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Enumerator's Manual
2010 Census of Population and Housing
National Statistics Office
Philippines

Foreword
The Census of Population and Housing (CPH) is an inventory of the total population, and housing units in the Philippines and its characteristics. The undertaking provides data that are useful in the formulation of policy, planning and program development in government; in determining business opportunities and industry status; in research and development; and in further academic studies.

The National Statistics Office is the lead agency in the conduct of the 2010 CPH with May 1 as reference date. With the assistance and support of the Department of Education and other national government agencies, local government units, non-governmental organizations and the private sector, the nationwide undertaking shall commence on May 17, 2010.

The success of the census largely depends on effective and efficient delivery of services by enumerators (ENs) who shall gather information through house-to-house visits and personal interview.

The 2010 CPH Enumerator's Manual is the basic reference book of ENs in conducting the interview. Concepts, operational procedures, and instructions on how to accomplish the various census forms are discussed in the manual to equip them with the proper knowledge relevant to the performance of their noble task while in the field. It will also come in handy in the event that questions and clarifications are raised by the respondents on the spot.
The role of the ENs in the census is of prime importance. It is hoped that with this manual each and every one of them will be able to understand and to realize the significant role they will play in the generation of accurate and reliable information which is the ultimate goal of the activity. May they be inspired and be committed to accomplish their assigned tasks with utmost dedication.
Carmelita N. Ericta
Administrator
Manila, Philippines
February 2010

[Table of contents and list of appendices, illustrations, and acronyms not presented here.]
[pg.1]
1. Introduction
This chapter introduces the 2010 Census of Population and Housing (2010 CPH) and explains its general and specific objectives. It also discusses the various uses of census data and other important facts about this census, specifically on its reference date and time, legal basis, confidentiality, and organizational set-up.

1.1 The census of population and housing
Census of Population and Housing (CPH) refers to the entire process of collecting, compiling, evaluating, analyzing, publishing, and disseminating data about the population and the living quarters in a country. It entails the listing and recording of the characteristics of each individual and each living quarter as of a specified time and within a specified territory. In other words, the CPH offers a "snapshot" of the entire population on a specific date; that is, how many people reside within the national borders, who they are, and where they live during such specified date. Also, included are the characteristics of the housing units where they reside.
The 2010 CPH is designed to take an inventory of the total population and housing units in the Philippines and collect information about their characteristics. The census of population is the source of information on the size and distribution of the population, as well as their demographic, social, economic, and cultural characteristics. The census of housing, on the other hand, provides information on the stock of housing units and their structural characteristics and facilities which have bearing on the maintenance of privacy and health, and the development of normal family living conditions. This information is vital for making rational plans and programs for local and national development.
The 2010 CPH is the 13th census of population and the 6th census of housing that will be conducted in the country since the first census was undertaken in 1903.
[pg.2]
[Omitted figure.]

1.2 Objectives of the 2010 CPH
General Objective
The 2010 CPH aims to provide government planners, policy makers, and administrators with data on which to base their social and economic development plans and programs.
Specific Objectives
Specifically, the 2010 CPH aims to:

1. obtain comprehensive data on the size, composition, and distribution of the population of the Philippines;
2. gather data on birth registration, literacy, school attendance, place of school, highest grade/year completed, residence 5 years ago, overseas worker, usual occupation, kind of business or industry, class of worker, place of work, fertility, religion, citizenship, ethnic group, disability, and functional difficulty, and determine their geographic distribution;
3. Take stock of the housing units existing in the country and to get information about their geographic location, structural characteristics, and facilities, among others;
4. Obtain information on the characteristics of the barangay, which will be used as basis for urban-rural classification; and
5. Serve as sampling frame for use in household-based surveys.
[pg. 3]

1.3 Uses of Census Data
Data collected in this census will be compiled, evaluated, analyzed, published, and disseminated for the use of government, business, industry, social scientists, other research and academic institutions, and the general public. Among the important uses of census data are the following:
In government:

redistricting and apportionment of congressional seats; allocation of resources and revenues; creation of political and administrative units; formulation of policies concerning population and housing; and formulation of programs relative to the delivery of basic services for health, education, housing, and others

In business and industry:

determination of sites for establishing businesses; determination of consumer demands for various goods and services; and determination of supply of labor for the production of goods and services

In research and academic institutions:

conduct of researches on population and other disciplines; and study of population growth and distribution as basis in preparing projections
1.4 Reference date and time
May 1, 2010 is the reference date for the 2010 CPH, on which date the enumeration of the population and the collection of all pertinent data on housing in the Philippines shall refer.
For the purpose of this census, all information to be collected about the population and living quarters will generally be counted as of 12:01 a.m., Saturday, May 1, 2010.
[pg.4]

1.5 Authority for the 2010 CPH
Section 2 of Commonwealth Act No. 591 (see Appendix 1, page 227), approved on August 19, 1940, authorized the then Bureau of the Census and Statistics (now the National Statistics Office or NSO) to collect by enumeration, sampling or other methods, statistics and other information concerning the population and to conduct, for statistical purposes, investigations and studies of social and economic conditions in the country, among others.
Batas Pambansa Bldg. 72 (see Appendix 2, page 230), which was passed into law on June 11, 1980, further accorded the NSO the authority to conduct population censuses every ten years beginning in 1980, without prejudice to the undertaking of special censuses on agriculture, industry, commerce, housing, and other sectors as may be approved by the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA).
Section 9 of Executive Order No. 121 (see Appendix 3, page 233), otherwise known as the Reorganization Act of the Philippine Statistical System, which was issued on January 30, 1987, declared that the "NSO shall be the major statistical agency responsible for generating general purpose statistics and for undertaking such censuses and surveys as may be designated by the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB)."

1.6 Confidentiality
All personnel who are involved in the 2010 CPH are required to maintain in strict confidence any information pertaining to any particular household or person that is obtained during the census.
Section 4 of Commonwealth Act No. 591 states very specifically that information obtained from the census respondents shall be held strictly confidential and shall not be divulged to any person, except authorized NSO personnel acting in the performance of their duties.
Further, this section restricts the use of individual information collected for taxation, investigation, or law enforcement. Any person violating the provisions shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than 600 pesos or by imprisonment of not more than six months, or both. If anyone is found guilty of violating this confidentiality provision, his/her services will be terminated immediately and he/she will be prosecuted under this law.
[pg. 5]

1.7 The 2010 CPH Organizational Set-Up
The NSO, headed by the Administrator, is the agency mandated to formulate and execute plans for the 2010 CPH. All directives pertaining to the census shall emanate from the NSO Administrator. To assist in the various aspects of this activity, the National Census Coordinating Board (NCCB) was created, with the Director General of NEDA as Chairperson, and the Secretaries from other Departments as Members. The NSO Administrator serves as the Executive Officer of the NCCB.
For the entire conduct of the 2010 CPH, the Director of HSD shall supervise the 2010 CPH Project Staff (CPS 2010), which serves as the monitoring hub and communications and action center for this nationwide undertaking.
In the region, the NSO Regional Director (RD) acts as the Executive Officer of the Regional Census Coordinating Board (RCCB), with the NEDA RD as Chairperson. Being responsible for the coordination, monitoring, and supervision of operations in all provinces within the region, the NSO RD shall directly supervise the conduct of enumeration in provinces under his/her jurisdiction. In addition, if his/her region hosts the 2010 CPH Census Processing Center (CPC 2010), the RD shall have direct supervision over the machine processing activities in the CPC 2010.
At the provincial level, the NSO Provincial Statistics Officer (PSO) acts as the Executive Officer of the Provincial Census Coordinating Board (PCCB) with the Provincial Governor as Chairperson. The PSO is responsible for the field operations in the province.
The NSO District Statistics Officer (DSO) or the Statistical Coordination Officer (SCO) is the Executive Officer of the City/Municipal Census Coordinating Board (C/MCCB) with the City/Municipal Mayor as Chairperson. The DSO/SCO is responsible for the supervision, monitoring, and coordination of the cities/municipalities within the district.
Under the DSO/SCO are the Census Area Supervisors (CASs), Assistant Census Area Supervisors (ACASs), Team Supervisors (TSs) and Enumerators (ENs).
The CAS is responsible for the conduct of enumeration in a city or municipality. He will monitor the progress of his TSs and ENs in their assigned EAs. The CAS will be assisted by an ACAS.
The TS, in turn, is responsible for the supervision of ENs. The TS will coordinate with his CAS regarding the progress of enumeration in his assigned EAs. Majority of CASs, TSs, and ENs come from the Department of Education (DepEd). To augment personnel requirements, additional supervisors and ENs are hired.
[Omitted Figure 1.2 illustrates the 2010 CPH Organizational Set-up.]
[pg.7]

2. The Role of an Enumerator
The completeness of census coverage and accuracy of population count would be highly dependent on how well you will do your job as an enumerator (EN). Thus, your acceptance of the job as an EN requires a commitment from you to maintain the highest quality standard, by ensuring that all information that you gather are correct, complete, and strictly in accordance with the instructions, concepts, and definitions explained in this manual, and as discussed during the training.
As an EN, you play a major role in the 2010 Census of Population and Housing (2010 CPH). Your work requires tact in approaching people, attention to the smallest detail, and a sense of responsibility to keep confidential all information about individuals and households that you cover during the census operation. Dedication to your job, therefore, is of prime importance.
This chapter gives the details of your role in the census and your specific duties and responsibilities as a census EN. It also provides information on your relationship with your TS, and the list of supplies and materials that you are going to use during the enumeration.

2.1 Designations of enumerators
As an EN, you will be issued an identification (ID) card as proof of your authority in relation to the conduct of the census. Whenever you are at work for the census, you should always wear your ID card as an evidence of being an authorized census interviewer. This shall also help you convince the respondent to be interviewed. For hired ENs, you will execute a service contract which states your responsibilities and accountabilities
Your appointment/assignment as an EN will be effective officially at the start of the training for ENs. As an EN, you will need to undergo training and complete the tasks assigned to you. It is expected that the enumeration will be completed in more or less 23 days, including Saturdays.
Being appointed/assigned as EN means that you will be the one who will perform all the work expected of an EN. In other words, you should not ask anybody else to do the job for you. Any violation of this rule will be a ground for dismissal/termination. Moreover, you are expected to cooperate and perform other duties related to census taking that may be assigned to you from time to time by your supervisor. In case you fail to perform your duties as an EN, the management has the right to terminate your services.
[pg. 8]

2.2 Duties and Responsibilities of an Enumerator
As an EN, you are expected to do your job to the best of your ability. Your task is to gather correct and precise information according to the instructions discussed in this manual. Data collection involves the following important tasks:

[] 1. Asking all the questions correctly in the required order, as discussed in this manual;
[] 2. Recording/noting down accurately the responses given to you; and
[] 3. Checking each response to ensure that it is reasonable and consistent with all other responses.

You must pay careful attention to each of these tasks. The success of the census undertaking will depend primarily on your ability to perform the foregoing tasks.
Your basic duties as a census EN are as follows:

[] 1. Update the map of your enumeration area (EA) and make block maps using the Mapping Form for congested areas found in the EA;
[] 2. list the buildings, housing units, households, household population, institutional living quarters (ILQs), and institutional population found in the EA using the Listing Booklet (CPH Form 1), and submit accomplished forms to your TS;
[] 3. Plot on the EA/block maps the relative location of buildings and households listed;
[] 4. enumerate correctly all households listed using Common Household Questionnaire (CPH Form 2) or Sample Household Questionnaire (CPH Form 3), and institutional population using the Institutional Population Questionnaire (CPH Form 4);
[] 5. Accomplish the EN's Accomplishment/Progress Monitoring Report (CPH Form 10) at the end of each day; and
[] 6. Submit the Certification of Barangay Chairperson (CPH Form 17) to your TS.
[pg. 9]
Detailed instructions on these tasks are given in the succeeding chapters of this manual.
In order to fully carry out these basic duties, you should perform/ accomplish the following:

[] 1. Attend the training for ENs to gain understanding of the concepts, definitions, and instructions regarding the conduct of the census;
[] 2. Always use this EN's Manual and Codebook as reference and guide in your job;
[] 3. Plan your travel route in advance to reduce unnecessary loss of time and callbacks or revisits to the household;
[] 4. Fill out the census forms completely and accurately;
[] 5. Check your work for completeness, reasonableness, consistency, accuracy and legibility. If you find any omission or inconsistency, which cannot be corrected using other information found in the questionnaire, revisit the household to get the required information;
[] 6. Complete your enumeration assignment within the specified period;
[] 7. Keep all information collected strictly confidential by not showing the accomplished census forms and questionnaires to persons other than your supervisors and authorized NSO personnel (see C.A. 591 Section 4, Appendix 1, page 228 );
[] 8. Report all census-related problems to your immediate supervisor;
[] 9. Submit all accomplished questionnaires (CPH Forms 1, 2, 3, and 4), other census forms (CPH Forms 10 and 17), and maps as scheduled; and
[] 10. Return to NSO all unused forms and questionnaires, EN's manual, Codebook, and your ID upon completion of your assigned work.
[pg. 10]

2.3 Relationship with the Team Supervisor (TS)
For better appreciation of your role as an EN, you must also understand your relationship with your TS. In general, a TS is assigned to supervise about five ENs during the field operations. The major duties and responsibilities of TS in relation to your work as an EN are the following:

[] 1. The TS will provide you with all the necessary materials such as census forms, field reporting forms, barangay/EA maps, and others.
[] 2. Your TS may have general information on matters such as travel, accommodation, terrain, and the like in the area/s assigned to you. It is your duty to obtain all such relevant information from him/her.
[] 3. Your TS is responsible for ensuring that you and all the other ENs under him/her, do the listing, mapping, and enumeration work efficiently and in accordance with the prescribed procedures. He/she plans and organizes the work in his/her area of supervision and sees to it that everything is conducted efficiently and completely within the prescribed time.
[] 4. Your TS will collect two copies of accomplished CPH Form 10, which is the source of information needed to monitor the progress of enumeration. He/she shall review CPH Form 10 against CPH Form 1 for accuracy and consistency of entries.
[] 5. If another EN assigned to your TS is unable to enumerate or complete the enumeration/operation in his/her respective area/s of assignment on time, the TS may assign you to cover the area if you have already finished your assignment. You are expected to accept this task in the interest of the service. Certainly, the TS will only assign additional work that you can possibly do.
[] 6. Your TS is required to check your work through review and editing of your accomplished census forms and accomplishment reports as the enumeration proceeds to make sure that you have done your work correctly and have followed the standard procedures laid down by the NSO. You must show and submit your work and report to him/her the progress of your work. You must also correct any error he/she points out in your work and avoid committing the same error again.
[] 7. Your TS will collect accomplished CPH forms from the household and/or institutions that you have referred to him/her and will take actions on other referrals you made.
[] 8. As part of his/her supervisory functions, your TS will visit the EA assigned to you to check if you have completely covered your area, primarily by checking the notice of listing/enumeration or sticker (CPH Form 6). He/she will also re-interview some of the households you have enumerated to check the veracity of the information you gathered. Such checking by the supervisor is a standard procedure in all censuses to ensure that high quality data are obtained.
[] 9. The TS serves as a link (communication channel) between you and the CAS. Just as he/she informs you of instructions coming from NSO officials, you must inform him/her of any problem or difficulty that you experience in line with your job as an EN. Seek his/her advice on how to deal with problems in the field as need arises.
2.4 Supplies and Materials
After the training and prior to the start of enumeration, your TS will provide you with all the census and administrative forms and supplies that you will need in the course of your work. As soon as you receive these things, check whether the materials allocated for you are correct and complete.
[pg.12]
The checklist below enumerates the census forms and supplies that you will use in your work. You will learn about how they will be used and/or accomplished in the chapters that follow.
[Checklist of materials omitted.]
[pg.13]

3. Census Concepts
This chapter discusses the basic units of listing and enumeration in a census of population and housing, namely, buildings, housing units, institutional living quarters (ILQs), households, and institutional population. It also provides guidelines on how these units are identified during the field enumeration.
You should refer to this chapter as often as necessary for you to fully understand the concepts, terms used, and data requirements for the census.

3.1 Building
Definition of a Building: A building is defined as any structure built, designed or intended for the enclosure, shelter or protection of any person, animal or property. It consists of one or more rooms and/or other spaces, covered by a roof, and usually enclosed within external walls or with common dividing walls with adjacent buildings, which usually extend from the foundation to the roof.

Buildings to be Listed
Each building within an EA will be assigned a unique building serial number (BSN) as it is being listed in CPH Form 1 (Listing Booklet).
For purposes of the census of population and housing (CPH), however, not all buildings will be included in the listing. As a general rule, only those buildings which contain living quarters, whether occupied or vacant, are to be listed.
Living quarters are structurally separate and independent places of abode. They may:

[] 1. have been constructed, built, converted, or arranged for human habitation, provided that they are not at the time of the census used wholly for other purposes; or
[] 2. Actually being used as living quarters at the time of the census, although not intended for habitation.

More specifically, the buildings to be listed are the following:

[] 1. Residential building which is presently occupied by a household; [Picture omitted.]
Residential buildings are buildings which, by the way they have been designed or constructed, are intended for abode such as single houses, multi- unit residential buildings, and others;
[] 2. Vacant residential building, except that which is open to elements, that is, the roof, walls, windows, and/or doors no longer protect the interior from wind and rain as a result of fire, deterioration or vandalism;
[] 3. Vacant deteriorated residential building which shows some signs that deterioration is being prevented to some extent, such as when windows and/or doors are covered by wood, metal, or other materials to keep them from being destroyed or to prevent entry into the building, or when secondary posts are added to prevent them from collapsing; [picture omitted.]
[] 4. New residential building which is still not occupied or still under construction, if at the time of the visit, the roofs and walls are already in place;
[] 5. Residential building which is presently not occupied by a household but is used for purposes other than residential, provided that it still has one or more vacant housing units;
Example: An apartment building with three units, two of which are used as business offices and the other one is vacant.
[] 6. ILQ in operation such as hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, seminaries, mental hospitals, and others;
[] 7. Nonresidential building presently occupied by a household;
Nonresidential buildings are buildings, which have been designed or constructed for purposes other than residential. These include commercial, industrial, and agricultural buildings such as offices, rice mills, and barns; and other nonresidential buildings such as churches, schools, and others;
[] 8. Nonresidential building which has one or more vacant housing units with complete facilities for cooking, dining, and sleeping, with or without inner partitions; and
[] 9. Other structure not intended for human habitation but is presently occupied by a household, such as caves, old railroad cars, old buses, culverts, trailers, barges, boats, cemeteries, and others.

3.2 Housing Unit
Definition of a Housing Unit: A housing unit is a structurally separate and independent place of abode which, by the way it has been constructed, converted, or arranged, is intended for habitation by one or more households. [Picture omitted.]
Structures or parts of structures which are not intended for habitation, such as commercial, industrial, and agricultural buildings, or natural and man-made shelters such as caves, boats, abandoned trucks, culverts, and others, but which are used as living quarters by households, are also considered as housing units.
The place of abode of an institutional population is not called a housing unit; it is referred to as an institutional living quarter (ILQ).

How to Identify Housing Units in a Building
Normally, a housing unit is intended for habitation by one household. However, in some cases, two or more households may share the same building or the same housing unit as their place of habitation. The building may have more than one housing unit but from its physical layout, the different housing units may not be discernible.
Discussed on the next pages are the guidelines on how to identify and count the housing units in a building.
[pg. 16]
A portion of a building (a room or a group of rooms) qualifies as a separate housing unit if it meets both the following requirements:

[] 1. Separateness -- the portion of a building must have facilities for sleeping, preparing and taking meals, and its occupants must be isolated from other households in the building by means of walls or permanent partitions; and
[] 2. Direct access -- the portion of the building can be accessed directly from the outside of the building, that is, the occupants can come in to the portion of the building without passing through anybody else's premises from the street, pathway, alley, road, yard, catwalk, public or communal staircase, passage, gallery, grounds, or through a common hall. [image omitted.]

If the portion of the building is vacant, the above guidelines will apply to the intended occupants. Illustration 3.1 shows two examples of the direct access criterion.
[pg. 17]
Illustrations of housing units are given below for a better understanding of the guidelines on how to identify them in a building.

[] 1. A single house has been modified, the structure of which is shown in the following illustration: The modified structure has four rooms, a common hallway, a common toilet and bath, and one main entrance from the outside. The individual rooms can be accessed from the common hallway. The occupants take their meals and sleep in their respective rooms. This building has four housing units. [image omitted.]
[] 2. A house has two rooms. The occupants of the rooms share all other areas in the house including the kitchen and dining area. Since the occupants of either room have no private area for dining and have to pass through the common premises to reach their own room, this structure actually contains only a single housing unit. [image omitted.]
[] 3. A house has two storeys. The first floor of the house is subdivided into two units, each having a separate entrance from the outside. The access to the second floor is the stairs in the living room of one of the units on the first floor. This house has two housing units; one is the unit on the ground floor covering only the area which has a bedroom, a kitchen, and a toilet and bath; and the other one is the unit covering the rest of the ground floor and the entire second floor. Note that in this case, the second floor cannot be considered as a separate housing unit even though it has facilities for sleeping and preparing/taking meals because its access is only through the premises of the ground floor. [image omitted.]
[pg. 18]

Housing Units to be Listed
The housing units within an EA will be identified and listed in the listing booklet. Each housing unit will be assigned a unique housing unit serial number (HUSN) as it is being listed in CPH Form 1.
The following are to be included in the listing of housing units:

[] 1. Occupied or vacant housing units (VHUs) in single residential houses.
[] 2. Occupied or VHUs in multi-unit residential buildings such as duplex, accessoria or row houses, condominiums, tenement houses, townhouses, and others.
[] 3. Occupied barong-barong or shanties. [Picture omitted.]
[] 4. VHUs in residential buildings with one or more housing units presently not occupied by households but used for purposes other than residential.
[] 5. Housing units which are still under construction, but the roof and walls are already in place
[] 6. Occupied housing units in ILQs such as hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, seminaries, mental hospitals, and others.
[] 7. Occupied housing units in nonresidential buildings such as offices, rice mills, barns, churches, and others.
[] 8. VHUs with complete facilities for cooking, dining, and sleeping in ILQs and nonresidential buildings;
[] 9. Occupied mobile housing units such as boats, trailers, and others.
[] 10. Occupied improvised housing units in structures such as culverts, abandoned trucks, caves, container vans, tents, and railroad cars.

Note that a housing unit used only during vacation, weekends, or only during certain times of the year is considered vacant even though at the time of your visit, somebody is occupying it. The persons using them should be enumerated in their usual place of residence.
The following are to be excluded from the listing of housing units:

[] 1. Housing units which are still under construction with walls and roof not yet in place.
[] 2. VHUs which are open to elements, that is, when the roof and the walls no longer provide protection from the wind and rain and there are no signs that deterioration was being prevented.
[] 3. VHUs which are being demolished.
[] 4. VHUs in ILQs and nonresidential buildings without complete facilities for cooking, dining, and sleeping.
[] 5. Vacant mobile housing units such as boats, trailers, and others.
[] 6. Structures such as culverts, abandoned trucks, caves, container vans, tents, railroad cars, and others which had been used as improvised housing unit or place of abode in the past but are vacant at the time of visit.
[] 7. All housing units in residential buildings used entirely for purposes other than residential.

If a housing unit appears to be vacant because nobody responds to your call, ascertain from neighbors whether or not it is indeed vacant
[pg. 20.]

3.3 Household
Definition of a Household: A household is a social unit consisting of a person living alone or a group of persons who sleep in the same housing unit and have a common arrangement in the preparation and consumption of food.
In most cases, a household consists of persons who are related by kinship ties, like parents and their children. In some instances, several generations of familial ties are represented in one household while, still in others, even more distant relatives are members of the household.
Household helpers, boarders, and nonrelatives are considered as members of the household provided they sleep in the same housing unit and have common arrangement for the preparation and consumption of food and do not usually go home to their family at least once a week.
A group of unrelated individuals, as in the case of a group of students or workers who decide to rent a place and make common arrangements for the preparation and consumption of their food, constitute one household.
Usually, a household is an entire group of persons who customarily live in the same housing unit. However, there are cases when two or more distinct family groups or groups of unrelated persons maintain separate food arrangements even though they share one housing unit. Each of these two or more distinct groups constitutes a household.
A person who shares a housing unit with a household but separately cooks his/her meals or consumes his/her food elsewhere is not considered a member of the household he/she shares the housing unit with. That person should be listed as a separate (one member) household.
As a rule, if two groups of individuals prepare and consume their meals together but sleep in separate housing units, then the two groups constitute two different households. An exception is that of children who are still economically dependent on their parents but live in separate but adjacent housing units for convenience; they are considered members of their parents' household. However, if the children are economically independent, they should be listed as a separate household.
Economically dependent children are those who still derive/need financial support from their parents or other benefactors and whose decision making rests on their parents/benefactors.
[pg. 21]

Household Membership
In determining household membership, the basic criterion is the usual place of residence or the place where the person usually resides. This may be the same or different from the place where he/she is found at the time of the census. As a rule, it is the place where he/she usually sleeps.
Important notice: A household is different from a family. Household helpers, boarders, and nonrelatives are not considered as family members; they are considered household members for as long as they sleep in the same housing unit and have common arrangement in the preparation and consumption of food.
The following individuals are to be included as members of a household:

[] 1. Those who are present at the time of visit and whose usual place of residence is the housing unit where the household lives.
[] 2. Family members who are overseas workers and who have been away at the time of the census for not more than five years from the date of departure and are expected to be back within five years from the date of last departure.
An overseas worker is a household member who is currently out of the country due to overseas employment. He/she may or may not have a specific work contract or may be presently at home on vacation but has an existing overseas employment to return to. Undocumented overseas workers, or "TNT" ("Tago Nang Tago"), are considered as overseas workers for as long as they are still considered members of the household and had been away for less than five years. However, immigrants are excluded from the census.
[] 3. Those whose usual place of residence is the place where the household lives but are temporarily away at the time of the census for any of the following reasons:
[] a. on vacation, business/pleasure trip, or training somewhere in the Philippines and are expected to be back within six months from the date of departure. An example is a person on training with the Armed Forces of the Philippines for not more than six months;
[] b. on vacation, business/pleasure trip, or studying/training abroad and are expected to be back within a year from the date of departure;
[] c. working or attending school in some other place but usually comes home at least once a week;
[] d. confined in hospitals for a period of not more than six months as of May 1, 2010, except when they are confined as patients in mental hospitals, leprosaria or leper colonies, or drug rehabilitation centers, regardless of the duration of confinement;
[] e. detained in national/provincial/city/municipal jails or in military camps for a period of not more than six months as of May 1, 2010, except when their sentence or detention is expected to exceed six months;
[] f. on board coastal, interisland, or fishing vessels within Philippine territories; and
[] g. on board oceangoing vessels but are expected to be back within five years from the date of departure.
[] 4. Boarders/lodgers of the household or employees of household- operated businesses who do not usually return/go to their respective homes weekly.
[] 5. Citizens of foreign countries who have resided or are expected to reside in the Philippines for at least a year from their arrival, except members of diplomatic missions and non-Filipino members of international organizations.
[] 6. Filipino "balikbayans" with usual place of residence in a foreign country but have resided or are expected to reside in the Philippines for at least a year from their arrival.
[] 7. Persons temporarily staying with the household who have no usual place of residence or who are not certain to be enumerated elsewhere.
[pg. 23]

Take note of the following special cases:

[] 1. Boarders are considered members of a household if they fall under rule #4 on previous page. However, if there are 10 or more of such persons in the household, do not include them as members of the household with whom they live as boarders. These boarders will all be considered as institutional population and will be listed separately from the household.
[] 2. A person who lodges with a household but makes arrangements for his/her own meals or takes his/her meals outside (for instance, a bed spacer) is not considered a member of that household. He/she constitutes a one-member household, provided he/she does not usually go home to his/her family at least once a week.
[] 3. Two or more families who share the same housing unit are considered one household if they have common arrangements for the preparation and consumption of food. They comprise different households if they prepare their food separately.
[] 4. Two or more unrelated individuals who share the same housing unit also constitute one household if they have common arrangements for the preparation and consumption of food. If each of them takes care of his/her own meal, then each one is considered a one-member household.
[] 5. Persons who take their meals with a household but sleep elsewhere are not considered members of that household.
Important Notice: the concepts and definitions of household and household membership must be properly and carefully explained to the respondents. The respondents should be informed of these concepts so as to avoid cases of household member not being listed or non-household members being included.

[pg. 24]

3.4 Institutional Living Quarter
Definition of an Institutional Living Quarter
Institutional living quarter (ILQ) is a structurally separate and independent place of abode intended for habitation by large groups of individuals (10 or more). Such a quarter usually has certain common facilities such as kitchen and dining rooms, toilet and bath, and lounging areas, which are shared by the occupants.
The occupants of an ILQ are usually subject to a common authority or management or are bound by either a common public objective or a common personal interest.

Institutional Living Quarters to be Listed
ILQs in operation are to be listed in the listing booklet and assigned institutional serial numbers (ISNs).
Among the common ILQs to be listed are the following:

[] 1. Hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, pensions, and other lodging houses which provide lodging on a fee basis
[] 2. Hospitals, sanitaria, and rehabilitation centers
[] 3. Orphanages and homes for the aged
[] 4. Seminaries, convents, nunneries, boarding schools, and other religious training centers
[] 5. Corrective and penal institutions
[] 6. Military camps and barracks
[] 7. Logging, mining, and construction/public work camps
[] 8. Oceangoing and interisland/coastal vessels at port
[] 9. Refugee camps
[pg. 25]
ILQs which are in operation but at the time of the census have no residents who qualify for enumeration are also to be listed. An example is a dormitory whose residents all went home for vacation.
Do not list buildings previously used as ILQs if they are no longer used as such or are already abandoned at the time of the census.

3.5 Institutional Population
Definition of an Institutional Population
Institutional population comprises of persons who are found living in ILQs. They may have their own families or households elsewhere but at the time of the census, they are committed or confined in institutions, or they live in ILQs and are usually subject to a common authority or management, or are bound by either a common public objective or a common personal interest.
Institutional Population Membership
The following persons are to be considered as members of the institutional population:

[] 1. Permanent lodgers in boarding houses
[] 2. Dormitory residents who do not usually go home to their respective households at least once a week
[] 3. Hotel residents who have stayed in the hotel for more than six months at the time of the census
[] 4. Boarders in residential houses provided that their number is 10 or more. (Note: If the number of boarders in a house is less than 10, they will be considered as members of regular households, not of institutions.)
[] 5. Patients in hospitals who are confined for more than six months
[] 6. Patients confined in mental hospitals, leprosaria or leper colonies, and drug rehabilitation centers, regardless of the length of confinement
[] 7. Wards in orphanages
[] 8. Inmates of penal colonies or prison cells
[] 9. Seminarians, nuns in convents, and monks
[] 10. Soldiers residing in military camps
[] 11. Workers in mining and similar camps

The following persons are not considered as members of the institutional population and should be included in the households to which they belong:

[]1. Military officials/enlisted men or draftees (and members of their households) who have housing units within military installations or camps
[] 2. Managers (and members of their households) of refugee camps, dormitories, hotels, hospitals, and others, who occupy and regularly use as their place of abode living quarters in the institutions that they manage
[] 3. Priests who, together with their relatives and/or household help, occupy and regularly use as their place of abode a living quarter in the church or seminary

3.6 Whom to Enumerate
Persons to be included in the enumeration
The persons whom you will enumerate during the census will be those who are alive as of 12:01 a.m. of May 1, 2010 and who are:

[] 1. Filipino nationals permanently residing in the Philippines;
[] 2. Filipino nationals who, as of May 1, 2010, were temporarily at Philippine sea, or were temporarily on vacation, business/pleasure trip or studying/training abroad and were expected to be back within a year from the date of departure;
[] 3. Filipino overseas workers, including those on board oceangoing vessels, who were away as of May 1, 2010 but were expected to be back within five years;
[] 4. Philippine government officials, both military and civilian, including Philippine diplomatic personnel and their families, assigned abroad; and
[] 5. Civilian citizens of foreign countries who have their usual residence in the Philippines, or foreign visitors who had stayed or are expected to stay for at least a year from the date of their arrival in this country.
[pg. 27]

Take note of the following cases:
A person who died after 12:01 a.m., May 1, 2010 should be included in the enumeration.

Example: The EN interviewed the de la Cruz household on May 18, 2010, and he was told that Johnny died on May 8, 2010. The EN should include Johnny as a member of the household because he was still alive on May 1, 2010, which is the reference date of the census.

A person who died before or exactly 12:01 a.m., May 1, 2010 should be excluded from the enumeration.

Example: Jenny Zapra died from heart attack at 12:00 midnight of May 1, 2010. The EN should exclude Jenny from the enumeration of the Zapra household. She was no longer alive at 12:01 a.m., May 1, 2010 and therefore, she is not part of the population as of the census date.

A baby born alive before or exactly 12:01 a.m., May 1, 2010 should be included in the enumeration.
A baby born alive after 12:01 a.m., May 1, 2010 should be excluded from the enumeration.
Persons to be excluded from the Enumeration
You should exclude the following persons from enumeration although they happen to be within the territorial jurisdiction of the Philippines at the time of the census enumeration:
[pg.28]

[] 1. Foreign ambassadors, ministers, consuls, or other diplomatic representatives, and members of their families (except Filipino and non-Filipino employees who have been residents of the Philippines prior to said employment);
[] 2. Citizens of foreign countries living within the premises of an embassy, legation, chancellery, or consulate;
[] 3. Citizens of foreign countries who are chiefs or officials of international organizations, such as United Nations (UN), International Labor Organization (ILO), Asian Development Bank (ADB), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), or the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), as they may be subject to reassignment to other countries after their tour of duty in the Philippines, and members of their families;
[] 4. Citizens of foreign countries, together with non-Filipino members of their families, who are students, or who are employed or have business in the Philippines, but who have stayed or are expected to stay in the country for less than a year from arrival;
[] 5. Citizens of foreign countries and Filipinos with usual place of residence in a foreign country, who are visiting the Philippines and who have stayed or are expected to stay in the country for less than a year from arrival (for instance, a "balikbayan" who will return to his/her usual place of residence abroad after a short vacation or visit in the Philippines);
[] 6. Citizens of foreign countries in refugee camps/vessels; and
[] 7. Residents of the Philippines on vacation, pleasure or business trip, study or training abroad who have been away or expected to be away from the Philippines for more than one year from departure.

Although the persons listed above are not to be enumerated, you should still visit their households. Persons working for them or living with them may be among those who should be included according to the rules of enumeration. An example would be Filipinos working in foreign embassies in the Philippines. They are to be included in the enumeration but not as overseas workers.

[pg. 29]

4. Census forms and procedures
This chapter discusses the field enumeration procedures, describes the basic census forms to be used during the field enumeration, and gives a brief outline of other fieldwork procedures. It also includes instructions on how to identify enumeration areas, how to conduct an enumeration, and how to handle enumeration problems. Some of these topics are discussed in more detail in the succeeding chapters.

4.1 Basic Census Forms
Listed below are the basic census forms that you, as an EN, will use during the field enumeration. Specimen forms are shown in the appendices and copies of actual forms are included in your training kit.

[] CPH Form 1 -- Listing Booklet
This is a booklet wherein you will list the buildings, housing units, households, and institutional living quarters (ILQs) within an EA. You will also record other information pertaining to the population of households and ILQs in this form.
[] CPH Form 2 -- Common Household Questionnaire
This is the basic census questionnaire, which you will use to interview and record information about the common or nonsample households. This questionnaire gathers information on the following demographic and socio- economic characteristics of the population: relationship to household head, sex, date of birth, age, birth registration, marital status, religion, ethnicity, citizenship, disability, functional difficulty, highest grade/year completed, residence 5 years ago, and overseas worker. It also contains questions on the type of building/house, construction materials of the roof and outer walls, state of repair of the building/house, year the building/house was built, floor area of the housing unit, and tenure status of the lot.
[] CPH Form 3 -- Sample Household Questionnaire
This is the basic census questionnaire, which you will use to interview and record information about the sample households. This questionnaire contains ALL questions asked in CPH Form 2 PLUS additional population questions: literacy, school attendance, place of school, usual occupation, kind of business or industry, class of worker, place of work, and some items on fertility. Moreover, there are additional questions on household characteristics: fuel for lighting and cooking, source of water supply for drinking and/or cooking and for laundry, and bathing, tenure status of the housing unit, acquisition of the housing unit, source of financing of the housing unit, monthly rental of the housing unit, tenure status of the lot, usual manner of garbage disposal, kind of toilet facility, and land ownership. It also asks questions on the language/dialect generally spoken at home, residence five years from now, and presence of household conveniences/devices, and access to internet.
[] CPH Form 4 -Institutional Population Questionnaire
This questionnaire records information about persons who are considered part of the institutional population. It contains questions on residence status, sex, age, date of birth, birth registration, martial status, religious affiliation, citizenship, ethnicity, disability, functional difficulty, and highest grade/ year completed.
[] CPH Form 6 -- Notice of Listing/ Enumeration
This is a sticker which you will have to post in a very conspicuous place, preferably in front of the house or gate of the building after enumerating. This sticker indicates that the building/housing unit/household/ILQ had already been enumerated.
[] CPH Form 7 - Common Household Self-Administered Questionnaire Instructions
[] CPH Form 7 if a 14-page instruction booklet that will be used by the respondent as guide in filling out CPH Form 2, when he/she cannot be personally interviewed by you. It contains the message of Administrator about the rationale of the census undertaking, basic information on census such as reference period, confidentiality of census data, whom to include in the enumeration, how census data will be processed, concepts and definitions, samples of properly filled out sections of CPH Form 2 to serve as guide for the respondent, and contact information, It will accompany CPH Form 2 to be distributed to households who cannot be interviewed, such as those in designated self-administered questionnaire (SAQ) areas or those where two callbacks or three visits have already been made.
[] CPH Form 8 - Institutional Population Self-Administered Questionnaire Instructions.
[] CPH Form 8 is a 12 page instruction booklet on how to accomplish CPH Form 4. This form is similar to CPH Form 7 except that is it used as a guide for the respondent of institutional populations and contains concepts and definitions to be used in filling up CPH Form 4. It will be given together with CPH Form 4 and will be filled out by managers or administrators of ILGs that are not, for some reason, personally interviewed by you.
[] CPH Form 9 -- Appointment Slip to Household/ Institutional Population Respondent
This form will be used to set an appointment with the household head or any responsible member of the household, or manager of the institution in case you were unable to enumerate any one during your first or second visit. You will indicate in this form the date and time of your next visit.
[] CPH Form 10 -- EN's Accomplishment/ Progress Monitoring Report
This form will be used to record the number of buildings, housing units, households, and ILQ, as well as household and institutional population you have enumerated. This form will be used in monitoring the progress of enumeration.
[] CPH Form 13 -- Transmittal/ Receipt Form
This form will be accomplished whenever you transmit or receive census materials.
[] CPH Form 17 -- Certification of Barangay Chairperson
This form is a certification to be signed by the Barangay Chairperson after the completion of enumeration in his/her barangay. This form indicates the duration of the conduct of enumeration and the completeness of coverage. This certification is included in the last transmittal of CPH

Form 10 for the barangay.

Mapping Form
This form will be used to plot buildings, either vacant or occupied by households, and ILQs. This is also used to enlarge the map of each block of an EA/barangay, especially if the areas being enumerated are congested.

4.2 Enumeration Area Assignment
For purposes of the 2010 CPH, an Enumeration Area (EA) is a barangay or part of a barangay, which consists of about 350 to 500 households. Generally a barangay constitutes one EA. However, barangays with large population or physical area may be divided into two or more EAs. A barangay which was not divided into two or more EAs, has an EA number of "0000".
On the other hand, large barangays were divided into several EAs during the EA delineation activity, as part of the preparatory activities for the census. EAs within these barangays are serially numbered beginning with serial number "0100".
[pg. 32]
Your TS will provide you with the geographic codes of your area of assignment, as well as your EN code. If in the course of enumeration you have found out that your assigned EA exceeded the usual number of households for an EA, (say more than 500 households) and you expect that you will not be able to cover all households in the given duration of listing/interview, you need to inform your TS immediately about this.
As an EN, you will be assigned to cover one or more EAs depending on your workload or on the expected duration within which you can cover the EA.

4.3 Enumeration Procedures
Prior to the actual enumeration you should familiarize yourself with the EA assigned to you. You should meet with the barangay officials, especially the Barangay Chairperson, who could give you the best information on barangay boundaries, prominent features, among others. With the help of the barangay officials, you may also be able to gather advance information about some areas that are congested, hence, help you plan for best strategy in enumerating the households.
Field enumeration for the 2010 CPH consists of the following major activities:

[] 1. Mapping -- updating and verifying the physical features on the EA map provided to you (discussed in detail in Chapter 5).
[] 2. Canvassing -- door-to-door visit in the entire EA to look for buildings, housing units, households, household population, ILQs, and institutional population to list, ensuring complete coverage of the area (discussed in detail in Chapter 5).
[] 3. Listing -- listing of buildings, housing units, households, household population, ILQs, and institutional population using CPH Form 1 (discussed in detail in Chapter 6).
[] 4. Plotting -- indicating listed buildings and households on EA map using specific symbols (discussed in detail in Chapter 5).
[] 5. Interviewing -- asking questions and accomplishing CPH Form 2 for common households, CPH Form 3 for sample households, or CPH Form 4 for institutional population.
[] 6.Posting of Sticker -- placing CPH Form 6 (Notice of Listing/Enumeration) on a conspicuous part of the main entrance of the housing unit or ILQ.
[pg. 33]

You must perform the aforementioned activities sequentially before you proceed to the next household/ILQ. The sequence of steps that you should follow in covering your area of assignment during the census field operation is described below:
General steps in census taking

[] Step 1. Before going to the EA, be sure to fill out the geographic items (province, city/municipality, barangay, and EA number) of CPH Forms 1, 2, 3, and 4.
[] Step 2. Prior to the start of enumeration, make a courtesy call to the Barangay Chairperson, or in his absence any barangay official.
[] Step 3. Using your EA map, acquaint yourself with the area by going around it and through it. Verify the boundaries and landmarks to avoid overlapping of coverage.
[] Step 4. Plan the most efficient route for listing and enumeration to cover the entire EA. Indicate this route on the EA map.
[] Step 5. Locate a place where you can conveniently start and mark this point "S" (for Start) on your map.
[] Step 6. Go to the first building.
[] Step 7. Ascertain if the building is to be listed. As you enter the building for enumeration, watch out for basements and/or side and rear entrances for these may lead to other living quarters.
[] Step 8. Plot on the map the building symbol.
[] Step 9. If the living quarter is a housing unit, ascertain if it is to be listed or not. If it is to be listed, accomplish CPH Form 1, and CPH Form 2, or 3. If the living quarter is an ILQ, accomplish CPH Form 1 and CPH Form 4.
Step 10. Post CPH Form 6 -- Notice of Listing/ Enumeration in a conspicuous part of the housing unit or ILQ after writing on it the BSN, HUSN, and HSN/ISN (on the boxes provided). Likewise, write the necessary HSNs below the building symbol plotted on the map to represent the household/s interviewed, the housing unit that is vacant or used only as vacation or rest house, or occupied by persons whose usual place of residence is somewhere else, or by those excluded from the enumeration. If a household is meant to be revisited because you failed to interview an eligible respondent, indicate the HSN on the sticker, check CB for callback, write the date listed, then post the sticker. You will write the date enumerated only when the household was completely interviewed.
[] Step 11. Go to the next building. Step 12. Follow steps 7 to 11.
[] Step 13. If the building is the last building in the EA, mark the point "E" (for End) on your map.
[] Step 14. If CPH Form 1 is completely filled out, compute the column totals, and accomplish CPH Form 10 (EN's Accomplishment/Progress Monitoring Report).
[] Step 15. Edit CPH Forms 2, 3, and 4 against CPH form 1.
[] Step 16. Accomplish CPH Form 17 (Barangay Certification) if your area of assignment is the entire barangay. If two or more of you are assigned in the barangay, your TS will be responsible for accomplishing this form. If there are more than one TS in the barangay, the CAS/ACAS will be responsible in accomplishing CPH Form 17.
Step 17. Submit all accomplished CPH Forms 10, together with accomplished CPH Forms 1, 2, 3, 4, maps, and CPH Form 17 to your TS on specified schedule. Submit also all accomplished and unused forms to your TS.

4.4 How to Enumerate
Whom to Interview
Interview any responsible member who can provide accurate answers to the questions and who can give information for all household members. The head of the household or his/her spouse would be the most qualified respondent. Household helpers or boarders usually cannot give accurate information.
[pg. 35]

How to Conduct an Interview
Getting accurate and complete information is the prime objective of a data gathering operation. As an interviewer, you can do this by being polite at all times but at the same time, being authoritative enough to win the trust and confidence of the respondent. A good impression of you counts much towards the success of the interview.
Be guided by the following interviewing techniques: [Images omitted.]

[] 1. Be presentable. Make a good impression by dressing appropriately and neatly. Some people judge others by what they wear and may not open the door for someone who appears messy or untidy.
[] 2. Be polite. Different people will react to you in different manners. However, you must maintain composure and always remain cordial and polite. Always try to smile. Be prepared to give honest answers for all types of questions.
[] 3. Introduce yourself and the 2010 CPH. Your introduction is important. As an introduction, you may say the following:

.

"Good morning/afternoon. I am (your name), an enumerator of the National Statistics Office. Here is my identification card. We are currently conducting the 2010 census of population and housing in the country. I would appreciate very much your cooperation in answering the questions in this census."
[] 4. Assure the respondent of the confidentiality of information he/she will give.
"Please be assured that all your answered will be treated with utmost confidentiality."
5. Explain the importance and objectives of the 2010 CPH. It is necessary to explain the objectives of the census to gain cooperation from a person. Explain to him/her the objectives of the census as discussed in Chapter 1 of this manual. An example of how you will explain the 2010 CPH objectives is:
"The results of this census will be used as bases for the development of programs and projects on population, education, employment, and housing. "
[] 6. Ask all the questions in the questionnaire. Ask the question even if you think you already know the answer to it. What you think may not be the right answer.
[] 7. Do not settle for an unsatisfactory answer. Occasionally, a person's answer may be confusing or unclear. In this case, do not settle for his/her answer. If you think the respondent's answer is not satisfactory, try probing for more information. The most common types of probing are:
Repeating the question. Asking the question several times sometimes help the respondent in providing information, which he/she needs to recall from memory.
Asking for more information. Asking the respondent to explain more clearly his/her answers.
Asking for an estimate, if appropriate. If the respondent cannot recall, for example the birthday and age of his/her sister, try to ask for an estimate. Help him/her calculate.
Pausing to give the person time to think. Do not hurry the respondent. Give him/her time to think of the answers.
[] 8. Thank the respondent for his/her cooperation. Always try to leave the respondent with a good feeling towards the census. Thus, after an interview, express your appreciation for the respondent's cooperation.
[pg. 37]

How to Ask Questions
Questions to be asked to the respondents and instructions for interviewers are both written in the questionnaires. Questions to be asked are printed in small letters while instructions for interviewers are printed in capital letters. In asking questions, observe the following rules:

[] 1. Ask all questions exactly as they are worded in the questionnaire. Changing the wording of a question may change its meaning and, thereby, elicit a different answer.
[] 2. If the respondent cannot understand or is not comfortable with the English language, use the translation guide provided for this purpose Appendix 12, pages 271-284. If there is no exact translation guide available, you can translate the questions in the dialect which both of you can understand, but be sure that the meaning of the questions are not changed.
[] 3. Ask all questions in the order shown in the questionnaire. Follow strictly the "skipping" instructions to avoid asking questions which are unnecessary or not applicable for a household member.
[] 4. Never ask a leading question. A leading question is one that suggests the answer desired by the interviewer. By asking a leading question, the respondent's mind is set into believing that the answer suggested by the EN is the right one. Example of a leading question: "Are you the head of this household?" The right question should be: "Who is the head of this household?"
[] 5. Ask probing questions when necessary.
[] 6. Do not interrupt the respondent while he/she is answering a question.
[] 7. Finish recording an answer first before asking the next question.

How to Record Answers
Observe the following rules in recording answers on the questionnaires:

[]1. You must fill out the questionnaire during the actual interview. Do not write the answers on a separate piece of paper with the intention of transcribing the answers to the questionnaire at a later time.
[] 2. Complete all information to maintain data accuracy and consistency.
[] 3. Use only the supplied pencil when filling out the forms. Never use pens or markers.
[] 4. An eraser is provided which you will use in case you need to correct an entry. Make sure that each entry is properly erased. Do not leave dirt on the questionnaires.
[] 5. Write neatly and legibly.
[] 6. Use the prescribed alphanumeric characters. [Examples of alphanumeric characters omitted.]
[] 7. Boxes are provided in the questionnaire. These either require handwritten responses or an "X" mark. Each box corresponds to only one character. Make sure that each character or the "X" mark is written inside the box; it should not extend outside the boxes. Unnecessary lines or curves (for example, hooks, decorative strokes, and others) should be avoided.
[] 8. Some questions require answers to be specified. A line is provided for this purpose. Make sure that the answers written on the space provided should not touch the boxes, if any.[Example image omitted.]
[] 9. Do not make unnecessary marks or comments on the form. If an answer needs further explanation, write this down in the "Remarks" portion of the CPH Forms 1, 2, 3, or 4. Do not forget to indicate the section and item number being referred to.
[] 10. If the household member listed is found to be not a member of the household and should be excluded from the list, line out entries with two horizontal lines including the boxes in that particular row or line number, regardless if these have entries or not..[Example image omitted.]

Types of Questions/Items

1. For questions which require answers in numeric characters, prefix zero or zeroes in the boxes when necessary.
[Example image omitted] If the age of the household member is 7 years old, prefix "00". If the age is 15 years old, prefix "0".
2. In CPH Form 1, circles are provided where you will write either "X" or "check" mark. Make sure to write the mark inside the circle.[Example image omitted]
3. In CPH Form 2, 3, or 4, the following are the different cases in filling out the items:
[] a. Most of the items are provided with possible answers and their corresponding codes. Mark the appropriate box opposite the code that corresponds to the answer made by the respondent. There should only be one box marked with "X". [Example image omitted]
[] b. Other items require entering responses in the boxes. [Example image omitted]
[] c. Some items require both writing the information and entering the code in the code boxes. For write-in entries, be concise but clear. For codes, make sure that these are written inside the boxes. [Example image omitted]
[] d. Some items require multiple answers. The box corresponding to the answer made by the respondent for each category should be marked with "X". [Example image omitted]
[] e. Some items have multiple selections but only one answer is required. The box corresponding to the answer made by the respondent should be marked with "X". [Example image omitted]

How to Take Care of your Questionnaire
CPH Forms 1, 2, 3, and 4 are machine readable. These forms will be scanned and entries in the boxes will be interpreted during processing. Hence, extra care in handling these forms is required. The following are some tips on how you will handle your questionnaires with care:

[] 1. Do not fold the questionnaire in parts other than the fold in the center.
[] 2. Do not write unnecessary remarks or marks anywhere in the questionnaire.
[] 3. Do not crease or crumple the questionnaire.
[] 4. Do not punch holes nor staple the questionnaire.

Any unnecessary mark or dirt in the questionnaire might lead to misinterpretation of entries in the boxes when scanned. Hence, you should erase unnecessary marks in the questionnaire. Note that write-in entries and important remarks should not be erased.

How to Check the Completed Questionnaire
After each interview, review CPH Form 1 against CPH Form 2, CPH Form 3, or CPH Form 4 immediately. This means going over the entries to see to it that they are legible, complete, reasonable, and consistent with each other. Verify from the respondent certain answers which are doubtful. If you find an answer doubtful even after probing, accept the answer but write your explanations in the remarks portion of the questionnaire to guide your supervisor in reviewing the questionnaire.
If it is not possible to make a thorough review of the questionnaire immediately after completing the interview, you must at least go over it before leaving the household to make sure that no question is omitted. You may do detailed check later. In case of major errors or discrepancies, revisit the household as soon as possible to verify and correct the errors.
When to Provide Self-Administered Questionnaire Instructions
You should exert all efforts to obtain information through personal interview. However, if personal interview is still not possible after three visits made on separate days, provide Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) instructions and appropriate CPH forms. This means that you have to leave CPH Forms 2 and 7 with the household (even if selected as sample) for a responsible member to accomplish. For ILQs, leave CPH Forms 4 and 8 with the manager of the ILQ for him/her to accomplish. CPH Form 7 and CPH Form 8, as briefly described in Section 4.1, are the instructions that will guide respondents of the household and institution, respectively, in answering the appropriate questionnaires which you will leave.

You need to determine the total number of household members so that you can leave enough number of copies of CPH Form 2, as well as the number of residents in the institution for CPH Form 4. Further, properly indicate in CPH Form 1 who will be responsible in the retrieval of the accomplished CPH form, that is, either you or your TS.
There are two cases when SAQ shall be used:
Case 1. To enumerate special areas such as exclusive subdivisions/villages, condominiums, and others with households or institutional population where personal interview is not possible:
Your supervisor has been furnished with the list of such special areas in the municipality or city. The provincial staff has made prior arrangements with the management (President of homeowners' association or villages, or the building administrator) of special areas with regard to the manner the questionnaires will be administered, distributed, and collected. You may be assigned to cover these special areas.
Be guided by the following procedures in enumerating special areas:

[] 1. Estimate the number of questionnaires (CPH Form 2 or CPH Form 4) and instructions (CPH Form 7 or CPH Form 8) you need to bring based on the estimated number of households/institutional population provided by the CAS/ACAS/TS. In some cases, when the management of special areas could not provide you with the number, you would need to estimate this based on your personal knowledge of the area.
[] 2. Fill out the Geographic Identification portion of all CPH forms to be distributed before you visit the area.
[] 3. Contact the President of the homeowners' association or villages, or the building administrator. Depending on the prior arrangement made, distribute CPH Form 2 (with CPH Form 7) to the household, or CPH Form 4 (with CPH Form 8) to the institution, or leave them with the management.
[] 4. In each CPH Form 7 and/or CPH Form 8, which you will distribute or leave with the management, enter the time and date when you will return to collect the questionnaires. In case you will leave the form to the management, fill out a CPH Form 13 (Transmittal/Receipt Form) and enter in the remarks portion of the CPH Form 1, the date and time when you will collect the questionnaires.
[] 5. Cover all the special areas assigned to you, following steps 1 to 4 above.
[] 6. Return to the special areas on the appointed time and date to collect the forms which you distributed.
[] 7. Upon collection, review all the accomplished CPH Form 2 or CPH Form 4 for completeness, consistency, and accuracy. You should either return any questionnaire not properly filled out and set another appointment for collection, or ask if the household or institution can be interviewed.
[] 8. For items that need to be coded in CPH Forms 2 and 4, enter the appropriate codes in the boxes. These include P2-Relationship to Household Head and P16-Highest Grade/Year Completed.
[] 9. Fill out CPH Form 1 with the necessary entries. In addition, during your weekly meetings. the TS will return to you all accomplished CPH Forms 2 and 4 that he/she had collected from households and/or institutions. These are the cases which you previously referred to your TS. Verify the population count in CPH Form 1 against these forms. Correct any inconsistencies by copying the right entries from CPH Form 2 or 4 to CPH Form 1.

Case 2. For households or institutions not contacted after three visits:
You should fill out the Geographic Identification portion and exact address in CPH Form 2 (with CPH Form 7) or CPH Form 4 (with CPH Form 8). Leave CPH Form 2 along with CPH Form 7, or CPH Form 4 along with CPH Form 8 in the mailbox or in a conspicuous place in the building or with the nearest neighbor. In CPH Form 7 or CPH Form 8, enter the time and date when you will collect it. Indicate the HSN or ISN on the sticker, check "CB" for callback, write the date listed, then post the sticker.

4.5 How to Handle Enumeration Problems
Some of the problems that you may encounter during enumeration are listed below. If you encounter difficulties not covered in this manual, do not hesitate to contact your TS for assistance.
No eligible respondent at home or the entire household is away
If on your first visit you do not find any possible respondent at home or the entire household is away, you must make a callback at your earliest opportunity. You must try to contact the respondent and obtain information pertaining to the household.

A callback (CB) is a revisit to a household whose respondent had not been interviewed by the EN during the previous visit. Any unsuccessful visit done on the same day as the previous visit will not be counted as callback. It is important to schedule callbacks on different dates and time to reduce the rate of nonresponse. You should plan callbacks efficiently by checking when the respondents will most likely to be at home.
Inquire from the other members of the household, household helpers, or neighbors about the best day and time for a callback. Leave CPH Form 9 (Appointment Slip to Household/Institutional Population Respondent) to any person in the house/ILQ or to the nearest neighbor. Indicate the date and time you will be back for an interview. Enter that date and time in the "Remarks" column of CPH Form 1.

Household refuses to be interviewed
It may happen that the respondent is at home but does not want to be interviewed because he/she is busy at that particular time.
Occasionally, you may encounter a respondent who will refuse to give the required information or who would refuse to be interviewed at all.. You should persuade the respondent to submit to an interview or to make an appointment. You also need to emphasize to the respondent that:
The information they will provide will be held strictly confidential.
The 2010 CPH is a very important undertaking; the conduct of censuses by the NSO is mandated by laws, which accorded NSO the authority to collect information on the population and housing.
The census covers all individual persons and living quarters throughout the country.
The information collected is needed by the government and private sectors to serve as guide in the preparation of plans and programs for the development of the country.
You may also encounter an argumentative type of respondent who would ask questions about certain aspects of the census. You will not gain much if you argue with him/her. It is better not to say anything controversial and just let him/her air his/her views. Very often, after having his/her way, he/she will become cooperative.
It is important that a refusal should not be taken as a final act.
If you still fail to obtain an interview after all efforts have been exhausted, write "Refusal: for referral" in the "Remark/s" column in CPH Form 1, and report the matter to your TS.
Households found in temporary evacuation centers for conflict or calamity-affected areas
Households found in temporary evacuation centers at the time of the census should be listed using a separate listing booklet. The household will be assigned HSNs but no BSN and HUSN will be assigned since they are found in temporary evacuation centers. Ask for the complete addresses of households in the conflict- or calamity-affected areas (barangay, municipality, and province) where they came from and write them in the Remark/s portion of CPH Form 1.

Critical areas
The CAS has a list of critical areas in the city/municipality. If during the course of enumeration you found out that your assigned EA is a critical area, inform your TS immediately to discuss the best strategy to adopt to the situation. You can say that an area is in critical condition when it is a (a) hotspots for election; (b) an epidemic area; or (c) has a peace and order problem, among others.

Political intervention
If the Barangay Chairperson or any local official insists that the listing booklets/accomplished census forms be shown to him/her, explain politely that you are prohibited by law to divulge the information that you gathered and that the forms were already collected by supervisors from the Provincial Office of NSO. Do not show the forms even if the local official insists. Refer the problem immediately to your TS so that he/she could help you handle the situation.
Households in high-rise buildings and exclusive villages
In residential areas, such as exclusive subdivisions/villages and tightly- guarded condominiums, the CPH Form 2 with CPH Form 7 (Instructions) can be used in collecting the needed data. For exclusive villages, condominiums, and townhouses which cannot be penetrated, coordinate with the barangay chairperson and president of the homeowner's association or building administrator about the distribution of the questionnaires and instructions. The procedures have been discussed in the preceding section.

Lost or damaged census documents or materials
If during the census enumeration, some of your questionnaires were lost or damaged due to unforeseen/uncontrollable circumstances, you must report immediately to your TS for immediate action or decision. Your TS, on the other hand, should report the matter to your CAS/ACAS or NSO supervisor.
[pg. 49]

Other untoward incidents
In case any untoward incident, such as, dog bite, accident, sickness happens during census enumeration, report the matter immediately to your TS. The TS shall, in turn report the matter to the CAS/ACAS or NSO supervisor.
[pg. 50]
5. Canvassing and Mapping
Canvassing and mapping are two simultaneous activities that should be done during the 2010 CPH. These activities are necessary to ensure complete coverage of listing and enumeration. Hence, you shall master the procedures and instructions for canvassing and mapping to efficiently accomplish your other tasks during enumeration.
This chapter describes the detailed instructions and procedures for canvassing and mapping operations. It also discusses the instructions on how to canvass an EA, which basically involves locating an EA and developing an efficient and systematic route of travel through the EA. Most importantly, this chapter teaches you how to read and update an EA map.
Prior to enumerating the households, you are required to familiarize yourself with your EA. You may request information from any barangay official, particularly the Barangay Chairperson, who can give you the boundaries of the barangay, its prominent features, among others. In doing so, you can effectively strategize on what routes to take during enumeration. Take note of the prominent features of the EA, which may be needed in updating your EA map or preparing block maps for a portion of an EA/barangay.

5.1 Canvassing An Enumeration Area
You will canvass an EA during the actual conduct of enumeration. You shall observe the following procedures when canvassing.
How to Canvass an Enumeration Area with Blocks
A block is an area bounded on all sides by visible features such as streets, roads, railroad tracks, rivers, and others, or by invisible features such as city/municipality or province limits.
If you are assigned to an EA composed of blocks, apply the following canvassing procedures:

[] 1. Canvass the area BLOCK BY BLOCK, starting at the lowest numbered block. Then completely canvass one block at a time, in the order of the block numbers shown below, that is, Block 1, Block 2, Block 3, and so on, up to the last block. [Image omitted]
[] 2. For each block, start canvassing from a corner and go around the block preferably in a clockwise direction (keep right), along the inner side of the bounding streets until the starting point has been reached. In enumerating along the street or road, never go from one side of the street or road to the other side. (Refer to illustration 5.2, page 65).
[] 3. When you are near the boundary of the EA, ascertain whether the block still belongs to your area before proceeding to canvass the said block.
[] 4. Be observant at every point along the way for buildings at the back of front-row buildings. If a short alley or path is seen, enumerate the building encountered as soon as you come to the alley or path; always try to finish one side of the pathway or alley first until you reach a dead-end, before proceeding to the other side of the pathway/alley.
[] 5. Encircle the block number on the map when you have finished canvassing the block so that you can keep track of your progress. [Image omitted.]
6. Do not canvass blocks which do not have any building, such as, a vacant lot, park, baseball field, basketball court, and others.
[pg. 52]

How to Canvass an Enumeration Area without Blocks
If your EA does not have blocks (see illustration 5.3, page 66), canvass the area as systematically as possible. If a street or road cuts through the middle of the EA, canvass on one side of the street or road first, and later on the other side.
In a densely-populated EA without blocks, where the buildings are not systematically laid out, begin from one outer part of the EA, then proceed to the next part, and so on, until all the densely-populated areas are covered. Sometimes, buildings are in clusters and the clusters are separated from each other by a path, alley, canal, water pipeline, or fence. In such a situation, canvassing shall proceed cluster by cluster. In any case, be sure to go through the alleys, paths, and other ways.
In rural areas, canvass from one end of an EA to the other end, particularly when buildings/houses are along the roads, riverbanks, shorelines, or mountains; or, from one outer sitio, village, or locality to the next, and so on, until the whole EA has been completely covered. For buildings that are far from clusters of buildings, determine the routes to follow in order to canvass the whole area.

In an EA where the buildings are relatively dispersed, consult with the barangay officials or other knowledgeable persons on the best way to cover it. If necessary, draw lightly with a pencil on your maps the routes to take. While in the course of your enumeration, always inquire about buildings in the vicinity that are hidden from view, the best routes to follow, and other helpful information.
How to Canvass a Multi-Storey Building
A storey is the space in a building between two adjacent floor levels or between a floor and the roof.
A building is multi-storeyed if it has two or more storeys.
In a multi-storey building, canvass storey by storey, starting on the ground floor. Inquire about possible persons living in closed rooms and rooms apparently used as offices.
[pg. 54]
In multi-storey residential buildings, watch out for separate entrances and stairways leading to individual housing units. Canvass the buildings going from one entrance/stairway to another, including those on the ground floor.
In commercial and industrial buildings, inquire from offices or establishments on the ground floor or from other sources whether or not there are living quarters in any of the floors. Be sure to canvass the entire building.

5.2 Mapping
Mapping generally refers to the task of drawing the shape of the EA and its features on a mapping form, making updates on the EA map in terms of the area's current features, and plotting the household serial numbers and the proper building symbols on the map sheets. Mapping job should be done almost simultaneously with listing and enumeration of households and ILQs in the assigned EA.
Map/Mapping Form to be Used
For purposes of the 2010 CPH, you shall be provided with EA maps without plotted buildings. This is a cartographic paper where in you shall plot the location of buildings and serial numbers of households that you have already listed in CPH Form 1. You shall also be provided with blank mapping forms to be used for block mapping. Never use manila paper or any other kind of paper other than the prescribed standard mapping form. [Image omitted.]

How to Read a Map
To effectively carry out your mapping job during the census, you should be familiar with the basic mapping symbols and their definitions used in census- takings, as well as the basic procedures on how to update an EA map and to draw a good map on a mapping form.
In general, maps are oriented to the North by an arrow pointing upwards, as indicated on the EA map provided to you.
In the absence of this arrow, it is presumed that the North is towards the top of the map sheet. However, the EA map given to you may have the wrong orientation. Thus, you shall check the maps orientation and, if incorrect, indicate the proper orientation by drawing on the EA map an arrow that points to the North.
Another important feature to know is the general location of the barangay and the proper EA boundaries. On the EA map, a barangay boundary is represented by: [Image omitted.]
while an EA boundary is represented by [Image omitted.]
The standard geographic and cartographic symbols are presented in Illustration 5.1 on the next page. Use these symbols as guides in reading/updating the map.
[Omitted image map legend.]

How to Update an Enumeration Area Map
Prior to enumeration, your supervisor shall provide you with a map of your EA. This map should have been updated as to the boundaries, roads, streets, and other landmarks. However, there might be cases wherein the EA map provided to you is not correct as to its orientation, or it needs further updating. Hence, you shall update your EA map using the following procedures:

[] 1. Check if your EA map is oriented to the North. If one faces the East where the sun rises and extends his/her left hand sidewise, the left hand is approximately pointing to the North. Then, orient your EA map in such a way that the location of the features in your EA map matches those features existing on the ground. It is advised that you do your mapping orientation activity in the morning and then draw in your EA map an arrow pointing to the North.
[] 2. Verify the natural and man-made features on the ground and draw correctly on your EA map the proper symbols for these features. Cross out any feature appearing on the map that no longer exists on the ground. Plot new prominent/important features in the area. Use pencil when making corrections on the EA map.
[] 3. Make sure that the names of the streets, roads, rivers, and other features are correctly spelled out in the EA map. If not, line out the wrong name and write the correct one above it.
[]4. In areas without blocks, take note of the natural or man-made features of the area and the relative distance of these features to the buildings. Plot the buildings in the sketch map as accurately as possible. (See illustration on the next page.) [Image omitted.]
[] 5. Print and sign your name at the lower right corner of the map (barangay/EA and/or block maps) and write your designation and the date when you have completely canvassed the area and updated the map.

How to Prepare Block Maps
There are cases when a portion of your EA has a high concentration of housing units and you will find difficulty in plotting the building symbols and/or indicating the HSN on the EA map. In this situation, you need to create a block map for that portion of the
EA using the standard Mapping Form. If you think the EA map is sufficient for plotting the buildings in your EA (especially if the area has few buildings), you may no longer need to draw block maps.
Block mapping is the process of sketching/drawing an enlarged map of each block of an area using the standard Mapping Form. See Appendix 4, page 243 for a copy of the Mapping Form. [Image omitted.]
[pg. 60]
The procedures for block mapping are as follows:

[]1. For identification of blocks, number each block in your EA map in a serpentine manner, starting from Block 1, and so, on up to the last block.
[] 2. Do not number blocks that have no buildings/structures, such as vacant lots, parks, basketball court, and others. Instead, write the description of these blocks as "vacant lot", "park", "basketball court", and others to serve as landmarks on the EA map.
[] 3. Print the name of the region, province, city/municipality and barangay, and their corresponding codes on the spaces provided. Write also the EA number and block number at the upper right corner of each accomplished Mapping Form.
[] 4. Orient the block map correctly by following the arrow symbol pointing to the North at the right side of the Mapping Form.
[] 5. Draw the general shape or contour of each block on the space provided for mapping. Indicate all its outer limits or boundaries (streets, rivers, and others). Refer also to the standard geographic and cartographic symbols indicated at the right side of the Mapping Form.
[] 6. Indicate the names of the boundaries on the Mapping Form. The names could be of those of the roads or streets, rivers or creeks, schools, and others.
[] 7. Paths, alleys, or trails found in the block shall also be indicated on the Mapping Form.
[] 8. If an area of the EA or barangay is divided into sitios, prepare block maps by sitio.
[] 9. Indicate at the upper right corner of the Mapping Form the number of Mapping Forms used for an EA. Follow the steps below on how to indicate the number of Mapping Forms for your assigned area to facilitate accounting of these maps. If you are given a single Barangay/EA Map for your assigned area, check that the map is labeled accordingly: [Image omitted.]

Number the Mapping Forms consecutively. This consecutive numbering of all maps shall include the original EA Map and shall also cover all block maps that you have drawn/sketched in the Mapping Forms. For instance, if aside from your original EA Map, you also prepared one block map, you shall update the sheet number by lining out the original sheet number in the EA Map and writing the new one below the old sheet number. [Example omitted.]
[] 10 .Print your name and sign over it on the space provided at the bottom right corner of all Mapping Forms used. Your signature certifies the accuracy and completeness of the sketches that you have made.

How to Indicate Buildings on the Map
In the course of mapping the EA, indicate on the map the approximate location of buildings/structures. Use the proper building symbols when plotting these buildings on the EA map or Mapping Form, as shown in the illustrations on the next page. [Symbols omitted.]
For other kinds of buildings, use the appropriate symbol. For instance, use the symbol for churches and put "O" inside to indicate that there is a household living in that particular structure.
To indicate that households in a cemetery have been mapped out, draw in your EA map the symbol for cemetery. Do not plot all of its structures such as tombs, mausoleums, and chapel in your map. Below the symbol, write the serial number of the first and the last household (separated by a dash) residing inside the cemetery. Then, use a Mapping Form to sketch a map for that part of the cemetery. Plot all residential structures occupied by households using the symbol "O" and other structures such as tombs using the symbol [omitted] and write the corresponding HSNs on the Mapping Form.
Important Notice: Plot important commercial, industrial, or agricultural buildings without households or housing units to serve as landmarks. Use the symbol [omitted] and write the name of buildings/ establishment inside the symbol. However, these types of buildings shall neither be listed in CPH Form 1 nor shall be assigned BSNs.
How to Indicate Household Serial Numbers on the Map
During enumeration, each household listed shall be assigned a unique HSN. Write the four-digit HSN right below the building symbol as shown in the following illustrations [Table of symbols omitted.]

How to Take Care of the Map
It is your responsibility to handle your map with care. The map is a very important document/record of a census. It will be used from time to time as reference material for other activities of the census and other survey operations that will be conducted by the NSO.
Maps are best preserved if they are not folded or rolled. Folds and creases make a dent on the map that may eventually tear the map. Hence, do not fold your EA map or the accomplished Mapping Form.
In the field, you shall protect the map especially during bad weather. Water, in particular, causes rapid deterioration of the paper. If the map gets wet, the ink might blot, hence, destroy valuable information. Use pencil when writing on the map.
If the map is torn, you should redraw it as soon as possible.
[Images for mapping omitted.]
[pg. 67]

6. Listing of Basic Units for Enumeration
During the enumeration, you will use CPH Form 1 or LISTING BOOKLET to systematically list the basic units for enumeration such as buildings, housing units, households, and ILQs, and to record the population of each household and ILQ in your assigned EA.
This chapter provides the detailed instructions on how to do the listing using CPH Form 1 and how to properly fill out this form. See Appendix 5, (page242) for a copy of this form.

6.1 Contents of CPH Form 1
CPH Form 1 is a four-page listing booklet. The first page of this form contains four sections, namely:

1. Title Panel: Contains the form type, authority and confidentiality clauses, office name and the title of the census and CPH form, serial number, page number, NSCB approval number, and expiration date.
2. Identification Panel: Consists of certification portion and geographic identification.
3. Listing Record: Contains 11 columns which consists of the line number, day of visit and callback indicator, BSN, HUSN, HSN, institutional serial number (ISN), name of household head or name/type of institution and address, total population count, population count of male and female, and the remark/s portion.
4. Page Totals: This portion is found at the bottom of the form. It is used to record the total number of buildings, housing units, households, and institutions, total population count, and total male and female population in the households and institutions listed on the page.
[pg. 68]

6.2 Title Panel
Form Type, Authority, and Confidentiality
Form type can be found at the upper left hand corner of the first page of the listing booklet. The authority and confidentiality clauses are found below the form type. The listing booklet is called CPH Form 1. [Image omitted.]
Form Title
You can find the form title at the middle part of the title panel, bearing also the name of the agency and the title of the census. CPH Form 1 is titled "Listing Booklet".
Serial Number and Page Number
The booklet serial number and the page number can be found at the upper right hand corner of the front page of each form. The booklet serial number is a unique six-digit number which is used to control and account for each booklet. The pages of CPH Form 1 are identified by the form number and a letter, that is, 1A for the first page, 1B for the second page, 1C for the third page, and 1D for the fourth page.
NSCB Approval Number and Expiration Date
The NSCB Approval Number and Expiration Date are likewise found at the upper right hand corner of the front page. These indicate that the 2010 CPH and the forms/questionnaires have clearance and approval from the NSCB.
[pg. 69]
Important Notice: In listing the households/institutions in an EA, it is advisable to use sequentially numbered booklets for control purposes. All forms that will be given to you will be accounted for until the end of enumeration. Do not lose any booklet of CPH Form 1 since all accomplished and unused forms will have to be returned to NSO through your supervisor. Do not write anything in the title panel.

6.3 Identification Panel
Certification
Fill out the certification portion after the last unit (housing unit or household or ILQ) has been listed in the booklet. Print your full name clearly on the space provided and sign over it. Your signature certifies that what you have listed in the booklet is complete and accurate. You should sign each booklet that you have used in covering the EA. Indicate the date you signed. [Image omitted.]
Your TS will also accomplish this certification portion after he/she had reviewed your work. He/she will print his/her full name and sign on the space provided.
Month of Visit
The code boxes for the month of visit for listing are found in the second column of the second panel of CPH Form 1. Write the two-digit code of the month in the code boxes before you start listing. Since the listing period is on May 17 to June 11, 2010, the appropriate code that should be placed in the two boxes is 05 or 06.
[pg. 70]

Random Start
Secure from your TS the random start to be used in the selection of sample households in your EA and write it on the boxes provided. The random start is any number from 01 to 05.
Geographic Identification
Secure from your TS the geographic identification of your EA, which consists of the geographic names and corresponding codes of the province, city/municipality, barangay, as well as the EA number. The geographic names and codes for the province, city/municipality, and barangay are based from the Philippine Standard Geographic Codes (PSGC).
Write the name of the province, city/municipality, and barangay on the lines provided, and enter the codes in their corresponding code boxes. Write also the four-digit EA number of your assigned EA in the corresponding boxes.
The number of code boxes for each geographic item indicates the number of digits in the geographic code for that area. Thus, the province has a two-digit code; the city/municipality has a two-digit code; the barangay has a three-digit code; and the EA number has a four-digit code. The EA number indicates the part of the barangay that constitutes your area of assignment. As mentioned, your TS will give you, your EA assignment together with all the codes.
All items of the geographic identification; namely, province, city/municipality, barangay, and EA number should be correctly and completely specified and coded.
Important Notice: If the barangay name is also a number (for instance, Barangay 237), do not use the number as the barangay code. Use the code given by your TS. You should fill out the geographic identification portion before going out to the field for enumeration.
Take note of the following special cases:

[] 1. Identify the name of cities, including highly urbanized and chartered cities, along with the provinces where they are located. Also, the name of the city should be written even if it is the same as the name of the province. For example, Cebu City is part of Cebu province. Therefore, both these geographic names should appear on the geographic identification portion. [Example omitted.]
[] 2. Complete names of provinces should also be written if areas like Agusan, Camarines, Cotabato, Davao, Ilocos, Lanao, Leyte, Misamis, Mindoro, Negros, Samar, Surigao, and Zamboanga are provided. For example, you need to specify Agusan del Norte or Agusan del Sur for Agusan, and so on.
[Example and table of complete name of provinces omitted.]
[] 3. In the National Capital Region (NCR), each of the four districts corresponds to a province. Manila, being one of the districts, should be reported as a province rather than a city. In turn, the areas or "districts" within it like Ermita, Sampaloc, or Tondo will be the equivalent of cities/municipalities. The other districts of NCR will be treated in the same manner.
Below are the areas comprising each of the four districts in the NCR [table omitted.]
[pg. 73]
Number of Booklets
This portion is found in the second column of the Geographic Identification Panel of CPH Form 1. The first two boxes indicate the order of the booklet and the last two boxes indicate the total number of listing booklets used for the EA. Enter the booklet number in two digits. Prefix zero for a single digit. [Example omitted.]

6.4 Listing Record
The order of listing is by rows. This is important because each row represents a basic unit to be listed such as a building, housing unit, and household or institution for each EA. If you follow the listing procedures correctly, you will see that the assignment of serial numbers for a building, housing unit, household, and institution is sequential, except when there are households or institutions for callback. Entries in CPH Form 1 should also correspond to the entries written in CPH Form 2, CPH Form 3 or CPH Form 4.
Line Number
There are 55 lines in CPH Form 1, with 10 lines on the first page, and 15 lines each on the remaining three pages. These lines are pre-numbered in this column.
[pg. 74]
Each line number corresponds to:

[] a household,
[] an institution,
[] a housing unit occupied by households not eligible for enumeration,
[] a vacant housing unit,
[] a housing unit used as vacation or rest house, or
[] a housing unit occupied by a household whose usual place of residence is somewhere else.

Column 1 -- Day of Visit/Callback Indicator
The first row of each line is allotted for the day of visit for listing. The circle on the second row, meanwhile, serves as an indicator whether the listed household/institution was successfully interviewed or not.
For the day of visit, write the two-digit code of the day on the first row. This code shall be written in every line number accomplished. For example, the 17th day of May is coded as "17". See line number "1" in Illustration 6.1 (page86) for example.
To mark the end of enumeration for an EA, write "00" on the first row immediately after the last line number accomplished. See line number "39" in Illustration 6.3 (page 88) for example.
For the callback indicator on the second row of column 1, enter an "x" mark for a household or institution listed that is not yet successfully interviewed or is set for an interview appointment/callback, or appointment for pick-up of questionnaires with SAQ instruction. Otherwise, leave the circle blank. See line numbers "1", "5", "9", "15", "18", "19", "22", "25", "30", and "36" in illustration 6.1 to6.3 (pages 86 to 88) for examples.

Column 2 -- Building Serial Number (BSN)
As you come across a building, observe and determine whether it is one of those types of buildings that should be listed (see Section 3.1, page 13). If it is to be listed, assign a unique BSN.
Assign four-digit BSNs consecutively, that is, BSN 0001 to the first building you list, 0002 to the second building, 0003 to the third building, and so on, up to the last building listed in your EA.

Note that for every line number, two rows are allotted in Column 2. The BSN should be written on the first row. See line number "7" in illustration 6.1 (page 86) for a single building.
For a large institutional population occupying two or more buildings, assign a BSN to each building. Write the beginning BSN on the first row and the ending BSN on the second row. See line number "19" for more than one building in Illustration 6.2 (page 87) for example.
See Appendix 11, page 265 for special cases in assigning BSN and the corresponding actions to be taken.

Column 3 -- Housing Unit Serial Number (HUSN)
Assign HUSN 0001 to the first housing unit that you encounter, 0002 to the second, 0003 to the third, and so on, up to the last housing unit in your area. Refer to Section 3.2 of Chapter 3 (page 18) for the housing units to be listed.
Remember that a building may contain one or more housing units. If the first building that you encounter has only one housing unit, the BSN and the HUSN should be the same. They will start to differ once you encounter a building that has two or more housing units.
Note that for every line number, two rows are allotted in the column for HUSN. For a building with a single housing unit, write the HUSN on the first row. Otherwise, if there are more than one housing unit in a building, write the beginning HUSN on the first row and the ending HUSN on the second row. See line number "33" for a single HUSN and "34" for more than one HUSN in Illustration 6.3 (page 88) for examples.

Column 4 -- Household Serial Number (HSN)
Assign a unique four-digit HSN for each of the household that you list. The first household that you list will be assigned HSN 0001, the second 0002, the third 0003, and so on. There are special HSNs which will be assigned in the following cases:

7777 -- assigned to a household to indicate that it is occupying a housing unit which is not their usual place of residence, as in the case of a household occupying the housing unit for convenience in going to work or school.
8888 -- assigned to a household to indicate that the members such as foreign diplomats, are excluded from enumeration.
[pg. 76]
8889 -- assigned to a household to indicate that the housing unit is only used as a vacation/rest house. In this case, the household has a usual place of residence somewhere else.
9999 -- assigned to a vacant housing unit, that is, no household is occupying the housing unit.

Refer to Section 3.3 (page 20) for the definition of a household and identification of household membership.
Since HUSN and HSN are only for households, ILQs will not be assigned HUSN and HSN, therefore, leave Columns 3 and 4 blank. See line numbers "2", "4", "8", "10", "14", and "28" in illustrations 6.1 to 6.3 (pages 86 to for examples on assigning HUSN and HSN.
See Appendix 11 (page 265) for different cases of assigning HUSN and HSN and the corresponding actions to be taken.

Column 5 -- Institutional Serial Number (ISN)
Assign a unique four-digit ISN to each ILQ listed. The first ILQ should have a serial number of 0001, the second 0002, and so on. Take note that when you assign an ISN in Column 5 for an ILQ listed, Columns 3 and 4 should be left blank.
If an ILQ is in operation but at the time of listing, no residents qualify for listing, you still have to list it and provide an ISN. This will be provided with CPH Form 4, with the geographic identification already filled out and with appropriate remarks on page 4D. An example of this may be a dormitory without any resident during the listing. See line number "6" in Illustration 6.1 (page 86) for example.

Column 6 -- Name of Household Head or Name/Type of Institution and Address
In this column, the first row is allotted for the name of the household head or the name or type of the ILQ, and the following notations: VBLDG if HSN is 9999, VHU if HSN is 9999, NUR if HSN is 7777, and VRH if HSN is 8889. The second row in Column 6 is for the household/ILQ address.
The head of the household is an adult person, male or female, who is responsible for the organization and care of the household, or who is regarded as such by the members of the household.
Write on the first row of Column 6 the name of the head of the household being enumerated. Write the surname first, followed by a comma and then the first name and middle initial, if given. For an ILQ, enter the name of the institution, such as the hotel, dormitory, and others. If the institution has no official name, enter the name of the person or the entity that manages it and the type of institution, as in the following examples:

Cristina Reyes' Boarding House
Hospicio de San Jose Orphanage
Manila City Jail
National Center for Mental Health
Davao Penal Colony
[pg. 77]
Enter the building or house number and the street or sitio name on the second row of Column 6. However, if there is no house number, enter only the street name, or sitio name or common name by which the area is known (for instance, Sitio Pook Dagohoy, Krus na Ligas, Arko ni Lukas, and the like). If the address of several households are the same, put in the remarks portion some permanent landmarks that will aid in locating the households (for example near church, near the elementary school, and others). Refer to Illustrations 6.1 to 6.3 (pages 86 to 88) for examples.

Columns 7, 8, and 9 -- Population Count
Ask the respondent the total number of males and females in the household or in the ILQ and enter the number in Columns 8 and 9, respectively. Add the number of males and females and write the total number in Column 7.
Leave these columns blank for households/ILQs scheduled for callback.
Refer to line numbers "1" and "5" in Illustration 6.1 (page 86).
If a building or housing unit is vacant or if an ILQ has no institutional population during the listing, leave Columns 7, 8, and 9 blank. On the other hand, if all members of the household/ILQ are males or females, write "0" in Column 8 or 9, as the case may be. Refer to line numbers "4", "6", "7" and "10" in Illustration 6.1 (page 86) for examples.
The number of males and females in Columns 8 and 9, respectively, when summed, should be equal to the total population count in Column 7. Refer to Column 7 in Illustrations 6.1 to 6.3 (pages 86 to 88) for examples.
In Column 7, a circle provided for institutional population indicator is located below the line. Put a check mark ("ü") in this circle to mean that the population count refers to an institutional population. However, put a "ü" mark in this column only if the institution is successfully interviewed. Refer to line numbers "26" and "37" in Illustration 6.3 (page 88) for examples.
[pg. 78]

Column 10 -- Remark/s
Use this portion to indicate the date and time of your appointment for callback to the household/ILQ, and any important remarks which may be useful to your supervisors.
Examples:

Suppose you visited a household on May 17, 2010 and there was no responsible member to interview, write in this column the date of callback you indicated in CPH Form 9 (Appointment Slip to Household/Institutional Population Respondent) so that you would remember your appointment with the household.
For example, if you indicated "May 18, 8:00 a.m." as the date and time of callback in CPH Form 9, you have to write "APPT. 05/18 and 8:00 a.m." in Column 10. If upon your return to the household there is still no responsible member, schedule another appointment and record this in the remarks portion. If you are still unsuccessful on your third visit, write "STILL NOT AROUND: REFER TO TS". Refer to line numbers "1", "18", and "30" in Illustrations 6.1 to 6.3 (pages 86 to 88).
Suppose you visited another household on May 17, 2010 and the household refused to be interviewed, write "REFUSAL" in this column of CPH Form 1. If after three visits the household still refused to be interviewed write "REFUSAL: FOR REFERRAL TO TS. If an interview of the same household is made on May 20, 2010 with the assistance of the barangay chairperson, enter "C-05/29: Interview OK (with Bgy. Chairperson)". Refer to line number "9", "22", "25" and "35" in Illustrations 6.1 to 6.3 (pages 86 to 88).

For successful callbacks, enter the date the interview was completed, preceded by a "C" to differentiate it from the appointment date. For example "C-05/19" means that the callback was successfully done on May 19. Refer to line number "31" in Illustration 6.3 (page 88).
If you have distributed CPH Form 7 together with CPH Form 2 to the head or any adult household member, write "SAQ c/o your name", or CPH Form 8 together with CPH Form 4 to the manager or head of an institutional living quarter, write "c/o TS" if your TS will be the one to collect the questionnaire. Refer to line numbers "15" in Illustration 6.2 (page 87).
If you yourself conducted the interview and accomplished CPH Form 4, write the institutional population count and write "c/o (your name)". Refer to line number "26" in Illustration 6.3 (page 88).
[pg. 79]

6.5 Page Totals
Filling Out of Column Totals
This portion should be filled out only after all lines on the page have been filled out, except when it is the last page being used for the EA. Ignore the lines for households or institutional population scheduled for callback, that is, with "X" mark in the circle in Column 1. Also, when counting buildings and housing units, do not forget about the existence of multiple housing units in a building and multiple households in a housing unit. In such cases, the same BSN or same HUSN should be counted only once.
Do not leave this portion blank if there are no entries to add. Write zero (0), instead. See Illustrations 6.1 (page 86) and 6.2 (page 87) for examples.
Letters below the boxes for total are guides in filling out the respective columns in CPH Form 10 EN's Accomplishment/Progress Monitoring Report. This will be discussed in detail in Chapter 10.

Buildings
Total (A): Count the number of buildings and enter the number in the box at the bottom of Column 2, excluding those scheduled for callback (with "X" mark in the circle in Column 1).
Vacant: Count the number of entries marked VBLDG in Column 6 and enter the number in the box at the bottom of Column 2.
Housing Units
Total (B): Count the number of housing units and enter the number in the box at the bottom of Column 3, excluding those scheduled for callback (with "X" mark in the circle in Column 1).
Vacant: Count the number of housing units with VHU and VBLDG in Column 6 and make sure that multiple entries in one line number under Column 3 are considered in the count. Enter the number in the box at the bottom of Column 3.
[pg. 80]

Households and Institutions
Total Households (C): Count the number of households listed on the page and enter the number in the appropriate box at the bottom of Column 4, excluding those scheduled for callback (with "X" mark in the circle in Column 1) and those with serial numbers "7777", "8888", "8889", and "9999".
Total Institutions (D): Count the number of institutions and enter the number in the box at the bottom of Column 5, excluding those scheduled for callback (with "X" mark in the circle in Column 1).
Population Count
Total Household Population (E to G): For those lines without a "Check" mark in the circle in Column 7, add all entries in Columns 7, 8, and 9 downward and place the totals in their respective boxes.
Total Institutional Population (H to J): For those lines with a " check" mark in the circle in Column 7, add all entries in Columns 7, 8, and 9 downward and place the totals in their respective boxes.
Total Population: Add entries in Total Household Population and Total Institutional Population downward and enter the totals in their respective boxes.

6.6 Procedure for Successful Callbacks/Pick-Up Questionnaires With SAQ Instruction
When a household/institution has been successfully interviewed during a callback or when the accomplished questionnaires have been picked- up/collected:

1. Copy the information in Columns 2 to 6 from the original entries to the line following the last household/institution listed so far.
2. After completing the interview using CPH Form 2, 3, or 4 or after collecting accomplished CPH Forms 2, 3 or 4, enter the population count and the number of males and females in Columns 7, 8, and 9, respectively.
3. Leave the circle in Column 1 blank to signify the success of the interview.

Refer to line numbers "5" and "31" in Illustrations 6.1 (page 86) and 6.3 (page 88) for examples.
[pg. 81]

6.7 How to Identify and Select the Sample Households
In the 2010 CPH, there are basically two types of questionnaires to be used for the enumeration of household members. These are CPH Form 2 or the Common Household Questionnaire and CPH Form 3 or the Sample Household
Questionnaire. As mentioned earlier, CPH Form 3 contains more questions than CPH Form 2. There are procedures for selecting households which will be interviewed using CPH Form 3. All ENs are required to strictly follow these procedures.
The 2010 CPH will be carried out through the combination of complete enumeration and sampling. For this census, systematic cluster sampling will be adopted instead of systematic random sampling. This sampling method is designed in such a way that efficient and accurate estimates will be obtained at the city/municipality level.
The sampling rate or the proportion of households to be selected as samples will depend on the size of the city/municipality where the EA is located. It can be 100 percent or 20 percent as shown below. [Table omitted.]
In this sampling scheme, each city/municipality is treated as a domain. For city/municipality with 100 percent sampling rate, all households in all the EAs within this city/municipality will be selected as samples. For those with a 20 percent sampling rate, systematic cluster sampling will be adopted. That is, sample selection of one in five clusters with the first cluster selected at random. Thus in effect, the EAs belonging to the city/municipality with 20 percent sampling rate are divided into clusters of size 5. Random start is pre-determined for each EA.
If the sampling rate applied to a city/municipality is 100 percent, it means that all households in that municipality will be administered with CPH Form 3. If it is 20 percent, it means that 20 percent of all households will use CPH Form 3 while 80 percent will use CPH Form 2.
Ascertain from your TS the appropriate sampling rate for the EA assigned to you. If it is 20 percent ask from him/her the random start number that you will use. The random start is a number from 1 to 5 which is used to select the cluster where the first sample household in an EA, and subsequently the other sample households, are included. Remember that the random start is predetermined for each EA. You should not change the random start assigned to your EA.
[pg.82]
Clusters are formed by grouping together households that have been assigned consecutive serial numbers as they are listed in the Listing Booklet. For a 20 percent sampling rate, clusters are formed by grouping together five households.
Listed below are the HSNs comprising the first 10 clusters in an EA [Table omitted.]
How to Draw Sample Households Using a 20 percent Sampling Rate

Step 1. Determining households in the first sample cluster
Your random start will be a number from 1 to 5. It corresponds to the first cluster to be included in the sample. To determine the households comprising the cluster, multiply the random start by 5 and subtract 4 from the product. The resulting number corresponds to HSN of the first household in the sample cluster. The next four households listed will complete the sample cluster. [Examples omitted.]
[pg. 83]
Step 2. Determining households in the next sample clusters
The next sample clusters are determined by just adding 5 to the cluster number of the immediately preceding sample cluster. [Examples omitted.]
Since the cluster identification number is not actually indicated in the Listing Booklet, your concern, therefore, is to locate the sample households in the succeeding sample clusters as determined in the two examples shown above.
To determine the households comprising the second and succeeding sample clusters, you only need to determine the HSN of the first household in the sample cluster. To do this, add 25 to the household number of the first household in the immediately preceding sample cluster. The resulting number corresponds to the household serial number of the first household in the current sample cluster. The next four households will complete the list of households in the said sample cluster.
[pg. 84]
[Examples omitted. ]
Important Notice: Since the total number of households in an EA may not be in multiples of 5, it is possible to have less than 5 households in the last cluster. When this cluster is a sample cluster, the number of samples for the last cluster be less than 5.
[pg. 85]
[Examples omitted.]
[Example booklets omitted.]
[pg. 87]

7. Enumeration of household population using CPH Form 2- Common Household Questionnaire
This chapter discusses how you will enumerate the household population using CPH Form 2 -- Common Household Questionnaire. This questionnaire gathers information on the basic demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the household population, as well as some characteristics of the housing units where they reside. See Appendix 6 (page 248) for a copy of this form.

7.1 Contents of CPH Form 2
CPH Form 2 is the form that you will use to enumerate all nonsample households. It is a four-page questionnaire which, when completed, will serve as the record of the basic characteristics of the household population and the housing units they occupy.
The first page (page 2A) of this form contains the following:

[] Title Panel
[] Identification Panel
[] Interview Record
[] Household Definition and Membership

The second and third pages (pages 2B and 2C) of CPH Form 2 contain the Population Census Questions. These pages consist of 16 columns containing the questions on demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the household.
The following are the population census questions (P1 to P14, P16, and P19) which gather data on the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the population.

[] P1- Name of Household Members
[] P2- Relationship to Head
[] P3- Sex
[] P4- Date of Birth
[] P5- Age
[] P6- Birth Registration
[] P7- Martial Status
[] P8- Religious Affiliation
[] P9 and P10- Citizenship
[] P11- Ethnicity
[] P12- Disability
[] P13- Functional Difficulty
[] P14- Residence 5 years ago
[] P16- Highest Grade/ Year completed
[] P19- Overseas Workers
[pg. 90]
Found at the bottom of page 2B is a question on whether there are household members who are not yet listed and an instruction on what to do if there are more than eight members in the household. It also contains the codes for relationship to household head. The codes for highest grade/year completed, meanwhile, are found at the bottom of the third page (2C).
The fourth page (page 2D) contains seven items on housing characteristics and a remarks portion where you can write any necessary information that can be of help to you and your supervisor when scrutinizing the questionnaire.
The following are the housing census questions (B1 to B5, D1, and H8) which gather data on the characteristics of the buildings and/or housing units.

[] B1-Type of Building/House
[] B2-Construction Materials of the Roof
[] B3-Construction Materials of the Outer Walls
[] B4-State of Repair of the Building/House
[] B5-Year Building/House was Built
[] D1-Floor Area of the Housing Unit
[] H8-Tenure Status of the Lot
7.2 Title Panel
The left portion of title panel contains the form type, the authority and confidentiality clauses for the 2010 CPH. In the middle part is the name of the office and the title of the census and the questionnaire. The questionnaire's eight-digit serial number, page number, NSCB approval number, and expiration date are located at the upper right hand side of the form. {example omitted.]
[pg. 91]

7.3 Identification Panel
Certification Portion
You should fill out the certification portion of CPH Form 2 once you have successfully completed the interview and edited the questionnaire. When you sign this portion, you are certifying that you have personally conducted the interview and that you have religiously followed the 2010 CPH enumeration procedures as stated in this manual.
Print your full name clearly on the space provided for the EN and sign over it. Enter also the date you accomplished the questionnaire. All questionnaires that you have accomplished should bear your name and your signature.
Your TS, as well as your CAS or ACAS, will also accomplish this certification after they have reviewed your work. They will print their full name and affix their signature only if they have completed verifying the questionnaire. Personnel from the NSO Central, Regional and Provincial Offices will also certify if they have done supervision during interview and/or reviewed the questionnaire.
Note that the CAS should line out the word ACAS to indicate that he/she is the CAS, vice versa. Likewise, for the NSO supervisor, the reviewer from CO should line RO and PO to indicate that he/she is from CO. The same rule applies to the reviewer from RO or PO. [Image omitted.]

Number of Booklet/s used
CPH Form 2 can accommodate a total of eight household members. Hence, if a household has more than eight members, then one or more additional booklets will have to be filled out for this household.
In order to properly account all the booklets utilized to record information on all household members, you must always fill out this portion of the questionnaire.
If a household has eight or fewer members, only one booklet should be used. Indicate this by writing [example omitted.]
[pg. 93]

Geographic Identification
Copy the geographic identification (province, city/municipality, barangay, and EA number) from the title panel of CPH Form 1 -- Listing Booklet. You should do this before you go to the field for enumeration. During the actual visit to the household, transcribe the serial numbers of the building, housing unit, and household from the corresponding columns (Columns 2 to 4) in CPH Form 1. [Image omitted.]

Line Number of Respondent
You should fill out the code boxes for the line number of the respondent after you have listed in Item P1 all the members of the household. Once you have ascertained the completeness of the household members listed, determine the corresponding line number of the respondent. It is usually the encircled line number at the leftmost column in page 2B. Enter in the code boxes the two-digit code of the line number of the respondent. Note that you have to prefix "0" if the line number of the respondent is less than 10. However, enter "00" in the code boxes if the respondent is not a household member (for instance, in case wherein as a last resort, a nonmember is interviewed because there is no household member who can be interviewed), or if this item is not applicable (that is, the housing unit is vacant or used only as a vacation or rest house, the household is occupied exclusively by non-usual residents, or all household members are not eligible for enumeration).
[pg. 94]
As discussed in Section 4.4 of Chapter 4, a respondent is any responsible member of the household who can provide accurate answers to the questions and who can give correct information for the household.
Interview the head of the household or his/her spouse since they are the most qualified respondent. If they are not available, ask for any member of the household who can provide accurate information for all the members.
Name of Household Head
Transcribe on the line provided in CPH Form 2 the name of the household head from Column 6 of CPH Form 1. Write the last name followed by the first name.
Address
Transcribe on the line provided in CPH Form 2 the address of the household from Column 6 of CPH Form 1.

7.4 Interview Record
Use the Interview Record portion to record the result of each visit or attempt to interview the household. A visit can result to any of the following situations, depending on the availability and cooperation of the household:

[] 1. Completed. The interview was successfully finished.
[] 2. Partly completed. The interview has been started but could not be completed.
[] 3. Refused. The household refused to be interviewed at the time of visit and could not be convinced to set an appointment for an interview in the future. EN should ask first the help of the TS or higher supervisor, or an influential person in the community to turn this refusal to a successful interview. This should only be used as the final result code after all efforts to obtain a successful interview have been exerted.
[] 4. Postponed. The household could not be interviewed at the time of visit but has set an appointment to be interviewed later. This code must not be used in the final result of visit since it would mean no interview was done.
[] 5. Household temporarily away/No respondent around. The household is temporarily away, not at home, or on vacation, or no responsible respondent is available at the time of visit. This interview status is recorded after at least two callbacks
[] 6. Others, SPECIFY. The household could not be interviewed for reasons other than those given above.
[pg. 95]
If the interview was not successfully completed at the first visit for whatever reason, you must make arrangements for a callback or return visit by setting an appointment using CPH Form 9 -- Appointment Slip to Household/Institutional Population Respondent. You can make at least two callbacks. If you are still unsuccessful after the two callbacks, seek the help of your TS.
Codes for result of visit are found at the bottom of Summary of Visit portion of the Interview Record for your reference.
For each visit, you should record the following details regarding the interview:

[] Date of visit (month:day)
[] Time began (hour:minute)
[] Time ended (hour:minute)
[] Result of visit

Use military time in recording time began and time ended, that is, you add 12 hours for interviews that you conduct starting at 1 o'clock p.m. For example, 2:45 p.m. will be written as 14:45. If a callback is needed, you should also record the date and time of the appointment you set on the boxes provided (next visit portion).
Summary of Visit
Enter the three-digit Enumerator's Code assigned to you. Your TS will provide you with your EN's code when he/she gives your area of assignment.
After the final visit, record the following information at the Summary of Visit portion:

Number of visits made to the household
Result of final visit

Enter the appropriate code for the result of final visit in the box provided. Note that Postponed, code "4" is not an acceptable code for the result of final visit.
[pg. 96]
Record also the following if you were able to obtain the information:

[] Number of household members
[] Number of males
[] Number of females

These numbers refer to the total number of household members, total number of males, and total number of females in the household.
Check for the consistency of these numbers with Columns 7, 8, and 9 of CPH Form 1. In case of inconsistencies with the totals between CPH Form 1 and CPH Form 2, the numbers in CPH Form 2 shall prevail.
SAQ Indicator
The SAQ Indicator is included as an item in the Summary of Visit portion. This item will indicate whether or not CPH Form 7 (SAQ Instructions) was provided to the household because the household could not be personally interviewed by the EN for a valid reason. In this case, the household should accomplish CPH Form 2 using CPH Form 7 as guide. This will also indicate if the household provided with CPH Form 7 is a sample or nonsample household.
If you personally interviewed the nonsample household and did not provide SAQ instructions, write "1" in the box for the nonsample household without SAQ instructions. Otherwise write "2" for nonsample household provided with SAQ instructions. Meanwhile, if the household is a sample and you need to provide SAQ instruction, write "3" in the box for sample household with SAQ instructions.
Important Notice: When using more than one CPH Form 2 for a household with more than eight members, copy the contents of the geographic identification items from the first booklet to the additional booklet/s that will be used. Leave Interview Record and Summary of Visit blank.

7.5 Household Definition and Household Membership
Found at the bottom of the first page (2A) of CPH Form 2 are the definition of a household and the correct order of listing the household members. These will guide you in the proper order of listing household members to ensure that no one is omitted in the list. Detailed discussion on household membership is included in Items P1 and P2.
[pg. 97]

7.6 Instructions on the Population Census Questions
In CPH Form 2, Items P1 to P12 will be filled out for all persons; P13, P14, and P16 for all persons 5 years old and over; and P19 for all persons 10 years old and over.
Be guided by the general instructions and illustrations when accomplishing such items.
General Instructions in Asking Items P1 to P14, P16, and P19
List all the household members according to this order:

[] Head
[] Spouse of the head
[] Never-married children of head/spouse from oldest to the youngest
[] Ever-married children of head/spouse and their families from oldest to youngest
[] Other relatives
[] Nonrelatives

It is important that you list the names of the household members following this order so that you will be able to list all household members and no one will be missed. The names in Item P1 will enable you to ask with ease the questions in other columns since you will be referring to the name of the member when asking subsequent questions.
As a rule, you should ask the questions in Items P1, P2, and P3, one after another for each member until the last household member is listed, strictly following the prescribed order of listing. Once you have completed Items P1, P2, and P3, for all household members, you should ask probing question #1 on household size at the bottom of page 2B to ensure that all household members are listed. Then, you should go back to the first household member listed and ask the respondent the questions in Items P4 to P19. [Image of order of questions omitted.]
[pg. 99]

Specific Instructions by item
The quality of data collected in this form will depend so much on how well you ask the questions and how you record the answer. For this reason, you are required to follow the instructions correctly for each item of CPH Form 2 as provided in this manual. Pay close attention to the rationale and importance of each item included in the questionnaire.
Line Number
Every questionnaire is allotted with eight lines or rows. Each line or row is provided with a line number. You will write on these lines the names and characteristics of all the members of the household.
Encircle the line number at the left side of the name of respondent. If there are two or more respondents, encircle the line number of the person who provided most of the answers you recorded in the questionnaire. There may be instances when an interview of a household was partly completed in the first visit but was later completed during your callback visit and the respondent in your first visit and callback visit are not the same. In this case, encircle the line number of the respondent who provided you with the most number of acceptable answers and write the necessary remarks on page 2D of the questionnaire.
Transcribe the line number of the respondent in the geographic identification section on page 2A.
If there are more than eight members in the household, you need to use additional CPH Form 2. For the second booklet of CPH Form 2, the line number on the left side of the household member listed in the first line or row should be in sequence to the last line number indicated in the first booklet of CPH Form 2 that was just accomplished. Similarly, the line number of the next household member/s should be in sequence to the line number of the household member listed in the immediately preceding line or row. Any change in the line number on page 2B should also be reflected in the column for line number on page 2C. [Examples omitted.]
[pg. 100]

Columns P1 to P12 for All persons
Columns P1 to P12 are to be accomplished for all household members regardless of age.
P1-Name, P2-Relationship to Head, and P3-Sex
Data on the relationship to head of household identify the different types of family groups and their structures within a household. They provide an indication of the typical relationship among household members. Knowledge on changing family characteristics is necessary in the formulation of social security and welfare programs.
[pg. 101]
Write the names of the members of the households in Column P1 and fill out Columns P2 and P3 for the relationship to the head and sex, respectively. The complete list of codes corresponding to their relationship to the head of the household is found at the bottom of page 2B of every CPH Form 2. Be guided also by the following:
Begin asking the respondent, "Who is the head of this household?" Who are the persons residing here as of May 1, 2010? Write the name of the household head on the first line. Write "head" on the line provided and enter "01" in the boxes in column P2. Determine the sex of the head by asking the question. "Is [the respondent] male or female? Write "X" in the box corresponding to "1" if male, or in the box for "2" if female.
Ask the name of the other members, their relationship to household head and sex. Inform the respondent that you want to list the members in the order of listing shown below (or as indicated at the bottom of page 2B). This list shows the relationship of members to the household head:

[] Head
[] Spouse of the head
[] Never-married children of head/spouse from oldest to youngest, regardless of sex, and never-married children of head/spouse from previous marriage (if any) from oldest to youngest, regardless of sex
[] Ever-married children of head/spouse and their families from oldest to youngest (for instance, son first, followed by daughter-in-law, then grandchildren; or son-in-law first, followed by daughter, then grandchildren, as the case may be)
[] Other relatives of the head such as parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, parents-in-law, and others (including other relatives of the spouse of the head)
[] Nonrelatives of the head such as boarders (including relatives who are mere boarders) and domestic helpers (including relatives who are employed as domestic helpers).

The order of listing will help the respondent in recalling and reporting all the members of the household. Following this order of listing is imposed primarily to avoid omission of household members from the list.
If the head has more than one spouse living in the same household, list down the name of the first spouse and their unmarried children, followed by the second spouse and their unmarried children, and so on, keeping the nuclear family together, as much as possible.
[pg. 102]
Also inform the respondent that you need to include in the list all household members who are Overseas Workers. Undocumented workers who are commonly called "TNT" ("tago nang tago") are included if the household still considers them as members and if the respondent still mentions these TNT's names when you ask about the names of household members.
However, immigrants are excluded from the census. Refer to Section 3.3 Chapter 3 (page 21) for the definition of overseas workers.
Take note that boarders are members of the household if they do not usually go to their respective homes weekly. However, if there are 10 or more of such persons in the household, do not include them as members of the household. These boarders will all be considered as institutional population and will be enumerated separately from the household.
You may sometimes encounter respondents who will insist that you include as member of the household a person who does not qualify as a household member as per our census concepts. Explain to the respondent that we are strictly adhering to the census concepts and that the person he/she wants to include in his/her household will definitely be included in another household following strictly the concepts/definitions of the census. Example of persons whom your respondent would most likely insist on including in his/her household are students who attend school in Manila or in another province or municipality and go home at least once a month or at the end of every semester. Such students should be enumerated in the place where they are boarding and not in their parents' household.
When you are in doubt as to whether a person should be included or excluded as member of a household, include that person first but write the necessary remarks/explanations at the bottom of page 2D of the questionnaire. Refer this matter to your supervisor.
In writing the names of the members of the household, enter the surname on the first line and then the first or given name and middle initial (if given), on the second line.
If the surname of a member is the same as the one immediately preceding him/her, draw a horizontal line (----) in place of his/her surname and write the first name of the person on the second line.
Note that in some parts of the country, people do not have surnames. If you encounter such a case, just write the name as given in the appropriate space.
[pg. 103]
As the respondent gives the name of a household member, ask immediately the member's relationship to the household head, "What is the relationship to the head of this household?"
Write the description of the relationship to the household head and enter the appropriate code in the boxes in Column P2. The code should be one of the 22 codes listed at the bottom of page 2B.
"Children" of the head are the sons/daughters of the head, regardless of the children's age or marital status. A married son, who, together with the members of his family, is a member of his father's household should be reported as "son" and his wife and children, as "daughter-in-law" and "grandson"/"granddaughter" of the household head, respectively.
Note that they will have these relationships if they qualify as members of the same household.
"Other relatives" include such relatives as parents-in-law, cousins, grandparents, sisters-/brothers-in-law, and others.
Members of the household who are related to the head by blood or affinity but who are boarders should be considered as boarders. Similarly, household/domestic helpers should be listed as household/domestic helpers even if they are related to the head or to other members of the household by blood or affinity.

Determine the sex of each household member by asking the question, "Is [the respondent] male or female?" The sex of each household member can be determined by his/her name or relationship to the head, but in some cases, there is a need to ask the respondent whether the person is a male or female. Some names such as Charlie, Florence, Alex, Chito, Cielito, Christy, Loreto, Trinidad, Resurreccion, Rosario, Joey, Regine, and others, have been commonly used to refer to either a male or female person.
Sex-disaggregated data is of prime importance in demographic and socio-economic studies. Separate data for males and females may be crucial in the analysis of many types of data. Demographers and statisticians likewise consider sex a key variable in evaluating the completeness and accuracy of census counts.
Mark the appropriate box with "X" opposite "1" for Male or "2" for Female.

After listing all the members of the household in Column P1 and completing entries for Columns P2 and P3, you should ask the question and follow the instruction stated at the lower portion of page 2B of the questionnaire, under the heading Household Size. These items will help you determine if there are still household members whom the respondent has forgotten to include in the list. It is important to probe if there are other persons such as small children, infants, and overseas workers who were not listed as household members. Oftentimes, respondents inadvertently fail to report or erroneously consider these persons as nonmembers of the household.
[pg. 104]
In case the respondent mentions another household member not yet listed, add the name of that household member following the last household member listed. Do not insert the additional member in between the filled out lines just to follow the order of listing as discussed earlier. This is one case wherein the order of listing may not be followed.
If the list of qualified household members had already been exhausted, that is, all household members had already been listed; affix your initial on the space provided for the surname in Column P1 for all empty lines or unused rows.

[Images omitted.]
[pg. 106]

P4-Date of Birth
The information to be asked for all persons in this column is the specific month and year when the person was born. Presented below are the two-digit codes corresponding to the 12 months in a year.

[] 01 January
[] 02 February
[] 03 March
[] 04 April
[] 05 May
[] 06 June
[] 07 July
[] 08 August
[] 09 September
[] 10 October
[] 11 November
[] 12 December

Enter the two-digit code for the month and the complete year of birth in the corresponding boxes provided for this purpose.
Example: A person born on June 25, 1980 should have the following entry in Column P4:
In case the respondent still cannot give definite answer for the month and/or year of birth, even after exhaustive probing, write 9's in the boxes provided for the month and/or year.

P5-Age
Data on age is essential in analyzing population changes and in preparing population estimates and forecasts needed for the provision of basic health and social services like immunization, education, and others. This information is also needed for actuarial analysis of probability of survival and other related life-table functions.
For purposes of this census, age as of last birthday refers to the interval of time between the person's date of birth and May 1, 2010. It is expressed in completed years, thus, recorded in whole number.
Determine the age of each household member by asking the respondent, "What is [The respondent]'s age as of his/her last birthday?" Enter the age in the boxes provided.
[pg. 107]
Important notice: You should still ask P5- Age even if the date of birth is already given in item P4.
Here are some basic guidelines for your reference:

[] 1. If During Your Visit, A Member Of The Household Has Just Celebrated His/Her Last Birthday On Or after May 1, 2010, then you have to report his/her age as of his/her previous birthday. For example, a person born on May 2, 1986 has just celebrated his/her 24th birthday, the age to be reported for this person should be "023", and NOT "024".
[] 2. Three boxes are allotted for the age of household members. Enter the age of every person one year old and over in completed years. Prefix zeroes (0's) for ages 1 to 99 years, for example: "002", "010", and others. For persons 100 years old and over, record the actual age, that is, "100", "101", and so on. However, for persons less than one year old, enter "000". Do not record ages such as 7.5, 5 years and two months, and others. Instead, record "007" and "005", respectively.
[] 3. Check for inconsistencies in the ages of mother and her children. The respondent may have given incorrect information for one reason or another. Probe and verify further, as needed: for example when the age difference between the mother and her eldest child is less than 15 years.
[] 4. If the exact age is not known, ask for an estimate. It may also help to estimate the ages of siblings with reference to one of them whose age is known. In some cases, you may ask the respondent to recall some well-known local, national, or world event in the past by which the age may be associated with, or if the member is older or younger than some prominent persons. If all possible means have already been exhausted and the respondent is still unable to give the correct information, record his/her best estimate.
[pg. 108]
[Table of reference dates omitted.]
Important Notice: There must be a report for age in Column P5 for every household member. Check for the consistency of age and date of birth using Table 1 (Age as of Last Birthday Conversion) found at the inside back cover of this manual. Resolve any inconsistency while you are still in the household.

P6-Birth Registration
Provisions of the Civil Code and other laws in the country are concerned with the legal or civil rights of an individual. Civil rights could be granted only by the government and the proof of one's claim to such rights is dependent on official registration, the legal purpose for which civil registration was designed. The birth of a person is one of the vital events subject to official registration.
The recording of the occurrence of birth in the city/municipality civil registry office is called birth registration, and the proof of such registration is the birth certificate with a Local Civil Registry (LCR) number. The purpose of collecting this data is to determine the extent of birth registration in the country.
[pg. 109]
Low registration of this vital event would prompt policy makers and program managers to devise measures to increase the level of birth registration in the country.
Ask the respondent, "Was [the respondent]'s birth registered with the Civil Registry Office?" If the birth registration of a member of the household is unknown to the respondent, verify from the member himself/herself. If after probing the birth registration is still unknown, mark the box opposite "3" for Don't Know.

P7-Marital Status
Marital status refers to the personal status of each individual with reference to the marriage laws or customs of the country. It is the same as "civil status", the term usually used in official and private records, documents, transactions, and others, in the country. For the 2010 CPH, the person's marital status shall be as of the date of visit.
For persons below 10 years old, mark the box opposite "1" for Single without asking the question. For persons 10 years old and over ask: "Is single, married, widowed, divorced/separated, or in a common-law/live-in arrangement?"
Below are the definitions of the categories for marital status:

[] 1 Single: A person who has never been married.
[] 2 Married: A person married in a religious or civil ceremony, either living together with spouse at the time of visit, or temporarily living apart because his/her spouse is employed elsewhere or is in the Armed Forces.
[] 3 Widowed: A married person whose spouse died and who has not married up to the time of visit.
[] 4 Divorced/Separated: A person who is permanently separated from his/her spouse, legally, or through mutual consent. This is also applicable for a person whose marriage with another person has been annulled or dissolved and can, therefore, remarry.
[] 5 Common-law/ Live-in: A person cohabiting or living 0onsensually with another person as husband and wife without the benefit of a legal marriage.
[] 6 Unknown: A person whose marital status is unknown to the respondent, or whose marital status is being concealed by the respondent/person himself/herself to the other members of the household.

Important Notice: Some respondents may find this question too personal or a sensitive issue. Avoid antagonizing the respondent. Do not refute the reported marital status of any person. Disregard any knowledge you may have about the person and record only whatever is reported by the respondent.

P8-Religious Affiliation
Religious affiliation refers to a particular system of beliefs, attitudes, emotions, and behaviors constituting man's relationship with the powers and principalities of the universe. Data on this are required for the planning of religion-related and/or -sponsored activities. They may also be used in examining the ethnic characteristics of the population.
Specify the religious affiliation of the member as reported by the respondent on the space provided. Enter the corresponding code in the boxes. Use the codebook as reference.
If the religious affiliation reported is not among the pre-coded answers provided in the codebook, write code "99".
An infant who is not yet baptized must carry the religious affiliation of his/her mother.
Take note that the "Protestant" religion has different denominations; same is true with "other" religions. In case you are in doubt on how to classify a certain religious sect, write the specific religion on the space provided. For Roman Catholics, Protestants, and others who are members of charismatic movements or fellowships and now call themselves as "born again" Christians or charismatics, verify where they are attending religious services. Hence, an El Shaddai follower who still attends to or practices Roman Catholic religious rites should still be considered as a Roman Catholic.

Indigenous peoples (IPs) who practice a traditional religious or belief system may not necessarily belong to any church, unless they have already been converted to a particular religion. If a member of the household, who is an IP, is baptized in any of the formal religions, he/she should be reported as an affiliate of that religion. However, if the IP respondent mentioned that a member of the household believes or has faith in Kabunian, Apo Namalyari, Magbabaya, and so on, which refer to supreme deities in their language, the religious affiliation shall be coded as "96" for Tribal Religion. Tribal religion is characterized by the observance of indigenous rituals, such as, venerating the dead ancestors and invoking divine intercession for good things in life.

Filling Out Columns P1 to P8 of CPH Form 2: An Example
Illustration 7.2 shows the household of Karl Santos, 45 years old who lives with his lawful wife Janine, 40 years old; son Josh, 10 years old; daughter Sophia, 13 years old; and Karl's nephew, Daniel Cruz who is single. Everyone in the household is Roman Catholic, except their household helper, Marie Ecol, a 49 year-old widow who is an Aglipay. The births of all members of the household have been registered with the local civil registry office. The respondent is Janine who mentioned that all her children are single and too young to engage in a relationship.
Below are the dates of birth of the household members:

[] Karl was born on January 8, 1965
[] Janine was born on July 14, 1969
[] Sophia was born on September 20, 1996
[] Josh was born on October 20, 1999
[] Daniel was born on March 19, 1990
[] Marie was born on December 15, 1960

[Image of example omitted.]

[pg. 113]

P9 and P10-Citizenship
Citizenship is defined as the legal nationality of a person. A citizen is a legal national of the country at the time of census, while an alien is a non-national of the country. Data on citizenship allows the classification of the population into (a) citizens and (b) aliens. These data are valuable in the study of problems relating to the legal status and civil rights of immigrants.
A person's citizenship depends on the country to which he/she owes legal allegiance or where he/she exercises the right of suffrage.
Ask the question in P9:" Is [the respondent]a citizen of the Philippines?" for all persons. This question determines who among the members of the household citizens of the Philippines are and who are not. If the household member is a citizen only of the Philippines, write "X" in the box beside code "1" for Yes, and skip to P11. However, if the household member is a citizen of the Philippines and at the same time a citizen of another country, write "X" in the box beside code "2", meaning he/she has a dual citizenship. Then ask the question in P10 "What country is [the respondent]a citizen of?" Moreover, if the household member is not a citizen of the Philippines, write "X" in the box beside code "3" and ask the question in P10.
For persons with dual alien citizenship, inquire which one should be reported and enter the code for the preferred country of citizenship. However, for those with Filipino citizenship and alien citizenship, write "X" in the box for Yes, Dual Citizenship in P9. Specify the other country of citizenship in P10 and enter the appropriate code for the country of citizenship. The codes are listed in the Codebook.
For persons whose citizenship is other than those provided in the Codebook, write on the space provided the name of the country where they owe legal allegiance to.
If the person being interviewed hesitates to answer this question, remind him/they that the information shall be held strictly confidential and no reference to individual persons will be made
[pg. 114]

P11-Ethnicity
Ethnicity is a primary sense of belonging to an ethnic group. Ethnic group is consanguine in nature, meaning, the ties are reckoned by blood and traced through the family tree. Thus, ethnicity refers to the household member's identity, by blood and not by choice nor by adoption/confirmation for any ethnic group, primarily the Indigenous Peoples (IPs).
Generally, ethnic grouping denotes genealogical and paternal lineage to any of the Philippines' group of native population. However, for the purpose of 2010 CPH, ethnic grouping also includes maternal lineage. As such, anybody whose consanguinity with both parents or any of them, who is/are member/s of an IP group, is an Indigenous Person.
As defined in Section 3h, Chapter II, of Republic Act No. 8371, otherwise known as the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA), IPs refer to a group of people or homogenous societies identified by self-ascription and ascription by others, who have continuously lived as organized community on communally bounded and defined territory, and who have, under claims of ownership since time immemorial, occupied, possessed, and utilized such territories, sharing common bonds of language, customs, traditions, and other distinctive cultural traits, or who have, through resistance to political, social, and cultural inroads of colonization, non-indigenous religions and cultures, became historically differentiated from the majority of Filipinos. IPs likewise include peoples who are regarded as indigenous on account of their descent from the populations which inhabited the country, at the time of conquest or colonization, or at the time of inroads of non-indigenous and cultures, or the establishment of present state boundaries, who retain some or all of their own social, economic, cultural, and political institutions, but who may have been displaced from their traditional domains or who may have resettled outside their ancestral domains.
Ask the respondent the question in P11: "What is [the respondent]'s ethnicity by blood?" for all members of the household.
It is important that you make a follow-up question by mentioning the common ethnic groups in your area. Thus, you should say, "Is he/she a/an...?" (Mention the most common ethnic groups in the area,
See List in Appendix 9 (pages 260 to 263). For instance, if you are assigned in the municipality of Upi in the province of Maguindanao, which is predominantly inhabited by Maguindanaos, Iranons, and Tedurays, mention these ethnic groups by saying, "Is he/she a Maguindanao, Iranon, or Teduray?" If you are assigned in Surigao City in the province of Surigao del Norte, most of inhabitants are Mamanwa, Cebuano, or Bisaya. Mention these ethnic groups as examples when you ask the ethnicity of the respondent and the other household members.
As a strategy, ask for the ethnicity of the parents. Write the ethnicity on the space provided. Mentioning the common ethnic groups in the area can help the respondent identify the ethnicity of his/her parents.
[pg. 115]
The complete alphabetical listing of ethnicity, their corresponding codes, as well as the most common ethnic groups by province are provided in the codebook for your reference.
Cases of mixed ancestry, that is, parents belonging to different ethnic groups may be encountered. In these cases, refer to the foregoing explanations:
Case 1 - Mixed Non-IP parents

Father - Tagalog Mother - Ilocano
In case 1, children aged 13 years old and over will decide between Tagalog and Ilocano. If children (13 years old and over) are around, you should directly ask them. If not, ask the respondent on behalf of these children.
Children below 13 years of age who could not yet decide on their ethnicity at the time of census should take the ethnicity of their mother.
Case 2 - Mixed IP parents
Father - Kankanaey Mother - Ibaloi
In case 2, children aged 13 years old and over will decide between Kankanaey and Ibaloi. If children (13 years old and over) are around, you should directly ask them. If not, ask the respondent on behalf of these children.
In no case, however, shall an IP group not referring to any of the parents be accepted as ethnicity of the children.
Children below 13 years of age who could not yet decide on their ethnicity at the time of census should take the ethnicity of their mother.
Case 3 - Mixed IP and Non-IP parents
Father -- Dumagat (IP) Mother - Kapampangan (Non-IP)
In case 3, wherein only one of the parents is an IP, the ethnicity of the children should follow that of the IP parent.
In this case, all children, regardless of age, should automatically be considered as Dumagat.
[pg. 116]
Case 4 - Mixed IP and Muslim parents
Father -- Maranao (Muslim) Mother - Manobo (IP)
Muslim tribes are paternalistic, by nature.
In case 4, for the family with Islam as their religion, the ethnicity of the children should follow the father's ethnicity, that is, Maranao.
For a family that adopted any religion other than Islam, the ethnicity of the children, regardless of age, should be that of the IP parent. In this case, the child's ethnicity should be Manobo.
Case 5 - Mixed Muslim parents
Father - Samal Mother - Badjao
In case 5, for the family with Islam as their religion, all children, regardless of age, should follow the ethnicity of their father, that is, Samal.
There are instances, however, when a person belonging to a Muslim tribe has a religion, other than Islam. In this case, children aged 13 years old and over should decide between Samal and Badjao, while children below 13 years of age who cannot decide on their ethnicity at the time of census should take the ethnicity of their mother, that is, Badjao.
Case 6 - Mixed Muslim and Non-IP parents
Father -- Tausug (Muslim) Mother - Bicolano (Non-IP)
In this example, all children, regardless of age, should be considered as Tausug. However, if it happens that the father is Bicolano and the mother is Tausug (Muslim), their children should be considered as Bicolanos, strictly adhering to paternalistic concept.

Answers such as Igorot, Cordilleran, Lumad, Bangsa Moro, among others are not IP or ethnic groups. These are generic or general/collective terms coined by others or by religious groups to refer to groups, which, with constant use and span of time, the group have somewhat adopted to identify themselves. If you encounter answers such as these, you should further probe by mentioning some of the predominant/common subgroups listed on the next page to get their real ethnicity.
[pg. 117]

Igorot: Kankanaey, Ibaloi, Bontoc, Applai, others
Cordilleran: Kankanaey, Ibaloi, Ifugao, Kalinga, Bontoc, Tingguian/Itneg, Isneg/Isnag/Apayao, Ilocano, Tagalog and other non-IPs living in the Cordillera Administrative Region
Lumad: B'laan, Banwaon, Bagobo, Dibabawon, Mandaya, Manguangan , Manobo, Mansaka, Talaandig, Teduray, T'boli, Tagakaolo, Subanen, Ubo, Higaonon, others
Bangsa Moro: Maranao, Tausog, Maguindanao, Iranon, others

Write the ethnic group on the space provided in the questionnaire and refer to the codebook for the corresponding code of the ethnic group.

Disability and Functional Difficulty
For this census, question on disability is collected and measured in terms of whether or not a person has disability. To understand the concept of disability, it is important to include its dimensions, namely, impairment, activity limitation, and participation restriction. The question on whether or not a person has disability is an impairment approach. It does not necessarily include the other two dimension of disability. Activity and participation approaches to disability measurement can be captured by asking questions on functional difficulties.
The kind of data on functional difficulty will determine how many people have difficulties in performing activities of everyday living such as seeing, hearing, walking or climbing steps, remembering or concentrating, self-caring, and communicating. In this census, questions on difficulty in seeing or in hearing cover people who use assistive devices and technical aids to perform the said activities. Including them in the scope of this census will reflect the actual level of participation restriction of the people in general
.
P12-Disability
[pg. 118]
Disability refers to any restriction or lack of ability (resulting from an impairment) to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being. Impairments associated with disabilities may be physical, mental, or sensory motor impairment such as partial or total blindness, low vision, partial or total deafness, oral defect, having only one hand/no hands, one leg/no legs, mild or severe cerebral palsy, retarded, mentally ill, mental retardation and multiple impairment. Data on disability will enable planners to prepare plans for rehabilitation, education, development, and preventive programs.
Comprehensive and accurate data on persons with disability are essential in the formulation of plans for the rehabilitation, education, and development of persons with disability. This information is also important to rationalize the establishment of more government-subsidized institutions that would cater to the promotion of physical, emotional, and psycho-social well-being of persons with disability.
To identify household members who may have disabilities, ask the respondent "Does have any physical or mental disability?". If the answer is Yes, write "X" in the box for Yes, otherwise, write "X" in the box for No.

Columns P13, P14 and P16 for All 5 Years Old and Over
Columns P13, P14 and P16 are to be accomplished only for household members five years old and over. Thus, if a household member is less than five years old leave columns P13, P14 and P16 blank.

P13-Functional Difficulty
As defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) of the World Health Organization, functioning is an umbrella term for body functions, body structures, activities, and participation. It denotes the positive aspects of the interaction between an individual (with a health condition) and that individual's contextual factors (environmental and personal factors). Environmental factors include the physical world and its features, the human-made physical world, other people in different relationships and roles, attitudes and values, social systems and services, and policies, rules and laws. Personal factors are factors that relate to individual such as age, gender, social status, life experiences, and so on.
A person with difficulty in functioning may have activity limitations, which means difficulties an individual may have in executing activities. An activity limitation may range from a slight to a severe deviation in terms of quality or quantity in executing the activity in a manner or to the extent that is expected of people without the health condition. In general, functional difficulties experienced by people may have been due to their health conditions. Health conditions refer to diseases or illnesses, other health problems that may be short
or long lasting injuries, mental or emotional problems, and problems with alcohol or drugs. A health condition may also include other circumstances such as pregnancy, ageing, stress, congenital anomaly, or genetic predisposition. Difficulty is usually manifested when a person is doing an activity with increased effort, discomfort or pain, slowness, or changes in the way he/she does the activity.
[pg. 119]
For the purpose of this census, functional difficulty is classified into six core categories. The concepts and definitions are based on ICF. These difficulties are the following:

Difficulty in seeing, even if wearing eyeglasses

Seeing refers to an individual using his/her eyes and vision capacity in order to perceive or observe what is happening around him/her.
The purpose of this question is to identify persons who have some serious vision limitation or problems of any kind with their seeing that contribute to difficulty in doing their daily activities. They can have problem in doing close handwork or reading, or the problem can be that they cannot read road signs when driving. They may not be able to see out of one eye or may be only able to see directly in front of them but not to the sides. Any difficulty with vision, with or without eyeglasses, that they consider a problem should be reported.
Note that if the person is wearing eyeglasses, make sure he/she understands that the question refers to difficulties he/she may have while wearing his/her eyeglasses.

Difficulty in hearing, even if using a hearing aid

Hearing refers to an individual using his/her ears and auditory (or hearing) capacity in order to know what is being said to him/her or the sounds of activity, including danger that is happening around him/her.
The purpose of this question is to identify persons who have some serious hearing limitation or problems of any kind with their hearing that contribute to difficulty in doing any aspect of their daily activities. They can have a problem hearing someone talk when in a crowded or noisy space or the problem can be that they cannot hear when someone talks to them directly in a quiet place. They may not be able to hear in one ear or both. Any difficulty with hearing, with or without hearing aid, that they consider a problem should be reported.
[pg. 120]
Note that if the person is using hearing aids, make sure that he/she understands that the question refers to difficulties he/she may have even while wearing his/her hearing aids.

Difficulty in walking or climbing steps

Walking refers to an individual using his/her legs in such a way as to propel himself/herself over the ground to get from one point or place to another. The capacity to walk should be without assistance of any device or human. If such assistance is needed, the person has difficulty in walking.
The purpose of this question is to identify persons who have some serious limitation or problems of any kind getting around on foot. It may or may not contribute to difficulty in doing their daily activities. They can have a problem walking more than a block or some short distance, or the problem can be that they cannot walk up or down the steps without difficulty. They may not be able to walk any distance without stopping to rest or they may not be able to walk without using some types of device such as cane, a walker, or crutches. In some instances, they may be totally unable to stand for more than a minute or two and need a wheelchair to get from one place to another. Any difficulty with walking (whether it is on flat land or up or down steps) that they consider a problem should be reported.

Difficulty in remembering or concentrating

Remembering refers to an individual using his/her memory capacity in order to recall what has happened around him/her. It means the individual can bring to mind or think again about something that has taken place in the past (either the recent past or further back). In connection with younger people, remembering is often associated with storing facts learned in school and being able to retrieve them when needed.
Concentrating refers to an individual using his/her mental ability to accomplish some tasks such as reading, calculating numbers, and learning something. It is associated with focusing on the task at hand in order to complete it. It is the act of directing one's full attention to a subject or to focus without distraction on one thing.
The purpose of this question is to identify persons who have some serious problems with remembering or concentrating that contribute to difficulty in doing their daily activities. They can have a problem finding their way around, or the problem can be that they cannot concentrate on what they are doing, or they may forget where they are or what month it is. They may not remember what someone just said to them or they may seem confused or frightened about most things. Any difficulty with remembering, concentrating, or understanding what is going on around them that they or family members (if the family member is the respondent) consider a problem should be reported.
[pg. 121]
Note that if the person is taking notes, has electronic reminder systems or with verbal cueing from personal assistants being used as a memory aid, difficulty should be assessed with this help taken into consideration. However, a person may have a difficulty remembering or concentrating not because he/she has a disability but because he/she is very busy or is aging. Just remember that this question refers to a person who experiences a functional difficulty because of a health condition or health problem, and not because he/she is busy or aging.

Difficulty in self-caring (bathing or dressing)

Bathing refers to the process of cleaning one's entire body (usually with a soap and water). The washing activity includes cleaning hair down to the feet, as well as gathering any necessary items for bathing such as soap, shampoo, washcloth, or water.
Dressing refers to all aspects of putting clothing or garments on the upper and lower body, including the feet. Gathering clothing from storage areas (such as closet or dressers), securing buttons, tying knots, zipping, and others, should be considered part of the dressing activity.
This question refers not only to the washing of one's entire body but also includes all aspects of dressing the upper or lower body.
The purpose of this item is to identify persons who have problems with taking care of basic daily activities required for independent living. Bathing and dressing represent two of the very basic activities that occur on a daily basis.
Note that if the person is using assistive device or getting help from someone in bathing or dressing, difficulty should be assessed with this help taken into consideration.

Difficulty in communicating
[pg. 122]

Communicating refers to an individual's exchanging information or ideas with other people through the use of language. They may usetheir voices for their exchange or make signs or write the information they want to exchange. It may involve mechanical problems such as hearing or speech impairment, or it may be related to the ability of the mind to interpret the sounds that the auditory system is gathering and to recognize the words that are being used.
The purpose of this question is to identify persons who have some problems with talking, listening, or understanding speech such that it contributes to difficulty in doing their daily activities. They can have a problem making themselves understood, or the problem may be that they cannot understand people who talk to them or try to communicate with them.
Difficulty may be experienced due to factors relevant to communication such as hearing loss, language problems as after a stroke, stuttering, anxiety, or any other factor related to a health condition.
Note the person's usual mode of communication (such as, spoken language, sign language, gestural, or with an assistive device such as hearing aid) and situations such as when others speak quickly, with background noise or with distractions. Difficulty should be assessed with these factors taken into consideration. For instance, difficulty due to the fact that the language spoken is not one's mother tongue should be excluded.

To identify household members who may have functional difficulty, ask the respondent, "Does [the respondent] have any difficulty/problem in ?" You need to read out each kind of functional difficulty one by one.

Seeing, even when wearing eyeglasses
Hearing, even when using a hearing aid
Walking or climbing steps
Remembering or concentrating
Self-caring (bathing or dressing)
Communicating using his/her usual language

For each functional difficulty, if the answer is Yes, write "X" in the box for Yes, otherwise, write "X" in the box for No.
Important notice: Make sure that each of the six categories has an "x" mark in the box corresponding to yes or no for each household member 5 years old and over.

P14-Residence 5 Years Ago
The question on residence 5 years ago pertains to the place where a person was residing 5 years ago. Data on these are vital for projects concerning housing and industrial development. Estimates on migration are needed in the preparation of population projections necessary for planning and policy formulation. Distribution of internal migration at certain geographic level will be better judged as to its implications to social changes given a detailed analysis of the volume and trend of internal migration.
Ask the respondent, "In what city/municipality did reside on May 1, 2005?" Enter code "0000" in P14 if the person's residence 5 years ago is the same as his/her present residence. Write "SAME" for province and city/municipality on the spaces provided.
However, if his/her residence 5 years ago was in another city/municipality, write the name of the province and city/municipality on the spaces provided.
For those whose residence 5 years ago is in a foreign country, enter code "8887" in the code boxes.
In case the respondent knows only the province but not the city/ municipality, enter the correct code of the province in the first two code boxes and code "99" in the last two boxes. If the respondent does not know even the province, ask the person himself/herself about his/her residence 5 years ago. In case the person/member cannot recall both the city/municipality and province name where he/she lived five years ago, exert all efforts to obtain even the name of the province only. If after exhaustive probing the member still cannot give the name of the province, enter code "9999" for unknown in the code boxes.
Complete names of provinces should be asked if areas like Agusan, Camarines, Cotabato, Davao, Ilocos, Lanao, Leyte, Misamis, Mindoro, Negros, Samar, Surigao, and Zamboanga are provided. Refer to Section 6.3 of Chapter 6 (pages 71 to 72) for the complete list of these provinces. If the answer provided is Bicol, ask the respondent the particular province in Bicol the household member lived 5 years ago.
If the answer provided is Manila, ask what particular district in Manila (Tondo, Sampaloc, Paco, and others) did the household member live 5 years ago.
Refer to page 72 for the districts of NCR.

P16-Highest Grade/Year Completed
Data on highest grade/year completed furnish information for a comparison of the present educational qualification of the population with the present and anticipated future requirements of manpower for various types of economic activities.
Highest grade/year completed refers to the highest grade or year completed in school, college, or university as of May 1, 2010. This may be any one of the specific grades or years in elementary, high school, post-secondary school, college, and post baccalaureate levels of schooling. It also includes preschool education.
Ask the respondent, "What is the highest grade/year completed by [the respondent]?" for all persons five years old and over.
Write the grade/year level of schooling completed on the space provided and the appropriate codes in the boxes. The codes for highest grade/year completed can be found at the bottom of page 2C. For graduates of post-secondary course or college degree, write on the space provided the specific course or degree obtained. This will be coded during manual processing at the Provincial Office.
An answer such as elementary, high school, or college is insufficient. Determine the specific grade or year by asking the respondent additional question, "What particular grade in elementary/year in high school or college did complete?"

Examples: If the person has completed Grade 1, write "grade l" on the space provided and enter "210" in the boxes.
If the person has not completed any grade at all, write "no grade completed" on the space provided and enter "000" in the boxes.
If the person finished nursery, write "nursery" on the space provided and enter "010" in the boxes. Preschool includes nursery, kindergarten, and preparatory school.
A student who is enrolled in 2nd year high school at the time of the census has completed 1st year and should be reported as 1st year high school -- code "310"
.

Note that for an elementary graduate, meaning he/she finished Grade 6 or Grade 7, as the case may be, the code should be "280". For a high school graduate, meaning he/she finished 4th Year High School, the code should be "350".
Report also in Column P16 the post-secondary course that a person has completed.
Post-secondary course refers to the stage of formal education following the secondary education level covering non-degree programs that have varying duration lasting up to three years. This course is concerned primarily with developing strong and appropriately trained middle level manpower.
Post-secondary 1st year is the highest grade completed by a person who has taken a post-secondary course for at least a year but has not yet completed the course at the time of the 2010 CPH. Consider, for example, a person who at the time of the census is a 2nd year student of a two-year course in Automotive Technology. Since he/she has finished his/her 1st year in Automotive Technology, he/she is considered under this category and the correct code is "410".
Post-secondary 2nd year is the highest grade completed by a person who has taken post-secondary course for at least two years but has not yet completed the course at the time of the 2010 CPH. The appropriate code for this is "420".
Post-secondary 3rd year is the highest grade completed by a person who has taken post-secondary course for at least three years but has not yet completed the course at the time of the 2010 CPH. The appropriate code for this is "430".
In order to determine whether the vocational/technical course reported by the respondent is under a post-secondary education (formal education), the following probing questions should be asked:

Is the course offered/taken in school, college/university, or Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA)? If the course is taken in TESDA, the course is non-formal and, therefore, will not be considered as post-secondary education.

If the course is taken in a school, college or university, this question should be asked:

Is completion of a high school course a requirement for admission? If yes, the course is considered formal, hence, post-secondary
.

If the person has successfully completed his/her post-secondary education, specify its title and corresponding duration on the space provided. This will be coded during manual processing at the Provincial Office.
Examples

[] 2-Year Associate in Arts
[] 2-Year Certificate in Physical Education
[] 6-Month Basic Computer System
[] 6-Month Auto Diesel Technology

Take note of the following cases:

If a person finished a post-secondary course and is currently a 1st year college student, his/her post-secondary course should be reported.
If a person is currently enrolled in a 6-month or 1-year post-secondary course but has not finished the course yet, he/she should be reported as a high school graduate.
If a person is currently in 1st year college or post-secondary, do not assume that he/she is only a high school graduate. Verify if he/she has taken/completed other courses (degree or non-degree courses).

If the person is a college undergraduate, that is, he/she has not yet earned a degree, enter the code of the year he/she has completed -- "810" for 1st year college, "840" for 4th year college, and others. Note that code "860" stands for 6th or higher year in college.
Usually, it is difficult to differentiate certificate and diploma courses that are under post-secondary education from post graduate courses. In order to determine whether the course reported by the respondent is a post-secondary or a post graduate course, this question should be asked:
Is a baccalaureate or college degree a requirement for admission to certificate or diploma course? If yes, the course is considered under post graduate course. Otherwise, it is classified as post-secondary course. [Examples omitted.]

The acquisition of a college degree implies the successful completion of a course study. Information on degree received should be collected only for persons who have completed a course study at the third level of education. Such information should include the title of the highest degree received, and an indication of the field of study if the title does not make it clear.
For a college graduate, write on the space provided the specific Bachelor's degree obtained. This will also be coded during manual processing at the Provincial Office. Examples: BS Commerce, BS Chemical Engineering, BS Statistics.
For those who have pursued and completed two or more degrees of the same level and duration, say, nursing and medical technology (both are 4-year courses), report only one degree or whichever degree the person prefers to be reported.
Post baccalaureate course refers to any course for which an undergraduate degree is required. Masters and doctoral degree students and graduates both fall under this category. In instances where law or medical students have usually earned a degree in AB Political Science, BS Zoology, BS Medical Technology, and others, but are still in law or medical school, the appropriate code for this educational level is "900" for post baccalaureate. The same rule applies to students who are still working on their master's degree, taking doctorate studies and for a person who has already completed masters or doctoral degree. For both cases, enter "900".
If an unusually high "highest grade/year completed" is reported in relation to the age of the person, verify the report from the respondent. For example: 3rd year high school for a boy/girl who is 11 years old, or college graduate for a person who is 15 years old, put a remark if this person had been accelerated.

Column P19 for All 10 Years Old and Over
Column P19 is to be accomplished only for household members 10 years old and over. Thus, if a household member is less than 10 years old, leave column P19 blank.

P19-Overseas Worker
As discussed in Section 3.3 of Chapter 3 (page 21), an overseas worker is a household member who is currently out of the country due to overseas employment.
The increasing volume of overseas workers provides a boost to the stability of the economy through their remittances which may be invested in industries like transportation, housing, construction, education, manufacturing, and others. Data on overseas workers also help government planners and program managers in the formulation of policies, plans, and programs for the protection of overseas workers and the promotion of their welfare.
For persons 10 years old and over, ask "Is[ the respondent] an overseas worker?" If the member is an overseas worker, write "X" in the box opposite "1" for Yes, or "2" for No.
If a household member is less than ten years old, leave column P19 blank.

Filling Out Columns P9 to P14, P16, and P19 of CPH Form 2 (Page 2C):
An Example: To continue our interview of the household of Karl Santos, residing in San Jose del Monte City, Bulacan, Illustration 7.3 shows that Karl, his wife, children, and nephew have no disability and functional difficulty. Marie was reported to have difficulty in seeing, even if she is wearing her eyeglasses. Everyone in the household had lived in the same residence for more than five years, except for Marie who used to live in Tanza, Cavite five years ago. The Santos family including Daniel are all Tagalog while Marie is a Caviteño.
[pg. 129]
The household members have the following highest educational attainment and occupation [image omitted]:

Karl is a B.S. in Chemical Engineering graduate and works as a structural engineer at Wilson Builders and Construction, Co. in Quezon City since 1995
Janine is a B.S. in Computer Science graduate; she owns and operates a grocery store at San Jose del Monte City
Sophia will be an incoming second year high school in Lagro High School, Quezon City; the same school she attended last school year
Josh had finished grade five in Tungkong Mangga Elementary School, San Jose del Monte City
Daniel is a graduate of two-year automotive mechanic program of Technical Education and skills development Authority (TESDA) and works as a diesel engine mechanic in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia for two years now
Marie is an elementary graduate
Although Daniel works abroad, he is still a Filipino citizen, as well as all the other household members.

7.7 Instructions on the Housing Census Questions
The housing portion of CPH Form 2 consists of questions on building characteristics (B1 to B5), floor area of the housing unit (D1), and tenure status of the lot (H9).
General Instructions in Filling Out the Housing Census Questions
Be guided by the following general instructions in filling out the housing questions, particularly on building and housing characteristics:
A box is allotted to each category of all housing questions. Only one box must be marked with "X".

[] 1. Fill out Items B1 to B4 (Type of Building/House, Construction Materials of the Roof, Construction Materials of the Outer Walls, and State of Repair of the Building/House) by observation. Even before entering the building, you should already figure out the answers to these questions. However, if doubtful, ask the respondent.
[] 2. If there are more than one housing unit in a building or more than one household in a housing unit, the same characteristics of building or housing units observed should be entered for all the households residing in the same building/ housing unit.
Ask question B5 (Years Building/ Housing unit Built), from the respondent of any of the households in the same building, preferably the respondent of the first household interviewed.
For item D1 (Floor Area of the housing unit), if there are tow or ore households in the housing unit, ask the respondent of any of the households living in that same housing unit (preferably the respondent of the first household interviewed) for best estimate of the housing unit's floor area.
Transcribe the same entries for B1 to B5 and D1 to the corresponding questionnaire items for other households living in the same housing unit.
[] 3. For buildings or housing units that are vacant (VBLDG or VHU), or those used only as rest house, vacation house, and others, fill out only the geographic identification portion and Items B1 to B4.
[] 4. Similarly, for housing units whose occupants are excluded in the enumeration, as in the case of a housing unit occupied by foreign diplomats, fill out the geographic identification portion and Items B1 to B4 only. The same rule should apply to housing units wholly occupied by non-usual residents.
[] 5. If the households are located in a temporary relocation area, the following should be followed:
If houses previously occupied were burned
The housing census questions, specifically items B1 to B5, D1, and H8 should be left blank. However, it is important to place remarks in CPH Forms 1 and 2.
If houses are still existing but vacated due to peace and order problems, calamities, disaster, and others
The housing census questions should be asked in reference to the original housing unit. Thus, the characteristics of the original housing unit should be entered. Likewise, remarks should be indicated in CPH Forms 1, and 2.
[] 6. If you used two or more booklets (for households with more than eight members), fill out the housing portion of the first booklet only. Leave the housing portion of the other booklets blank.

Specific Instructions by Items
To ask the questions correctly, follow the instructions for each item of CPH Form 2. The rationale and/or importance of each item are explained.

B1-Type of Building/House
The distribution of households by type of building supplies information about the available housing accommodation at the time of census, patterns of living, and building trends. Such details are essential for planning future housing needs. Specifically, for housing programmes, information is required on the number of households that need to be provided with housing. The number of households living in marginal housing units (commercial/industrial/agricultural buildings used as living quarters, such as barns, warehouses, mills, offices, and others, and other housing units such as boats, caves, and others) provides an approximation of this element of housing needs.
[pg. 133]
Write "X" in the box opposite the applicable type of building occupied by the household. The types of building are as follows:

[] 1. Single House -- This is an independent residential structure intended for one household, separated by an open space or walls from all other structures. It includes the so-called "nipa hut", or a small house that is built as a more or less permanent housing unit, or a "barong-barong" which is made of salvaged/makeshift/improvised materials.
[] 2. Duplex -- This is a residential structure intended for two households, with complete living facilities for each. It is divided vertically or horizontally into two separate housing units which are usually identical.
[] 3. Multi-Unit Residential (three or more units) -- This is a building intended for residential use only, consisting of three or more housing units. These houses may consist of one or more storeys in a row of three or more housing units, separated from each other by walls extending from the ground to the roof, or a building having floors to accommodate three or more housing units.
Examples:
Apartment Building -- a structure usually having several storeys, with three or more independent entrances from internal halls or courts. An apartment has one common entrance from the outside.
Accesoria -- a one- or two-floor structure divided into three or more housing units, each housing unit having its own separate entrance from the outside. Another name for accesoria is row house.
Residential Condominium -- a high-rise building where the housing units are owned individually but the land and other areas and facilities are commonly owned.
Note: A building that was originally constructed as a single house or duplex, but now partitioned into three or more rooms/group of rooms (with separate entrance from a common hall or passage) without changing the outside structure or appearance, will be classified as a single house or duplex, as the case may be.
Commercial/Industrial/Agricultural -- These refer to buildings which are not intended mainly for human habitation but are used as living quarters of households at the time of census.
4. A commercial building is a building built for transacting business or for rendering professional services, such as a store, office, warehouse, rice mill and others.
An industrial building is a building built for processing, assembling, fabricating, finishing, and manufacturing or packaging operations, such as a factory or a plant.
An agricultural building is any structure built for agricultural purposes, such as a barn, stable, poultry house, granary, and others.
5. Institutional Living Quarters -- Hotels, motels, inns, boarding houses, dormitories, and pension or lodging houses fall into this category. This group comprises permanent structures which provide lodging and/or meals on fee basis. Institutional buildings are buildings intended for persons confined to receive medical, charitable or other care/treatment such as hospitals and orphanages, for persons detained such as jails and penal colonies, and other buildings like convents, school dormitories, and others.
Also included in this category are camps which are defined sets of premises originally intended for the temporary accommodation of persons with common activities or interests like military camps, and other camps established for the housing of workers in mining, agriculture, public works, or other types of enterprises.
6. Other Housing Units -- These refer to living quarters which are neither intended for human habitation nor located in permanent buildings but are nevertheless, used as living quarters at the time of the census. Caves, trailers, barges, carts, boats, and others, fall into this category.

Important Notice: When a building is intended partly for residential purposes and partly for commercial or industrial purposes, report the building as residential (code 1, 2, or 3) if half or more of the building is residential. Thus, if the second floor of a two-storey building is for housing, the building should be classified as residential. Likewise, if a one-storey building is divided into several units, and the front part of each unit is for business purposes while the back part is for living quarters, report also the building as residential.
[Pictures of example houses omitted.]

B2 and B3-Construction Materials of the Roof and Outer Walls
Data on construction materials of the roof and outer walls provide information on the construction, replacement, and improvement of housing units. These items can be used as proxy variables to measure the economic condition of households.
Moreover, data on these items can be used in the evaluation of construction statistics, programme implementation, and for estimating investments in housing construction. They can also be used to determine the number of households residing in structurally acceptable housing units.

Structural acceptability of housing units implies that these housing units are made of durable construction materials that will safeguard the occupants of the housing unit from adverse climatic conditions and provide protection and privacy.

B2-Construction Materials of the Roof
The categories for the kind of construction materials of the roof are as follows:

[] Galvanized iron/aluminum
[] Tile concrete/clay tile
[] Half galvanized iron and half concrete
[] Wood
[] Cogon/nipa/anahaw
[] Asbestos
[] Makeshift/salvaged/improvised materials
[] Others, specify

Write "X" in the box opposite the kind of material used in the construction of the roof. This item can be answered through observation but if you are in doubt, ask the respondent on the material used mainly for the roof.
If two or more kinds of roofing materials are used, report the material used in most part of the roof. Thus, for a house with different kinds of roofs, report the material used in the main portion of the housing unit (usually containing the living room/sala and bedrooms). Specify the kind of construction material used for the roof if it is not one of the aforementioned categories.
Bamboo, when used as a roofing material, is included in the category for Wood. On the other hand, housing units in structures such as culverts, bridges, and others should have an "X" mark in the box opposite Makeshift/ salvaged/improvised materials.

B3-Construction Materials of the Outer Walls
The categories for the kind of construction materials of the outer walls are as follows0:

[] Concrete/brick/stone
[] Wood
[] Half concrete/brick/stone and half wood
[] Galvanized iron/aluminum
[] Bamboo/sawali/cogon/nipa
[] Asbestos
[] Glass
[] Makeshift/salvaged/improvised materials
[] Others, specify
[] No walls

Write "X" in the box opposite the kind of material used in the construction of the outer walls. Fill out this item through observation but if you are in doubt, ask the respondent on the material used mainly for the outer walls.
For a house or building in which half of the storeys is walled with concrete/brick/stone and the other half with wood, write "X" in the box opposite the category "half concrete/brick/stone and half wood". Mark also this category if the walls are made of about half of two categories of materials mentioned above.
For a two-storey house, especially in rural areas wherein the ground floor is used to raise poultry, or to store grains, farm implements, and others, report the main material used in walling the second floor, unless the walls can be classified under Half concrete/brick/stone and half wood. In other cases, wherein the walls are made of different materials, report the material used in most part of the walls.
Housing units in nonbuilding structures such as carts, railroad cars, trailers, caves, culverts, boats, and bridges should have an "X" mark in the box opposite Makeshift/salvaged/ improvised materials.
Write "X" in the box opposite Others and specify the kind of material used for the outer walls if the material of the outer walls is not one of the aforementioned categories.

B4-State of Repair of the Building/House
This item provides information on the current status of the building/house which is of prime importance in housing programmes. It is also useful in prioritizing population with immediate housing needs and in identifying households whose housing units are in dire need of housing repair.
Determine the current state of repair of the building/house and write "X" in the box opposite the appropriate category.
[pg. 139]

[] 1. Needs no repair/needs minor repair -- This building is usually new or has a good building maintenance, that is, no deterioration is apparent from the outside.
[] 2. Needs major repair -- The building/house cannot fully protect the occupants from outside elements such as rain, wind, and temperature. It may have cracks on the interior walls, leaking roof, holes on the floors, and broken windows, among others, which can only be mended by major repair.
[] 3. Dilapidated/condemned -- This building/house is beyond repair. Dilapidated parts of pillars, roofs, and outer walls clearly need renovation. Condemned buildings/houses, wherein substandard materials/procedures were used in the construction or those buildings which are structurally defective, are also included in this category.
[] 4. Under renovation/being repaired -- This is a building/house that was fully constructed and finished but is now being repaired for some deterioration or damages. This also includes buildings/houses being renovated to make additional structures and/or modify/repair existing structures.
[] 5. Under construction -- The construction work has started but not yet completed at the time of visit. Hence, buildings/houses under construction are included in this category.
Construction refers to all on-site work done from site preparation, excavation, foundation, and assembly of all components and installation of utilities and equipment of buildings/houses.
[] 6.Unfinished construction -- This is a partly constructed building/house, which at the time of visit, construction is temporarily or permanently stopped, that is, no construction activity is going on for quite some time.
[] 7. Not applicable - If non-building structures are used as housing unit such as cave, carts, railroad cars, and others.

B5-Year Building/House was Built
Item B5--Year building/house was built shall be asked from a responsible member of any household in the building.

This item provides basis for appraising the building/house inventory in terms of durability, expected rate of replacement, and estimate of rate of building/house construction over time. It also provides an estimate for maintenance costs and an insight into the housing patterns of the population.
[Dictionary Definition] The year the building/house was built refers to the year when the construction was completed and ready for occupancy and not when construction began. Generally, building constructions commence and are finished within the same year. There are cases, however, when the construction period lasts for several years. Report the year when the building was finished.
Ask the respondent, "When was this building/house built? If the building/house under construction is still vacant, write "X" in the box opposite the category not applicable to signify that the question is not applicable to the building/house. Otherwise, if it is already occupied while construction is still on going, enter the year when it was occupied.
Write "X" in the box opposite the appropriate category.

[] 01 2010
[] 02 2009
[] 03 2008
[] 04 2007
[] 05 2006
[] 06 2001-2005
[] 07 1991-2000
[] 08 1981-1990
[] 09 1971-1980
[] 10 1970 or earlier
[] 11 Not applicable
[] 12 Don't know

If the respondent finds it difficult to give the year the building/house became ready for occupancy, help him/her approximate the year by mentioning some historical/national events. The respondent himself/herself may be able to mention an event that occurred in the past which may be indicative of the year the building/house was built. Refer to pages 107-108 of this chapter for the examples of famous historical/national events.

D1-Floor Area of the Housing Unit
Item D1--Floor area of the housing unit shall be asked from a responsible member of any household in the housing unit.

Density of occupancy, expressed as the number of persons per unit of floor area, can be used as a measure of housing adequacy. The so-called "crowding index" is based on this measure. Data on floor area can provide information on the current status of the density of occupancy of existing housing units in the country. This item can also be used by planners and policymakers in the adoption of housing standards that will provide adequate housing space to a level consistent with the maintenance of health and general living conditions of the occupants.
Write "X" in the box corresponding to the estimated floor area of the housing unit. The codes and the categories for floor area are presented below:

[] 01 Less than 5 square meters/ less than 54 square feet
[] 02 5-9 square meters/ 54-107 square feet
[] 03 10-19 square meters/ 108-209 square feet
[] 04 20-29 square meters/ 210-317 square feet
[] 05 30-49 square meters/ 318-532 square feet
[] 06 50-69 square meters/ 533-748 square feet
[] 07 70-89 square meters/ 749-963 square feet
[] 08 90-119 square meters/ 964-1286 square feet
[] 09 120-149 square meters/ 1287-1609 square feet
[] 10 150-199 square meters/ 16010-2147 square feet
[] 11 200 square meters and over/ 2148 square feet and over
[] 12 not applicable
Floor area refers to the area or space enclosed by the exterior walls of the housing unit. In case of housing units with several floors or storeys, get the area of each floor/storey in square meters or square feet and add them together to get the total floor area of the entire housing unit.
There are many ways in approximating the total floor area. You may use any method convenient to you such as, use a meter stick, visual approximation (using your eyes only), or pace factor (see Appendix 10, page 264). In case the respondent does not know the floor area of the housing unit, you can approximate the floor area using any of the aforementioned methods. Familiarize yourself with the length of a meter so that you can do visual approximation.
An example of getting the estimate of floor area is shown in Illustration 7.5 on the next page. In this illustration, it is assumed that the width and length of the floor spaces are already determined using one of the methods discussed above.
[pg. 142]
To get the estimated floor area (EFA) of the ground floor, use the formula:


ground flood = 10 meters x 7 meters = 70 sq. m.

Use the same formula for the second floor:
EFA second floor = 10 meters x 9 meters = 90 sq. m
.

To get the total estimated floor area of the housing unit, which will be the answer to the inquiry "What is the estimated floor area of this housing unit?" The formula is :

EFA ground floor + EFA second floor = 70 + 90 = 160 sq.m.

For this example, write "X" in the box opposite the range of values that includes the given answer, that is, 150-199 sq. m. (code "10"). [Image omitted.]

H8 - Tenure Status of the Lot
Data on tenure status of the lot is important for housing priorities and policies, in the promotion of lot ownership, and identification of groups in need of housing assistance.
Tenure status of lot is to be asked to any of the household member in the housing unit/building.
Ask the respondent, "Do you own or amortize this lot occupied by your household or do you rent it, do you occupy it rent-free with consent of owner, or rent-free without consent of owner?"
The categories for tenure status of the lot are as follows:


[]1. Owned/being amortized.
This includes house owners paying the land on installment basis or holders of certificate of land title under the Land Reform Program, or holders of Ancestral Domain Title, and house/lot awardees of housing loan from Pag-ibig, Social Security System (SSS), Government Service Insurance System (GSIS), commercial banks or other financial firms. It also includes owner-like possession of the lot such as those held under heirship and other similar arrangements.
A lot is held under heirship if it is inherited even if the title of ownership has not been transferred to the heir(s) yet. Included here are inherited lots without title of ownership.
[] 2. Rented. There is a fixed amount paid by the occupant in cash or in kind.
[] 3. Rent-free with consent of owner. The household occupies the lot with permission of the owner and without paying any rent in cash or in kind to the owner, tenant/lessee or subtenant/sub-lessee.
[] 4. Rent-free without consent of owner. The household occupies the lot without the permission of the owner.
[] 5. Not applicable. Mark the box opposite "5" for Not applicable if the household is living in a boat, culvert, cart, and others. Specify whether the household is living in a boat, culvert, cart, or others.

For a multi-storey building like condominium and other similar buildings, the tenure status of the lot of the household occupying the units will follow the tenure status of the housing unit.

[pg. 144]

7.8 Common Household Self-Administered Questionnaire Instruction
There are instances when a personal interview is not possible for a household (for instance, the household members are busy or are about to leave the house) or no respondent is available for interview despite those call backs. In these cases, you may ask the respondent to accomplish CPH Form 2 by himself/herself with the aid of CPH Form 7 -- Household Self-Administered Questionnaire Instructions.
CPH Form 7 is a 14-page instruction booklet that will be used by the respondent as guide in filling out CPH Form 2 when he/she cannot be personally interviewed by you.
Refer to Section 4.4 of Chapter 4 (page 44) for instruction when to provide CPH Form 2 with the aid of CPH Form 7.
7.9 Ending the Interview
Once the interview for all members of the household is completed, review the questionnaire thoroughly to check for completeness, consistency, and correctness. Verify doubtful entries and make the necessary changes/corrections. Record the time the interview ended and complete the other items such as result of final visit and the population items in the Interview Record. Then sign the Certification portion. Thank the respondent for his/her cooperation before leaving the household.
[Example questionnaire omitted.]
[pg. 146]

8. Enumeration of Household Population Using CPH Form 3 - Sample Household Questionnaire
This chapter discusses how you will enumerate the household population using CPH Form 3 -- Sample Household Questionnaire. This questionnaire gathers information on the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the sample household population, including housing unit characteristics and its amenities.
8.1 Contents of CPH Form 3
CPH Form 3 is the form that you will use to enumerate all sample households. It is a four-page questionnaire which, when completed, will serve as the record of the characteristics of the household population as well as their housing unit characteristics.
Like CPH Form 2, CPH Form 3 contains questions on population and housing. However, CPH Form 3 contains additional population questions (P15, P17 to P18, and P20 to P27), housing questions (H1 to H7 and H9 to H11), and household questions (H12 to H15).
The first page (3A) of this form contains the following:

[] Title Panel
[] Identification Panel
[] Interview Record

The second page (3B) of the questionnaire contains the Population Census Questions (P1 to P13). Questions on household size, specifically on whether there are household members not yet listed, whether there are more than 8 household members, and codes for relationship to household head are found at the bottom of this page.
The third page (3C) contains other population census questions (P14 to P27). Codes for highest grade/year completed and class of worker are found at the bottom of this page.
The last page (3D), meanwhile, contains housing census questions B1 to B5, D1, and H1 to H15, and the remarks portion.
[pg. 147]

8.2 Title Panel
The title panel contains the title of the questionnaire, authority and confidentiality clauses, title of the census, 8-digit serial number, form type, page number, NSCB approval number, and expiration date.
8.3 Identification Panel
Refer to Section 7.3 of Chapter 7 (pages 91 to 93) for the instructions in filling out the certification and geographic identification items.
Found at the right side of geographic identification portion are the definition of a household and the correct order for listing the household members. These will guide you in the proper order of listing of household members to ensure that no one is omitted in the list. Detailed discussion of household membership is included in Items P1 and P2 of Chapter 7, pages 100 to 103.
8.4 Interview Record
Refer to Section 7.4 of Chapter 7 (pages 94 to 96) for the instructions in filling out these items.
8.5 Instructions on the Population Census Questions
In accomplishing the population portion of CPH Form 3, take note that P1 to P12 will be filled out for all persons; P13 to P16 for all persons 5 years old and over; P17 to P18 for all persons 5 to 24 years old; P19 for all persons 10 years old and over; P20 to P23 for all persons 15 years old and over; and P24 to P27 for all females 15 to 49 years old.
[pg. 148]
General Instructions in Filling Out the Population Census Questions

[] 1. During the interview, you must always refer to the age of the person in P5 since it is an indicator whether a certain question is still applicable to the person.
[] 2. Enter the codes or write "X" in the box, as the case may be, for the answer of the respondent. The precoded answers are found in the Codebook. If the answer of the respondent is not among the precoded answers, write the answer on the space provided near the code boxes.
[]3. Refer to Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 for the instructions in filling out same items in CPH Form 3.

Specific Instructions by Item
To ask the questions correctly, follow the instructions for each item of CPH Form 3. The rationale and/or importance of each item are explained.

Columns P1 to P12 for All Persons and P13 for Persons 5 Years Old and Over
Columns P1 to P12 are to be accomplished for all household members, while P13 for all persons 5 years old and over.

P1-Name of Household Members to P13-Functional Difficulty
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 (pages 97 to 122) in filling out the same items in CPH Form 2.

Example: Household of Ken Salazar -- start of the interview
The household of Ken Salazar, 50 years old who lives with wife Luisa, 45 years old; son John Carlos, 11 years old; daughters Sarah, 14 years old and Korina, 19 years old. Everyone in the household is an Iglesia ni Cristo, except for Karen Mejia, the household helper who attends church service at the Bread of Life Ministries. Karen is 49 years old and separated from her husband. Manny Sanchez, the family driver is a Roman Catholic, 35 years old and single. Living also with the household is Luisa's father, Martin Sandoval, 70 years old, widowed, and was paralyzed since December 2009. Martin needs assistance in walking and taking a bath. The rest of the household members have no disability and functional difficulty. The births of all members of the household have been registered with the local Civil Registry Office and they are all Filipino citizens. Ken and Luisa are Waray while Karen is Boholano, and Manny, a Cebuano. The respondent was Mr. Salazar.
These are the birthdates of the following household members:

[] Ken was born on March 10, 1960
[] Luisa was born on August 17, 1964
[] Korina was born on January 20, 1991
[] Sarah was born on October 25, 1995
[] John Carlos was born on November 8, 1998
[] Martin was born on April 10, 1940
[] Karen was born on July 5, 1960
[] Manny was born on January 2, 1975
Illustration 8.1 [omitted] shows how to fill out columns P1 to P13 of CPH Form 3 (page 3B).

[pg. 151]

Columns P14 to P16 for Persons 5 Years Old and Over
Columns P14 to P16 are to be accomplished only for household members 5 years old and over. Thus, if a household member is less than 5 years old leave these columns blank.

P14 -- Residence 5 Years Ago
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 (page 123) in filling out the same items in CPH Form 2.

P15-Literacy
Data on literacy provide an important indicator of the capability of the nation for economic, social, and cultural development. Such data serve as guide to planners in formulating policies for the development of the country's educational system.
Ask the respondent the question in P15: "Can read and write a simple message in any language or dialect?" Write "X" in the box for yes, for persons who are literate. Otherwise, write "X" in the box for no, for those illiterate.
Simple literacy is the ability to read and write a simple message. A person is literate when he/she can both read and write a simple message in any language or dialect. A person who cannot read and write a simple message, like "I can read" is illiterate. Also consider a person illiterate if he is capable of reading and writing only his/her own name or numbers, as well as a person who can read but not write, or vice versa.
A person who knows how to read and write but at the time of the census he/she can no longer read and/or write due to some physical defects or illnesses is considered literate. Example of this is an aged person who knows how to read and write but can no longer perform these activities due to poor eyesight.
Persons with disability who can read and write through any means such as Braille are considered literate.

P16-Highest Grade Completed
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 (pages 124 to 128) in filling out the same items in CPH Form 2.

[pg. 152]

Columns P17 to P18 for All Persons 5 to 24 Years Old
Columns P17 to P18 shall be accomplished only for household members 5 to 24 years old. Thus, if a household member is less than 5 years or more than 24 years old, leave these columns blank.

P17-School Attendance
Item P17 is a question on school attendance, specifically, if the household member attended school at anytime from June 2009 to March 2010. Data on school attendance provide a description of the school-age population actually in school. The proportion of the school-age population is necessary in the assessment of the adequacy of the country's educational system.
Ask the respondent the question in P17:"Did [the respondent] attend school at any time from June 2009 to March 2010?" for all person 5 to 24 years old. If the answer is Yes, write "X" in the box for Yes, otherwise, write "X" in the box for No. If the answer is No in P17, do not ask P18-Place of School anymore.

School attendance means attendance in any educational institution, public or private, for formal academic education at the elementary, high school, college or university level.
Attendance in these schools leads to a higher grade/year and ultimately to an academic title/degree. It includes attendance in open universities/distance learning and night classes.
Include school attendance that is leading to a high school diploma in vocational high schools, such as school of arts and trades or technical high schools, and rural or agricultural high schools.
Include also attendance in post-secondary vocational/technical schools which are within the regular system of education in universities and colleges.
Examples of technical schools:

Eulogio "Amang" Rodriguez Institute of Science and Technology (EARIST)
Samson Institute of Technology

Exclude attendance in vocational schools outside the regular system of education, that is short courses such as dressmaking, beauty culture, hair science, auto mechanic, motor vehicle driving, typing, stenography, bookkeeping, and others. Exclude also day care centers (nursery, kindergarten I), which teach children the alphabet just to pass away their time. Include, however, attendance in preparatory or its equivalent (Kindergarten II, Prep) if it is offered in regular schools.
[pg. 153]

Examples of schools to be excluded:
[] A-1 Driving School
[] CWL Vocational Center
[] Twinkle Twinkle Little Star Day Care Center

Exclude also training received by mail from correspondence schools like the International Correspondence School (ICS). However, if the correspondence courses are given by a regular school such as a university, and the courses are considered toward promotion in the regular school system, such schooling should be included. Also excluded are school attendance in review classes for bar or board or other examinations for the practice of a profession or trade.
If a person was enrolled at the beginning of the school year or in the second semester but subsequently dropped out from school, write "X" in the box corresponding to the answer yes.
For purposes of the census, include attendance in Madrasah and other learning systems, which are organized by indigenous communities. However, these types of school should be accredited by the DepEd.

P18-Place of School
The purpose of this question is to determine the number of students who commute to places outside of the city/municipality where they are residing for purposes of studying. Such data are vital in transport planning, that is, in the analysis of trip patterns, forecasting public transportation patronage, and projecting fuel usage. Data that will be derived from this question will also be used as input in determining daytime population.
For every person 5 to 24 years old whose answer in P17 is Yes, ask the respondent the question in P18:"In what city/municipality did [the respondent] attend school?"

For a household member whose place of school is the same as his/her present residence, that is, the school is located within the city/municipality where he/she resides, enter "0000" in the code boxes and write "SAME" on the spaces provided for the names of the city/municipality and province. However, if the place of school is in another city/municipality, specify on the spaces provided for the names of the city/municipality and province where he/she attends school. These will be coded during manual processing at the Provincial Office (PO). For those whose place of school is in a foreign country, write the country on the space provided and enter "8887" in the code boxes.

Always bear in mind that the name of the city/municipality alone is not sufficient, neither is the name of the province alone. The entry in this column must always be complete to include both the city/municipality and province.
Complete names of provinces should also be written if areas like Agusan, Camarines, Cotabato, Davao, Ilocos, Lanao, Leyte, Misamis, Mindoro, Negros, Samar, Surigao, and Zamboanga are provided. For example, you have to specify Agusan del Norte or Agusan del Sur for Agusan, and so on. If the answer provided is Bicol, ask the respondent in what particular province in Bicol did the household member attend school. Refer to Section 6.3 of Chapter 6 (pages 71 to 72).
If the answer provided for the city/municipality is Manila, ask what particular district in Manila (Tondo, Sampaloc, Paco, and others) did the household member attend school. Refer to Section 6.3 of Chapter 6 (page 72).

P19 for All Persons 10 Years Old and Over
Column P19 is to be accomplished only for all persons 10 years old and over. Thus, if a household member is less than 10 years old, leave this column blank.

P19-Overseas Worker
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 (page128) in filling out the same item.

Columns P20 to P23 for All Persons 15 Years Old and Over
Columns P20 to P23 are to be accomplished only for household members 15 years old and over. Thus, if a household member is less than 15 years old, leave these columns blank.

P20-Usual Occupation
Data on occupation are essential in analyzing the growth, composition, and distribution of the country's work force. They provide information on the socio-economic status of the population and are essential in planning the necessary training programs aimed at full and efficient utilization of the country's human resources.
Ask the question in column P20, "During the past 12 months, what was [the respondent]'s usual activity/occupation?" for all persons 15 years old and over.
Through this question, we can determine whether a person is a gainful or non gainful worker. Write in the space provided the type of activity/occupation of the household member. This will be coded later in the PO.
The term usual activity/occupation refers to the kind of job or business, which a person was engaged in most of the time during the last 12 months preceding the interview. In other words, usual activity/occupation is the person's principal means of earning a living such as real estate salesman, medical doctor, architect, rice farmer, elementary school teacher, police inspector, lawyer, call center representative, and others during the past 12 months.
For persons who did not work during the past 12 months, their usual activity/occupation relates to the non gainful activities they usually do most of the year or to their status.
Non gainful persons may be reported as any of the following:

[] Housekeeper, own home
[] Student
[] Pensioner (quite old to work and receiving monthly pension or annuity)
[] Retired (quite old to work and not receiving monthly pension or annuity, including those who retired from the government service or private employment, can still work but do not care to work anymore)
[] Persons with disability (persons suffering from permanent illness or disability)
[] Dependent (other than above), and others.

For purposes of this census, a person is considered a gainful worker or usually working most of the time during the past 12 months if he/she works for at least 10 hours a week for six months (26 weeks) or longer, including vacation or sick leave, in one or more of these classes of work:

[] 1. Work for pay (wage, salary, commission, tips, and others);
[] 2. Work for profit in own farm, business, or private practice of a profession or trade; and
[] 3. Work without pay on own family farm or business.

For persons whose activities varied during the preceding 12 months, report as his/her usual activity/occupation that which he/she was engaged in for more than six months. However, if none of these activities lasted for more than six months, report the one which had the longest duration.
Take note of the following cases:

[] 1. When reporting usual occupation, note that a gainful activity takes precedence over a nongainful one when a person is engaged in both types of activities at the same time. For example, a student works in a slaughterhouse as a helper every other day in the mornings and goes to school every day in the afternoons. Report his/her occupation as a slaughterhouse helper.
However, note that if the activities do not occur at the same time, such that there is a clear-cut period to separate the gainful from the nongainful one, report the activity which occurs more than six months.
[] 2. If for several years a person had been a school teacher but on May 1, 2010 he/she had already quit his/her teaching job and is operating a palay farm, his/her usual occupation is still an elementary school teacher. Again, the reference should be the past 12 months.
[] 3. During the census, a person may be working in a job other than his/her usual occupation. For instance, a palay farmer or fisherman works temporarily as a carpenter. In this case, the report should be "Palay farmer" or "Fisherman", and not the temporary job he/she is presently doing.

Always describe the specific job or occupation performed by the person in the establishment, office, and farm, among others, such as radio technician, records clerk, typist, stenographer, lawyer, farm manager, elementary school teacher, bill collector, carpenter, cigarette vendor, and hospital attendant, among others.
Answers such as agent, engineer, mechanic, employee, and others, do not describe adequately the work being performed. As such, ask the respondent additional questions like, "Does this person work for a life insurance company, advertising agency, and others?" or "What kind of engineer or mechanic is he/she?"
If the respondent gives a long description of the actual duties of work of the person, report the occupation that fits the description.

Avoid such ambiguous descriptions as owner, partner, businessman, and others. They do not adequately describe the occupation of the person. They simply indicate the proprietary relationship of the person to the business and some owners do not do any work in connection with their business.
If a person is the owner of an enterprise and he/she manages it or participates in its management, report "Manager" as his/her occupation. However, if such enterprise is engaged in wholesale and retail trade, hotel, dormitory, restaurant, cafeteria, or other lodging or eating places, said owner managing or participating in the management of the enterprise should be reported as "wholesale merchant", "retailer", or "working proprietor". Note however, that a partner in a business who is paid by the partnership to manage the business should be reported as "manager" and not "working proprietor".
Check for the consistency of the usual activity/occupation of a person with his/her highest grade/year completed. For instance, you need to probe further if the person's usual occupation is "civil engineer" or "lawyer" but the highest grade/year completed is only "high school graduate".
Jobs/Occupations which Need Special Care in Reporting
The following are examples of jobs or occupations, which need special care in reporting:

[Unacceptable entry: Acceptable entries and examples]
[] Agent: Insurance agent, real estate agent, among others. Note that a Philippine National Police (PNP) agent should be reported as "enlisted man" while "PNP Inspector" should be reported as "police detective" or "private detective".
[]Apprentice: An entry should include both the occupation and the word "apprentice". The correct entry should be apprentice plumber, apprentice printer, and others.
[]Assemblers: Specify the type of machinery or products being assembled, such as mechanical machinery assembler, electrical machinery assembler, wood and related materials product assembler, and others.
[] Attendant: Bar attendant, hospital attendant, and others
[] Businessman: Wholesale merchant, retailer, manager, and others
[] Clerk: Accounting clerk, filing clerk, records clerk, and others
[] Collector: Bill collector, garbage collector, collector, market collector, toll collector
[] Contractor: A contractor is engaged principally in obtaining building and/or other contracts and in supervising the work. He/she should be reported as "building contractor", "road contractor", and others.
[] Craftsman or skilled worker: Specify type of skill such as miner, quarry worker, bricklayer carpenter, roofer, plumber, pipe fitter, spray painter, metal molder, sheet metal worker, blacksmith, toolmaker, metal worker, metal grinder, metal polisher, motor vehicle mechanic and fitter, radio and television services, telephone installer, electrical line installer, glass engraver, printing engraver, basket weaver, wood treater, cabinet marker, and others.
[] Driver: Tricycle driver, taxi driver, jeep driver, heavy equipment driver, calesa driver, light van driver, bus driver, tram driver, heavy truck driver, heavy van driver, and others
[] Employee: Specify whether the employee is a statistician, receptionist, typist, and others.
[] Engineer: Civil engineer, mining engineer, marine engineer, and others
Factory worker: Weaver, knitter, sewer, tinsmith, and others
[] Farmer: Rice farmer, corn farmer, sugarcane farmer, coconut farmer
[] Farm worker: Skilled rice farm worker, skilled corn farm worker, and others; farm hand, farm laborer, and others
[] Fireman: Locomotive fireman, city fireman (for city fire department), fire fighter (as in airfields), and others
[] Fisherman: Fisherman in deep-sea, fish pen, fishpond, coastal, inland, and others; fishpond operator, prawn farm machinery operator, and others
[] Foreman: Foreman-carpenter, foreman-electrician, and others
Government official: Specify position such as mayor, congressman, senator, cabinet secretary, assistant cabinet secretary, commissioner, and justice; councilor, barangay chairperson, barangay treasurer, and others.
[] Helper: Store helper, bakery helper, and others
Inspector: Meat inspector, market inspector, and others
[] Manager: Board of Director, special company manager such as: production and operations manager, finance and administration manager, personnel and industrial relations
manager, sales and marketing manager, advertising and public relations manager, supply and distribution manager, computing services manager, research and development manager, small firm manager, and others
[] Mechanic: Auto mechanic, airplane mechanic, radio mechanic, and others. Do not confuse mechanic with machinist who is a skilled craftsman and who constructs and repairs all kinds of metal parts, tools, and machines through the use of blueprints, machine and hand tools, and precision measuring instruments.
[] Midwife: Differentiate "licensed midwife" from "practical midwife", "hilot", and others
[] Nurse: Registered nurse, practical nurse, nurse's aide, and others
[] Operator: Bulldozer operator, elevator operator, telephone operator, mining plant operator, mineral ore and stone treating operator, well driller and borer, ore smelting operator, metal melter, caster and rolling-mill operator, metal heat-treating plant operator, metal drawer and extruder, glass and ceramics kiln operator, paper-making plant operator, chemical processing plant operator, power-generating plant operator, steam turbine operator, automated assembly-line operator, machine tool operator, chemical products machine operator, rubber and plastic products machine operator, wood products machine operator, printing machine operator, binding machine operator, paper and paperboard products machine operator, spinning and winding machine operator, weaving and knitting machine operator, sewing and embroidering machine operator, textile bleaching, dyeing and cleaning machine operator, meat and fish processing machine operator, dairy products machine operator, grain and spice milling machine operator, fruit, vegetable and nut processing operator, sugar processing and refining machine operator, tea, coffee, cocoa and chocolate preparing and producing machine operator, tobacco products processing machine operator, brewer and wine and other beverage machine operator, and others
[] Police: Police officer, detective, patrolman, traffic police, and others. Note that in municipalities with small police force, an entry of policeman may be sufficient or acceptable.
[] Secretary: The title "secretary" should be used for persons doing secretarial work in an office. The secretary who is an elected or appointed officer of a corporation, firm or other organization should be reported as "executive secretary".
Supervisor: Principal, superintendent, sales supervisor, teacher- supervisor, transport supervisor, housekeeping supervisor, farm overseer, and others
[] Teacher: Elementary school teacher, high school teacher, professor, instructor, substitute teacher or teaching assistant (elementary, high school or college), private tutor, university instructor, vocational-technical skill instructor, specialized trainer such as sales trainer, management trainer, instructor-trainer, and others
[] Technician: Civil engineering technician, quantity surveyor, surveyor's technician, mining technician, electrical engineering technician, electronics engineering technician, telecommunications technician, mechanical engineering technician, aeronautical engineering technician, automotive engineering technician, chemical engineering technician, metallurgical technician, mining engineering technician, production engineering technician, draftsman technician, and others. Note that an engineering graduate or a licensed engineer is an engineer by qualification but may be hired as a technician and performing technician jobs. Report him/her as a technician and specify his/her field
[] Unskilled laborer: Whenever possible, specify the unskilled laborer as "street sweeper", "janitor", "stevedore", and others

Important Notice: Pay special attention to the preceding instructions because ambiguous reporting of the usual occupation or activity will result to inappropriate or wrong codes and consequently, affect the data on the economic characteristics of the population
Skip to P24 if the member is reported to have a nongainful activity during the past 12 months.

P21-Kind of Business or Industry
[definition] Industry refers to the nature or character of the business or enterprise, or the place wherein the person works. Data on this provide information on the level and trend of industrialization and/or important aspects of the country's potential for economic development.

For persons 15 years old and over with report of gainful usual activity/occupation in P20, ask, "In what kind of business or industry did [the respondent] work during the past twelve months?"

Write on the space provided the kind of business or industry of the household member. This will be coded later in the PO. However, for persons 15 years old and over who are reported as nongainful (housewives, students, retirees, and disabled, among others) and for those below 15 years old, leave P21 blank.

The entries in columns P20 and P21 should be consistent with each other. The business or industry should describe specifically and adequately the character and nature of business or industry or the place where the work is being performed in connection with the job or occupation, such as palay farm, sari-sari store, gold mine, leather shoe factory, rice mill, call center, and others. Do not be satisfied with answers like names of firms (for instance, Soriano and Co., LM Enterprise, and others), since they do not necessarily describe the specific business or activity the company is engaged in. Probe and try to elicit from the respondent information about the kind of product (if manufacturing firm) or the kind of service that the company is engaged in.
Moreover, if work is pursued in a big company that is engaged in several types of activities, report the nature of the particular activity of that company where the person is working. An example is San Miguel Corporation, which is engaged in brewery, bottling, food processing, dairies, and others.
If the person works in a government office or institution, the name of the office, bureau, public school, and others, may be accepted. If the person works in the executive branch of a local government, indicate whether it is under the provincial, city or municipal government.
Moreover, when the government office is engaged in services other than administrative, for instance, education, communication, health, transportation, construction, and others, persons working in such office must be reported based on their corresponding activity, such as railroad, airport, insurance, high school, highway construction, and others.
Below are examples of how some officials and employees of the government should be reported:

[] Usual Occupation: Business or Industry
[] Accounting clerk: Land Bank of the Philippines, NSO
[] Registered nurse: Rural Health Unit, Provincial Hospital
[] Market collector: Municipal Government
[] Municipal Secretary: Municipal Government,
[] Dump truck operator: Road construction (DPWH)
[] Stenographer: Regional Trial Court

Distinction should be made between manufacturing and retailing in case an establishment is engaged in both activities. The entry in this column should be according to the section of the establishment in which the person works. Likewise, manufacturing should be differentiated from wholesaling.
Example: A traveling salesman working for a distributor of soft drinks will have an entry of "soft drinks distribution" for industry. A traveling salesman working directly with a soft drinks factory will have "soft drinks factory" for industry.
You must distinguish between two kinds of business specializing in selling. A wholesale store sells primarily to retailers, while a retail store sells directly to consumers.
For a person conducting business in his/her own house, report his/her business just as you are reporting a regular establishment, such as dressmaking or tailoring shop, radio repair shop, law office, dental clinic, and others.
For a person who does not have a permanent job and usually pursues his usual occupation by working for several employers engaged in different kinds of business or industry (like many farm and manual laborers), report the kind of business or industry in which he/she usually worked longest during the past 12 months.
Industries which Need Special Care in Classification

In some industries, the common titles are sometimes inadequate. In such cases, enter the specific kind of business or industry the firm or company is engaged in. Below are examples of industries for which special care must be taken.
[] Agency: Real estate agency, travel agency, security agency, and others
[] Assembly plant: Motor vehicle assembly plant, motor/bicycle assembly plant, and others
[] Box factory: Paper box factory, wooden box factory, and others
[] Business: Wholesale/retail of fish, dry goods/textile retail, and others
[] Buying and selling: Eggs wholesale, vegetable retail, and others
[] Canning factory: Fruit canning factory, fish canning factory, and others
[] Factory: Candy factory, soap factory, and others
[] Farm: Corn farm, sugar cane farm, and others
[] Fishing: Fishpond, lake or river, deep-sea fishing, and others
[] Manufacturing: Manufacture of household appliances, garments, toys, and others
[] Mill: Rice or corn mill, flour mill, sugar mill, knitting mill, and others
[] Mining: Coal mine, gold mine, copper mine, and others
[] Office: Law office, life insurance company, savings or commercial bank, and others
[] Plant: Ice plant, electric power plant, and others
[] Private Firm: Specify kind of business engaged in by the firm
[] Repair Shop: Shoe repair shop, radio repair shop, auto repair shop, welding shop, and others
[] Shoe Factory: Leather shoe factory, rubber shoe factory, wooden shoe factory, and others
[] Shop: Dress shop, beauty parlor, barber shop, and others
[] Store: Wholesale dry goods store, sari-sari store, and others
[] Textile: Knitting, weaving or spinning mill, and others

Important Notice: Pay special attention to the preceding instructions because ambiguous reporting of the kind of business or industry will result to inappropriate or wrong codes and consequently affect the data on the economic characteristics of the population

P22-Class of Worker
This question should be asked for those who are engaged in gainful occupations in the past 12 months: "What kind of worker is ?" (Mention the categories). The response to this question should be referred to the usual occupation recorded in column P20. Write the answer or the equivalent "short name" of the category in the space provided and enter the appropriate code in the box.
Possible answers are categorized into seven classes of workers with their corresponding "short name" and code:

[] 1.Worked for private household (domestic services) or PHH. This refers to persons who worked in a private household for pay, in cash or in kind. Examples are family drivers, gardeners, nannies (yaya), household helpers, and other persons engaged in domestic services
[] 2. Worked for private business/enterprise/farm or PVT. All employees in private firms and farms should be classified under this category. Examples of this class of workers are:
[] Persons working in public works project on private contract
Public transport drivers who do not own the vehicles but drive the vehicles on boundary basis
[] Dock hands or stevedores
[] Cargo handlers in public markets, railroad stations or piers, and others
[] Palay harvesters getting fixed share of harvested palay, sacadas, and other farm workers
[] 3. Worked for government/government corporation or GOV. All government employees should be classified here. Examples of this class of workers are:
[] Employees in national and local government offices, agencies, and corporations
[] Filipinos working in embassies, legations, chancelleries or consulates of foreign government in the Philippines
[] Filipinos working in international organization of sovereign states of government such as the United Nations (UN), World Health Organization (WHO), and others
[] Chaplains in the Armed Forces of the Philippines
[] 4.Self-employed without any paid employee or SELF. This refer to persons who worked for profit or fee in own business, farm, profession or trade without any paid employee. Examples include vendors, professionals with own offices/clinics, and workers who worked purely on commission basis and had no regular working hours.
[] 5. Employer in own farm or business or EMP. This refers to persons who worked in his/her own business, farm, profession or trade, and had one or more regularly paid employees, including paid family members (Code 6 below
Some cases worth noting are:
[] A farm or business proprietor who is assisted purely by domestic helpers, family drivers, and other household helpers who are NOT hired employees in the farm or enterprise/business, regardless of the time spent in this activity, is not an employer.
[] A retail store operator who is wholly assisted in the operation of his/her store by unpaid relatives living with him/her and who employs carpenters to construct portions of his/her store (with the store operator supervising the work) is not an employer. However, if this operator is also the owner or partner of a firm with paid construction workers and staff, and the reported industry in column P22 is building construction, then he/she is an employer.
[] 6. Worked with pay in own family-operated farm or business or PAID. This refers to members of the family who worked with pay in a farm or business operated by another family member living in the same household. Payment can be in the form of cash or a fixed share of the produce. Note that whenever there is a household member with this code, there should be a household member with code 5 for class of worker.
[] 7. Worked without pay in own family-operated farm or business or UNPAID. This refers to members of the family who worked without pay in a farm or business operated by another family member living in the same household. Note that whenever there is a household member with this code, there should be a household member with either code 4 or 5 for class of worker.

The above codes can also be found at the bottom of page 3C of CPH Form 3.

P23-Place of Work
This question aims to determine the number of workers who commute to places outside the city/municipality where they are usually residing to work. Data derived from this question is used as input in determining daytime population which greatly affects the resources being required of an area to extend necessary services/facilities.
Ask the question in P23: "In what city/municipality did [the respondent] work during the past 12 months?" for every person 15 years old and over and whose usual occupation is a gainful one.

For a person whose place of work is the same as his/her present residence, that is, the establishment or office where he/she works is located within the city/municipality where he/she resides, enter "0000" in the code boxes and write "SAME" on the spaces provided for the names of the city/municipality and province. However, if the place of work is in another city/municipality, specify on the spaces provided the names of the city/municipality and province where he/she works. For a person whose place of work is in a foreign country, as in the case of an overseas worker, write the country on the space provided and enter "8887" in the code boxes.
For traveling salesmen and their helpers, drivers and conductors of public utilities, officers and crew of interisland or commercial fishing vessels, report the location of the establishment or its branch office from which their trip originated and to which they report upon their return. If there are two or more of these branches, including the main office, report the location of the branch where they usually collect their salaries or wages.
Always bear in mind that the name of the city/municipality alone is not sufficient, neither is the name of the province alone. The entry in this column must always be complete to include both the city/municipality and province.
The province and city/municipality will be coded later at the PO.

Columns P24 to P27 for All Females 15 to 49 Years old
Columns P24 to P27 are to be accomplished only for females 15 to 49 years old. For all other members, leave these columns blank.
Questions P24 to P27 are designed to collect necessary information for deriving fertility indicators. The fertility indicators are indispensable bases for studying population growth and changes in population's age structure, and their possible implications on the economic and social needs of the population.

P24-Number of Children Born Alive
Data on the number of children ever born alive to a particular woman is an aggregate measure of her fertility experience up to the moment the data are collected. Cross tabulation of this variable with other variables will enable computation of principal measures, such as the mean number of children born alive to women who have reached the end of their child- bearing period and the proportion of women who are childless by the end of their reproductive life.

Ask the respondent the question in P24: "How many children have been born alive to?" for every female member aged 15 to 49 years old, regardless of marital status.
Explain to the respondent that the number of children born alive to a woman should comprise all her live-born children as of census reference date, that is:

[] Children born of present marriage;
[] Children of previous marriage/s, if any;
[] Children born outside of marriage, if any;
[] Children born alive but no longer surviving;
[] Children still living and residing with the household; and
[] Children living elsewhere at the time of the interview ;

As defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), live birth is the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of conception, irrespective of the duration of pregnancy, which after such separation, breathes or shows any other evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord, definite movement of voluntary muscles, whether or not the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached. Each product of such a birth is considered live-born.
Explain to the respondent that the following are to be excluded from the count of children ever born alive to a female member aged 15 to 49 years:

[] 1. Stillbirth -- the UN defines stillbirths as fetal deaths of 28 completed weeks of gestation or more. The death is indicated by the fact that after separation from its mother, the fetus does not breathe or show any evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord or definite movement of voluntary muscles.
[] 2. Adopted -- a child or ward who is considered part of the family although may not be related by blood to the guardian.
[] 3. Stepchild -- a child of a woman's husband with his former wife/partner.

Entry for this column should consist of two digits; thus, for women with one to nine live-born children, prefix "0".
Examples: "01", "02", "03", ...."09"
Enter "00" in the boxes for a female member aged 15 to 49 years who has not had any livebirth.
Important Notice: The number of children born alive should include newly born children, except those born after May 1, 2010, 12:01 a.m.

P25-Number of Children Still Living
Data on the number of children who are still living are used in the calculation of mortality indicators.
Ask the respondent the question in P25: "How many childen are still living?" The answer to this question refers to the number of children still living out of the total number of children ever born reported in P24.
Enter in this column the number of children who are still alive as of census date, May 1, 2010 as of 12:01 a.m., whether such children are presently living with the household or not. Prefix "0" to entries less than 10.
In no case, however, should the number in P25 exceed that in P24. If it does, verify from the respondent which of the entries in P24 and P25 is correct. It is possible that the respondent got mixed up in reporting the number of children born alive and children still living.
If all children born of a woman are still living as of census date, then the entry in P25 should be equal to the entry in P24. For instance, if a woman has an entry of "03" in P24, the same number should be reported in P25, if all three children are still living as of census date.
If the entry in P24 is "00", enter also "00" in P25.

P26-Number of Children Born Alive from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2010
Data on the number of births in the last 12 months are used in estimating indicators of current fertility of women, such as total fertility rate and age-specific fertility rate.
Ask the respondent the question in P26: "How many children were born alive to from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2010?"
The question refers to the number of children born alive to a woman during the last 12 months, from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2010. Enter in this column the number of children born alive in the last 12 months preceding the census reference date. This includes the number of children born alive but are no longer surviving, and children born alive but living elsewhere.

An answer of two or more children born alive to a woman is unusual but possible. This is acceptable in cases of twins, triplets, and others, or if there was a short interval between two livebirths, say one was born May 2009 and the other in April 2010. Probe if the answer is correct by checking P5 for presence of children aged less than one year. If there is none, probe further by asking if the children reported are living elsewhere. It is possible that a respondent will erroneously include a stillbirth or miscarriage, or a child born before or after the reference period of 12 months.
Enter the actual number of children born alive in the past 12 months such as "1" for one child born alive, "2" for two children born alive, "3" for three children born alive, and so on. If no child was born alive to a woman during the last 12 months, enter "0".

P27-Age at First Marriage
Age at first marriage gives information on the woman's entry into first marital union, which exposes her to higher chance of childbearing. Age at first marriage is associated with fertility of women. Women who marry at younger age are more likely to have more children than women who marry at later age.
Ask the respondent the question in P27: "What was [the respondent's] age at first marriage?" only for ever-married females aged 15 to 49 years, that is, those with entries of code "2" (married), "3" (widowed), "4" (divorced/separated), or "5" (common-law/live-in) in P7-Marital Status.

Explain to the respondent that marriage includes either a legal or consensual union (where the man and the woman decide to live together without the benefit of clergy or civil ceremony).
Age at first marriage is the age at which the woman first entered married life or a consensual
union. In a legal marriage, report the age of the woman when the marriage was solemnized. In cases wherein the spouses lived together before a legal marriage, the age to be reported should be the age of the woman when she began to live together with her spouse. In a consensual marriage, it is the age of the woman when she and the man began to live together as husband and wife.
Illustration 8.2 shows how to fill out columns P14 to P27 of CPH Form 3, page 3C:
Example: Household of Ken Salazar -- continuation of interview [Image of example questionnaire omitted.]

Among the household members of Ken and Luisa Salazar, Korina, Sarah and John Carlos attended school from June 2009 to March 2010. Korina finished her 3rd year college in BS Electronics and Communication Engineering at Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Sta. Mesa, Manila. Sarah finished her 3rd year high school at New Era High School, Quezon City, and John Carlos finished elementary at Commonwealth Elementary School, Quezon City. Luisa was 25 years old when she married Ken. Their marriage produced only three pregnancies (Korina, Sarah and John Carlos). The household of Ken lived in
Fairview, Quezon City since 2000. Martin, the father of Luisa, used to live in Borongan, Eastern Samar five years ago.
Karen got married at the age of 20 years old and is now separated. She gave birth to four children but one died on February 14, 2003. She used to lived in Loboc, Bohol five years ago. Manny finished his second year high school in Cebu City. He used to live in Baliuag, Bulacan five years ago.
The following information are highest grade/year completed and occupation of the other household members.
[] Ken is a graduate BS Chemical Engineering and works as Quality Assurance Officer at Coca Cola Bottling Co., Pandacan, Manila since 1995
[] Luisa is a BS in Statistics graduate and works as Statistician IV at Social Weather Station, Diliman, Quezon City since 1998
[] Korina is in 3rd year college with a course of BS ECE in PUP,
Sampaloc, Manila
[] Martin Sandoval finished BS in Elementary Education and was an Elementary School Principal in Borongan, Eastern Samar. He was a retiree since 2004
[] Karen finished her third year high school in Bohol and works as a household helper of the Salazar family since 2008
[] Manny works as the family driver since 2005.

8.6 Instructions On The Housing Census Questions
The housing portion consists of the following:

B1 to B5 -- Questions on building/house characteristics

[] D1 -- Floor area of the housing unit
[] H1 -- Fuel for lighting
[] H2 -- Fuel for cooking
[] H3 -- Source of water supply for drinking, cooking, laundry and/or bathing
[] H4 -- Tenure status of the housing unit
[] H5 -- Acquisition of the housing unit
[] H6 -- Source of financing of the housing unit
[] H7 -- Monthly rental of the housing unit
[] H8 -- Tenure status of the lot
[] H9 -- Usual manner of garbage disposal
[] H10 -- Kind of toilet facility
[] H11 -- Land ownership

Refer to the general instructions in Section 7.7 of Chapter 7 (page 131) for one housing unit with more than one household.
Specific Instructions on How to Fill Out Housing Census Questions
To ask the questions correctly, follow the instructions for each item of CPH Form 3. The rationale and/or importance of each item are explained.

B1-Type of Building/House to B5-Year Building or House was Built
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.7 of Chapter 7 (pages 132 to 140) in filling out the same items in CPH Form 2.

D1-Floor Area of the Housing Unit
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.7 of Chapter 7, (page 140-142) in filling out the same item in CPH Form 2.

H1-Fuel for Lighting
The proportion of households with access to electricity will allow planners to identify areas where community lighting needs to be provided. Data on types of fuel can be analyzed to forecast future demands for various sources of energy, hence, help planning for power installations.

Ask the respondent, "What type of fuel does this household use for lighting?" Write "X" in the box opposite the category which corresponds to the fuel used by the household for its lighting facility. If the household is using electricity, mark the box for this item even if it is not used most of the time. If two or more types of fuel for lighting are used, except electricity (for instance, kerosene and oil, oil and candle, and other combinations), report the type of fuel used most of the time for lighting. Mark the box of the category corresponding to the type of lighting used more often than the other. The choices for types of fuel used for lighting are as follows:

[] 1. Electricity
[] 2. Kerosene (gaas)
[] 3. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)
[] 4. Oil (vegetable, animal, and others)
[] 5. Others, specify
[] 0. None

If the household uses a generator, report the fuel being used to run the generator.

H2-Fuel for Cooking
Information on fuel for cooking is relevant in assessing energy planning decisions, energy conservation programs, and in developing marketing strategies. It also serves as a benchmark for the study of changes in household energy use and user patterns over time. Likewise, it is helpful in monitoring supply and demand requirements for alternative fuels.
Ask the respondent, "What kind of fuel does this household use most of the time for cooking?" Mark the corresponding box for the appropriate item. If two or more kinds of cooking fuel are used (for instance, electricity and LPG, LPG and wood, kerosene and charcoal, and other combinations), report the fuel used most of the time for cooking. The choices for types of fuel used for cooking are as follows:

[] 1. Electricity
[] 2. Kerosene (gaas)
[] 3. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)
[] 4. Charcoal
[] 5. Wood
[] 6. Others, specify
[] 0. None

If the household uses a power-generating machine for cooking, report the fuel used to run the generator.

[Pictures of fuel omitted.]
[pg. 176]

H3-Source of Water Supply for Drinking, Cooking, Laundry, and/or Bathing
Information on the main source of drinking water provides the number of households with ready access to potable water supply, as well as the availability of piped water for each housing unit. The provision of a piped water installation for every housing unit is one of the primary objectives of a sound housing policy, as well as of a public health policy.
Ask the question,

"What is the household's main source of water supply for drinking, cooking, and laundry/bathing?

Write "X" in the corresponding box for the source of drinking water, as well as water for cooking, laundry and/or bathing. If there are two or more sources of water for drinking, cooking, laundry and/or bathing, report the source used most of the time during the past 12 months.
The different sources of water are as follows:

[]1. Own use faucet, community water system -- The household gets its water supply from a faucet inside the house/yard directly connected to a water pipeline from the community water system, such as the Maynilad, Manila Water Company, or other local water districts.
Note that a community water system using deep well as the source of water, should be reported under this category.
[] 2. Shared faucet, community water system -- The household gets its water supply from the faucet of another household, establishment, or office, which is connected to the community water system.
[] 3. Own use tubed/piped deep well -- Water is taken from a tubed/piped well, which is at least 100 feet or 30 meters deep, and for private use of the household/s in the same building or compound.
[] 4. Shared tubed/piped deep well -- Water supply is taken from a tubed/piped deep well, which is at least 100 feet or 30 meters deep, and shared with another household, establishment, or office, or from a deep well which was constructed for public use.
[] 5. Tubed/piped shallow well -- Water is taken from a tubed/piped well, which is less than 100 feet or 30 meters deep.
[] 6. Dug well -- The household gets its water supply from a well, which may be provided with a protective device against contamination or pollution. An ordinary dug well ("balon") belongs to this type. An improvised dug well (dug and with water depository) which is provided with a pump and cover also belongs to this type

[] 7. Protected spring -- A spring protected from contaminations by a "spring box" which is typically constructed of brick, masonry, or concrete and is built around the spring so that water flows directly out of the box through a pipe without being exposed to outside pollution.
[] 8. Unprotected spring -- A spring that is subject to runoff and/or bird droppings or animal/other external contaminations. Unprotected springs typically do not have a "spring box".
[] 9. Lake, river, rain, and others -- The household gets its water supply from natural bodies of water, or water is accumulated from rainfall.
10. Peddler -- The household gets its water from peddlers. These are the usual sources of water supply of households in low water pressure areas with no community water system.
11. Bottled water -- Mineral/distilled water bought in bottles or gallons are included in this category. Water refilling stations are also included in this category.
12. Others, Specify -- Includes other sources not mentioned in categories "01" to "11" above.

[Pictures of water sources omitted.]
[pg. 179]

H4-Tenure Status of the Housing Unit
The extent to which households own or rent the living quarters they occupy is of special significance to housing programs. Data on tenure status is also useful for housing priorities and policies, in the promotion of house ownership, and identification of groups in need of housing assistance.
Housing unit refers to a structurally separate and independent place of abode which, by the way it has been constructed, converted, or arranged is intended for habitation by one household.
Ask the respondent the question in H4: "Do you own or amortize this housing unit occupied by your household or do you rent it, do you occupy it rent-free with consent of owner, or rent-free without consent of owner?"
The categories for tenure status of the housing unit are as follows:

[] 1. Owned/being amortized -- The household is the owner and has legal possession of the housing unit, or the household claims to own it. Included also are housing units which are being amortized or paid on installment basis.
[] 2. Rented -- The occupant actually pays rent either in cash or in kind.
[] 3. Rent-free with consent of owner -- The household occupies the housing unit with the permission of the owner and without paying any rent in cash or in kind to the owner. Included here are households of farm tenants/lessees who occupy rent-free houses belonging to the owner of the lands they farm or till. It also covers those employees given free housing as part of fringe benefits (they are made to vacate the housing unit upon separation from work.)
[] 4. Rent-free without consent of owner -- The household occupies the housing unit without the consent or knowledge of the owner. Examples are squatters who are occupying public and private buildings
.

Write "X" in the box corresponding to the tenure status of the housing unit occupied by the household. If the answer in H4 is rented or code "2", go to H7. If the answer in H4 is rent-free with consent of owner (code "3") or rent-free without consent of owner (code "4"), go to H8.

[pg. 180]

H5-Acquisition of the Housing Unit
Ask the respondent the question in H5: "How did you acquire this housing unit?" only if the entry in H4 is owned/being amortized (code "1"). Write "X" in the box which describes how the household acquired the housing unit.
The different categories for this item are:

[] 1.Inherited - The housing unit was transmitted by mode of succession upon death of an individual to another family member. This may also include those properties transmitted by a living person, in contemplation of death, provided that the same is irrevocable. The inheritance may be testate or intestate. Filipino terms are "minana or pinasa".
[] 2. Gift - The housing unit was donated or bequeathed, without any consideration other than gratuity. This gift may be documented or implied. Filipino terms are "regalo" or "bigay".
[] 3. Company Benefit - The dweller was allowed to stay in the premises as a privilege accorded by the company/employer. Common arrangements include dormitories, staff houses, bed space, quarters, or barracks. The arrangement may be free, with rental, or with a minimal fee. However, housing provided by the company but being amortized by the dweller shall be considered as purchased.
[] 4. Purchased - The dwelling unit may be amortized/acquired through a housing loan/mortgage (through Pag-IBIG, SSS, GSIS, banks, and other financial institutions), or through arrangements with another person. Documents for purchase include Real Estate Mortgage, Deed of Sale, or Contract to Sell and usually involve the Transfer Certificate of Title (TCT).
[] 5. Others, Specify

Examples of other mode of acquiring the housing unit are:

[] 1 Rights -- In the event the respondent answers "binili ang rights" of the land, it is suggested that this be noted as "Rights" instead of purchase. If the "rights of the land" was purchased from another person, as in the case of those living in squatter areas, this does not constitute a transfer of ownership of the land and the transaction is not recognized by the government.
[] 2. Awarded -- refers to lots/dwelling units awarded by the government, LGU, or other legal entities (Gawad Kalinga, Habitat for Humanity) based on a legally binding document (Certificate of Entitlement to LotAward, Certification of Lot Award, Certification of Allocation, or Certificate of Eligibility). There may be conditions set before a dweller could qualify as beneficiary, as in the case of a dweller required to pay a certain amount for the award. This category also refers to lots/dwelling units wherein sale has yet to be consummated.
[] 3. This may also refer to a housing unit acquired as a prize of raffles, contests, and similar activities.

If the answer to this question is inherited, gift, company benefit or others, skip to H8.

H6-Source of Financing of the Housing Unit
Data on the source/s of financing give information on the extent to which housing assistance is provided by the government. Specifically, information on this will help monitor government participation in terms of financing or administering the construction of new residential housing units.
Ask the respondent the question in H6 only if the answer in H5 is purchased (code "4"), "Did you avail of the following sources of financing in the construction/purchase of this housing unit?"
The different sources of financing are as follows:

[]1. Own resources/interest-free loans from relatives/friends
[] 2. Government assistance: NHA, Pag-IBIG, GSIS, SSS, DBP, and others.
[] 3. Private banks/foundations/cooperatives: Metrobank, BPI, and others.
[] 4. Employer assistance/loans
[] 5. Private persons (loans with interest, for instance from informal lenders)
[] 6. Others, Specify

For each of the six sources of financing, write "X" in each box for a "Yes" or "No" response. The question refers to the source of financing for the construction/purchase of residential housing units and not for subsequent repairs, renovations, and improvements.
If the household has availed of a source of financing not included in the list, mark the box for Yes in "Others" and specify the source of financing. Otherwise, mark the box for No.
Skip to H8 after accomplishing this question.
[pg. 182]

H7-Monthly Rental of the Housing Unit
Information on monthly rental of the housing unit is used in reviewing government housing policy, and in related matters such as the need for rent controls. It also enables analysis of income level to rental level for particular groups.
Ask the question in H7: "How much is the monthly rental of this housing unit?" only if entry in H4 is "Rented" (code "2").
The total monthly rental of the housing unit should exclude rental for furnishings and payment for electricity and water. Rental for the housing unit, which includes furnishings, or payment of electricity and water, can be estimated by subtracting the estimated rental for furnishings or amount for the consumption of water and electricity from the total monthly rental.
Report the monthly rental even if the rent is still unpaid or paid by someone who is not a household member.
Write "X" in the box corresponding to the range of cost of monthly rental of the housing unit.

[] 1 PhP 500 or less
[] 2 PhP 501 -- 1,000
[] 3 PhP 1,001 -- 1,500
[] 4 PhP 1,501 -- 2,000
[] 5 PhP 2,001 -- 4,000
[] 6 PhP 4,001 -- 6,000
[] 7 PhP 6,001 -- 7,500
[] 8 PhP 7,501 -- 10,000
[] 9 PhP 10,001 and over

H8-Tenure Status of the Lot
Follow the instructions and concepts in Section 7.7 of Chapter 7 (page 143) in filling out the same item in CPH Form 2.

H9-Usual Manner of Garbage Disposal
The proportion of households with access to sanitary manner of garbage disposal provides knowledge of the population's environmental living conditions and is, therefore, essential for health planners in the formulation of plans and programs for the improvement of general health conditions.

Ask the respondent, "How does your household usually dispose of your kitchen garbage such as leftover food, peeling of fruits and vegetables, fish and chicken entrails, and others?" Inquire from the respondent the manner by which the household usually disposes its kitchen garbage such as leftover food, peelings of fruits and vegetables, fish and chicken entrails, and others. If the household has various ways of disposing its kitchen garbage, ask the manner of garbage disposal used most of the time.
Described below are some of the common methods of disposal used in the country. Determine which of these methods best describes the practice of the household. Write "X" in the box corresponding to the answer.

[] 1. Picked up by garbage truck -- when the local government or a private contractor manages the systematic collection of garbage in the community through the use of garbage trucks/carts.
[] 2. Dumping in individual pit (not burned) -- when garbage is simply thrown in pits, whether inside the yard or vacant lots and left to decay.
[] 3. Burning -- when the household dumps its garbage in an open space or pit and burns it.
[] 4. Composting -- when garbage is composted, that is, allowed to decay under controlled conditions and the composted materials are collected later for use as soil conditioner or fertilizer.
[] 5. Burying -- when the garbage is thrown in pit and then covered with soil.
[] 6. Feeding to animals -- when the garbage is given to animals as feed.
[] 7.Others, Specify when the household disposes its kitchen garbage in a manner different from those mentioned above (thrown in esteros, vacant lots, rivers, and others).

H10-Kind of Toilet Facility
Data on the kind of toilet facility provide the minimum data required for the evaluation of toilet facilities in housing units available to households. A sanitary toilet facility is necessary to prevent diseases and improve the general health condition of the household members. Likewise, the presence of sanitary toilet facilities indicates the sanitation as well as economic status of the household.

Water sealed -- as the name implies, is the type of toilet facility where after water is flushed or poured into the bowl, a small amount of water is left in the bowl and seals the bottom of the bowl from the pipe leading to the depository.
Sewer/septic tank -- a tank in which the solid matter or sewage is accumulated to be disintegrated by bacteria. This is commonly called "poso negro".
Other depository -- if the depository is other than a sewer/septic tank like canals, rivers, and others.
Ask the respondent, "What type of toilet facility does this household use?" Write "X" in the box corresponding to the type of toilet facility used by the household.
The different types of toilet facilities commonly found in buildings and houses throughout the country are:

[] 1. Water-sealed, sewer/septic tank, used exclusively by the household
[] 2. Water-sealed, sewer/septic tank, shared with other households
[] 3. Water-sealed, other depository, used exclusively by the household
[] 4. Water-sealed, other depository, shared with other households
[] 5. Closed pit -- is a type of toilet facility without a water-sealed bowl; the depository is constructed usually of large circular tubes made of concrete or clay with a top cover and small opening. It may or may not have a box for sitting or squatting over the opening; for example, antipolo-type, and others.
[] 6. Open pit -- is the same as closed pit but without covering.
[] 7. Others (pail system and others) -- includes a toilet facility wherein fecal matter is accumulated in a pail to be picked up for disposal from time to time, or any kind of toilet facility not belonging to the preceding types.
[] 0. None -- for households which do not have any toilet facility.

[Images of toilets omitted.]
[pg. 186]

H11-Land Ownership
For land ownership, mark the box with "X" opposite the corresponding category to indicate a Yes or No answer to the question: "Does any member of this household own the following?"

[] Other residential land/s
[] Agricultural land/s
[] Agricultural land/s, acquired through CARP, Agrarian Reform beneficiary
Other land/s

If a household owns another residential land/s, write "X" in the box opposite the category "Other residential land/s" for Yes, otherwise, write "X" in the box for No. Do the same for the succeeding categories.
The third category, "Agricultural land/s acquired through Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP) agrarian reform beneficiary" pertains to land ownership through CARP.

[] 1. Emancipation Patent (EP) Holder -- this refers to an agrarian reform beneficiary whose land title was acquired through operation land transfer (OLT) program, or rice and corn lands under Presidential Decree No. 27.
[] 2. Certificate of Land Ownership Award (CLOA) -- this refers to an agrarian reform beneficiary whose land title was acquired under the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Law (CARL), better known as Republic Act 6657. Such title is awarded to agrarian reform beneficiaries in private lands acquired through voluntary land transfer compulsory acquisition; and is classified as Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) settlement and landed estates.
[] 3. Homestead Patent (HP) -- refers to an agrarian reform beneficiary in settlement areas whose land title was awarded prior to 1989.
[] 4. Leasehold Contract (LC) -- refers to tenurial instrument awarded to a lessee in landowner's retained area.

The fourth category "Other land/s" includes commercial lands, industrial lands, ancestral domains, and ancestral lands. The last two categories are distinguished from Torrens Title and other tenurial instruments granted by a government agency or by the court.

[pg. 187]

8.7 Instructions on Household Census Questions
The household question consists of questions on H12 to H15. Below are the instructions on how you will fill out these questions.

H12-Language/Dialect Generally Spoken at Home
Language/dialect generally spoken at home provides a measure of the linguistic homogeneity or difference in the population. It can also be used to measure the extent of actual use of the language/dialect within a household.
Ask the respondent the question in H12: "What is the language/dialect generally spoken at home by members of this household?" Write the answer of the respondent in the space provided.
The languages/dialects and their corresponding codes can be found in the Codebook.
If two or more languages/dialects are spoken in the household, enter the code of the language/dialect which is commonly spoken by majority of the household members.
Note that if the response is Visaya, probe if it is Bisaya, Binisaya, Hiligaynon, Cebuano, waray or others.

H13 - Residence 5 Years from Now
Ask the respondent the question in H13: "What city/municipality does this household intend to reside on May 1, 2015?" Enter code "0000" in H13 if the household intends to remain in their present residence 5 years from now. Otherwise, if the household plans to reside 5 years from now in another city/municipality and province, write the name of the city/municipality and province where the household plans to transfer on the spaces provided. Codes shall be transcribed later using the Codebook.
Complete names of provinces should be asked if areas such as Agusan, Camarines, Cotabato, Davao, Ilocos, Lanao, Leyte, Misamis, Mindoro, Negros, Samar, Surigao, and Zamboanga are provided. Refer to Section 6.3 of Chapter
6 (pages 71 to 72) for the complete list of these provinces. If the answer provided is Bicol, ask the respondent in what particular province in Bicol does the household member intend to live 5 years from now.
If the answer provided for the city/municipality is Manila, ask the particular district in Manila (Tondo, Sampaloc, Paco, and others) where the household member will reside 5 years from now. Refer to page 72 for the districts of NCR.
For households who intend to reside 5 years from now in a foreign country, enter code "8887" in the code boxes.

H14-Presence of Household Conveniences/Devices
This item provides information on selected housing conveniences and information and communications technology (ICT) devices, the presence of which in the household indicates the means of communication through which the population can be most easily reached. This also provides a basis for leisure statistics. The presence of motor vehicles in the household provides data about access to private transport. It can also provide information for the construction of roads/bridges and solution to traffic problems.
In general, the presence of household conveniences/devices can be used as proxy indicators in determining the socio-economic status of the household.
Ask the question: "Does this household have the following household conveniences/devices in working condition?" and read out the items listed in the questionnaire one by one. Write "X" in the box for a Yes or No answer.

[] Radio/radio cassette
[] Television set
[] CD/VCD/DVD player
[] Component/stereo set
[] Landline/wireless telephone
[] Cellular phone
[] Personal computer
[] Refrigerator/freezer
[] Cooking range
[] Washing machine
[] Car/jeep/van
[] Motorcycle/tricycle
[] Motorized boat/banca

The category "radio/radio cassette" includes transistor radio, radiophone, stereo or karaoke. "Personal computer" includes desktop, laptop, notebook, and netbook.

Exclude any aforementioned household item which has not been in working condition for six months or longer (although intended to be repaired). Exclude also motor vehicles (cars/jeeps/vans, motorcycles/tricycles or motorized bancas/boats) which are used exclusively for business purposes.

H15-Internet Access
Write "X" in the box for a Yes or No answer to the question: "Does this household have access to internet?".

From home
From elsewhere (for instance, office, school, internet café, among others)

Filling Out Housing Census Questions of CPH Form 3 (Page 3D): An Example

Based on the observation of the EN, the housing unit of Ken Salazar has the following characteristics:
[] a single house
[] roof is made of galvanized iron
[] outer walls are concrete
[] housing unit is still in good condition and needs no repair

To continue with the interview, Ken divulged the following information:

[] the housing unit was built in 2000 with a floor area of 110 square meters
[] for lighting, the household is serviced by Meralco
[] they use LPG for cooking
[] on a regular basis, they are rationed with bottled water for drinking but for cooking and laundry/bathing, their source of water supply is through the faucet of their own use from the community water system
[] the housing unit and lot were purchased by Ken and Luisa through Pag-IBIG loan
a truck contracted by the village association picks up the garbage
[] their toilet facility is water-sealed, used exclusively by the household
[] to augment their income, they collect their share of harvest from their rice farm in Bulacan

Ken enumerated the following household conveniences that they are

[] television set
[] CD/DVD player
[] stereo set
[] two personal computers with internet access at home, although both Ken and Luisa have also internet access in their respective offices
[] refrigerator
[] washing machine.

Although some of the household members can speak different dialects, everyone communicates in Tagalog.
Ken said the household has no plan to move out from their residence in five or ten years from now.
Illustration 8.7 on the next page shows on how to record items B1 to B5, D1, and H1 to H15 of CPH Form 3 (page 3D). [Image omitted.]

8.8 End of Interview
After completing the interview and obtaining all information on the household, review the questionnaire thoroughly for the consistency, completeness and correctness of entries. Verify any doubtful entry and make the necessary changes/corrections. Record the time the interview ended and complete the other items such as result of final visit and the population items in the Interview Record. Then sign the Certification portion. Before leaving the household, thank the respondent for his/her cooperation.

9. Enumeration of Institutional Populations
This chapter discusses the detailed instructions on how to accomplish CPH Form 4 -- Institutional Population Questionnaire. This questionnaire, which is a four-page booklet, gathers information about persons considered part of the institutional population. See Appendix 8, (pages 252 to 255) for a copy of this form.
How to Enumerate Institutional Populations

1. For 20 or less members: List and interview each residents
2. For more than 20 members: Contact the head of the institution. Request his/her staff to fill out CPH Form 4. However, if the head requires you to interview the members, follow procedures in number 1 above. Ask the number of males and females in the ILQ. Leave CPH Form 4 together with CPH Form 8. Write "c/o TS" in the remarks portion of CPH Form 1. Inform the head of the institution that the TS will collect the accomplished CPH Form 4 within a week or at his/her convenience, but not beyond the enumeration period.
9.1 Who Will Enumerate the Institutional Population
You will be able to determine how and who will enumerate the institutional population as soon as you have accomplished CPH Form 1 for a particular institution.
The three situations to consider in enumerating institutional population are the following:

Case 1. For ILQs such as hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, and boarding houses, which have 20 or less residents, YOU will have to list and interview each resident and accomplish CPH Form 4. Do not forget to write "c/o (your name)" in the remarks column of CPH Form 1.
Case 2. For hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, and boarding houses with more than 20 members and for other ILQs, do the following:
Contact the manager, head, or person-in-charge of the institution. Explain to him/her the objectives and methodology of the census.
Request him/her to ask his/her staff to fill out CPH Form 4 with the aid of their records and based on the instructions provided in CPH Form 8. However, if the institution's manager requests that the residents be individually interviewed at the time of your visit, you should do the interview by yourself even if the number of institutional members is more than 20, following the procedures in Case 1.
Before you leave CPH Form 4 together with CPH Form 8 to the manager, head, or person-in-charge, ask him/her of the total number of male and female population in the ILQ and enter the counts in Columns 8 and 9, respectively of CPH Form 1. Leave as many CPH Form 4 as may be required, depending on the number of residents in the institution.
Inform him/her that the accomplished CPH Form 4 will be collected by your TS (give his/her name) within a week or at the convenience of manager/owner, but not beyond the enumeration period. Do not forget to write "c/o TS and the appointment date/time" in the remarks column of CPH Form 1.
Case 3. For ILQs wherein no one is eligible for enumeration, assign CPH Form 4. Fill out only the geographic identification (province, city/ municipality, barangay, EA number, ISN, type of ILQ, and address). Write "c/o (your name)" in the remarks column of CPH Form 1 and the reason why no one was enumerated.
9.2 Persons To Be Enumerated As Members Of The Institutional Population
The following are to be included as members of the institution for each type of ILQs:

[] 1.Hotels, motels, lodging houses, dormitories, and others -- These are establishments that provide lodging and meals and various personal services for the public.
Proprietor, manager, and employees living in the establishment, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week
[] Lodgers/boarders who have stayed for more than six months as of May 1, 2010, or have been away from their own families for the same period. However, exclude those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.
[] Lodgers/boarders who are not residents of the Philippines and who have been in the Philippines for one year or longer as of May 1, 2010, or are expected to stay in the Philippines for one year or longer. However, exclude those who have a temporary place of residence elsewhere in the Philippines where they usually go home. Exclude also diplomatic representatives of the United Nations (UN), International Labor Organization (ILO), or United States Agency for International Development (USAID) officials who, like diplomatic representatives, may be subject to reassignment to other countries after their tour of duty in the Philippines, and members of their families.
Boarders in residential houses provided that their number is 10 or more
2. Hospitals and nurses' home -- These are institutions where the needy, aged, young, or where the sick or injured are given medical or surgical care.
All patients confined in mental hospitals, leprosaria or leper colonies, pavilions of tuberculosis sanitaria where patients stay more or less permanently, and rehabilitation centers for drug addicts, regardless of the duration of confinement
Patients who have been confined for more than six months as of May 1, 2010 in other kinds of hospitals and wards for temporary confinement in tuberculosis sanitaria
Nurses in nurses' homes who do not usually go home to their respective families at least once a week
Staff members and employees living in hospitals/nurses' homes, except those living therein with their families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.
3. Welfare institutions -- These are institutions intended for seeing or improving the welfare of disadvantaged social groups. Included here are institution for juvenile, sexually abused, and others.
All inmates or wards, including those who have just been confined
Staff members and employees living in the institutions, except those living therein with their families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.
4. Corrective and penal institutions -- These are living quarters intended for housing the prisoners and detainees.
All prisoners in national prisons and reformatories (Welfareville)
Prisoners and detainees in provincial or city/municipal jails who have been continuously confined for more than six months, including confinement in another jail elsewhere, as of May 1, 2010, or those whose sentence would exceed six months, even if the sentence is on appeal
Staff members and employees living in these institutions, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.
5. Convents, nunneries, seminaries, and boarding schools -- These are ILQs intended for the housing of nuns, seminarians, other religious entities, and students.
Monks, priests, ministers, nuns, seminarians, and others. However, priests or ministers of sects who live in the convent or house close to the church or chapel with their own families are to be considered as members of households.
Students in boarding schools (schools where students are required to stay in the school campus)
Staff members, employees, and helpers living in the premises, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week
6. Military camps and stations -- These are camps established for the temporary accommodation of military men/women.
Officers and enlisted men/draftees, except those who live in the premises with their own families and those who go home to their respective families once a week or staying in hotels, lodging places or dormitories. This includes also those belonging to the unit in the camp or station but who are away on military operation or mission or aboard naval vessels, except those whose families are living in the camp or station (their own families will report them).
PMA, PNPA, and PMMA cadets and trainees whose training will last for more than six months
Detainees who have been continuously confined for more than six months, including confinement in another camp or station elsewhere, as of May 1, 2010
Civilian employees living in the camp or station, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week
7. Logging, mining, and construction/public works camps -- These are camps established for the housing of workers in mining, agriculture, public works, or other types of enterprises.
Proprietor, manager, contractor, and employees who do not live with their own families in the camp/station premises and are supplied with lodging (bedding, and others) and/or meals by the company, firm contractor or agency, except those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week
8. Oceangoing and interisland/coastal vessels -- These are vessels that are used as living quarters of the crewmembers.
Filipino crewmember of interisland/coastal vessel or deep-sea fishing vessel at port on any day during the enumeration, if the crewmember has no home other than the vessel
9. Refugee camps -- These are camps established for the housing of refugees.
Filipino citizens working and living inside the camps, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.
10. Others -- These are ILQs not mentioned above.

9.3 How to Accomplish CPH Form 4 -- Institutional Population Questionnaire
One booklet of CPH Form 4 can accommodate 16 persons. The cover page of the questionnaire contains the title panel, certification, the geographic identification portion, and the interview status while the inside pages consist of Items P1 to P13, and P16.

Booklet Number
There are two boxes allotted for this item. Refer to the instructions in Section 7.3 of Chapter 7 (page 92), but this time prefix zero (0) when the booklet number is less than 10, for instance, Booklet 01 of 02 booklets.
Geographic Identification
Transcribe in CPH Form 4 the name and code of the province, city/municipality, barangay, and EA, from CPH Form 1. Copy the BSN and ISN from Columns 2 and 5, respectively, of CPH Form 1.
Types of Institutional Living Quarter
Identify the ILQ as to its type and enter the code in accordance with the following coding scheme.

Type of Institutional Living Quarter

[] 01 Hotels, motels, lodging houses, dormitories, and others
[] 02 Hospitals and nurses' home
[] 03 Welfare institutions
[] 04 Corrective and penal institutions
[] 05 Convents, nunneries, seminaries, and boarding schools
[] 21 Military camps and stations
[] 22 Logging, mining and construction/public works camps
[] 23 Oceangoing and interisland/coastal vessels
[] 24 Refugee camps
[] 25 Others, Specify____

The codes for the types of ILQs are found at the right side of the Interview Record portion on the first page (4A) of the questionnaire.

Name of Institutional Living Quarter
Transcribe on the lines provided for this item the name of the ILQ from Column 6 of CPH Form 1.Address
Enter here the number and name of the street, sitio, or purok where the ILQ is located.

At the right side of the Geographic Identification are the definition of Institutional Population and the list of Institutional Population Membership for your guide.
Interview Record
Use this portion to record the result of each visit or attempt to interview the institution. For each visit, you should record the date of visit, time began and ended, and result of visit. You should also record the date and time of the appointment you set on the space provided (NEXT VISIT portion). After your final visit, record the total number of visits to the institution, final result of visit, total number of members, number of males, and number of females in the institution. You should check the consistency of these numbers with Columns 7, 8, and 9 of CPH Form 1. The numbers in CPH Form 4 shall prevail. Refer to Section 7.4 of Chapter 7 (pages 94 to 96) for other details. This is similar to that of CPH Form 2.
You can find the codes for types of ILQs at the right side of the Interview Record. Codes for P2 (Residence Status) and P16 (Highest Grade/Year Completed), meanwhile, are found at the bottom of page 4B for your reference.
Important Notice: When using more than one booklet for an institutional population (with more than 16 members), copy the contents of the geographic items of the first booklet to the additional booklet/s. Leave Interview Record and Summary of Visit blank.

Line Number
Every booklet has 16 lines for recording the names and characteristics of the institutional population. Each line is identified by a number that corresponds to a member of the ILQ. Thus, the first member is entered on Line Number "1", the second member on Line Number "2", and so on. Just like what you did in CPH Form 2, encircle also the line number of the respondent.
Ask the respondent the question, "How many persons are residing in this institutional living quarter as of May 1, 2010?" When the members are more than 20, the enumeration will be done by the manager/head of the institution, and the TS will collect the questionnaires. The answer provided will also help you in determining whether or not you have listed all the members of the ILQ in Column P1 As you ask this question, be sure to explain to the respondent the person to be included.
If there are more than 16 members in the ILQ, you need to use additional CPH Form 4. Then, the next line number for the next institutional member should be in sequence to the last line number indicated in the last booklet of CPH Form 4 that already full (16 member). Just like what you did in CPH Form 2, you have to line out the preprinted line number on the additional form and write above it the correct sequential number. The instruction located at the bottom page 4C under the heading "Institutional Population Size" will help you determine if additional questionnaire/s would be needed to list all the members of the ILQ.
Whenever you accomplish more than one CPH Form 4, be sure to indicate the number of booklets in the cover page of the questionnaire.

P1-Name
Write the names of the members, family name first, followed by the first name. List the names of the members of the institutional population in the order listed in the coding scheme for Column P2 (See bottom part of page 4B). However, if a mistake is committed in the order of entering the names, let the list stand as it is.

P2-Residence Status
Ask the residence status of the member, write the description on the space provided, and enter the code in the boxes in accordance with the following coding scheme:

[] Residence Status
[] 01 Manager, director, person in-charge
[] 02 Staff member/employee, including physicians and nurses
[] 03 Officer/enlisted man, trainee
[] 04 Officer/crew members in merchant vessel
[] 21 Priest, seminarian, nun
[] 22 Lodger or boarder
[] 23 Patient (hospital, sanitarium, and others)
[] 24 Inmate/ward (home for the aged, orphanage)
[] 31 Prisoner/detainee
[] 32 Others

Note that in a particular type of ILQ, only one or two or a few of the codes are applicable. For instance, the proprietor (manager) of a hotel and his/her employees who do not live with their own families in the hotel and do not usually go home to their respective families at least once a week will be coded, respectively, as "01" -- Manager, director, person in-charge and "02" -- Staff member/employee, and others.

P3-Sex to P13-Functional Difficulty and P16-Highest Grade/Year Completed
For items in Columns P3 to P13 and P16, follow the instructions given for the same items in CPH Form 2, as discussed in Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 (pages 100 to 122 and 124). However, take note of the difference in the column numbers in CPH Form 4.

Institutional Population Size
After listing all the members of the institution in Column P1 and filling out Columns P2 and P3, follow the instruction located at the bottom of page 4C of the questionnaire, under the heading Institutional Population Size, "if there are more than 16 members in this institution, write x in the box for yes. Otherwise, write x in the box for no." If Yes,provide additional questionnaire for the institution. This instruction will help you determine if there are still institutional members whom the respondent has forgotten to include in the list. This item is also important for it will inform the reviewers whether one or more CPH Form 4 were used for the institution. You should follow a similar guideline in asking this question, as outlined in Section 7.6 of Chapter 7 (page 97
Filling Out Columns P1 to 13 and P16 of CPH Form 4: An Example

Illustration 9.1 (page 203) shows the characteristics of the residents of the lodging house of Allan Santiago, aged 36 and a graduate of BS in Mathematics, living with his five single male lodgers and one female staff. His lodgers are the twin Junel and Jeremy Antolin, 20 years old, both are currently in their 4th year BS in Architecture. Other lodgers are cousins Angelo Salvador, 20 years old, currently enrolled in his 4th year BS in Accountancy, and Andrew Salvador, 19 years old, currently 3rd year BS in Finance and Management. Jorge Castro, 20 years old, is also currently a 3rd year student taking up BS in Economics. Charita Pumaren, a 52-year-old high school graduate and a widow, is a stay-in staff, hired to clean and cook for the lodgers.
All the members in the institution have no disability and functional difficulty according to the respondent. He also said that all of them are Cebuanos and all their births were registered with the Local Civil Registrar in Cebu City.

The respondent, Allan informed the enumerator of his birth date as well as that of his lodgers and staff, and their religious affiliation:
Allan Santiago was born on March 1, 1971, a Roman Catholic
Junel and Jeremy Antolin were born on May 22, 1989, both Seventh Day Adventist
Angelo Salvador was born on August 12, 1989, a Jehovah's Witness
Andrew Salvador was born on September 18, 1990, a Jehovah's Witness
Jorge Castro was born on February 14, 1989, a Roman Catholic
Charita Pumaren was born on December 1, 1954, a Roman Catholic

[pg. 201]

9.4 Using CPH Form 2 In Place Of CPH Form 4
If you encounter an ILQ in your EA and you do not have CPH Form 4, proceed to enumerate the members of that ILQ using CPH Form 2, as an improvised CPH Form 4. The information will be transcribed later to CPH Form 4 by your TS.
In this case, be sure to:

[] 1. Write the word "Institutional" diagonally across the geographic identification portion of CPH Form 2.
[] 2. Write the Name of Institution in the space provided for Name of Household Head.
[] 3. Fill out the geographic identification portion. Replace "Household Serial Number" with "Institutional Serial Number" and write the serial number in the appropriate boxes. Also replace "Line Number of Respondent" with "Type Of Institutional Living Quarter" and write the code corresponding to the type of institution. Fill out also the number of booklets used.
[] 4. Replace the question on relationship to the household head (Column P2) with a question on the residence position or status of the member of ILQ.
[] 5. Fill out only Columns P2 to P13 and Column P16 to record the characteristics of the residents of the ILQ.
[pg. 202]
[Example image omitted.]

9.5 Institutional Population Self-Administered Questionnaire Instructions
As discussed earlier, you may not be able to personally interview the manager/staff/respondent of the institution, for some reasons, but the manager/staff/respondent opted to accomplish the CPH Form 4 through the use of the Institutional Population Self-Administered Questionnaire Instructions (CPH Form 8). As an EN, it is important that you also familiarize yourself with the features of this form.
CPH Form 8 is an eight-page instruction on how to accomplish CPH Form 4. It contains the message of the Administrator about the rationale of the census undertaking, basic information on the census such as reference period, confidentiality of census data, whom to include in the enumeration, how the census data will be processed, concepts and definitions, samples of properly filled out sections of CPH Form 4 to serve as guide for the respondent, and contact information.
[pg. 203]
[Example form omitted.]
[pg. 204]

10. EN's Accomplishment and Progress Monitoring Report
This chapter contains detailed instructions on how you will accomplish CPH Form 10 or the EN's Accomplishment/Progress Monitoring Report.
CPH Form 10 is designed to provide your supervisors with information about your output or the number of households and population that you have completely enumerated so far. In other words, the data on this form will serve as the source of information that will be used to monitor the progress of enumeration. Inaccurate reporting in this form will correspondingly provide incorrect information. Hence, you should accomplish this form properly. Entries in this form will come from accomplished CPH Form 1. Make sure that the totals in CPH Form 1 are correct. To do this, follow the instructions discussed in Section 6.5 of Chapter 6, pages 79 to 80. In case of inconsistency in totals, verify CPH Form 1 against CPH Form 2, 3 or 4. Entries in CPH Forms 2, 3 or 4 shall prevail over those found in CPH Form 1.
Important Notice: Information in CPH Form 10 will be sent through text messaging (Short Message Service -- SMS) by your CAS/ACAS. Accuracy and reliability of the data in this form are greatly required.
Bear in mind that all information gathered in the census shall be kept strictly confidential. Hence, you should neither give nor show the information from CPH Form 10 or from other accomplished CPH forms to unauthorized NSO and non-NSO personnel.

General instructions on how to fill Out CPH form 10
[] 1. Accomplish CPH Form 10 in triplicate copies. Two copies will be submitted to your TS when he/she collects these forms from you weekly, preferably every Wednesday. Your TS, in turn, will submit one copy of the accomplished CPH Form 10 to his/her CAS/ACAS every week, usually every Friday.
[] 2. You should fill out a line in CPH Form 10 (Column 1 through Column 14) each time a page of CPH Form 1 is completely filled out. The required data for this form are the number of buildings and housing units, total number of males and females, total population actually enumerated during the period, and the corresponding number of households. Also asked are the number of ILQs and the number of male and female institutional population.
[pg. 205]
[] 3. In case you are assigned to cover more than one EA/barangay, you should use a separate CPH Form 10 for each EA/barangay.

Specific Instructions on How to Fill Out CPH Form 10
The instructions below should be followed in filling out CPH Form 10:
[] 1. PM Report No.
PM Report No. is located in the uppermost right hand corner of CPH Form 10. You should write the number consecutively in every sheet for every EA/barangay assigned to you. This is to account for all CPH Form 10 that you have submitted to your TS.
[] 2. Date
Enter the month and day you accomplished CPH Form 10 in the boxes provided at the upper left hand side. Write the two-digit code for the month and day. The date should be the date indicated in Column 14 for the last entry in the form or when this was completely accomplished.
[] 3. SMS Receipt No.
Leave this portion blank. This will be filled out by your CAS/ACAS.
[] 4. Geographic Identification
Copy from CPH Form 1 the province, city/municipality, and barangay names and the []
5. EA Status
Enter "1" if the enumeration for the EA is still ongoing or "2" if already completed. To determine if an EA is completely enumerated, check if there is an entry of "00" for day of visit after the last row that is filled out in column 1 of CPH Form 1.
[] 6. Check Number
Leave this portion blank. This will be filled out by your CAS/ACAS
[] 7. Column 1 -- CPH Form 1 Serial Number and Page
Copy the Serial Number of the completed page of CPH Form 1 and the page letter, which you are reporting on this line. For instance, if you have accomplished CPH Form 1 with serial number 000008, the first line should have an entry of 000008 1A; on the second line, 000008 1B; on the third line, 000008 1C; and so on. Refer to Illustrations 10.1 to 10.3.
[] 8. Column 2-- Number of Buildings
Copy the total number of buildings from the Total (A) box in Column 2 of CPH Form 1.
[] 9. Column 3-- Number of Housing Units
Copy the total number of housing units from the Total (B) box in Column 3 of CPH Form 1.
[] 10. Column 4-- Number of Households
Copy the total number of households from the Total (C) box in Column 4 of CPH Form 1.
[] 11. Column 5 (D) -- Number of Institutions
Copy the total number of institutions from the Total (D) box in Column 5 of CPH Form 1.
[] 12. Column 6 -- Cumulative Total
This will be filled out only after filling out Columns 7 to 9. To get the cumulative total for the current line in this column, add the entry in the current line of Column 7 and the entry in the previous line of this column (Column 6).
[] 13. Columns 7, 8, and 9 -- Household Population
Copy in Column 7 the total household population from the Total (E) box in Column 7 of CPH Form 1.
Copy in Column 8 the male household population from the Total (F) box in Column 8 of CPH Form 1.
Copy in Column 9 the female household population from the Total (G) box in Column 9 of CPH Form 1.
[] 14. Columns 10, 11 and 12 -- Institutional Population (Total, Male and Female)
Copy in Column 10 the total institutional population from the Total box in Column 7 of CPH Form 1.
Copy in Column 11 the male institutional population from the Total box in Column 8 of CPH Form 1.
Copy in Column 12 the female institutional population from the Total (J) box in Column 9 of CPH Form 1.
[] 15. Column 13 -- Number of Callbacks
Count the number of households marked with "x" in Column 1 (callback indicator) on the particular page of CPH Form 1. These are the households which were not successfully interviewed and scheduled for callbacks on a later date.
[] 16. Column 14 -- Date Accomplished
Determine from Column 1 of CPH Form 1 the latest date when a particular page has been accomplished. Enter that date in this column.
[] 17. Row Totals
For every CPH Form 10 to be submitted, you have to add all the entries in Column 4 for the Total Number of Households. Enter the sum in the box labeled Total with letters HH below it. Similarly, add all the entries in Column 7 for the Total Household Population, Column 8 for male household population and Column 9 for female household population. Enter the corresponding sums in the boxes labeled HP, HM, and HF, respectively. Do the same for Columns 10 (IP), 11 (IM), and 12 (IF). Check if the total in Column 7 is equal to the last cumulative total in Column 6. The sum of Columns 8 and 9 should also be equal to the total in Column 7. Likewise, the sum of Columns 11 and 12 should be equal to the total in Column 10.
18. Name and Signature of the EN
Print your name and affix your signature on the line "Prepared by:"
19. Name and Signature of the TS and Date Verified
Leave this blank for the TS to print and sign his/her name and the date he/she reviewed or verified the entries in the form.
[pg. 208]
See Illustrations 10.1 to 10.3 for accomplished CPH Form 10 with entries taken from CPH Form 1. [Example forms omitted page 209-211.]

11. How to Accomplish CPH Forms 6, 9, 13, and 17
This chapter contains detailed instructions on when to use and how to fill out CPH Forms 6, 9, 13, and 17.

11.1 CPH Form 6 -- Notice Of Listing/Enumeration
CPH Form 6 is a sticker used for control and monitoring purposes. Its presence indicates that a particular housing unit or ILQ had already been listed/enumerated including those enumerated using SAQ Instructions. You have to post as many stickers as there are housing units and/or ILQs in a building. For an ILQ with housing unit, post a separate CPH Form 6 for each, that is, one for the ILQ and another one for the housing unit.
Before you post CPH Form 6 to the housing unit, write the BSN, HUSN, line out ISN, and print on the space provided the HSN. Copy the BSN, HUSN, and HSN that you wrote in CPH Form 1 when you interview the household. If two or more households occupy the same housing unit, indicate all serial numbers of households covered under one notice form by writing the first HSN and the last HSN, separated by a hyphen. Thus, for a housing unit having three households with serial numbers 0025, 0026, and 0027, simply write on the space provided: HSN 0025-0027. Indicate also the date/s you have listed and completely enumerated the housing unit/ILQ. See Illustration 11.1 on the next page for example.
If the housing unit is occupied by "non-usual residents", write "7777"; if occupied by person/s who is/are excluded from enumeration, "8888"; if vacant, "9999"; or if a vacation/rest house, "8889".
For ILQs, line out HSN and write the ISN on the space provided.
Place the sticker on a convenient and conspicuous part of the main entrance to the housing unit or ILQ. If a household or institutional population is meant to be revisited because you failed to interview an eligible respondent during your first visit, indicate the HSN or ISN on the sticker, check "CB" for callback and write the date listed, then post the sticker. You will write the date enumerated only after you have completely obtained the information about the household or institutional population (accomplished CPH Form 2 or CPH Form 4).
You should see to it that the sticker is properly posted before you leave the household or ILQ. Don't hurry. Avoid pasting it on a wet, greasy/oily, or very rough surface. Make sure also that it is pasted airtight to avoid water and other elements from seeping under it.
[pg. 213]

11.2 CPH Form 9 -- Appointment Slip to Household/Institutional Population Respondent
You will need this form if during you first visit, there is no responsible (or eligible) respondent in the household/institution who could provide you with accurate information, hence, necessitating you to make a callback at a later date. In other words, this will serve as your appointment slip with a responsible member of the household/institution.
Try to ascertain the availability of the person whom you wish to interview and consider his/her available time in making the appointment. Inquire from other household member/s, household help/caretaker or neighbors of the household, security guards, or other staff of the institution for the best day and time to make a callback. State in CPH Form 9 the time and date you will revisit the household/institution, and affix your signature. Make sure that you also indicate the same time and date on the remarks column of CPH Form 1. You have to maintain a record of your appointments so that you can keep track of your scheduled visits properly.
Leave CPH Form 9 to any member of the household (such as the household help or son/daughter of the household head) or of the institution (such as the caretaker, security guard, or other staff of institution) to make the household/institution aware of your future visit. If no one can receive the notice, put it in the mailbox or in a conspicuous place near the entrance/door.
[Example image omitted.]

11.3 CPH Form 13 -- Transmittal/Receipt Form
This form will be used when you transmit or receive CPH forms and materials to or from your TS. You will also use this form when you leave CPH Forms 2, 3, or 4 with SAQ Instructions. You should always record the number of questionnaires transmitted or received in this form. This form will also be used in the collection of unused census materials, which you will submit to your TS after enumeration. Follow the procedures described below in filling out this form:
[] 1. Accomplish this form in duplicate, one copy to the receiving personnel and the other for you as the transmitting officer.
[] 2. Fill out the geographic identification portion for the names and codes of the region and province.
[] 3. Indicate your name and designation as transmitting officer on the space provided.
[] 4. This form is to be used whenever you transmit/receive census forms and/or materials for your assigned barangay or EA. List first the names and codes of the city/municipality and barangay, and EA number, then write the corresponding census forms/materials which you will transmit. List the forms by type and in ascending order of form number, that is, CPH Form 1, CPH Form 2, CPH Form 3, and so on.
[] 5. Specify the unit of the forms, that is, number of booklets, sheets, and others.
[] 6. If you are going to receive CPH forms and materials, you should write the date, quantity, and your name and signature under the "Received" column of CPH Form 13. Do not forget to get a copy of this form because this will serve as the proof of all the forms and materials that you received.
[] 7. Each time you transmit accomplished forms and questionnaires, enter the date you transmitted these forms in Column "Date" and the number of forms/materials in Column "Quantity" under the "Transmitted" column and always print and sign your name as the transmitting officer.
[] 8. At the end of the enumeration, when you transmit the materials and unused forms to your TS, you have to identify them in CPH Form 13 by writing "unused forms" above the list of blank forms and questionnaires to be returned. Then, ask the TS to enter the date, quantity, and his/her signature under the "Received" column.
[pg. 216]
[Example form omitted.]

11.4 CPH Form 17 -- Certification Of Barangay Chairperson
This is a certification of the Barangay Chairperson that the barangay had been completely covered and enumerated in the 2010 CPH. It also specifies the period the enumeration was conducted.
If the barangay has only one EA, it is the responsibility of the EN to secure the Barangay Chairperson's signature upon completion of enumeration of the barangay. Fill out the form before you visit the Barangay Chairperson to request him/her to sign and also to thank him/her for his/her cooperation, assistance, and support. Check CPH Form 1 for the date the enumeration was started and finished.
If the barangay has more than one EA, your TS will be responsible for securing the Barangay Chairperson's signature. However, if more than one TS is assigned to the barangay, the CAS/ACAS will have to secure the Barangay Chairperson's signature. The TS/ACAS/CAS should check the first and last day the enumeration was conducted in various EAs of the barangay for the actual period of the census. [Image omitted.]
Important Notice: Remember that all information gathered during the census should not be disclosed to anybody.

12. Administrative and Financial Matters
This chapter describes the procedures for reporting and submission of forms to your supervisor, review of your completed work, the method of payment, accomplishment of administrative forms, and other administrative matters.
12.1 Reporting And Submission Of Forms To Your Team Supervisor
During enumeration, you must report to your TS once a week, preferably every Wednesday, to discuss the progress of your work and the problems you encountered in the field, if any. During these meetings, you will submit CPH Form 10 and the accomplished questionnaires. Bring with you always the EA map and CPH Form 1 for the EA.
12.2 Submitting Completed Work
Upon completion of an EA, submit the following to your TS:

Map of the barangay/EA received from your supervisor and the EA/block maps you have drawn/sketched in the Mapping Form.
CPH Form 1 -- Listing Booklet
All remaining accomplished questionnaires/forms which you still have:
CPH Form 2/7 and CPH Form 4/8
CPH Form 10 -- EN's Accomplishment/Progress Monitoring Report
CPH Form 17 -- Certification of Barangay Chairperson

Upon completion of all your assigned areas, submit the following:

EN's Manual
2010 CPH Identification Card
All unused forms and materials

Preparing Questionnaires for Submission
It is a must that you edit all the accomplished questionnaires before submitting them to your TS. Verify that each questionnaire contains all the required information, and that the entries are clear and legible.
If a questionnaire fails your edit, that is, some required information are inadvertently missing, entries are neither legible nor clear, and so forth, you must correct the situation before you submit the questionnaire to your TS. If necessary, contact the respondent again to obtain the missing information.

12.3 Review Of Your Completed Work By The Team Supervisor
Your TS will review your work each time he/she meets with you. The details of these reviews will depend on the quality of your work and how well you follow the procedures in this manual.
Each review consists of the following:

A detailed check of the EA map if buildings, households, and landmarks are properly plotted.
A detailed check of CPH Form 1 to ensure that the required entries have been made and that all the households listed have corresponding questionnaires and the number of males and females in the household or ILQs listed in the form conform with those in CPH Forms 2, 3 and 4.
A detailed check of the questionnaires to ensure that all applicable questions/items are properly filled out.
12.4 Daily Time Record (CSC Form 48)
This form shall be used to monitor your attendance in going to work. Print your name on the designated line and the current month and year. Fill out this form every time you report to work.
This form consists of seven columns and 31 rows (for 31 days of a month). Fill out the Daily Time Record (DTR) each day you work as an EN. The "morning", "afternoon", and "overtime" columns have corresponding IN or OUT columns. The IN column corresponds to the time you begin enumerating the first household/ILQ for the day and the out column, the time you finish enumerating the last household/ILQ for the day.

When your supervisor tells you to submit the form to him/her, be sure that you have signed your name on the designated line. Be diligent and honest in reporting your working hours. Illustration 12.1 [omitted] shows how to fill out the DTR.
[pg. 221]

12.5 Issuance of Certification
You will be issued a Certificate of Work Completed (CPH Form 18) by the DSO countersigned by the CAS/ACAS, and a Certificate of Appearance duly signed by your TS. These will serve as your supporting documents for payment of your wages or other financial claims. You will not be paid your wages or claims for traveling expenses without these certifications. [Image omitted.]

12.6 Clearance
Once all the duties and responsibilities required of you for the census have been satisfactorily done and completed, and after you have submitted all the accomplished questionnaires, barangay/EA maps, field operation forms, blank or unused forms, narrative reports, and other documents, you (as well as your TS/CAS/ACAS) can already secure your clearance from the NSO. This clearance is a certification that you are cleared of all the duties and responsibilities in connection with the 2010 CPH, duly signed by your DSO/SCO. See Illustration 12.3 for your reference [omitted.]
[pg. 223]

12. 7 Daily Output and Remuneration
The average daily output expected of you varies depending on the geographical characteristics of the assigned EAs.
Remuneration of teacher ENs is based on the provisions stipulated in the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the NSO and DepEd. Meanwhile, nonteacher ENs will be paid based on the amount stipulated in their respective service contracts.
Remuneration will be paid upon submission of claims through your supervisor who, in turn will submit them to the Provincial Office for processing. Actual payment of your money claims will be effected by the Disbursing Officer of the NSO Provincial Office. Claims for payment should be accomplished using the Disbursement Voucher (General Form 5A). It should be accompanied by the acceptable supporting papers such as: duly accomplished DTR (CSC Form 48), Itinerary of Travel, Certificate of Appearance, certificate of work completed, bus tickets, and others.

12.8 Financial Forms
Disbursement Voucher (General Form No. 5A)
This form is used in claiming per diems and transportation expenses/allowances. This voucher can either be prepared for you by the office secretary or you can prepare it yourself. See appendix 13 (page 283) for a copy of this form.
Itinerary of Travel
The itinerary of travel must be filled out every time you make a financial claim. Print the required information on the form: your name, position (EN/TS/CAS/ACAS, and others), official station (office address), and the purpose of travel (listing, enumeration of EA, and others).
Write the date/s, the place or area visited, the time you departed/arrived from/to the place, the mode of transportation, the allowable expenses incurred, and the total expenses incurred (add up the transportation expenses incurred, per diem, and allowances).

Sign below the line, which is denoted by, "Prepared by:"
Print also the name of the Approving Officer (the PSO) on the designated line. Have your CAS/ACAS affix his/her initial below the PSO's name. Illustration 12.4 shows how to fill out the Itinerary of Travel. [Image omitted.]
Note that the Itinerary of Travel, DTR, and RER are supporting papers for your voucher.
[Appendices not included. See original for more information.]