a particular person. If a person's age was given or estimated as 32 and the respondent states that this person has been a resident of the state for 35 years, then you should stop and verify which answer is correct -- the person's age or their duration of residence. A person cannot live in a state longer than they have been alive.

7.3. LFQ interview questions 11-14

Q11 "In what state did [the respondent] usually reside this time last year?"

  • Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01"; ask "In what state did [the respondent] usually reside this time last year?"
  • If the person was residing in Sudan, identify the state where the person was living, write the state code in the boxes provided from the state code list and shade the appropriate numbers.
  • If the respondent states that he/she was not residing in Sudan, write and shade the numbers "99" to indicate that he/she was residing outside Sudan.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 11-13. This illustration is omitted here]

Q12 "Is [the respondent's] biological mother alive?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01"; ask if this person's mother is still alive. Shade the appropriate number as follows: 1 for "Yes", 2 for "No", or 3 for "Don't know".

Q13 "Is [the respondent's] biological father alive?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01"; ask if this person's father is still alive. Shade the number which corresponds to their answer as follows: 1 for "Yes", 2 for "No", or 3 for "Don't know".

Q14 "Does [the respondent] have any difficulty in moving, seeing, hearing, speaking or learning?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01", ask question 14. You must ask the question exactly as it is written on the questionnaire. Do not ask if the person has any form of handicap or disability.

  • If the respondent states that a person has no difficulty in moving, seeing, hearing, speaking or learning, shade "12" for "No disability"
  • If the respondent states that a person does have difficulty in moving, seeing, hearing, speaking or learning, ask the respondent to mention all problems the person has. Shade the appropriate number of all problems mentioned. For example, a person may be deaf and mute, which means that you would shade "6" for "Deaf" and "10" for "Mute"
  • If the respondent doesn't know if a person has any difficulties, ask if anyone else in the household would be able to answer the question. If no one is able to speak for the person, then shade "13" for "Don't know"
  • This is a multiple response question. Shade all difficulties mentioned for a person, or shade 12 for "No disability" or 13 for "Don't know"

[Below the text is a form showing question 9. This illustration is omitted here]

You must ask questions 1-14 of all persons. None of these questions are left blank for any reason.

7.4. LFQ educational status questions 15-18
Note: these questions should be asked only to persons aged 6 years and above. Check the age of the persons as reported in question 4. If they are less than 6 years old, then you are finished asking questions about that person. Go to the next person listed in the questionnaire.
Asking questions only for persons of certain ages or only of females is called a "skip pattern". Skip patterns are used to avoid asking questions of persons that don't make sense. For example, asking if a 1-year-old baby attends school.

Above each set of questions is a direction on who is asked which questions. Pay careful attention to skip patterns in the questionnaire.

  • Questions 1-14, asked of everyone.
  • Questions 15-18, asked only of persons age 6 years and over.
  • Questions 19-23, asked only of persons age 10 years and above.
  • Questions 24-25, asked only of persons age 12 years and above.
  • Questions 26-32, asked only of females aged 12-54. In the 10 states of Northern Sudan, these questions are only asked of ever-married females 12-54.

Q15 "Can [the respondent] read and write, with understanding, a simple sentence in any language?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" if they are 6 years old or over, ask question 15 as written on the questionnaire.

  • Shade the number of the answer given: 1 for "Yes", and 2 for "No"

[Below the text is a form showing questions 15-16. This illustration is omitted here]

Q16 "Has [the respondent] ever attended, never attended, or is currently attending school this year?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" age 6 years and over, ask question 16 and shade the number of the response.

  • "School attendance" refers to any regular educational institution, public or private, for systematic instruction at any level of education. Examples include: primary schools, secondary or high schools, technical schools, agricultural institutions, teacher training colleges and universities.
  • School attendance should be full time participation. Adult or short-term vocational training are not to be classified as school attendance.
(1) "Currently attending" refers to all persons who are now attending formal educational institutions and include those who are temporarily absent from school or those on holiday.
(2) "Previously attended" refers to those who once attended formal school but have left or completed their cycle and are no longer attending.
(3)"Never attended" is for those, who have never attended any formal educational institution at all.
  • For the purposes of the census, Koranic schools (khalwa) are treated as regular educational institutions.

Note: There are skips in question 16 depending on the response given:

1. Currently attending, continue with question 17.
2. Previously attended, skip to question 18.
3. Never attended, skip to question 19.

Q17 For those currently attending: "What is the grade and level that [the respondent] is attending?" Continuing with the first person "Person 01" age 6 years and over and currently attending in question 16, ask question 17.

  • Shade the appropriate level/grade code that corresponds to the given response.
  • Check that the reported level/grade's minimum age is consistent with the age of the respondent as reported in Q4. For example, it is unlikely that a person 8 years old is attending college "16".
  • If there is any confusion or doubt, confirm answers with the respondent -- you must record what the respondent tells you, not what you think is true.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 17-18. This illustration is omitted here]

Q18 For those currently and previously attending school: "What is the highest level [the respondent] completed?" Continuing with the first person "Person 01" age 6 years and over and currently attending or previously attended in question 16, ask question 18.

  • Shade the number that corresponds to the appropriate educational level.
  • Note that 1 "No qualification" is applicable only for those who have previously attended school and 2 "Incomplete primary" is only applicable for those currently attending school.

Study and become familiar with the grade and level codes for questions 17 and 18. Ask questions if you have any doubt or confusion.

7.5. LFQ economic status questions 19-23

The remaining questions are only asked of persons aged 10 years old and above. If you are asking questions for a person 9 years old or less, stop and go to the next person listed on the questionnaire. These questions refer to the period of time 7 days prior to census night.

Q19 "During the week before census night, did [the respondent] work at least one hour for pay (or without pay), profit, in kind or for family business?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 10 years old or over, ask question 17.

  • Shade the number that corresponds to the given response.
  • Never assume that female members of the household are homemakers and do not work. You must probe to get the correct response.

[Below the text is a form showing question 19. This illustration is omitted here]

(1) "Worked" (skip to Q21). Those who should be considered as having worked last week include:

a) All persons at least 10 years old who were in paid employment during the 7 days preceding census night, no matter how much they were paid.
b) All who worked at least one hour for food, goods, or services even if it was their own/family business or farm, including: small shop owners, cattle herders, basket weavers, traditional beer makers, roadside fruit sellers, wayside barbers, or tea and coffee sellers.
c) Farmers, hunters and fishermen (male or female) who worked producing or capturing food for their own household, if this makes up a large part of the food for the household. Women who gather food for household consumption are included in this category.
d) Apprentices who worked at least one hour, whether paid or not.
e) Homemakers who also worked on the family farm/business, or worked some outside the home to earn money. Such as:
  • Persons who collect firewood and sell part of it.
  • Persons who make and sell traditional beer.
  • Persons who milk cattle and sell part of the milk.
  • Persons who weave baskets and sell them.
f) Students, who while studying, were at the same time in paid or unpaid employment. Students who look after cattle after school hours or at weekends should be included in this category.
(2) "Did not work but have job to go back to" (skip to Q21). Includes those with jobs, businesses or farms that were temporarily not at work the week before census night for a specific reason, such as:

  • Farmers not working because of drought.
  • Temporarily away from work/job because of illness, maternity leave, or vacation.
  • Did not work because there were no customers that week (hairdressers, dressmakers, painters, etc.)
  • Workers temporarily off from work but have been assured that they will go back to work (construction workers who are waiting for materials for example.)
  • Persons who have a job but took other temporary work that week, such as teachers involved in the census work.
(3) "Did not work but worked before and seeking work and available for work" (skip to Q21). Includes persons who were not working, had no job, but were looking for and available for work.

  • This includes persons who completed applications for employment, checked at work sites, asked for work at businesses, or looked for land or money to establish their own business
(4) "Did not work, seeking work for the first time and available for work" (skip to Q24). Includes persons who have never had a job, paid or unpaid, but are seeking and available for work.

(5) "Did not work, and not seeking work." Includes persons who did not work at all (paid or unpaid), were not temporarily away from work, and are not looking for work.

[Below the text is a form showing question 20. This illustration is omitted here]

Q20 For those who did no work and were not seeking work, "Why did [the respondent] not seek work?" This question applies only to those persons who were coded "5" in Q19. Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 10 years old or over who responded "5" in question 19, ask question 20. Possible responses include:

(1) "No hope to find a job." Includes persons who have given up looking for a job, but will accept one if offered.

(2) "Full time student." Includes any male or female 10 years or older who were attending school the week before census night, who were not engaged in any work as previously defined and were not seeking or available for work.

(3) "Income recipient." Includes persons who were not engaged in any work but who received money from rents or other investments.

(4) "Too old." Includes those not working or seeking work due to old age. Old persons currently working should coded "1" in question 19. Old persons who are receiving income from rent or other investments should be coded "3" in question 20.

(5) "Disabled/too sick." Includes those who were not working or looking for work because either a disability or long illness prevents them from doing so. Those who are disabled or ill who receive income should be coded "3" and those who receive pensions should be coded "7".

(6) "Full-time homemaker." Includes any male or female who was wholly engaged in household duties the week prior to census night and were not engaged in any work for pay, goods, or services of any kind nor looking for work.

Note: Persons, male or female, who while engaged in household duties were also actively looking for work and available for work should be coded 03 if worked before or 04 if seeking work for the first time in Q19.

(7) "Retired/Pensioner." Includes those who've retired from work or who receive pensions who are not working or seeking work. Note that retired persons currently in paid or self-employment should be classified as working and coded 1 in Q19. Likewise, retired persons who are receiving income from rent or other investments should be coded 3 in this question.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 21-23. This illustration is omitted here]

Q21 For those who worked or have worked before (Q19, 1-3), state in detail, the main job that [the respondent] was engaged in during the week before census night? (occupation) This question applies only to those persons who were coded "1-3" in Q19. Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 10 years old or over who responded "1,2, or 3" in question 19, ask question 21.

  • Occupation refers to the type of work, trade or profession performed by an individual during the reference period.
  • For persons with more than one occupation at the same time, record the person's main occupation -- where he/she spends most of the time.
  • Write a short description of the type of work the person performed for most of the reference period. The type of work should be recorded as fully as possible, examples include:
  • Village headman
  • Government official
  • Typist
  • Head of Finance
  • Bartender
  • Computer programmer
  • Lawyer
  • Waiter/waitress
  • Minister
  • Motor vehicle mechanic
  • Cook
  • Panel beating
  • Taxi driver
  • Primary school teacher
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Hairdresser
  • Assistant nurse
  • Coffee or tea seller

Avoid unclear or general descriptions as operator, foreman, or clerk.

Do not make any marks in the boxes. Write your answers in the red space provided. Office clerks will use your written answer to assign occupation and industry codes in the office. Write as neatly as possible.

Q22 For those who worked or have worked before (Q19, 1-3), "What was [the respondent's] place of work or main activity of [the respondent's] place of work during the week before census night?" (industry) This question applies only to those persons who were coded "1-3" in Q19. Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 10 years old or over who responded "1, 2, or 3" in question 19, ask question 22.

This question refers to the type of goods produced, services provided, or work carried out at the respondent's main workplace or previous workplace. You must record the main type of activity, which takes place at the respondent's workplace as given by the respondent. Below are examples of possible answers.

  • Farming
  • Fishing
  • Transporting people
  • Transport of goods
  • Selling vehicles
  • Selling firewood
  • Selling food
  • Selling beverages/drinks
  • School
  • Hospital
  • Road Construction
  • Building construction
  • Selling/supplying nets and hooks
  • Breaking rocks for gravel/building
  • Fish and meat drying/smoking
  • Making animal fat
  • Thatch making
  • Bicycle repair
  • Hotel/hostel/guest camp
  • Restaurant
  • Bar

The answers to this question are very important. For example, a security guard can work in a variety of places but his/her occupation is still that of security guard.

If a security guard is working in a shop/supermarket, then the activity at the place of work is shop/supermarket. If a security guard is working at a government office, then the activity at the place of work is government work/office. If a security guard working at a bank, the activity at the place of work is banking.

The same can apply to a driver, clerk, cook, or cleaner. You should make sure that you properly describe the activity at the respondent's place of work.

Do not make any marks in the boxes. Write your answers in the red space provided. Office clerks will use your written answer to assign occupation and industry codes in the office. Write as neatly as possible.

Q23 For those who worked or have worked before (Q19, 1-3), "What was [the respondent's] employment status?" This question applies only to those persons who were coded "1-3" in Q19. Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 10 years old or over who responded "1,2, or 3" in question 19, ask question 23.

You should read the categories aloud so the respondent can choose the correct description of their employment status. You must be able to answer any questions that a respondent may ask about each of the choices. You should also be able to explain the different types of employment statuses in the local language.

(1) "Paid Employee." Includes those who were in paid employment for at least one hour the seven days prior to census night, whether they are paid weekly, monthly, or hourly.

(2) "Employer." Includes those who for at least one hour during the reference period operated their own business, profession or trade and employed one or more employees.

(3) "Own account worker." Includes those who operated their own enterprise, profession, or trade without paid employed and worked for their own consumption or profit. Examples include: basket weavers, coffee and tea sellers, bicycle taxis, fruit sellers, cattle milking, firewood collection, farmers, fishermen, and herders.

(4) "Unpaid family worker." Includes those who worked in the enterprise, profession or trade of the household without pay or profit. Examples include: daughters helping mothers sell food, sons helping watch herds, family members who work in the family store, or family members working on the family farm.

(5) "Unpaid working for others." includes apprentices or trainees who are not paid, participants in food for work programmes and anyone else who works for others but does not receive money.

7.6. LFQ marital status questions 24-25

The remaining questions are only asked of persons aged 12 years old and above. If you are asking questions for a person 11 years old or less, stop and go to the next person listed on the questionnaire.

Q24 "What is [the respondent's] marital status?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 12 years old or over, ask question 24.

  • Never assume a person's marital status.
  • Be sure to differentiate between never married, divorced and widowed.
  • Shade the number corresponding to the respondents answer.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 24-25. This illustration is omitted here]

Q25 For all ever-married persons: "What was [the respondent's] age at first marriage?" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" 12 years old or over who was either married, widowed or divorced, ask question 25.

  • Do not ask this question of people who have never married.
  • This question is asking for the person's age when he/she was first married. This may have been before the current marriage. You should therefore be sure to emphasize this point when asking this question.
  • Write the age at first marriage in the boxes and shade the corresponding numbers.

7.7. LFQ fertility questions 26-32
The remaining questions are only asked of women aged 12 to 54 years old. If you are asking questions for a male, or a female 11 years old or less or 55 years or older, stop and go to the next person listed on the questionnaire. In the 15 states of North Sudan, these questions are not asked of never married females as reported in Q24.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 26-27. This illustration is omitted here]

Q26 "What is the total number of children [the respondent] has ever born alive? (even if the child was only alive for a short time and died soon after birth)" Continuing with the first person listed "Person 01" who is female 12 to 54 years (and not never-married in the 15 states of North Sudan), ask question 26.

  • Attempt to ask these questions directly to females 12-54 years old (and not never married in the 15 states of Northern Sudan). The respondent for the household may not be able to supply the information for questions 26 through 32.
  • Write the total number of males ever born alive to the respondent in the boxes under the column "male" and the number of females ever born alive in the boxes under the column "female".
  • You must use two digits in the boxes provided as some women may have had more than 9 live births.
  • Use leading zeroes, for example if she has only one male child you should write "01" and not just "1".
  • If she did not have any male births then write "00" in the "male" column. Do the same for the female children born to the respondent.
  • Shade in the numbers corresponding to the numbers written in the boxes.
  • Do not leave these questions blank for any female aged 12 to 54 years (and not never married in the 15 states of Northern Sudan.)

Q27 "How many of those children are living with [the respondent] in this household?" Continuing with the same female respondent, ask question 27.

  • Write the total number of male children who are living with the mother in the household in the boxes under the column "male."
  • Write the total number of female children living with the mother in the household in the boxes under the column "female".
  • Remember to use two digits. If there are no male children living with the mother write "00" in the male column. Do the same for female children.
  • Shade in the numbers corresponding to the numbers written in the boxes.
  • Ask if any of these children living with the mother in the same household spent census night in the household.
  • If so, check that they are listed in question 1.
  • If the respondent had failed to identify any child who spent census night in the household, then you must write down their names in question 1 and go back to Q1-Q14 and gather information on the missed children after you complete questions 26 through 32.

[Below the text is a form showing question 28. This illustration is omitted here]

Q28 "How many of those children are living elsewhere (not in this household)?" Continuing with the same respondent ask question 28.

  • Write the reported number of male and female children reported as living elsewhere in the boxes under the respective male and female columns.
  • Note that this question is split with the part referring to males in the first row and the part referring to females on the second row.
  • Remember to use two digits. If there are no male or female children living elsewhere write "00" in their respective columns.
  • Shade in the numbers corresponding to the numbers written in the boxes.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 28-29. This illustration is omitted here]

Q29 "How many of those children are no longer alive?" Continuing with the same female respondent, ask question 29.

  • You should ask the question as it is written on the questionnaire." Do not ask: "How many of your children are dead?"
  • Write the number of male and female children who are reported as no longer alive in their respective columns.
  • Again make sure to use two digits. If all her children are alive, then you should write "00" in the respective male and female columns.
  • Shade in the numbers corresponding to the numbers written in the boxes.

Verifying the number of children:

  • Add the number of male children from Q27-29 and verify that the sum equals the total number of males in Q26.
  • Add the number of female children from Q27-29 and verify that the sum equals the total number of females in Q26.
  • If the number of males or females is not equal, you must go through the questions again with the respondent and make the necessary corrections.

Verify the number of children as soon as you complete question 29, so that you can correct any mistakes with the respondent.

Q30 - Q32 refer to the children born to females aged 12 - 54 during the 12 months before census night.

Q30 "Did [the respondent] give birth during the last 12 months?" If no births in the last 12 months go to the next person listed on the questionnaire. Continuing with the same female respondent, ask question 30.

  • If yes, shade "1" and continue with the next questions.
  • If no, shade "2" and skip to the next person listed on the questionnaire.
  • If this is the last person in the household, then move to the next section of questions on housing - or question 33.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 30-32. This illustration is omitted here]

Q31 "How many children has [the respondent] given birth to in the last 12 months?" Continuing with the same female respondent, who answered yes "1" to question 30, ask question 31.

  • Write the number of male births in the box under the "males" column
  • Write the number of female births in the box under the "females" column.
  • If she did not have any male births then write "0" in the "males" column.
  • If she did not have any female births, write "0" in the "females" column.
  • Shade in the numbers corresponding to the numbers written in the boxes.

Q32 "How many of these children born in the last 12 months are still alive?" Continuing with the same female respondent, who answered yes "1" to question 30, ask question 32.

  • Write the number of living male and female children in the boxes under the respective male and female columns.
  • Shade in the numbers corresponding to the numbers written in the boxes.

Verifying the number of children:

  • Check that the number of males alive (Q32) is not more than the number of males born (Q31).
  • Check that the number of females alive (Q32) is not more than the number of females born (Q31).
  • If the alive numbers are greater than the born numbers, ask the respondent to verify which numbers are correct.

Note: Once you have asked questions 4-32 of the first person listed (person 01), ask questions 4-32 of the second person listed (person 02). Continue in this manner until all questions have been asked and completed for all persons listed. Complete questions for all persons before moving to the housing questions.

7.8. LFQ housing questions 33-42
These questions refer to the main building/compound/structure occupied by the household. These questions are asked of all households.

Q33 "What type of dwelling does this household live in?" Ask question 33.

  • If the respondent is unsure of the type of response you are looking for, read the categories aloud.
  • Work with the respondent to try and classify their dwelling into one of the options provided in the questionnaire.
  • Shade the appropriate household code as reported by the respondent.
  • Remember that only one code should be shaded.

Study the different categories for type of dwelling. If you are unsure of any category, ask questions.

[Below the text is a form showing question 33. This illustration is omitted here]

Q34 "How many rooms does this household use for sleeping indoors?" Ask question 34.

  • Write the number of rooms in the boxes and shade the corresponding numbers in the rows.
  • Use leading zeroes. If the respondent says 5 rooms, write and shade "05"
  • The number of sleeping rooms should include the number of rooms in the main building plus any other rooms used for sleeping in the building/compound.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 34-35. This illustration is omitted here]

Q35 "What is the tenure status of this dwelling?" Ask question 35.

  • Shade the number corresponding to the type of tenure reported by the respondent.
  • Read the categories aloud if the respondent seems confused.
(1) "Owned." A member of the household owns the dwelling.

(2) "Rented." A member of the household pays rent for the dwelling.

(3) "Housing provided as part of work." Dwelling is provided by the employer of a household member even though some rent may be paid. If the employment stops, the household members lose the lower rent and/or dwelling.

(4) "Free." A household member does not own the dwelling, it is occupied free of charge without rent or linkage to job.

[Below the text is a form showing question 36. This illustration is omitted here]

Q36 "What is the main source of drinking water for this household?"

  • A household may obtain water from numerous sources. You must ask them which source they get most of their water.
  • If the respondent is uncertain, read the categories aloud.
  • Shade the number corresponding to the answer provided by the respondent.
  • Remember that only one of the sources listed should be shaded.

[Below the text is a form showing question 37. This illustration is omitted here]

Q37 "What main source of lighting for this household?"

  • A household may use different types of lighting. You must ask them which source they use for lighting for most of the time.
  • If the respondent is uncertain, read the categories aloud.
  • Shade the number corresponding to the answer provided by the respondent.
  • Remember that only one of the sources listed should be shaded.

[Below the text is a form showing question 38. This illustration is omitted here]

Q38 "What is the main source of energy used for cooking in this household?"

  • A household may use different kinds of fuel to cook. You must ask them which source of energy they mainly use for cooking.
  • If the respondent is uncertain, read the categories aloud.
  • Shade the number corresponding to the answer provided by the respondent.
  • Remember that only one of the sources listed should be shaded.

[Below the text is a form showing question 39. This illustration is omitted here]

Q39 "What is the main type of toilet facility used by this household?"

  • A household may have or use more than one toilet facility. You must ask them which toilet facility they use most often.
  • If the respondent is uncertain, read the categories aloud.
  • Shade the number corresponding to the answer provided by the respondent.
  • Remember that only one of the facilities listed should be shaded.

[Below the text is a form showing question 40. This illustration is omitted here]

Q40 "Does any member of this household own any of the following?"
(Mark all that apply)

  • Read off each item in the list to the respondent.
  • If the answer is "yes", shade the number beside the item.
  • If the answer is "no", leave the number blank and move to the next item.
  • If the respondent says no to 1 through 6, shade 7 "none."
  • This is a multiple response question, meaning more than one item can be shaded.

[Below the text is a form showing question 41. This illustration is omitted here]

Q41 "Does any member of this household own any of the following?" (mark all that apply)

  • Read off each item in the list to the respondent.
  • If the answer is "yes", shade the number beside the item.
  • If the answer is "no", leave the number blank and move to the next item.
  • If the respondent says no to 1 through 9, shade 10 "none".
  • This is a multiple response question, meaning more than one item can be shaded.

[Below the text is a form showing question 42. This illustration is omitted here]

Q42 "What is the household's main source of livelihood?"

  • Only one number can be shaded.
  • Shade the number for the source that the respondent says is the most important for the survival of the household. If this source is cut or is not available then the household will find it very difficult to survive.
  • If the respondent is uncertain, read the categories aloud.

Review all response categories for every question in the housing section. If you have any questions on what any of the categories mean, ask your trainer/supervisor.

7.9 LFQ agricultural questions 43-48
These questions are asked of all households whether they are obviously engaged in agricultural activities or not.

Q43 "Does this household perform any cultivation/plantation activities?"

  • If the answer is yes, shade "1"
  • If the answer is no, shade "2" and skip to question 47.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 43-44. This illustration is omitted here]

[Questions 44 to 46 were only asked of households that responded "yes" to whether they engaged in any cultivation/plantation activities.]

Q44 "How large is the area being cultivated by this household?" Code area in feddans.

  • Write the number of feddans under cultivation in the boxes and shade the corresponding numbers.

[Note: 1 feddan = 4200 square meters = 1.038 acres]

[Below the text is a form showing question 45. This illustration is omitted here]

Q45 "What type of crops did this household cultivate during the previous year?"

  • Note, this is a multiple response question. You should mark all the crops that were cultivated during the previous 12 months by the household.
  • Shade the appropriate box next to the crops listed:
1. Cereals (sorghum, maize)
2. Vegetables (eggplant, tomatoes, melons)
3. Fruits and nuts (avocado, bananas)
4. Oil seed (groundnuts, oil palm, sesame)
5. Root and Tuber (potatoes, yams)
6. Beverage/spice (chilies, beverages other than coffee or tea)
7. Leguminous (beans and peas)
8. Sugar
9. Cotton
10. Coffee
11. Tea
12. Other (flowers, tobacco)

Q46 "What is the tenure status of land under cultivation/plantation?"

  • Shade the number corresponding to the type of tenure reported by the respondent.
  • Read the categories aloud if the respondent seems confused.
(1) "Owned." A member of the household owns the land.

(2) "Rented." A member of the household pays rent for the land.

(3) "Partially owned." Land is partly owned by a member of the household.

(4) "Communal." Land is shared by member of the community without ownership.

[Below the text is a form showing question 46. This illustration is omitted here]

[Questions 47 and 48 were asked of all households.]

Q47 "Does this household perform any fishery activities?"

  • If the answer is yes, shade "1"
  • If the answer is no, shade "2"

[Below the text is a form showing question 47. This illustration is omitted here]

Q48 "Does this household own any of the following animals?" if more than 999, code 999.

  • Read the animal group names, one by one, to the respondent
  • If the respondent says they have no cattle, write and shade "000"
  • If the respondent says they have 5 camels, write and shade "005"
  • Continue until you have a response for every animal group listed

[Below the text is a form showing question 48. This illustration is omitted here]

7.10. LFQ mortality questions 49-54
Q43 - Q48 refer to the deaths of any household members during the 12 months before census night. These questions can be upsetting and should be treated sensitively. This information is important to inform officials of the number and cause of deaths in different areas of Sudan.

Q49 "Were there any deaths among members of this household in the past 12 months?"

  • If "Yes", shade number one and continue asking questions.
  • If "No", shade number two and end the interview.

[Below the text is a form showing questions 49-54. This illustration is omitted here]

Q50 Name(s) of the deceased. If the respondent said that there has been a death in the household (Q43=1), ask for the names of those who died and list them in this column.

  • If more than one person died in this household, list all persons before continuing.
  • If the deceased was an unnamed newborn, write "newborn baby."
  • If the respondent does not know the name of the deceased, write the relationship such as "cousin" or write "man" or "woman."

Q51 "Was the deceased male or female?"

  • If the person was male, shade "1"
  • If the person was female, shade "2"

Q52 Age at death. If age is unknown, estimate age using local historic calendar. Record age in completed years.

  • Write the age of the deceased in the boxes provided and shade the corresponding numbers
  • Use leading zeroes, for example if 5 years old, write and shade "05"
  • If the deceased was less than one year, write and shade "00"
  • If the exact age is not known, estimate age based on other household members and/or historic calendar

Q53 "Was the death related to either accident or act of violence?"

  • This question is used to separate those who died from illness from those who were in a car accident or who died during conflict.
  • If the answer is yes, shade "1"
  • If the answer is no, shade "2"

Q54 Females only 12-54: "Did the death occur during pregnancy, delivery or the first 2 months after delivery?"

  • If the deceased was female between the ages of 12-54, ask this question.
  • If the answer is yes, shade "1"
  • If the answer is no, shade "2"

Note: Quickly look over the questionnaire to be sure it is complete. Thank the household members for their time. They have just been counted in the Fifth Population and Housing Census of Sudan!

8. Unusual situations
Most of your interviews will be simple and go smoothly. However, we will discuss some rare situations that may occur so that you will know what to do.

8.1.1. Language barrier
If a respondent speaks a language that you do not speak, try to find someone else in the household who speaks English or a language you understand. Kindly ask the person if they would interpret your questions to the respondent and the respondent's answers to you. Notify your supervisor if you are unable to solve the problem within the household.

8.1.2. Respondent refuses to be interviewed.
You may encounter a household that is unwilling to be interviewed. You should make every effort to persuade the household to grant you an interview. If you are unsuccessful, you should:

  • Explain the necessity of their participation for a complete count of persons in Sudan.
  • Tell them their answers will be used to inform decision-makers about the people and needs of their community and country.
  • Inform them that their responses will be kept confidential.
  • Take help of community leaders and your supervisor.

If you are unable to convince them to be interviewed:

  • Note the location of the building/compound on your census map.
  • Complete as much information as possible in your census listing book.
  • Contact your supervisor as soon as possible.

DO NOT: Provide false information. Submitting made up information is worse than receiving no information.

8.1.3. Incomplete information for persons that spent census night
If the respondent cannot give you complete information about a person that spent census night with the household:

  • Find out when that person or someone more knowledgeable about that person will be home.
  • Complete as much information as possible for that person during your current visit. Many times the respondent will be able to provide the majority of information.
  • Arrange a time with the household for your return visit to complete the questionnaire. Make a note in your notepad of the return date and location of the household.
  • Do not allow this to take a large part of your time. Try to gather information for all persons during the first visit.
  • If you are unable to get complete information on a person tell your supervisor.
8.1.4. Respondent says they were already interviewed.
If a respondent states that they have already been interviewed you should first verify that you are in the correct EA -- make sure that you have not gone outside the boundaries of your EA. Next, ask the respondent if they have an interview verification card. If you haven't gone outside your EA and they do not have an interview verification card, politely explain to the respondent that you do not have a questionnaire for this household and that you must conduct an interview.

8.2. Things enumerators must do:

  • Always carry your identity card.
  • Keep the enumerator's manual with you at all times and consult it whenever you have a question.
  • List all buildings/compounds and households in your EA.
  • Complete the identification information on all questionnaires before you begin an interview.
  • Enumerate all persons who were in your EA on census night, whether they live in the back of a store, slept in the market, stayed at a hostel, live in a tukul or an apartment.
  • Complete all questions for all persons who were in your EA on census night. Do not leave answers blank.
  • You must discuss any and all problems with your supervisor at the earliest opportunity.
  • You must make appointments to callback on the households where enumeration has not been completed and always keep your callback appointments.
8.3. Things enumerators must not do:
  • Never interview people in front of a group unless they are members of the same household.
  • Never discuss politics or allow yourself to be involved in controversial arguments.
  • Do not argue with your respondents. If the response is obviously wrong, explain the question to the respondent so that they can provide the correct response.
  • Never ask a leading question. A leading question is the type of question that suggests answer to the respondent. For example, "Are you 50 years old?"
  • Never share the information collected during enumeration to anyone other than a sworn census worker.
  • Do not make up answers on questionnaires. Your work will be checked and false answers will be discovered.

[Sections 9-10 and annexes of the enumeration instructions are not presented here. This includes the supervisor review of the enumerator's work and administrative procedures after completing enumeration, as well as a copy of the call back form, interview verification card, census listing book, long form questionnaire, and state and county codes]