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[Senegal 2002 Enumerator Instruction Manual]


Third Population and Housing General Census (2002)

Manual for the Census Enumerators

Foreword

Senegal is undertaking its third demographic census in its history. This operation is of utmost importance, and has a peculiar character. For the public authorities, it is the opportunity to gather detailed information on the population, in order to ensure a better management of grass roots affairs, the process of which just started.

The "Provision and Statistics Division" [Direction de la Prévision et de la Statistique] is in charge, with your help, to carry on this very large operation, in order to meet the expectations of the numerous users of the census data. It takes many measures to ensure its success, in particular during its fundamental phase which is the data collection in the field.

Because of the variety of the information to be collected, and because of the complexity of its methodology, the census requires a very high level of rigor, because from the quality of the data produced depends the good knowledge of the status and the characteristics of the population and of the housing.

So, whatever the quality of the technical preparation, and whatever the material and human investment already made, the census will be a success only if the information gathered is complete and reliable. The policy measures that the decision makers will have to take in order to promote the social and economic development can only be successful if they are based on good quality data which can shed light on the choices.

This is why the role of the census enumerator is crucial in this phase and requires the competence and the necessary enthusiasm to carry on the tasks what will be given to you. We therefore draw your attention on the immense responsibility that you bear, and we are calling for all the serious character that you are able to so that the census could fulfill all the objectives that were assigned to it.

We are sure of your total commitment in this noble task, for the sake of your country.

For this undertaking, the present manual was prepared for helping you carrying your work in the best conditions. It describes the procedures to be followed, and will give you all the instructions allowing you to better understand the census methodology, and the way to fill out the census forms. You must keep it with you during the whole period of field data collection. Read it carefully, and comply strictly with the instructions that it contains.

Lastly, do not spare any effort so that the Third Population and Housing General Census is a complete success.

Chapter I: General Considerations
1.1) Definition of the Population and housing general census

The Population and housing general census can be defined as a set of operations which consist of gathering, grouping and publishing the demographic, economic, and social data related to all the inhabitants of a country or a given territory, at a given point in time or over a given period" (from the United Nations, 1958). As one may observe, a census cannot be restricted to a simple count of all the persons in a territory by using a questionnaire.

1.2) Census objectives

The Population and housing general census will provide information that will be very useful for elaborating plans of economic and social development, as well as for research purposes. It is also an ideal sampling base for the various post-census surveys. This information deals with, among others:

The distribution of the population by sex, by age, and by administrative division.

Characteristics of housing in which the population lives.

For illustration, one gives below a few examples of the numerous uses of census results:

1.2.1. In the socio-cultural domain

The administrators of the Senegalese education system make provisions about the needs for school buildings, for school supplies and for teaching personnel while basing their numbers on the number of school age children.

The building of dispensaries, maternities, housing units, roads and numerous other infrastructures necessitate precise data on population, at all levels, including at the level of the smallest administrative units. Indeed, it answers to the needs of the new decentralization policy, which focuses on grass roots management.

1.2.2. In the economic domain

Inasmuch as the population includes at the same time producers and consumers, the public administration and the entrepreneurs use the census data to elaborate their policies for employment and for the labor force and for computing the volume of the production.

Planners also need the census data in order to make more accurate provisions, because they will be based on population estimates that only a census can provide.

1.2.3 - In the research field

The census data constitute the basis for sampling purposes, for all demographic, statistical, economic and sociological surveys. Typically, this means that only a census permits to constitute a complete and updated data base from which samples or sub-units can be drawn on which to conduct research.

1.3) Census Methods

The census is conducted with the direct interview method. The questionnaire is filled during the interviews with the concerned persons, by a census enumerator (AR). The census enumerator must record on a form called the questionnaire, all the information sought for on the individuals who compose a household. Beforehand, he or she will have prepared the list of all the compounds existing in his or her census track (DR) that was assigned to him or her. Each census enumerator (AR) has to enumerate a census track. He or she must proceed household by household, within each compound, while taking into account the recent destructions and new constructions, since changes might have occurred between the cartographic phase and the enumeration procedure. The data collection phase to the households shall last 15 days.

Census Organization

The chart displayed below will show you the place that you occupy in the organization of the field work:

National Coordinator
Regional Coordinator
Departmental Head
Supervisor
Controller
Census Enumerator

Chapter II: Concepts and Definitions

The concepts and definitions used for the census are explained below. You must know them well, and must apply them thoroughly.

2.1) Definition of technical terms

Cartography

The census mapping (cartography) is the operation consisting of locating on a map of a District or a Rural Community all the inhabited areas that are there. For urban centers, and for villages of 500 inhabitants or more, plans have been prepared. These maps and these maps were cut into smaller pieces, called "Census Track" [District de Recensement: DR]

Commune

An urban commune is a small place which has the status of a township [municipalité], under the authority of a Mayor. The Commune is divided into smaller administrative units, called Quarters or neighborhoods. In Dakar, the communes are divided into "arrondissement communes," which each are placed under the authority of a "District Mayor" [Maire d'arrondissement]. The complete official list of the communes of Senegal is available, and will be used in the census.

Census Track [District de Recensement: DR]

A census track is a well defined geographical area, with precise limits, and which accounts for 800 to 1000 inhabitants on the average. This unit is assigned to a census enumerator for its complete enumeration during a period fixed to be 15 days, or 17 days at most.

Quarter / Neighborhood

A quarter, or neighborhood, is a part of an urban center which has a name, and well known geographical limits. A person is administratively responsible of it, who is called the Head of Quarter or the Quarter Delegate, and has authority by delegation.

Village

The village is the smallest administrative unit in rural areas. It is placed under the authority of a Village Head [Chef de Village]. A village may be constituted by several places, of which the most important is the village headquarter, which, in general, gives its name to the village.

Hamlet

A hamlet is a part of a village, made of one or several compound(s), located in an isolated geographical area of the village to which it belongs administratively.

Compound

The compound is a set of buildings, enclosed or not by a wall or by any other type of fence or paling. In some case it could be reduced to a single building (single hut, house with one or several apartments, or other cases), including a series of distinct dwelling units. Generally, it is placed under the authority of a compound head [Chef de Concession: C.C.].

It is important to mention that a compound may include one or several households. The definition of a household is given below.

In the special cases of an "apartment building" or a "building with several floors", each dwelling unit (flat) will be considered as a distinct compound, by convention.

2.2) Demographic concepts

Household and household member

The household is generally defined as a set of persons, related by blood or not, who live under the same roof and share part or all of their resources to cover their basic needs, in particular lodging and food. These persons are called the household members, take generally their meals together, and recognize the authority of a sole and same person, called the Household Head [Chef de ménage: C.M.]. In our national languages, the words njël in Wolof, ngank in Sereer, hirande in Pulaar, and siitik in Diola translate faithfully this concept of a household.

One should note however that the definitions of "household" and "household members" are not very rigorous, and that, in practice, they can cover various situations. Precisions are therefore necessary in order to better understand the content of each of these terms.

Although it appears simple at first glance, the concept of household is quite complex, and deserves to be better explained for a uniform understanding by the personnel involved in the census. For example, one will distinguish between "ordinary households" [ménages ordinaires] and "institutions or collective households" [ménages collectifs], as it is the case with the religious communities [Daaras], a case that will be treated below.

Similarly, the interviewed persons may be in peculiar situations with respect to the household and the compound. To illustrate this fact, we give some examples, and ways to interpret them:

If a person lives in the compound, and takes his or her meals in a household within this compound, he or she is a member of this household, and must be enumerated.

If a person stays outside of the compound, but takes his or her meals in one of the household of the compound, he or she must not be enumerated in this household where he or she takes his or her meals; he or she is rather considered to be a member of the household where he or she spends the night.

A person may live on his or her own, and take his or her meals alone. This person still constitutes a regular household. This type of household with only one person is more frequent in urban areas. It is called a "single household" [ménage d'isolé].

A servant, or another person employed [by the household] (such as the seasonal workers in rural areas, called "sourgha", a family driver, or an apprentice in a family workshop in urban areas) are considered as members of their employer's household if they usually sleep there, that is most of the time.

Residence:

For this census, belonging to an ordinary household, the usual residence status, or the status of visitor correspond to several criteria that we will examine, that is the residence in the household during a certain period of time, the fact to share the meals, and the fact to sleep in the compound.

The duration of residence is the main criteria defining membership or not of a person in the household, that is to determine his or her status as either member or not member. So, the concept of residence is usually defined as the fact to live usually in a given place over a certain duration. The duration of presence or absence is used for making decisions on the membership of a household. In order to simplify the census concepts, the residence, here, is determined by the presence of a person in a compound for a conventional duration fixed at 6 months or more with respect to the night preceding the visit of the census enumerator in the household.

Real life is however more complex, and one will have to take into account certain peculiar situations to determine, in a correct way, the residence status of the persons concerned by the census.

By extension, one will take into account, for instance, the intention by some persons to set themselves up in a household, more or less permanently, in order to not exclude them from the household to which they belong. Indeed, even though certain persons are present in the household for less than six months, they are still full members of this household, and shall be considered as such. This latter fact will be developed below, in relation with the concept of residence status.

Indeed, as indicated above, spending the reference night in the compound (that is the night preceding the visit of the census enumerator) is a criterion that must be taken into account for classifying the persons to be enumerated, in one of the following residence statuses:

Resident Present (RP)

A resident present is defined as a person present in the compound during the night preceding your visit in the household, and who has been living there usually, that is for 6 months or more. Some Special cases may be found. So, the following persons will be considered as "Resident Present" even if they have not yet spent 6 months in the household:

A child born in the household less than 6 months ago, and who lives there since his or her birth;
A woman who joined the household of her husband, and possibly her children who accompany her.

Persons who, for reasons linked to their occupation, are sent or called to serve to another place (for instance a civil servant, or a salesperson), and the pupils or students who are sent elsewhere for doing their studies, to quote only these cases.

In summary, "resident-present" (RP) applies to all the persons who just moved in a household, within the past 6 months, whatever the reasons for moving, and whatever the duration since the move, and whether or not these persons moved on their own or with a group (such as a whole household).

Resident Absent (RA)

A resident absent is a person who usually lives in the compound, but who was absent on the night preceding your visit in the household, and for a duration of less than 6 months.

However, the women who just left their household of origin (that of their parents) to join the household of their husband, the persons who are sent away for service, and these who just moved away will not enumerated as Resident-Absent (RA) in the household that they just left. Indeed, they do not belong to this household any longer, but to that they have joined, and in which they will be enumerated as Resident-Present (RP). Similarly, the household members who are absent for 6 months or more will not be enumerated in the household, whatever is their intention.

In conclusion, if the duration of the absence is longer than 6 months, you must not enumerate this person. This will generally be the case of women who left their usual residence (their village) for more than 6 months, and who will be found in urban areas where they work as maids. Similarly, if a person has moved, or if he or she was sent away for service, you shall not enumerate him or her in his or her household of origin, and this whatever the duration of his or her absence.

A usual resident, who has not spent the night preceding the visit of the census enumerator in the household, but who is present at the time of the interview is enumerated as Resident-Absent (RA).

The visitor (VIS)

A visitor is a person who is not a household member, but who spent the night preceding your visit in the household. A visitor, who stayed for 6 months or more shall be considered as "Resident-Present" (RP).

Note: The visitor is recorded after the other household members. After skipping a line, one will give the sequential number "00".
A child under 6 months of age, born or not in the household from parents who are visitors is also a "Visitor" and shall be recorded as such.

Population counted separately / Institutions

The population counted separately, called "COMPTEE A PART" are the persons who live in institutions, which have an administrative or legal status which obliges any person foreign to the institution to have a special permit from the competent authorities, before conducting any given activity, including the census. These are:

The barracks (army, police, gendarmerie, firemen, etc.);
The boarding houses (religious institutions, colleges, high schools, university quarters, orphanages, Muslim brotherhood institutions with pensioners or daaras);
The hospitals, maternities and health centers;
The jails and rehabilitation centers;
The psychiatric asylums and leper-houses;
The hotels, motels, holyday villages, tourist camps;
The residences for diplomatic corps.

Floating population

The population said to be "floating" are the homeless people, who live anywhere, near the market places, in the factories, in shacks or even on the pavement, etc. This population is found especially in large cities, and in particular in Dakar.

Note: The enumeration of the institutions and the floating population will be conducted with specific methods, by agents recruited for this purpose.

Chapter III: The Work of the Census Enumerator

3.1) Working documents for the census enumerator

The documents which will be used by the census enumerator during the enumeration procedure are presented below:

1. The instructions manual;
2. The census enumerator identity card;
3. The map of the census track and possibly the village plan;
4. The legends for the maps;
5. The village information community form;
6. The list of compounds (for some census tracks);
7. The household visits booklet;
8. Blank household questionnaires;
9. The historical calendar;
10. The correspondence grid between ages and years;
11. The realization form [Fiche de concrétisations];
12. The transhumance form (when applicable);
13. The correspondence sheet between school levels.

Among the documents quoted above, one will present in details only the most important ones.

3.1.1. The instructions manual

This manual contains all the procedures that you must follow in order to do your work properly. It contains, among other things, the instructions for filling the questionnaire, and for conducting correctly the task that you are in charge of.

You must comply strictly with the instructions that are given to you in the present manual and must apply them rigorously and systematically. You must therefore know them well.

3.1.2. The census enumerator identity card

This is a card delivered by the "Provision and Statistics Directorate" (DPS), and shows the name and qualification of the census enumerator. For the interviewed persons, this is the proof that you are authorized to gather the required information from the households. You must have this card always with you, and must present it every time this will be necessary. In order to be valid, this card must have the agent's photograph and the stamp for the Regional Head of Service of the Provision and Statistics.

3.1.3 The map of the census track

The map of the census track is a geographical map, which specifies the location of the villages and hamlets composing the census track, for areas with less than 500 inhabitants; it also includes a detailed sketch for villages of more than 500 inhabitants, or a plan for urban communes (see Annex II).

In case of changes in the content of your census track (destruction or construction of dwelling units), your must inform your controller. He or she will tell you how to proceed. In case where you could not contact him or her, you must take this into account, and record these changes in your household visits booklet (creation or suppression).

3.1.4 Legends for the maps

3.1.5 The community form for information on villages

This form gives the information on the villages and the hamlets attached to them, those located within your census track limits. In principle, your controller also has all this information. However, this initial list might be modified after the cartographic phase, in particular when dwelling units were recently created or destroyed, or when they were counted in contiguous census tracks after a new apportionment. For this reasons, you must necessarily record on your household visits booklet all the changes noted from the list of the villages composing your census track. When facing such a situation, do not hesitate to call your controller. The latter will provide you with all the assistance that you may need, and will tell you how to proceed in case of a problem. In case you could not contact him or her, note in your booklet all the important questions that you would like to discuss with him or her prior to making a final decision.

3.1.6 The list of compounds

This list is prepared for the villages, in rural areas, and for the irregular settlements in certain urban communes. It provides the first name and last name of all the heads of compound living in the census track.

3.1.7 The household visits booklet

The household visits booklet is a document of several pages, in which you will register the list of all the heads of compound, and all the heads of household in your census track, in addition to the requested geographical data. For each household, you will record the household size from the summary table of enumerated persons on the front page of the household questionnaire. However, you shall record only the number or resident present (RP) and resident absent (RA). The household visits booklet will facilitate the rapid publication of the preliminary results, for all the main administrative divisions in the country. You must therefore take the greatest care in filling this booklet.

3.1.8. The household questionnaire

The household questionnaire is the form on which you will record the information gathered from the households. It is includes six pages, divided into six sections:

A front page, which includes the characteristics for the geographical identification of the census track and of the household (Section A). This page also contains a box for writing the household number, and another for the total number of forms filled for the household. It also includes a summary table for the number of household members. A last box is prepared for the signatures of the census enumerator, of the controller, of the supervisor, and of the coding agent;

A second part (section B), which includes the questions on the individual characteristics (demographic, economic, and social) related to each individual in the household;

A third part (section C), which includes the questions on deaths that occurred in the household in the past 12 months;

A fourth part (section D), which deals with the questions on out-migrations that occurred in the household in the past five years;

A fifth part (section E), focusing on housing characteristics.

Lastly a sixth part (section F), related to poverty.
3.1.9. The historical calendar

The historical calendar, as indicated by its name, is a document that provides the dates of striking historical events which occurred within an administrative unit (Commune, District, Department, or Region). It will help you determining the dates at which certain events occurred (births, deaths, migrations, marriages, etc.). The most important here will be to determine the age of the persons for whom the date of birth or the age is not known. Since the age of a person is very important in population studies, it is strongly recommended to use this document every time it is necessary. This will be the case when the date of birth of a person is not known, and when you have exhausted all the other means of cross-checking for its determination (comparison with other known ages, or with the dates of events which occurred within the household).

3.1.10. The correspondence grid between ages and year of birth

This grid will allow you to convert into an age the dates of birth that the enumerated
persons will give you, and will allow you to avoid doing your own calculations of ages.

3.1.11. The realization form [Fiche de concrétisation]

This form will provide you with the composition of the census track:

Names of villages and hamlets
Number of compounds
Name of the compound heads
Number of households
Information on physical access
3.1.12. The transhumance form

This form will allow you to gather some basic information concerning the persons who are in transhumance. These are: the number of persons, the usual place of residence, the itinerary, and the period of stay in a given place.

3.1.13. The correspondence list of school levels

[no details given]

3.2 How to move within your census track

[Details on how to move within census track from the original instructions are not presented here.]

3.3 Work to be done before the enumeration

[Details on enumerator preparatory work from the original instructions are not presented here.]

3.4 Attitudes and behavior of the census enumerator

An awareness campaign on the objectives and aims of the census was put in place, so that you could benefit from the collaboration of the population.

On your side, you must aim at gaining the confidence of the population, by keeping a friendly attitude, and a sense of communication, in order to guarantee the quality of the information gathered in your census track.

a) Since you are the person asking for information from the population, therefore asking for a service; you must therefore be courteous, and present yourself in decent attire.

b) You must show consideration for customs, religions, and manners.

c) You must always show your census enumerator card when necessary, and explain the aim of your visit to the heads of compound and heads of household before starting your work.

d) You must avoid living at the people's expenses, or making promises for governmental projects or gifts (equipment and food supplies for instance).

e) You must work at times that allow you to meet with the persons when they are at home. In most cases, you will have to work in the middle of the day and late at night, that is at times where the enumerated persons are able to welcome you and to answer correctly your questions.

f) If you cannot enumerate a compound, whatever the reason, when visiting it, you must make a new appointment, and continue your work in neighboring compounds.

g) During your interviews, you shall restrict yourself to the census objectives, and ask only the questions displayed on the questionnaire. In case you need, you may ask supplementary questions only for cross-checking with other information, for verifying their coherence, and for improving their quality.

h) Given the confidentiality around the information gathered from the households, you must not let anyone else foreign to the census be involved in your work. Inasmuch as possible, avoid allowing persons foreign to the household assist to the interviews, except the guide and the interpreter who accompany you for the needs of your work. Indeed, accepting the presence of a person not belonging to the household is a violation of the confidentiality principle, which could hamper the good quality of the information to be collected.

i) Never forget at any time that you shall show respect and consideration to your hierarchical bosses, and to the local authorities.

3.5 How to behave in a household

When you introduce yourself in a compound, ask first to see the compound head or the household head, who is the person entitled to give you the information on the household.

If the household head is absent, ask to see the person designated to have the authority in case of impediment. This can be the oldest son of the household head, his brother or his wife. The role of household head is straightaway given to a man by culture, religion and law. However, it should be noted that there are households headed in fact by a woman. In this case, the woman will be considered as the household head in the questionnaire, as if it were a person of the male sex. In any case, the prepared questions must be asked to a household member who is able to answer them with precision. Therefore, do not rely on answers that could be given by servants or neighbors. Use these persons only as a last resort, that is, when it will be impossible to speak with a person who could give you better information.

3.6 General principles for filling the household questionnaire

Special care was taken for the preparation of the questionnaire. The questions are treated in a certain logical order, in order to facilitate your task. For instance, information on the summary table, the number of forms filled, the effective date of each operation, and the names and signatures of the persons who completed these tasks, will be written only at the end of the enumeration of the household members, even if this information is prepared on the cover page. For these reasons, the questionnaire will be filled in the following order:

Characteristics for identification (section A);
Questionnaire number (front page);
Individual characteristics (section B);
Deaths that occurred in the household during the past twelve months (section C);
Out-migrations in the household during the past five years (section D);
Housing questions (section E);
Poverty questions (section F);
Number of questionnaires filled (front page);
Summary table (front page);
Observations (last page on the questionnaire).
Personal Categories

Some questions apply only to individuals of a given age group or with given characteristics. For example:

School attendance and level of education apply only to persons aged 3 years and above;
Literacy, Occupation in the last 12 months, economic activity and work status apply only to persons aged 6 years and above;
Questions on marital status [sic], the number of children ever born, and the number of children surviving apply only to women aged 12 years and above;
Questions of the number of births in the past 12 months are asked only to women aged 12-54 years;

The codes

The questionnaire includes many questions with precoded answers. This is the case for questions for which code or numbers were given beforehand. Each of these questions has a special number (code). For these questions, simply circle the code corresponding to the answer given by the interviewed person.

Certain questions are said to be with "multiple answers", which are questions for which several answers are valid for the same person or the same household. For these questions, write in the appropriate boxes the number "1", a code indicating that the corresponding item is present for the interviewed person or household.

How to write the answers

[Information from the original instructions on the physical characteristics of writing answers is not presented here.]

Filters

Respect the filters, that is the instructions "go to ____", which indicate that the question(s) immediately following the question just asked do not apply for a category of interviewed persons, and therefore do not apply to this person. In this case, cross out the corresponding boxes with an oblique hyphen.

Example: Questions on births (B23, B24, B25) must not be asked to women aged less than 12 years, because these girls do not have the age to have children, or to women aged more than 54 years, because they passed the fertility ages, and therefore do not have to answer these questions.

Reminder: Every time you will a finish a row, verify that all the codes are circled or all the appropriate boxes are filled with information. For multiple choice questions, make sure that you have written the number "1" in the appropriate boxes. If the question does not apply to the person, make sure to have filled the appropriate boxes with an oblique hyphen, indicating that the given question does not apply to this person. Lastly, no box must remain empty, except the case of multiple choice questions when the item does not apply to the person [or the household].

3.7. Sequential order for recording individuals on the household form

The sequential order for recording the persons which is recommended here aims at facilitating the data collection in the household, and improving its quality. Indeed, the selected method will permit, if followed in a rigorous way, to reduce to a minimum the omissions of persons. Remember that the census is based on the essential principle of the complete enumeration, that is, to count without omission and with no double count. However, before tackling the proposed method, it is necessary to define the terms that will be used later. This is the case in particular for the concept of "non-accompanied person", "accompanied person", and "family unit" [Personne non-accompagnée, Personne accompagnée, Noyau familial].

"Non-accompanied person" [Personne non-accompagnée]:

A "non-accompanied person" is a person who is unmarried (no spouse), and without children. An "accompanied person" is a person who fulfills at least one of the two conditions mentioned above. So, a person living in a household with his or her spouse, or with his or her child will be considered an ‘accompanied person".

Family unit [noyau familial]:

The family unit (or family kernel) corresponds to the "biological family" [famille biologique]. It is composed of both parents (or one of them) and their direct offspring (biological children) not-accompanied. The head of the family unit is called the "Head of kernel" [Chef de noyau: CN]. So, a household may be composed of one or several family units. However, a polygamous household including non-accompanied children is considered as a single family unit if all the members live and eat together in the same compound. A family unit can also include the direct parents, the brothers and sisters, the uncles and aunts, the grand-children, the nephews, the non-accompanied nieces who depend on the head of the kernel, etc.

The recording of the household members is based on the principle of the closest kinship (relationship). So, the first person to be recorded on the household form is the head of household (C.M.). Then, record closest kin to the household head, before recording the further kin, and the persons without any kin relationship with the former, while respecting as much as possible the belonging to a given family unit.

The following order is proposed:

The household head, if he is a man;

The un-accompanied children, whose mother does not live in the household, by decreasing order of age, that is by starting with the oldest and finishing with the youngest, whatever the gender;
His first wife, if applicable;
The un-accompanied children of the first wife, starting with the oldest, and so forth whatever the gender;
The other wives of the household head, sorted by marriage rank (2nd, 3rd and so-forth), and their un-accompanied children;
The other persons of the household head family unit, under the condition that they do not belong to another family unit; this is the case of the direct parents of the household head, of close kin of the household head such as brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, grand-children, nephews, nieces, cousins, other kin, etc.;
Similarly, if several accompanied daughters live with their husband in the household, the sequential order for recording them will be decreasing. One will start with the family unit of the oldest daughter, then the daughter that follows, and so-forth.
The household head, if she is a woman;
Her non-accompanied children resident in the household, by decreasing order of age, that is by starting with the oldest, and finishing with the youngest, and this whatever the gender;
Her co-wife, or her co-wives, by marriage rank if applicable, and their non-accompanied children.
Following the family unit of the household head, you will record all the other family units, in the following order:
Direct descendants of the household head, who are accompanied, by decreasing order of age;
Parents of the household head, when these constitute a distinct family unit;
Other close kin (brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts, grand-children, nieces and nephews, cousins, other kin, etc.);
The other family units, not related by blood to the household head, but who belong to the household (servants, other employed persons, for instance).

Note: before going to the next questions, ask the respondent whether he or she has forgotten to declare another household member, resident present (RP), resident absent (RA) or a visitor (VIS).

Remarks: if there are people in a compound, or in a building, they (maids, students, tenants), whether or not related by blood, who could be considered theoretically as a household (taking their meals separately), will be recorded in the same household. However, all persons living in the same room are considered as belonging to the same family unit.

If a person is living in a compound, has taken a meal, but does not eat regularly with the household members, he or she will be recorded as "isolated" [isole].

When there is ambiguity on who is the real head of household, record as the household head (CM) the person who declares himself or herself as such at time of the interview.

Chapter IV: Detailed Instructions for Filling out the Household Form

The questionnaire is divided into 6 main parts, each labeled with a letter.

A. Characteristics of the household identification;
B. Characteristics of the persons;
C. Deaths that occurred in the household during the past 12 months;
D. Out-migrations that occurred in the household during the five years;
E. Housing characteristics;
F. Questions related with poverty.

4.1. Characteristics of the household identification

Numbering the questionnaire, and Observations

4.1.1. Numbering the questionnaires

The household form is expected to fit a certain number of persons in the household. If one form is not enough, use as many supplementary forms as necessary to enumerate them all. Copy again the information on the geographical data (top part of the first page) on all the supplementary questionnaires).

Once the household identification characteristics have been filled, record its sequential number in the box located on the row "Questionnaire Number" [Numéro du questionnaire].

Once you are done with enumerating the whole household, record the number of forms filled for this household (the highest value of questionnaire numbers) in the box located on the row "Number of forms filled" [Nombre de questionnaires remplis], and this for all the forms filled for the household.

[Omitted example of filling out questions]

4.1.1. Part A: Characteristics of household identification

Do not write anything in the shaded boxes.

Record in words the names of the region, the department, the district, and the rural community, or the urban commune and the "commune d'arrondissement" (when applicable) in which the census track is located.

Circle the code corresponding to the area of residence: Urban or Rural. Urban areas correspond to the set of all urban communes (see the definition of the commune in the chapter on definitions and concepts). Conversely, the rural areas correspond to the rest of the country, that is, the set of all the villages. Write the corresponding code.

Record the census track number in the appropriate boxes.

Record the name of the village if the census track is in a rural community, or the name of the neighborhood if it is in an urban area.

All this information is available on the first page of your household visits booklet.

Record the name of the hamlet, when applicable.

Record the compound number that you have mentioned in your household visits booklet; you have already numbered all the compounds in a sequential order, from 1 to N, within your census track.

Record the household number that you have mentioned in your household visits booklet. Household numbers are given sequentially, 1 to N, within each compound.

Note: It may happen that in a census track a hamlet be attached to the closest village [for the census], but that this hamlet does not depend administratively from that village. In this case, the census enumerator is asked to write on the line (A.08) the name of the village to which it belongs, and not that to which it is attached.

4.1.2. Summary table (recap)

At the bottom of the first page, you will find a summary table for the household population, broken down by gender and residence status (categories RP, RA, and VIS for visitors), as well as the totals. You shall fill in this table after completion of the enumeration of the household. You shall record the numbers on the first questionnaire filled, while counting all the household members by gender and residence status, for all the questionnaires filled for this household.

4.1.3 Signature and dates of completion of the various operations

Record the date of the end of interviews of the household, and your name in full letters. The controller and the supervisor will also write their names on the line that is prepared for them, as well as their stamp indicating that they have examined the questionnaire.

Note: Copy again these data faithfully in the household visits booklet.

4.2. Section B: Individual Characteristics

B01.Sequential number

Sequential number of the person in the household

You must give a sequential number for each person enumerated in the household. Example: 01, 02, 03, 10, etc.

In case when the data collection in a household continues on another questionnaire, you must continue the numbering. If you cross-out a line, for any reason, change the numbering if it was already done.

Note: For each individual, fill in the boxes B01 to B23 before skipping to another person.

B02. First names and Last name

Write down the usual first names and the last name (family name) for each individual, then the first letter of the other names, if applicable. Write the full family name (last name), in capital letters (upper case).

Example: Amadou M. Dieng

Remarks: For twins, write in the "observations" box their names and their rank.

B03. Relationship to the household head

The relationship of members of the family unit will be that they have with the household head (CM).

1. CM - Head of household
2. EP - Spouse (husband or wife)
3. ENF - Child (son or daughter)
4. PAR - Parents (father or mother)
5. GPA - Grandparent (grandfather or grandmother)
6. F/S - Brother or sister
7. PF - Grandchild (grandson or granddaughter)
8. AP - Other kinship (for instance uncle, aunt, in-laws)
9. SL - No kin relationship

B04. Gender (Sex)

Circle:
1. "MASC" for male sex
2. "FEM" for female sex

Note: Do not rely on the first name. If the person you are enumerating is not the respondent, always ask whether the person is a male or a female. Some first names may indicate as well a man or a woman.

Example: Adama, Ardouma, Dominique, etc.

For babies, always ask for the gender of the child.

B05. B06. Date of birth and Age

The date of birth allows one to compute the age of the persons, and is therefore a very important piece of information of the census. You must therefore do your best in order to obtain precise information on this matter. Two cases can be found:

1st case: For all persons who have a birth certificate or an identity card with a complete date of birth, ask whether this date is from a proper birth registration or whether it is based on a court decision [jugement supplétif].

If this is a formal birth registration, register the month number (two digits) in the boxes under which is written month, and year of birth in the boxes under which is written year.

[A birth date example from the original was omitted]

Remarks: if the month and the year of birth are unknown, leave the boxes blank, and go to the next question.

When this is a court decision, estimate by yourself his or her age with the help of the historical calendar, or with any other method for checking ages (age at first marriage, comparison with other persons of the same age, age of the first child for instance).

When the person does not have any birth certificate or ID card: then estimate his or her age as rigorously as possible, with the help of the historical calendar and of any other means of estimation, and write the estimated age in the "age" box; for persons aged 98 years and above, write "98".

Note: For children under five years of age, do accept the birth certificates and possibly the health cards.

B07. Place of birth

This is the place where the person was effectively born, and not necessarily the place mentioned on his or her ID card. Ask the following question: "In which rural community, or in which country were you born?"

Record the name of the [urban] "Commune", followed by the letter "C", or the name of the [rural] "Communauté rurale", followed by the letter "CR". If the name of the "Communauté rurale" is not known, write the name of the District (Arrondissement) of birth, followed by the letter "A". If the name of the District is not known, record the name of the Department, followed by the letter "D". If it is not known, record the name of the "Region", followed by the letter "R".

Example: A person was born in the Thiès Commune: record "Thiès C". If the person was born in the Thiès Department: record "Thiès D". If the person was born in the Thiès Region, without knowing in which District or Department: record "Thiès R".

If the person was born abroad, record the name of the country of birth. Example: "France" for a person born in France, "The Gambia" for a person born in Gambia.

Note: For the persons born outside Senegal, give the name of the country of birth, and not the name of the place of birth in that country.

B08. Residence status

Circle: 1. RP, for resident present (see definitions and concepts);
Circle: 2. RA, for resident absent;
Circle: 3. VIS, for visitors and travelers.

Remarks: A child born on the morning of the census enumerator's visit needs to be recorded. The maids who come back to the village during the rainy season are enumerated at their parents' home, and not at their employer's home.

Note: Enumerate as Resident Absent (RA) in the household persons such as: fishermen in the sea, flying staff in air companies or sailing staff in ship companies. Enumerate as Resident Present (RP) the servants who spent the night in the household. Persons who are traveling for a duration less than 6 months are counted as Resident Absent (RA); after 6 months of absence, they are no longer enumerated, and therefore shall not be recorded on the household form. Polygamous men who do not have a fixed residence (visiting husbands) are enumerated as resident (RP or RA) in the household of their first wife, and visitor (VIS) if they spent the night at the home of any of their other wives.

B09. Residence five years ago

This question applies only to the persons aged 5 years and above. Record legibly the name of the [urban] commune or the name of the [rural] Communauté rurale if this is a place in Senegal, or record the name of the country if this is a foreign country.
Write an oblique hyphen for children under five years of age.

B10. Ethnicity or nationality

Record in plain words the ethnic group declared for the Senegalese, and the nationality for the foreigners.

Example: Wolof, Diola, Mancagne, etc.

For Senegalese who cannot determine their ethnic group, or for those who became Senegalese by naturalization, record "Other".

For foreigners, record the name of the country of origin, of which they have the nationality.

Example: Guinea-Conakry, France, the Gambia, etc.

B11. Languages spoken

Write in order the first and the second language spoken by the interviewed person. This is the language that the person speaks the most often, by order of importance, even if this is a foreign language. For persons who do not have a second language, write "None". For persons who are mute, write "None" for both the first and the second language.

The second language is that spoken in daily life after the first language.

For children who speak, ask the question, and write the declared answer.

For newborn children, record the mother's first and second languages, when applicable.

B12. Religion

For Muslims, circle the code corresponding to the brotherhood declared, among the followings items:

1 - KH: for Khadre
2 - LA: for Layene
3 - MU: for Mouride
4 - TI: for Tidiane
5 - AM: for other Muslims who do not belong to any of these brotherhoods.

For Christians:

6 - CA: for Catholics
7 - PR: for Protestants
8 - AC: for other Christians (Lutherans, Jehovah Witnesses, etc.)
Others:
9 - AR: for other religions (Jews, Buddhists, Animists, etc.) and the persons without religion.

Note: Ask for the religion of each person in the household, since persons of the same household may have different religions. For the children, take the father's religion.

B13. Disability / Handicap

Ask the following question: "Do you have a member of your household who suffers from any disability or handicap that could limit him (or her) in his (or her) daily activities?

If the answer is "no", circle: 1. None [AU], and go to the next question.

If the answer is "yes"; ask "what type of disability or handicap". Then record all the disability or handicaps declared, by writing the number "1" in the boxes corresponding to the different types of handicap given by the respondent.

AU - for persons who have no disability or handicap;
AV- for persons who are blind;
SO - for persons who are deaf, those who cannot hear;
MU - for persons who are mute, those who lost the ability to speak;
IMI - for persons who have a disability in the lower limbs. This may be one leg or both legs together;
IMS - for persons who have a disability in the upper limbs. This may be one arm or both arms together;
DM - for persons who are mentally deficient (lunatics, Down syndrome, etc.);
AL - for the albinos;
LM - for the lepers with mutilations;
AU - for the other cases not mentioned above.

Remarks: The natural mental weakness of the elderly is not considered as a handicap; a person who lost one eye is also not considered to be handicapped.

Note: the following questions (B14 and B15) apply only to persons aged 3 years and above. Write an oblique hyphen for all the persons aged less than 3 years.

B14. Schooling

Write the number "1" in the boxes corresponding to the various types of school attended:

AU - for "None"
FR - for "French school"
FA - for "Franco-Arabic school"
AR - for "Arabic school"
CO - for "Koranic school"
AUT - for other schools

Note: If the person has never been to school, or if he or she has been only to Arabic school or Koranic school, skip to question B16 on literacy.

B15 - Level of education

The question applies to all persons aged 3 years and above, and who were enrolled or are currently enrolled in a formal teaching school (French, Franco-Arabic or Others).

Then circle the code corresponding to the answer given.

[] 00 None
[] 01Pre-school / kindergarten

Primary (élémentaire):

[] 02 Preschool (CI)
[] 03 First grade (CP)
[] 04 Second grade (CE1)
[] 05 Third grade (CE2)
[] 06 Fourth grade (CM1)
[] 07 Fifth grade (CM2)

Secondary first cycle (moyen)

[] 08 Sixth grade (6ème)
[] 09 Seventh grade (5ème)
[] 10 Eighth grade (4ème)
[] 11 Ninth grade (3ème)

Secondary second cycle (secondaire)

[] 12 Tenth grade (Seconde)
[] 13 Eleventh grade (Première)
[] 14 Twelfth grade (Terminale)

University / Higher education (supérieur)

[] 15 Higher, first year
[] 16 Higher, second year
[] 17 Higher, third year (Bachelors) [Licence] or equivalent
[] 18 Higher, fourth year (Master's) [Maîtrise] or equivalent
[] 19 Higher, fifth year or more

Examples:

- For a student currently in grade 5 (CM2), or for a person who does not go to school any longer, but who stopped in grade 5 (CM2), write "07"
- For a student currently in grade 8 (4ème), or for a person who does not go to school any longer, but who stopped in grade 8 (4ème), write "10"
- For a student currently in third year university, or for a person who completed his or her studies at the same level, write "17".
- If a person went to technical or vocational school, try first to determine the level by comparison, write the number years of schooling in this school. (A list of correspondence between the levels of schools will be given to you).

Remarks: For persons who no longer go to school, take the last grade completed.

Note: The following questions (from B16 to B19) apply to all persons aged 6 years and above. Write an oblique hyphen for the persons who are less than 6 years of age.

B16. Literacy

Record all the languages that the respondent knows to read and write, by writing the number "1" in the appropriate boxes.

AU - None, if the person does not read any language
FR - French
AR - Arabic
WO - Wolof
PU - Pulaar
SE - Sereer
MA - Mandinka
DI - Diola
SO - Soninke
AL - Other language

B17 - Employment status in the last 12 months

This question applies to all persons aged 6 years and above. The activity is that in which the person was employed most of the time during the past 12 months.

Ask the following question: "During the past twelve months, have you practiced a paid activity in a continuous way during at least 3 months?"

If the answer is yes, circle "1 OCC" for employed.

Example: During the past twelve months, the person was farming his or her fields, or practiced fishing, or animal husbandry, etc. in a continuous way for at least 3 months; circle "1 OCC" for employed.

Warning: A woman may, in addition to domestic tasks, carry out a work outside her home, or inside her home; for instance, farming a field, or trading. For such a woman, circle "1 OCC" for employed. In rural areas, it is rare to find a woman who does only domestic work; often she has a main activity which might be farming, animal husbandry, etc. So, for a woman who claims to be housewife, ask her whether she does only domestic work.

Circle "2 CHO" for jobless persons, if the person is looking for work, and has not worked in a continuous way for at least 3 months during the past twelve months. Make sure that the person is really looking for work, either for a first job if he or she has never worked, or for a new job if he or she has lost the work that he or she had.

Circle "3 EL" for students or pupils.

For trainees, who worked for at least 3 months in the past twelve months, "1 OCC" for employed.

Circle "4 FO" for housewives, that is, for women who have no other tasks than those that they do at home (domestic tasks).

Circle "5 RET" for retired or pensioned people, who do not work any longer and have not practiced any activity for at least 3 months during the past twelve months.

Circle "6 VI" for elderly persons, who do not work any longer because they are too old.

Circle "7 AC" for handicapped persons who cannot work because of their disability.

Circle "8 ME" for beggars, that is, persons who earn money by begging for at least three months.

Circle "9 AU" for other cases (people with private means, people of leisure, etc.).

The following question (B18) applies only to persons for whom you have already circled "1 OCC" for employed.

B18. Main occupation practiced in the past 12 months

This is the occupation which the respondent practiced most of his or her time during the past 12 months.

For the employed persons, ask the following question: "What is the activity you are practicing, or that you did practiced during the past twelve months?"
Record the activity (occupation) declared by the respondent.

If a person practiced several activities, record the activity (occupation) that he or she estimates to have practiced most of the time.


Example of activities (occupation): farmer, bricklayer, fisherman, stock breeder, driver, auto mechanics, engineer for agricultural work, electrician engineer, vegetable gardener.

Note: always describe well the declared occupation.

Example: Retail salesperson, wholesale tradesperson, petty trader (bana-bana), apprentice for transport vehicle (motor boy), driver's aid (coxeur), postmaster, bus ticket collector, etc.

B19. Work status

Ask the following question: "What is your situation in the occupation that you have declared at the previous question?"

Circle "1 EM" for employer. An employer is a person who employs salaried people, that he or she is paying in cash or in kind, or both ways.

Note: The persons who pay maids are not considered as employers.

Circle "2 IN" for self employed. These are persons who work on their own (for their own sake), and who have no employees that he or she pays, but who may possibly utilize family aids or apprentices.

Circle "3 SA" for salaried persons. This is the case of a person who works for an employer, private or public, and who receives a payment (a salary or a commission, in cash or in kind), whether regular or not. Are also considered as salaried the agricultural seasonal worker [sourgha] who is paid in part or completely in cash or in kind.

Circle "4 ST" for trainees. He or she just completed a school, technical or vocational, and is looking for acquiring a work experience in his or her skills. They are generally students in national schools and institutes of technology or university institutes. The persons who are following a training prior being hired are not considered as salaried, but rather as trainees. The students who have not yet completed their coursus are not considered as trainees, even if they follow a training path in an industrial company, a bank or any production unit.

A trainee is therefore a person who has completed his or her studies, who works in a company, where he or she has not been hired, but who is rather looking for acquiring a certain work experience, or for consolidating his or her competence.

Circle "5 AF" for family aid. A family aid is a person who works for a relative, without receiving a payment.

Circle "6 AP" for apprentice. An apprentice is a person who learns a skill. He or she may receive a regular payment, in cash or in kind, or may not receive a payment while still getting occasionally little gifts, or even may be paying his or her employer for learning a skill.

Circle "7 AU" for other cases.

B20 - Marital status

Only the persons aged 12 years and above are concerned by this question.
Write an oblique hyphen for the persons aged less than 12 years.

Circle "0 MO" for men and women who are married in monogamy unions (only one wife for men, no co-wife for women).

Circle "1 P1" for men who have two wives, and for women who are the first wife.

Circle "2 P2" for men who have three wives, and for women who are the second wife.

Circle "3 P3" for men who have four wives or more, and for women who are the third wife or wife of higher rank.

Circle "4 CEL" for men or women who are single (never married)

Circle "5 VE" for widowed men or women.

Circle "6 DI" for divorced men and women.

Note: Some persons who are widowed or divorced could have the tendency to claim that they are single. For this reason, you shall never assume that a person claiming to be single has never been married in his or her lifetime.

Circle "7 AU" for the other cases: the persons who live in informal union or in free union, as well as the couples who live separated while still being united by the marriage bond.

Note: A marriage is a status [the French text says a fact] contracted either at city hall, or according to religion, or according to traditional Senegalese customs.

A man who had two wives, one of which died or divorced, is then married, in monogamous union. Circle then "0 MO".

B21. Number of children ever born

This part applies only to women aged 12 years and more.
Write an oblique hyphen for women aged less than 12 years.

Record the number of children ever born, broken down by sex.

[Example table omitted]

Note: These are all the children ever born to that woman who is being enumerated (whatever the age of the children, and whoever the father), whether still alive or deceased after the birth. A child is said to be born alive when he or she showed any sign of life at birth (cry, breathing, heart beating, etc.). These children may live with their mother in the household, or may live elsewhere.

[Example omitted]

B22. Number of children surviving

Record the number of children still alive, broken down by sex. These are the children ever born to this woman, whoever the father, and who are still alive.

These children may live with their mother in the household, or may live elsewhere.

Note: Do no leave the box empty, and write '00' if there is no child surviving.

Write an oblique hyphen for women aged less than 12 years.

B23 - Births in past 12 months
This question applies only to women aged from 12 to 54 years.

You have to write the number of live births of each sex that the woman had during the past twelve months. Remember that a child is said to be born alive if he or she showed any sign of life at birth (cry, breathing, heart beating, etc.).

Do not forget the births followed by a death, that the respondents have a tendency to omit, for voluntary or involuntary reasons linked to taboos or prohibitions.

If a woman had no live birth, write:
"00" in the "male" box, and "00" in the "female" box.

Note: Do not leave the boxes empty, and write the number of births broken down by sex. If there was no birth, write "00" in the appropriate boxes.

For a woman who had twins, both males, write:
"02" in the "male" box, and "00" in the "female" box.

Write an oblique hyphen for women aged less than 12 years.

4.3 Section C: Deaths that Occurred in the Household in the past 12 Months

This section has for reference the letter "C", followed by an index (2-digits). You have to record the deaths that occurred in the household in the past 12 months.

Ask whether "During the last twelve months, did any death occur in the household?"

If the answer is "No", write an oblique hyphen, and go to the questions on out-migration (Section D).

If the answer is "Yes", record the death or the deaths that occurred in the household, in the following way:

C01. Sequential number

In the questionnaire, a maximum of 6 deaths were anticipated, numbered from 1 to 6. If there were more than 6 deaths in the household, use a second household questionnaire to register the other deaths.

C02. First names and last name

Record the usual first name(s) the first initial of the other names (if applicable), and the last name of each person who died in the past 12 months. Write the family name in capital (upper cases).

Example: Amadou M. DIENG

Note: If the first name of the child is not known, write "PND" (first name not declared) in the corresponding box.

C03. Gender (sex)

Circle the "1 M" for the male sex, and "2 F" for the female sex. For children, do not let yourself be influenced by the first name. Always ask whether this is a male or a female. Some first names may as well designate a man or a woman. Be careful with children.

C04. Age at death

Record the age of the deceased person at the time of death.

Example: age 14 years, write "14" in the appropriate box. For persons aged 98 years and above, write "98". For infants, less than one year of age, write "00"

The date of birth, which permits you to compute the age of the person, is very important information for the census. You must therefore do your best to obtain precise information on this subject. Two cases may occur:

1st case: For persons who have a birth registration or an identity card with a complete date of birth, ask whether this date comes from a real declaration to civil registration or from a court decision.

If this is a court decision, estimate his or her age with the help of the historical calendar, or any other cross-checking method (age at first marriage, comparison with other members of the same age, age of the first child, for instance). This is with the aim of estimating his or her age at death.

2nd case: The person does not have a birth certificate or an ID card. Estimate then rigorously the age with the help of the historical calendar, or any other cross-checking method.

Note: For children younger than five years of age, accept the birth certificates and possibly the health cards. If the age at death is 98 years and above, write "98".

C05. Vital registration

Circle "1 Yes" if the death was registered, "2 No" if the death was not registered, and "3 Dkn" if the respondent does not know whether the death was registered or not. This applies to the death of "First name" and "Last name".

C06. Maternal death

This question applies to deaths of women which were not due to an accident.

Ask the following question: "Did the death of this woman "first name, last name" occur while she was pregnant, or delivering, or within 40 days following delivery?

Circle "1 YES" if yes, "2 NO" if not, and "3 DKN" if the respondent does not know.

4.4 Section D: Out Migration that Occurred in the Household in the Past Five Years

This section deals with out-migrations which occurred in the household during the five years preceding your visit in the household. For this, we advise you to pay attention to the issues of the reference period. This means that you shall avoid to include departures from the household which occurred outside the reference period, or to exclude departures that did in fact occur during the reference period.

Note: Out-migrations apply only to departures from the household for periods of six months or more.

D01. Sequential number

In the questionnaire, a maximum of 6 out-migrations were anticipated, numbered from 1 to 6. If there were more than 6 out-migrations in the household, use a second household questionnaire to register the others. Do not forget to fill in the front page.

D02. First names and last name

Record the usual first name(s) and the last name of all the household members who out-migrated in the past 5 years.

D03. Gender (sex)

Circle "1 M" for the male sex, and "2 F" for the female sex.

D04. Age at departure

This is the age that the out-migrant had at the time when he or she left Senegal. As for the preceding sections, the age estimation procedures already displayed still apply.

D05. Relationship with the household head

The relationship of the household member is the relationship they had with the household head.

Circle the code corresponding to the declared relationship:
[Warning; the codes do not match those on the questionnaire]

[] 1 "CM" for the household head
[] 2 "EP" for a spouse (husband or wife)
[] 3 "ENF" for a son or daughter of the household head
[] 4 "PAR" for parents of the household head (father / mother)
[] 5 "GPA" for grand- parents of the household head (Grand-father / Grand-mother);
[] 6 "F/S" for a brother or a sister of the household head
[] 7 "PF" for a grand-child of the household head (Grand-son / Grand-daughter)
[] 8 "AP" for other kin of the household head (example uncle, aunt, in-laws)
[] 9 "SL" No kin relationship

D06. Country of destination

This is the country to which the household member who out-migrated during the past five years went. Write clearly the name of the country of destination.

D07. Reasons for out-migrating

Circle the code corresponding to the reason for out-migration of the household member:

[] 1 "TRA" for work
[] 2 "ET/AP" for studies or training
[] 3 "MAR" for marriage: these are the out-migrants who left the household for getting married
[] 4 "SAN" for health reasons
[] 5 "FAM" for family reasons
[] 6 "AUT" for other reasons
[] 7 "NSP" for unknown reasons

Note: if there was no out-migration, write an oblique hyphen.

4.5 Section E: Housing Characteristics

All the housing questions refer to the household, and not to the household head only.

E01. Type of dwelling unit

Record the type of dwelling unit occupied by the household, by circling the corresponding code:

[] 1 Hut
[] 2 Shack
[] 3 House, no floor
[] 4 House, with floors
[] 5 Flat in apartment building
[] 6 Other

E02. Number of living rooms

You must record the number of living rooms which are effectively occupied by the household, in particular: the bedrooms, the living rooms, the dining rooms, and the other rooms which are inhabited. This is not necessarily the total number of rooms in the house which are called "room", but rather the number of rooms used for sleeping in a regular way.

For instance, the kitchens, the storage rooms, the bathrooms, and the toilets are not taken into account.

In the case of rooms occupied by several households in common, you must attribute them to one of the households. For instance, for a living room shared by two households.

E03. Ownership status

Circle, depending on the case:

1. Landlord: if the dwelling unit belongs to the household that occupies it. In case of leasing, also circle "1 Landlord". The dwelling unit must belong to at least one of the household members.

2. Condominium: if the household shares property rights on the dwelling unit jointly with other households, or jointly with a private or public organism.

3. Tenant: if the household rents the building or the flat that it occupies.

4. Paid by employer: this is the case where the household occupies [for free] a dwelling unit provided by the employer.

5. Free family lodging: this is the case where a household is lodged [for free] by the extended family.

6. Others: this covers all the statuses other than the ones mentioned above.

E04. Type of toilet facility

You have to circle the item corresponding to the answer given, that is, the type of toilet facility the most often used by the household members. This rule is made because the household members may utilize several types of toilet facility.

A flush toilet (water closet) corresponds to a type of toilet where wastes are drained with water running into pipes. The flush toilet might go into a sewage or to a tank. A cesspool corresponds to a hole dug into the soil.

Note: Record in 6 "Others" the case of chamber pots, emptied every morning.

E05. Source of water

You have to circle the item corresponding to the source of water the most often used. If the household has several sources [the French text says also one source] of water, keep that which is used most often. If the source varies according to season, select the source that was used at the time of your visit.

E06. Main type of lighting

You have to circle the item corresponding to the type of lighting the most often used by the household members. If there are several types of lighting, circle the most often used.

E07. Main type of fuel for cooking

Circle the main type of fuel used for cooking. These fuels are: wood, coal / charcoal, gas, electricity and other.

E08. Type of wall

Circle the item corresponding to the dominant type of material utilized for the walls of the dwelling unit occupied by the household.

E09. Type of roof

Circle the item corresponding to the dominant type of material utilized for the roof of the dwelling unit occupied by the household.

E10. Type of floor

Circle the item corresponding to the dominant type of material utilized for the floor of the dwelling unit occupied by the household.

E11. Household amenities

This information gives a measure of the socioeconomic status of the household.
Record each good, and record the number "1" in the appropriate boxes corresponding to amenities and equipment goods existing, functioning, or not working temporarily.

Note: there are several possible answers.

E12. Household means of transportation

As for question E11, this question will also permit to give a raw measure of the household socio-economic status. One asks whether any member owns a car, a bicycle, a motorcycle, a cart, a boat (pirogue), or other means. Quote each mean of transportation, and record "1" in all the boxes corresponding to the mean of transportation existing in the household.

Note: there are several possible answers. A child bicycle is not a mean of transportation, it is a toy.

E13. Household means of production

Ask whether the household owns a mean of production, that is, a tool that allows producing goods or services.
Write "1" in all the boxes corresponding to the means of production declared by the household.

Note: there are several possible answers (see questionnaire). Do record only the means of production that are working.

E14 - Main mode of disposal for household garbage

Circle the code corresponding to the answer.
A wild (illegal) dump is a non-authorized dump, generally in the wild.
Burying the garbage consists in pouring the garbage in a hole that is later filled.
On the contrary, "burning" consists in destroying the garbage by burning them.

E15. Main mode of disposal for sewage water

Circle the code corresponding to the answer.

4.6. Section F: Questions Related to Poverty

F01. Household meals

Circle the appropriate code:

[] 1 Yes, a meal was skipped because of lack of resources during the past 12 months.
[] 2 No, no meal was skipped because of lack of resources during the past 12 months.

F02. Health care for household members

Circle the appropriate code:

[] 1 Yes, it has happened that a household member could not get health care because of lack of resources [during the past 12 months].
[] 2 No, it has not happened that a household member could not get health care because of lack of resources [during the past 12 months].
[] 3 Not applicable, no household member was sick during the past 12 months.

Chapter V: Last General Advice for Data Collection

[Information on last general advice was omitted]

Annex II: Instructions Related to the Enumeration of Persons in Transhumance and Refugees

As for the population living in ordinary households, you must also enumerate the persons in transhumance and the refugees that you may find in your census track, or those who will be indicated to you by your controller. However, there is no special questionnaire for this population category: you will therefore have to use the "household form" and the "transhumance form".

However, special care must be taken for:

Households of persons in transhumance and of refugees are recorded without the population numbers in the "household visits booklet" with the mention "Transhumant" or "Refugee" in the observations box;

The identification section on the questionnaires for these households of persons in transhumance or of refugees must be filled with a pencil;

All the questionnaires filled for the persons in transhumance and for the refugees, as well as the "Transhumance form" in the same census track must be classified separately, and filed in the same bag, with a mention in full words: "Transhumant" or "Refugee"

Instructions for filling the "Transhumance form"

1. First names and last name: these are the first names and family name of the person (if he or she is alone), or of the head of household, or of the head of the group.

2. Number of persons: this is where you record the number of persons (men, women, children) involved in the transhumance. However, the information concerning each person will be recorded on the household questionnaire by the census enumerator.

3. Place of usual residence: this is the usual place of residence for the person, the household, or the group.

4. Itinerary Periods: these are the various places where they move, and possibility the periods.

5. Observations: these are the pieces of information that could help gather good information.