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2000 Census of Population and Housing
Republic of the Philippines
National Statistics Office
Manila

Census concepts

This chapter discusses the basic units of listing and enumeration in a census of population and housing, namely: buildings, housing units, institutional living quarters, households, and institutional population. It also provides guidelines on how to identify these units during the field enumeration of the census.

You should refer to this chapter as often as may be necessary for you to fully understand the concepts, terms used and data requirements for the census.

3.1 Building

Definition of Building

A building is defined as any structure built, designed or intended for the enclosure, shelter or protection of any person, animal or property. It consists of one or more rooms and/or other spaces, covered by a roof and usually enclosed within external walls or with common dividing walls with adjacent buildings, which usually extend from the foundation to the roof.

Buildings to be listed

Each building within an enumeration area will be assigned a building serial number as it is being listed in the listing page.

For purposes of the census of population and housing, not all buildings, however, will be included in the listing. As a general rule, only those buildings which contain living quarters, whether occupied or vacant, are to be listed. Living quarters are structurally separate and independent places of abode. They may:

1. have been constructed, built, converted or arranged for human habitation, provided that they are not at the time of the census used wholly for other purposes; or

2. actually being used as living quarters at the time of the census, although not intended for habitation.

More specifically, the buildings to be listed are the following:

1. Residential buildings which are presently occupied by a household;

Residential buildings are buildings which, by the way they have been designed or constructed, are intended for abode such as single houses, multi-unit residential buildings, etc.

2. Vacant residential buildings except those which are open to the elements, that is, if the roof, walls, windows, and/or doors no longer protect the interior from wind and rain as a result of fire, deterioration or vandalism;

3. Vacant deteriorated residential buildings which show some signs that deterioration is being prevented to some extent such as when windows and/or doors are covered by wood, metal, or other materials to keep them from being destroyed or to prevent entry into the building or secondary posts are added to prevent it from collapsing;

4. New residential buildings which are still not occupied or still under construction, if at the time of the visit, the roofs and walls are already in place;

5. Residential buildings which are presently not occupied by a household but are used for purposes other than as residence, provided they still have one or more vacant housing units;

Example: An apartment building with 3 units, two of which are used as business offices and the other one is vacant.

6. Institutional living quarters which are in operation such as hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, seminaries, mental hospitals, etc.;

7. Non-residential buildings presently occupied by a household;

Non-residential buildings are buildings, which have been designed or constructed for purposes other than as abode. These include commercial, industrial, and agricultural buildings such as offices, rice mills, barns, etc.; and other non-residential buildings such as churches, etc.;

8. Non-residential buildings which have one or more vacant housing units with complete facilities for cooking, dining and sleeping, with or without inner partitions; and

9. Other structures not intended for human habitation but are presently occupied by a household such as caves, old railroad cars, old buses, culverts, trailers, barges, boats, etc.

3.2 Housing unit

Definition of Housing Unit

A housing unit is a structurally separate and independent place of abode which, by the way it has been constructed, converted, or arranged, is intended for habitation by one or more households.

Structures or parts of structures which are not intended for habitation, such as commercial, industrial, and agricultural buildings, or natural and man-made shelters such as caves, boats, abandoned trucks, culverts, etc., but which are used as living quarters by households, are also considered as housing units.

The place of abode of an institutional population is not called a housing unit, it is referred to as institutional living quarter.

How to Identify Housing Units in a Building

Normally, a housing unit is intended for habitation by one household, however, in some cases, two or more households share the same building or the same housing unit as their place of habitation. The building may have more than one housing unit but from its physical layout the different housing units may not be discernible.

Discussed below are the guidelines on how to identify and count the housing units in a building.
A portion of a building (a room or a group of rooms,) qualifies as a separate housing unit if it meets both the following requirements:

1. Separateness - the portion of a building must have facilities for sleeping, preparing and taking meals, and its occupants must be isolated from other households in the building by means of walls or permanent partitions; and

2. Direct access - the portion of the building can be accessed directly from the outside of the building. That is, the occupants can come in or go out of the portion of the building without passing through anybody else's premises from the street, pathway, alley, callejon, road, yard, catwalk, public or communal staircase, passage, gallery, grounds or through a common hall.

If the portion of the building is vacant, the above guidelines will apply to the intended occupants.

Figure 2 shows two examples of the direct access criterion.

[Figure 2 is omitted]

Illustrations of housing units are given below for a better understanding of the guidelines on how to identify them in a building.

1. A single house has been modified, the structure of which is shown below. The modified structure has four rooms, a common hallway, a common toilet and bath and one main entrance from the outside. The individual rooms can be accessed from the common hallway. The occupants take their meals and sleep in their respective rooms. This building has four (4) housing units.

2. A house has two rooms. The occupants of the rooms share all other areas in the house including the kitchen and dining area. Since the occupants of either room have no private area for dining and have to pass through the common premises to reach their own room, this structure actually contains only a single housing unit.

3. A house has two stories. The first floor of the house is subdivided into two units, each having a separate entrance from the outside. The access to the second floor is the stairs in the living rooms of one of the units on the first floor.

This house has two (2) housing units; one is the unit on the ground floor covering only the area which has a bedroom, a kitchen and a toilet and bath, and the other one is the unit covering the rest of the ground floor and the entire second floor. Note that in this case, the second floor cannot be considered as a separate housing unit even though it has facilities for sleeping and preparing/taking meals because its access is only through the premises of the ground floor.

Housing units to be listed

The housing units within an enumeration area will likewise be identified and listed in the listing sheet.

Not all housing units, however, will be assigned housing unit serial number and listed. To be included in the listing are the following housing units:

1. Occupied or vacant housing units in single residential houses.

2. Occupied or vacant housing units in multi-unit residential buildings such as duplex, accessoria or row houses, condominiums, tenement houses, townhouses, etc.

3. Occupied barong-barong or shanties.

4. Vacant housing units in residential buildings used for purposes other than residential.

5. Housing units which are still under construction, but the roof and walls are already in place.

6. Occupied housing units in institutional living quarters such as hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, seminaries, mental hospitals, etc.

7. Occupied housing units in non-residential buildings such as offices, rice mills, barns, churches, etc.

8. Vacant housing units with complete facilities for cooking, dining and sleeping in institutional living quarters and non-residential buildings;

9. Occupied mobile housing units such as boats, trailers, etc.

10. Occupied improvised housing units in structures such as culverts, abandoned trucks, caves, container vans, tents, and railroad cars.

The following are to be excluded from the listing of housing units:

1. Housing units which are still under construction with walls and roof not yet in place.

2. Vacant housing units which are open to elements, that is, when the roof and the walls no longer provide protection from the wind and rain and there are no signs that deterioration is being prevented.

3. Vacant housing units which are being demolished.

4. Vacant housing units in institutional living quarters and non-residential buildings without complete facilities for cooking, dining, and sleeping.

5. Vacant mobile housing units such as boats, trailers, etc.

6. Structures such as culverts, abandoned trucks, caves, container vans, tents, railroad cars, etc. which had been used as improvised housing unit or place of abode in the past but are vacant at the time of visit.

If a housing unit appears to be vacant because nobody responds to your call, ascertain from neighbors whether or not it is indeed vacant. Note that a housing unit used only during vacation, weekends or only during certain times of the year is considered vacant even though at the time of your visit, somebody is occupying it. The persons using them should be enumerated in their usual residence.

3.3 Household

Definition of Household

A household is a social unit consisting of a person living alone or a group of persons who sleep in the same housing unit and have a common arrangement in the preparation and consumption of food.

In most cases, a household consists of persons who are related by kinship ties, like parents and their children. In some instances, several generations of familial ties are represented in one household while, still in others, even more distant relatives are members of the household.

Household helpers, boarders, and non-relatives are considered as members of the household provided they sleep in the same housing unit and have common arrangement for the preparation and consumption of food and do not usually go home to their family at least once a week.

A group of unrelated individuals, as in the case of a group of students or workers who decide to rent a place and make common arrangements for the preparation and consumption of their food, constitutes one household.

Usually, a household is the entire group of persons who customarily live in the same housing unit. However, there are cases when two or more distinct family groups or groups of unrelated persons maintain separate food arrangements even though they share one housing unit. Each of these two or more distinct groups constitutes a household.

A person who shares a housing unit with a household but separately cooks his meals or consumes his food elsewhere is not considered a member of the household he shares the housing unit with. That person should be listed as a separate household.

As a rule, if two groups of individuals prepare and consume their meals together but sleep in separate housing units, then the two groups constitute two different households. An exception is that of children, who are still economically dependent on their parents but live in separate but adjacent housing units for convenience, they are considered member of their parents' household. However, if the children are economically independent, they should be listed as a separate household.

Household Membership

In determining household membership, a basic criterion is the usual place of residence or the place where the person usually resides. This may be the same or different from the place where he is found at the time of the census. As a rule, it is the place where he usually sleeps.

The following individuals are to be included as members of a household:

1. Those whose usual place of residence is the housing unit where the household lives.

2. Family members who are overseas workers and who are away at the time of the census are considered members of the household.

3. Those whose usual place of residence is the place where the household lives but are temporarily away at the time of the census for any of the following reasons:

a. on vacation, business/pleasure trip or studying/training somewhere in the Philippines and are expected to be back within six (6) months from the time of departure;

b. on vacation, business/pleasure trip or studying/training abroad and are expected to be back within a year from the time of departure;

c. working or attending school in some other place but comes home at least once a week;

d. confined in hospitals for a period of not more than six (6) months at the time of enumeration except when they are confined as inmates of tuberculosis pavilions, mental hospitals, leprosaria or leper colonies, drug rehabilitation centers, etc.;

e. detained in national/provincial/city/municipal jails or in military camps for a period of not more than six (6) months at the time of enumeration except when their sentence or detention is expected to exceed 6 months;

f. training with the Armed Forces of the Philippines if training is not more than 6 months;

g. on board coastal, inter-island or fishing vessels within Philippine territories; and

h. on board ocean-going vessels but are expected to come home at least once a year.

4. Boarders/lodgers of the household or employees of household-operated businesses who do not usually go to their respective homes weekly.

5. Citizens of foreign countries, excluding members of diplomatic missions and non-Filipino members of international organizations, but including Filipino balikbayans who have resided or are expected to reside in the Philippines for more than a year from their arrival.

6. Persons temporarily staying with the household who have no usual place of residence or who are not certain to be enumerated elsewhere.

Take note of the following special cases:

1. Boarders are members of a household if they fall under rule #4 above. However, if there are10 or more of such persons in the household do not include them as members of the household with whom they board. These boarders will all be considered as institutional population and will be enumerated separately from the household.

2. A person who lodges with a household but makes arrangements for his own meals or takes his meals outside (e.g., bed-spacer) is not a member of that household. He constitutes a one-member household provided he does not usually go home to his family at least once a week.

3. Two or more families who share the same housing unit are considered one household if they have common arrangements for the preparation and consumption of food. They comprise different households if they prepare their food separately.

4. Two or more unrelated individuals who share the same housing unit also constitute one household if they have common arrangements for the preparation and consumption of food. If each of them takes care of his own meal, then each one is considered a one-member household.

5. Persons who take their meals with a household but sleep elsewhere are not considered members of that household.

3.4 Institutional living quarters

Definition of Institutional Living Quarters

Institutional living quarters are structurally separate and independent places of abode intended for habitation by large groups of individuals. Such quarters usually have certain common facilities such as kitchen and dining rooms, toilet and bath, and lounging areas which are shared by the occupants.

The occupants of institutional living quarters are usually subject to a common authority or management or are bound by either a common public objective or a common personal interest.

Institutional Living Quarters to be Listed

Institutional living quarters in operation at the time of the census are also to be listed in the listing sheet and to be assigned institutional living quarter serial numbers.
Among the common institutional living quarters are the following:

1. Hotels, Motels, Inns, Dormitories, Pension and other Lodging Houses which provide lodging on a fee basis
2. Hospitals, Sanitaria, Rehabilitation Centers
3. Orphanages, Homes for the Aged
4. Seminaries, Convents, Nunneries, Boarding schools and other religious training centers
5. Corrective and Penal Institutions
6. Military Camps and Barracks
7. Logging, Mining and Construction/Public Works Camps
8. Ocean-going and Inter-island/Coastal Vessels
9. Refugee Camps

Institutional living quarters which are in operation but at the time of the census have no residents that qualify for enumerations are also to be listed. An example is a dormitory whose residents all went home for vacation.

Do not list those previously used as institutional living quarter but are no longer used as such or are already abandoned at the time of the census.

3.5 Institutional population

Definition of Institutional Population

Institutional population comprises persons who are found living in institutional living quarters. They may have their own families or households elsewhere but at the time of the census, they are committed or confined in institutions, or they live in institutional living quarters and are usually subject to a common authority or management, or are bound by either a common public objective or a common personal interest.

Institutional Population Membership

The following persons are to be considered as members of the institutional population:

1. Permanent lodgers in boarding houses
2. Dormitory residents who do not go home at least once a week
3. Hotel residents who have stayed 6 months or more at the time of the census
4. Boarders in residential houses, provided that their number is ten (10) or more
(Note: If the number of boarders in a house is less than 10, they will be considered members of regular households, not institutional.)

5. Patients in hospitals who are confined for at least 6 months
6. Wards in orphanages
7. Inmates of penal colonies or prison cells
8. Seminarians, nuns in convents, monks
9. Soldiers residing in military camps
10. Workers in mining and similar camps

The following persons are not considered as members of the institutional population and should be included in the households to which they belong:

1. Military officials/enlisted men or draftees (and members of their households) who have housing units within military installations or camps.

2. Managers (and members of their households) of refugee camps, dormitories, hotels, hospitals, etc., who occupy and regularly use as their place of abode living quarters in the institutions that they manage.

3. Priests who, together with their relatives and/or household help, occupy and regularly use as their place of abode a living quarter in the church or seminary.

3.6 Whom to enumerate

Persons to be Included in the Enumeration

The persons whom you will enumerate during the census will be those who are alive as of 12:01 a.m. of May 1, 2000 and who are:

1. Filipino nationals permanently residing in the Philippines;
2. Filipino nationals who are temporarily at sea or are temporarily abroad as of census date;
3. Filipino overseas workers as of census date, even though expected to be away for more than a year;
4. Philippine government officials, both military and civilian, including Philippine diplomatic personnel and their families, assigned abroad; and
5. Civilian citizens of foreign countries having their usual residence in the Philippines or foreign visitors who have stayed or are expected to stay for at least a year from the time of their arrival in this country.

Take note of the following cases:

1. A person who died at exactly or after 12:01 A.M., May 1, 2000 should be included in the enumeration.

Example:
The EN interviewed the Reyes household on May 10, 2000, and he was told that Mario died on May 4, 2000. The EN should include Mario as member of the household because he was still alive on May 1, 2000, which is the reference day of the census.

2. A person who died before 12:01 A.M., May 1, 2000 should be excluded from the enumeration.

Example:
Anselmo Gaspar died from a heart attack at midnight (12:00 P.M.) of April 30, 2000. The EN should exclude Anselmo from the enumeration of the Gaspar household. He was no longer alive at 12:01 A.M., May 1, 2000 and therefore, he is not part of the population as of the census date.

3. A baby born before 12:01 A.M., May 1, 2000 should be included in the enumeration.

4. A baby born at exactly or after 12:01 A.M., May 1, 2000 should be excluded from the enumeration.

Persons to be excluded from the enumeration

You should exclude the following persons from enumeration although they happen to be within the territorial jurisdiction of the Philippines at the time of the census enumeration:

1. Foreign ambassadors, ministers, consuls or other diplomatic representatives, and members of their families (except Filipino and non-Filipino employees who have been residents of the Philippines prior to said employment);

2. Citizens of foreign countries living within the premises of an embassy, legation, chancellery or consulate;

3. Officers and enlisted men of U.S. Military or Naval Forces and non-Filipino members of their households, irrespective of residence; foreigners who are civilian employees in U.S. military or naval stations and members of their families living within the premises of said stations or reservation; (Note: for foreigners who are civilian employees of said stations living outside the station or reservation, see Item 5.);

4. Citizens of foreign countries who are chiefs or officials of international organizations like United Nations (UN), International Labor Organization (ILO), Asian Development Bank (ADB), Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) who are subject to reassignment to other countries after their tour of duty in the Philippines, and members of their families;

5. Citizens of foreign countries together with non-Filipino members of their families, who are students or who are employed, or have business in the Philippines but who are expected to stay in the country for less than a year from arrival;

6. Citizens of foreign countries and Filipinos with usual place of residence in a foreign country who are visiting the Philippines and who have stayed or are expected to stay in the country for less than a year from arrival (e.g., a balikbayan who will return to his usual place of residence abroad after a short vacation or visit in the Philippines);

7. Citizens of foreign countries in refugee camps/vessels; and

8. Residents of the Philippines on vacation, pleasure or business trip, study or training, etc., abroad who have been away or expected to be away from the Philippines for more than one year from departure.

Although the persons listed above are not to be enumerated, you should still visit their households. Persons working for them or living with them may be among those who should be included according to the rules of enumeration.

Chapter IV

Census forms and procedures

This chapter discusses the field enumeration procedures. It describes the basic census forms to be used during the field enumeration and gives a brief outline of the fieldwork procedures. It also includes instructions on how to identify enumeration areas, how to conduct an enumeration, and how to handle enumeration problems. Some of these topics are discussed with more detail in the succeeding chapters.

4.1 Basic census forms

Listed below are the basic census forms that you, as an EN, will use during the field enumeration. Specimen forms are shown in the appendices and copies of actual forms are included in your training kit.

CPH Form 1 - Listing Page
This is a sheet wherein you will list the buildings, housing units, households and institutional living quarters within an enumeration area (EA). You will also record other information pertaining to the population of households and institutional living quarters on this form.

CPH Form 2 -Common Household Questionnaire
This is the basic census questionnaire, which you will use for interview and for recording information about the common or non-sample households. This questionnaire gathers information on the following demographic and social characteristics of the population: relationship to household head, family nucleus, date of birth, age, birth registration, sex, marital status, religious affiliation, disability, ethnicity, residence five years ago and highest educational attainment. This also gathers information on building and housing unit characteristics.

CPH Form 3 -Sample Household Questionnaire
This is the basic census questionnaire, which you will use for interview and for recording information about the sample households. This questionnaire contains the same question as in CPH Form 2 and additional questions, namely: citizenship, language, literacy, school attendance, type of school, place of school, usual activity/occupation, kind of business/industry, place of work and some items on fertility. It also asks additional questions on household characteristics and amenities and residence five years ago.

CPH Form 4 -Institutional Population Questionnaire
This questionnaire records information about persons considered part of the institutional population. It contains questions on residence status, date of birth, age, sex, marital status, religious affiliation, disability, ethnicity and highest educational attainment.

CPH Form 6 -Notice of Listing/Enumeration
This is a sticker you will have to post in a very conspicuous place, preferably in front of the house or gate of the building after listing and interviewing. This sticker indicates that the Building/Housing Unit/Household has already been enumerated.

CPH Form 7 -Common Household Questionnaire SAQ Instructions
This form contains the detailed instructions on how to fill up/answer CPH Form 2. It will accompany CPH Form 2 to be distributed to households who will answer the form themselves, such as those in designated SAQ areas or those where three callbacks or four visits have been made.

CPH Form 8 -Institutional Population Questionnaire SAQ Instructions
This form describes the instructions on how to accomplish CPH Form 4 - Institutional Population Questionnaire. It will accompany CPH Form 4 to be distributed to head of institutions who will accomplish the form.

CPH Form 9 -Appointment Slip
This form will be used to set an appointment with the household head or any responsible member of the household in case you were unable to interview any one during your first visit or second visit. You will indicate in this form the date and time of your next visit.

CPH Form 9 -Blank Barangay Map
This form will be used to enlarge map of each block of an enumeration area/barangay especially if congested areas are being enumerated.

Chapter VII

[Chapters VII and VIII are combined in this section to yield the complete long form instructions]

How to accomplish CPH form 2 -common household questionnaire

This chapter discusses the detailed instructions on how to fill out CPH Form 2, the Common Household Questionnaire. This questionnaire which is a four-page booklet, gathers information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the population as well as the characteristics of the building and housing units. It also gathers information on household characteristics and amenities.

7.1 Contents of CPH form 2

CPH Form 2 is the form that you will use to enumerate all non-sample households.
The cover page of the questionnaire contains the particulars about the title of the questionnaire, the general instructions on how to properly fill up and handle the questionnaire and geographic location of the household that is being interviewed. Certifications by the EN and his supervisor regarding the manner by which the data are collected are likewise to be recorded on the cover page. The cover items are as follows:

a. Title panel:

NSCB Approval Number and the expiration date
Title of the Questionnaire
Confidentiality Clause

b. Guidelines and Geographic Identification
c. Interview Record
d. Certification

The contents of CPH Form 2 are divided into two parts, namely:

1. Population census questions (P1 to P10, P13 to P15, and P22 to P23) - gather data on the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the population.

Population Census Items

a. name of HH members
b. relationship to HH head
c. family nucleus
d. date of birth
e. date of registration
f. age
g. sex
h. overseas worker
i. marital status
j. religious affiliation
k. disability
1. ethnicity
m. highest educational attainment
n. residence 5 years ago

2. Housing census questions (B1 to B5, D1 and H8) - gather data on the characteristics of the buildings and housing units. These also gather data on household characteristics.

Housing census items

a. type of building/house
b. construction material of the roof
c. construction materials of the outer walls
e. state of repair
f. year building/house was built
g. floor area of the housing unit
h. tenure status of the lot

Note: In order to get complete information about all housing units in the country, you should accomplish this form even for vacant housing units and housing units used only as rest houses, vacation houses, etc. Likewise, accomplish it for occupied housing units whose occupants are excluded from enumeration as in the case of the housing units occupied by foreign diplomats. In these instances, however, fill out only the geographic items (province, city/municipality, barangay, enumeration area number and the serial numbers) and the housing items B1 to B5, and D1. Leave the rest of the questionnaire items blank.

[omitted section]

P1 Name and P2 Relationship to HH Head

Data on the relationship to head of household identify the different types of family groups and their structures within a household. They provide an indication of the typical relationship among household members. Knowledge of changing family characteristics is needed for the development of social security and welfare programs.

Write the names of the members of the household in column P1 and the codes corresponding to their relationship to the head of the household in P3. Be guided by the following:

1. Begin asking the respondent: "Who is the head of this household?"
Write the name of this person on the first column for entries.

2. Next, ask the names of the other members of the household by asking,
"Who are the persons usually residing here as of May 1, 2000?"
Inform the respondent that you want to list the members in the following order shown below. This list shows the possible relationship to the household head:

a. Head
b. Spouse of the head
c. Never-married children of head/spouse from oldest to youngest, regardless of sex
d. Never-married children of head/spouse from previous marriage (if any) from oldest to youngest, regardless of sex
e. Ever-married children of head/spouse and their families from oldest to youngest (son or son-in-law first, followed by daughter-in-law/daughter and grandchildren)
f. Parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, parents-in-law and other relatives of the head or the spouse of the head
g. Non-relatives of head
h. Boarders (including relatives who are mere boarders)
i. Domestic helpers (including relatives who are employed as domestic helpers)

If the head has more than one spouse living in the same household, list down the name of the first spouse and their children, followed by the second spouse and their children and so on, keeping the nuclear family together, if possible.

Write down the names of all household members in the order mentioned above.

Also inform the respondent that you need to list all household members who are overseas workers. An overseas worker is a household member who is currently out of the country due to overseas employment. He or she may or may not have a specific work contract or may be presently at home on vacation but has an existing overseas employment to return to. "TNT" workers are included if the household still considers them as members and if they mention their names when you ask about the names of household members. However immigrants are excluded.

Take note that boarders are members of a household if they do not usually go to their respective homes weekly. However, if there are 10 or more such persons in the household, do not include them as members of the household with whom they board. These boarders will all be considered as institutional population and will be enumerated separately from the household.

You may sometimes encounter respondents who will insist that you include as member of the household a person who does not qualify as per our census concepts. To avoid antagonizing your respondent, include the person as the last entry but write the necessary remarks. However, when you leave the household, erase the entries in the column of the said member of the household. Example of persons whom your respondent would likely to be included in their household are students who attend school in Manila or another province or municipality and go home only at least once a month and therefore should be enumerated in the place where he/she Qt is boarding and not in their parents' household.

When you are in doubt as to whether to include a person as member of a household or not, include but enter the necessary remarks/explanation at the back of the questionnaire.

3. In writing the names of the members of the household, enter the surname first on the first line and then the first or given name and middle initial, if given, on the second line. If the surname of a member is the same as the one immediately preceding him/her, just draw a horizontal line in place of his surname and write the first name of the person as illustrated in the following example:

[Example is omitted]

Note that in some parts of the country, people do not have surnames. If you encounter such a case, just write the name as given in the appropriate space.

4. As the respondent gives the name of a household member, immediately ask the member's relationship to the household head. This should be done for all household members.

Write the appropriate code for the Relationship to the HH Head in column P2. The code should be one of the 22 codes listed in the code book.

In the interpretation of relationship, "children" of the head are the sons/daughters of the head, regardless of age or marital status.

A married son, who, together with the members of his family, is a member of his father's household, should be reported as "son" and his wife and children, "daughter-in-law" and "grandson" / "granddaughter" of the household head, respectively.
"Other relatives" includes such relatives as parents-in-law, cousins, grandparents, sisters/brothers-in-law, etc.

Members of the household who are related to the head by blood or affinity but who are boarders, or household/domestic helpers should be considered as such.

5. If there are more than eight (8) members, you will need to use additional booklet of CPH Form 2. To cue you on this, the first question located on the upper right corner of the questionnaire "Are there more than 8 members in this household?" is found. This question is addressed to you and this should not be asked of the respondent. If there are more than 8 members in the household, draw an "x" mark on the circle before YES, and get another booklet for the household; otherwise, draw an "x" mark on the circle before NO.

6. After listing all members of the household in P1, ask the second question "Are there any other persons such as small children or infants that I have not listed?" Draw an "x" mark on the appropriate circle. If the answer is yes, add his name on the list. If two booklets are being used, draw an "x" mark on the appropriate circle on the second booklet only. Verify further by asking "Are there anyone who is usually a member of this household, but is presently away from home on business, on vacation, in school, etc.?" If another name is given, determine if the person is a member according to the rules on household membership. If he is, add his name to the list.

7. If there are empty columns after listing all the household members, affix your initial on the space provided for the surname on P1 for the first to the last empty cell.

[Example is omitted]

P3 Family nucleus

Since the entries on the household membership follow the "Sequence of Listing" of members of the household (P2), the relationship of members of the household to the head should also conform to the same sequence so that the family nucleus (group) within the household may be easily identified.

Determine the number of families in the household strictly in accordance with the following definition.

A family is restricted to refer to a married couple or parents, or parent (either a father or mother) and their never-married children living together in the same household.

The following are the only three possible combinations for the formation of a conjugal family nucleus:

1. a married couple without children;
2. a married couple with one or more never-married children; or
3. one parent (either father or mother) with one or more never-married
children.

You should be aware of the possibility that some households may not have any "family nucleus" such as:

1. orphaned brothers and sisters living together;
2. one-man household;
3. a related group of persons like students, friends, etc., forming one household; and
4. a related group of individuals like cousins, uncle and nephews or nieces, etc., (not on the level of parent and children) forming one household.

On the other hand, couples living together in consensual union without the benefit of a legal marriage should be regarded as those with family nucleus.

Draw an "x" mark on the appropriate circle in P3. For the 1st family, put an "x" on the second circle; for the 2nd family, the third; for the 3rd family, the fourth; and for the 4th family, the fifth.

For persons having no family nucleus, draw an "x" mark on the first circle. A person is said to have no family nucleus if he does not belong to any of the four categories mentioned.
The following are examples of the number of families in a household with the corresponding codes to be reported in P3:

[Example is omitted]

Note: Do not confuse a family from that of a household. A household may consist of one or more families but a family should not have more than one household. If two or more households are living in the same building or housing unit, enumerate separately the members of each household.

P4 Date of birth

The information to be asked for all persons in this column is the specific month and year when the person was born.

Ask the respondent the month and year of birth of each person. Code the month using the two-digit numerals, as shown below, and write the codes in the boxes provided for that purpose.

[Table omitted]

Record the year of birth and enter this in the boxes provided for that purpose.

After exhaustive probing and the respondent still does not know the month and/or year of birth, write 9's in the boxes.

Example: A person born on March 7, 1947 will have the following entry in P4.

P5 Birth registration with Local Civil Registrar (LCR)

Provisions of civil code and other laws in the country are concerned with the legal or civil rights of an individual. Civil rights could be granted only by the government and proof of one's claim to such rights is dependent on official registration, the legal purpose for which civil registration was designed. The birth of a person is one of the vital events for official registration. The recording of the occurrence of birth in the birth register is called birth registration. And the proof of such registration is the birth certificate with an LCR number.

After recording the date of birth of a person, ask the respondent "Was __________'s birth registered with the LCR?" Draw an "x" mark on the appropriate circle. When the birth of a member of the household is unknown to the respondent, verify from the member himself. If after probing the birth registration is still unknown, draw an "x" mark on the circle provided for the answer of don't know.

P6 Age as of last birthday

Age, sex and marital status are essential for inclusion in a census for the purposes of analyzing factors of population changes and preparing population estimates and forecasts. Information on these topics is also needed for actuarial analysis of probability of survival and other related life-table functions.

For purposes of the census, age as of last birthday refers to the interval of time between the date of birth and before May 1, 2000, expressed in completed year. Thus, ages are recorded as whole numbers, counting the whole years completed on or prior to May 1, 2000.

Determine the age of each household member by asking the respondent "What is ______'s age as of his/her last birthday?" Always ask the age of the person even if the date of birth is already given. Do not compute for the person's age from the reported date of birth. Enter the age on the space provided.

Here are some basic guidelines for your reference:

1. If during your visit, a member of the household has just celebrated his last birthday on or after May 1, 2000, then you have to report his/her age in his previous birthday. For example, a person has just celebrated his 24th birthday on May 2, 2000, the age to be reported for this person should be 23 and not 24.

2. Enter the age of every person one-year-old and over in completed years.
However, for persons less than 1 year old, enter 00. Entries on age should consist of two digits. For ages 1 to 9, prefix zero (0). For example, 02, 07, etc.

3. For persons born before 1900 (aged 100 and over), code the age as follows:

[Table is omitted]

4. Note that the examples are expressed in whole years. Do not record ages such as 7 1/2, 5 years and 2 mos., etc. Record the age according to the last birthday prior to May 1, 2000.

5. Check for inconsistencies in the ages of husband, wife and children. The respondent may have given incorrect information for one reason or another. Probe and verify further, as needed. An example is when the mother is only 15 years older than the eldest child.

6. If the exact age is not known, ask for an estimate. It may also help to ask an aged person to recall some well-known local, national or world event in the past by which his age may be associated, or if he is older or younger than some prominent persons. If all possible means have been exhausted and the respondent is unable to give the correct information, enter his best estimate.

7. There must be a report of age in P6 for every household member.
Age as of Last Birthday Conversion Table (see code book) will help you check the reported age of a person against his date of birth. Refer to this table when checking your entries on age for consistency.

P7 Sex

Gender-disaggregated data is of prime importance in demographic and socio-economic studies. Separate data for males and females are important for the analysis of other types of data, and for the evaluation of the completeness and accuracy of the census counts of population.

Determine the sex of each household member by asking the question "Is male or female?"
The sex of each household member can be determined by his/her name or relationship to the head, but in some cases there is a need to ask the respondent whether the person is male or female. Some names such as Charlie, Florence, Neneng, Alex, Chito, Cielito, Christy, Loreto, Trinidad, Dakila, Resurreccion, Rosario, Joey, Regine, Gene (Jean), etc., could be those of male or female persons.

Draw an "x" mark on the circle before MALE, if the member is a male. Otherwise, draw an "x" mark on the circle before FEMALE.

P8 Overseas workers

For persons below 10 years old, draw an "x" mark on the circle before NO without asking the question.

For persons 10 years old and over ask P8: "Is _____ an overseas worker?" If the member is an overseas worker, draw an "x" mark on the circle before YES in P8. Otherwise, draw an "x" mark on the circle before NO.

P9 Marital status

Marital status refers to the personal status of each individual in reference to the marriage laws or customs of the country. It is the same as "civil status", the term usually used in official and private records, documents, transactions, etc., in the country. In Census 2000, the person's marital status shall be as of the date of visit.
For persons below 10 years old, draw an "x" mark on the circle before Single without asking the question. For persons 10 years old and over ask:

"What is ______'s marital status?" Cross out the circle before the appropriate marital status reported by the respondent as defined in the next page.

1. Single
A person who has never been married.

2. Legally Married
A person married in a religious or civil ceremony, either living together with spouse at the time of visit, or temporarily living apart because his spouse is employed elsewhere or is in the Armed Forces, etc.

3. Widowed
A married person whose spouse died and who has not remarried up to the time of visit.

4. Divorced/Separated
A person who is permanently separated from his spouse, legally or through mutual consent. Also for a person whose marriage with another has been annulled or dissolved and can therefore remarry.

5. Common-law/
Live in person cohabiting or living consensually with another as husband and wife without the benefit of a legal marriage.

6. Unknown
Person whose marital status is not known to the respondent, or whose marital status is being concealed by the respondent.

A Word of Caution: Some respondents may find this question too personal or a sensitive issue. Avoid antagonizing the respondent. Do not refute the reported marital status of any person. Disregard any knowledge you may have about the person and record only whatever is reported by the respondent.

P10 Religious Affiliation

Religious affiliation refers to a particular system of beliefs, attitudes, emotions and behaviors constituting man's relationship with the powers and principalities of the universe. Data on this are required for the planning of religion-related and religion-sponsored activities. They may also be used for an examination of ethnic characteristics of the population.

Enter the code for the religious affiliation of each person as reported by the respondent. Use the Code Book as reference.

If the reported religious affiliation is not among the pre-coded answers provided in the questionnaire, write code 99.

An infant who is not yet baptized must carry the religious affiliation of his mother.

Take note that the "Protestant" religion has different denominations, and so with "other" religions. In case you are in doubt on how to classify a certain religious sect, write the specific religion on the space provided.

There are Roman Catholics, Protestants, etc. who joined some charismatic movements or fellowships and now claim themselves as "born again" Christians or charismatics. In this case, verify where they are attending religious services.

Indigenous peoples (IP) who practice the traditional religion or belief system may not belong to any church, unless they have been converted to one. If the member of the household, who is an IP, is baptized in any of the formal religions, the mentioned formal religious affiliation will be coded. However, if the IP respondent mentioned that the member of the household has faith in Kabunian, Apo na Mallari, Magbabaya, and so on, which refer to supreme deities in their language, the religious affiliation shall be coded as 92 for Traditional Religion. Tribal Religion is characterized by the observance of indigenous rituals venerating the dead ancestors and invoking divine intercession for good things in life.

Before proceeding with the last five items on CPH Form 2, look at the following example on how to complete P1 to P10.

Filling-Up Questions P1 to P10 of CPH Form 2: An Example

Illustration 7.1 shows the household of Ismael Santiago aged 49 who lives with wife, Rodora who is 47 yrs. old, daughters Marissa, 22 yrs. old, and Karmela, 30 yrs. old and her husband Jose Reyes who is 31 yrs. old. Karmela and Jose have two children, Carlito, who is 7 yrs. old, and Ana, who is only 1 year old. Their religion is Roman Catholic. Another member of this household is a helper Alma Cruz, an Iglesia ni Kristo, who is 25 yrs. old and single. All the members of the household have been registered with the LCR.
The household members were born on the following dates:

[Example omitted]

P11 and P12 Citizenship

Citizenship is defined as the legal nationality of a person. A citizen is a legal national of the country at the time of census, while an alien is a non-national of the country. The collection of data on citizenship permits the classification of the population into (a) citizens and (b) aliens.
Data on citizenship are valuable in the study of problems relating to the legal status and civil rights of immigrants.

A person's citizenship depends on the country to which he owes legal allegiance or where he exercises the right of suffrage.

Ask the question in P11: "Is ________ a citizen of the Philippines" for all persons. This question determines who among the members of the household are citizens of the Philippines and who are not. If the household member is a citizen of the Philippines, cross out circle for the category Yes and skip to P13. However, if the household member is not a citizen of the Philippines, mark the circle before NO in P11 and ask the question in P12: "What country is _______ a citizen of".

Enter the appropriate code for the country of citizenship of household members who are not Filipinos. The codes are listed in the Code Book.

For persons with dual citizenship, both aliens, inquire which one should be reported and enter the code for the preferred country of citizenship. However, for those with dual citizenship, Filipino and an alien citizenship, cross out the circle for Yes in P11.

For persons whose citizenship is other than those provided with codes at the bottom of the questionnaire, write on the space provided the name of the country to where they owe legal allegiance to.

If the person being interviewed hesitates to answer this question, remind him that the information will be held strictly confidential and no reference to individual persons will be made.

P13 and P14 Disability

Disability refers to any restriction or lack of ability (resulting from an impairment) to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being. Impairments associated with disabilities may be physical, mental, or sensory motor impairment such as partial or total blindness and deafness, muteness, speech defect, orthopedic handicaps, and mental retardation. Data on disability will enable planners to prepare plans for rehabilitation, education development and preventive programs.

To identify household members who may have disabilities. A "screening" question is asked in column P13. For each household member, ask the respondent "Does _____ have any physical or mental disability?" If the answer is Yes, draw an "x" mark on the circle before YES in

P13 and ask the question in P14: "What type of disability does ____have?" If the answer in P13 is NO, draw an "x" mark on the circle before NO in P13 and skip to P15.

The specific types of disabilities and their respective codes are listed in the Code Book. Be sure to use this Code Book as your guide in probing for information and for coding the responses in column P14. If the answer of the respondent is other than the types of disability listed, write in the space provided the answer of the respondent. The descriptions of the disabilities are given below:

Code 01
No useful sight in any of the two eyes. (Cannot distinguish objects in front of him). Persons may have some light perception (e.g., can realize that it is midday or midnight), but do not have usable sight. They need Braille materials for reading.
Short name: Tot-Blind

Code 02
With better eyesight than totally blind: can distinguish objects in front of him. However, even with eyeglasses cannot distinguish large letters. Practically, this person can walk without hitting his head against the wall, but cannot read anything. Included here as persons with severely limiting vision situations: central only or the sides only or only like a pie of a cake. Persons who can see some objects so that they can walk better and do some activities, but they cannot read printed text even with eyeglasses. They need Braille materials for reading.
Short name: Part-Blind

Code 03
With the better eye, even with eyeglasses, cannot distinguish regular size letters. Practically, can only read the bigger headlines in the newspapers. Included here are persons with limiting vision situations: central only or the sides only or only like a pie of a cake. Persons who, even with appropriate eyeglasses, need large print text (i.e., at least 18 points font) to read at a distance of one foot (30 cm.)
Short name: Low vision

Code 04
Cannot realize any regular sound. Practically the person does not react when somebody claps his hands behind his back. Person may still hear the blowing of a horn of a truck, or the beat of a drum, cannot understand words even with a hearing aid. Mute: There are almost no mute people. The normal case is the so-called "deaf-mute" which is for people who, because of deafness, did not learn to talk but they have all what is physically necessary to talk. Treat them as deaf.
Short name: Tot-Deaf

Code 05
Can hear speech but cannot discriminate the words. [Refers to a person whose both ears can recognize sounds but cannot determine the words (partially deaf).]
Short name: Part- Deaf

Code 06
Person can understand words only if spoken very loud or close to the ear and (normally) has severe difficulties if there are other noises (e.g.,) of other people speaking in the room. Person can be helped with a hearing aid but still has difficulties understanding normal speech.
Short name: Hard-Hear

Code 07
Person at least 15 years old, is object of ridicule or has severely limited job opportunities because of either: - a general stammering problem which makes normal speech extremely difficult - or a cleft-palate or hare-lip that cannot be solved by current medical procedures.
Short name: Oral defect

Code 08
Person has only one useful hand. One arm is not usable (e.g., amputated, deformed or paralyzed arm). Included here are two artificial arms if they are rather useful (i.e., both arms are missing but are replaced with artificial arm).
Short name: One hand

Code 09
Person has no useful hands. Both arms are not usable (e.g., amputated, deformed and missing).
Short name: No hands

Code 10
Person has only one useful leg: walks with crutches and/or artificial leg and/or braces. Note (1) Walking with an artificial leg can be considered if it really prevents the person from holding most jobs. (2) If the person has two legs amputated but in such a way that artificial legs can be used, the person can still go to most places, including going up the stairs. It may be slower, but it is surely very different from a person in a wheelchair who cannot even climb a single step without help.
Short name: One leg

Code 11
Person has no useful legs or two legs unusable (e.g., normally sits in a wheelchair.)
Short name: No legs

Code 12
Regular/Mild cerebral palsy: person can still walk and do most activities or might only be slightly awkward and require no special assistance.
Short name: Cr-Quadrip

The term cerebral refers to the brain's two halves, or hemispheres, and palsy describes any disorder that impairs control of body movement. Thus, these disorders are not caused by problems in the muscles or nerves. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupts the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture. An individual with cerebral palsy may have difficulty with fine motor tasks, such as writing or cutting with scissors; experience trouble with maintaining balance and walking; or be affected by involuntary movements, such as uncontrollable writhing motion of the hands or drooling.

Code13
Severe cerebral palsy: person is severely affected by the cerebral palsy or might be unable to walk and need extensive, lifelong care.
Short name: Cs-Quadrip

Code14
Regularly intellectually impaired: can be trained to be toilet trained, to wash himself, eat on his own and follow single instructions. Included here are those with Down Syndrome (Mongoloids) and most autistic (persons with autism). Note, not included are slow learners and persons who can travel alone.
Short name: Ir-Retarded

Code15
Severely intellectually impaired: cannot be toilet trained, eat alone, severe autism, etc.
Short name: Is-Retarded

Code16
Regularly impaired by mental illness: actually under psychiatric care or should be under psychiatric care (but do not have the money) as well as patients who recovered within the last three years (to consider the problem that so many becomes sick again). Included here are most persons with epilepsy even if the origin of their problem is very different, people treat them a bit the same as the mentally ill, they have more difficulties obtaining jobs, etc.
Short name: Pr-Mentally ill

Code17
Severely impaired by mental illness: persons needing hospitalization or having been hospitalized within the last three years (as mentioned above, to consider the fact that so many become sick again).
Short name: Ps-Mentally ill

Code18
Regularly multiple impaired. Multiple impairment is always a severe disability, yet among those with multiple impairment, one can be much lighter than the others whom we call severely multiple handicapped. Examples, are one arm and one leg unusable, mentally retarded and some physical defect.
Short name: Mr-Impairment

Code19
Severely multiple impaired. Examples are both legs and both arms paralyzed (quadriplegic); deaf and blind, and severely cerebral palsied and blind.
Short name: Ms-Impairment

P15 Ethnicity

Ethnicity is a primary sense of belonging to an ethnolinguistic group; it is consanguineal in nature, meaning, the ties are reckoned by blood and traced through the family tree. Thus, the item refers to the members of the household's identity of self-ascription, as one belonging to a group, by blood.

Ethno-linguistic grouping denotes genealogical and paternal lineage to any of the Philippine group of native population. This group has continuously lived as organized community on communally bounded and defined territory, and who have, under claims of ownership since time immemorial, occupied, possessed and utilized such territories, sharing common bonds of language, customs, traditions and other distinctive cultural traits (and) shall likewise include peoples who are regarded as indigenous on account of their descent ". This also includes those who have been displaced or from their traditional domains or who may have resettled outside their domains.

Cases of mixed ancestry, that is, parents belonging to different ethnic groups may occur. The family being bilateral just like any Filipino family, respondents have a choice whether or not to indicate the paternal or maternal branch as the reference point of their ethnic classification. The children of mixed marriages may follow the ethnic affiliation of a parent with whom he/she has more association. However, for children who do not talk vet at the time of census, their ethnicity would be that of the mother.

Ask the respondent the question in P15: "How does ________'s classify himself/herself?
Is he/she an Ibaloi, Kankanaey, Mangyan, Manobo, Chinese, llocano or what?" for all members of the household. The ethnicity and their corresponding codes for this item are listed in the Code Book. If it is not among the pre-coded answers, write the ethnicity on the space provided but not touching the code boxes.

Note: Items P22 and P23 are to be accomplished only for household members who are at least five years old. If a household member is younger than five years of age, leave columns P22 and P23 blank.

P16 Literacy

Data on literacy provide an important indication of the capability of the nation for economic, social and cultural development. Such data serve as guide to planners concerned with the policies for the development of the educational system.

Simple literacy is the ability to read and write a simple message. A person is literate when he can both read and write a simple message in any language or dialect. A person who cannot both read and write a simple message, like "Census 2000 count me in" is illiterate. Also consider a person illiterate if he is capable of reading and writing only his own name or numbers, as well as a person who can read but not write, or vice versa.

A person who knows how to read and write but at the time of the census he/she can no longer read and/or write due to some physical defects or illness is considered literate. Example of this is an aged person who knows how to read and write but can no longer perform these activities due to poor eyesight.

Disabled persons who can read and write through any means such as Braille are considered literate.

Ask the question in P16: "Can ______ read and write a simple message in any language or dialect?" Enter "x" mark in the circle before YES, for those persons who are literate, or cross out the circle for NO, for those persons who are illiterate.

P17 and P18 Language

Knowledge on the ability of the population to speak a language or dialect is important in a country like the Philippines since more than one dialect/language are used as teaching media in schools. Moreover, such data serve as input to studies on communication and education of linguistic minorities.

P17 Able to speak Filipino

Filipino is the national language of the Philippines. It is principally based on Tagalog, and is taught in schools and colleges throughout the country. On the other hand, Tagalog is the language generally spoken in Tagalog provinces such as Batangas, Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, Quezon, Rizal and Manila.

Ask the question in P17: "Is _________ able to speak Filipino/Tagalog?" for all persons 5 years old and over. Cross out circle for Yes if the members of the household can speak Filipino/Tagalog, else cross out circle for No. A person is said to be able to speak Filipino if he understands the language and can communicate in Tagalog even with a very limited vocabulary. A person who understands Filipino/Tagalog but cannot communicate in Filipino/Tagalog at all is considered not able to speak Filipino/Tagalog.

Persons having difficulty in speaking due to physical defects or illness but can communicate in Filipino/Tagalog through sign language; Braille, etc. are considered able to speak the said language.

P18 Able to speak English

Ask the question in P18: "Is ________ able to speak English?" for all persons 5 years old and over. Place "x" mark in the circle appropriated for category Yes or No. A person is said to be able to speak English if he understands the language and can communicate in English even with a very limited vocabulary. A person who understands English but cannot communicate in English at all is considered not able to speak English language.

P19 School attendance

Data on school attendance provide a description of the school-age population actually in school. The proportion of the school-age population, which is able to take advantage of the educational system, is necessary in the assessment of the adequacy of the educational system of the country.
Ask the respondent the question in P19: "Did _______ attend school at any time from June 1999 to March 2000?" for all persons 5 years old and over. If the answer is Yes, cross out the circle for this category; otherwise, place an "x" in the circle for No.

School attendance means attendance at any educational institution, public or private, for formal academic education at the elementary, high school, college or university level at any time during the school year June 1999 to March 2000.

Attendance in these schools leads to a higher grade and ultimately, to an academic title/degree. It includes attendance in night classes.

Include school attendance that is leading to a high school diploma in vocational high schools such as schools of arts and trades or technical high schools, and rural or agricultural high schools. Also include attendance in post secondary vocational/technical schools which are within the regular system of education such as universities and colleges.

Examples:

a. Eulogio "Amang" Rodriguez Institute of Science and Technology (EARIST)
b. San Carlos Rural High School

Exclude, however, attendance in vocational schools outside the regular system of education, in such short courses as dressmaking, beauty culture, hair science, auto mechanic, motor vehicle driving, typing, stenography, bookkeeping, etc. Also exclude day care centers which teach children the alphabet just to pass away their time.

Examples:

a. A-l Driving School
b. CWL Vocational Center
c. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star Day Care Center

Also exclude training received by mail from correspondence schools like ICS (International Correspondence School). However, if the correspondence courses are given by a regular school such as a university, and they are considered toward promotion in the regular school system, such schooling should be included. Also exclude school attendance in review classes for bar or board or other examination for the practice of a profession or trade.

If a person was enrolled at the beginning of the school year or on the second semester but subsequently dropped out from school, draw an "x" mark on the circle corresponding the answer YES.

If an answer of Yes is given for a person who is old enough to have graduated from college (25 years old and over), verify the answer, especially in barangays far from colleges and universities, before drawing an "x" mark on the circle corresponding the answer YES.

Filling Up Questions P11 to P19 of CPH Form 3: An Example
Illustration 8.1 shows how to fill-up P11 to P19 of CPH Form 3 based on the information from the household of Ismael Santiago. Among the household members, only Carlito attended school from June 1999 to March 2000. Alma can read and write only in Filipino/Tagalog.

P20 Place of school

The purpose of this question is to determine the number of students who study in places outside the city or municipality where they are usually residing. Such data are vital in transport planning i.e., in the analysis of trip patterns, forecasting public transportation patronage and projecting fuel usage and the number of non-resident students in the receiving municipality/city.
For every person 5 years old and over and whose answer in P19 is YES, ask the question "In what city/municipality did _______ attend school?"

For a person whose place of school is the same as his present residence, that is the school is located within the city/municipality where he resides, enter code 0008 in the code box. However, if the place of school is in another city/municipality, specify on the space provided the province and city/municipality where he attends school. Codes of province and municipal names are included in the Code Book. Enter code 0007 for those whose place of school is in a foreign country.

Complete names of provinces should be written when provinces like llocos, Negros, Davao and Bicol were provided. Ask the respondents whether, they mean llocos Norte or llocos Sur, Negros Oriental or Occidental, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte or Davao Oriental and what particular province in the Bicol Region.

P21 Type of school

For all persons 5 years old and over, whose answer in P19 is Yes and there is an entry in P20, ask the respondent the question in P21: "What type of school?". Cross out the circle corresponding to the selected category. If the answer is for "Government/Public" or "Private", proceed to ask the question in P21, otherwise, skip to P23.

Public schools are those schools entirely subsidized by the national government as mandated by the Constitution. Free government elementary and secondary schools have been established in many barangays throughout the country. Preschool education, however, are mostly offered by private sector. Public colleges and universities are classified into three categories, as follows:

1. Chartered state universities and colleges are institutions that enjoy autonomy under a self-governing board of regents chaired by the Secretary of the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS) or by his or her designated representative.

2. Non-chartered state colleges are higher educational institutions offering higher education courses. Many of them evolved from technical schools such as schools of arts and trades (SATs), agriculture, and others.

3. Community colleges are mostly outgrowths of barangay high schools located in rural areas and offer degree programs including graduate programs.

Private schools are those schools subsidized by a private person or a group of persons. Some of the secondary and post secondary schools are private stock (non-sectarian) or non-corporations. Private colleges and universities are governed by corporation laws. Such institutions have their respective board of directors or trustees and are either stock or non-stock corporations. Institutions with religious affiliations are classified as sectarian schools and are non-stock organizations.

Madrasah and others refer to schools that provide alternative learning system. This alternative learning system is classified as non-formal and informal educational systems. However, such entities are not accredited by the Department of Education, Culture and Sports. Learning systems like schools of living traditions which are organized by indigenous communities and supported by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts are categorized as "others".

P22 Highest educational attainment

Data on highest educational attainment furnish material for a comparison of the present educational equipment of the adult population with the present and anticipated future requirements of manpower for various types of economic activities.

Highest educational attainment refers to the highest grade or year completed in school, college or university as of May 1, 2000. This may be any one of the specific grades or years in elementary, high school, post secondary school, college and post-baccalaureate levels of schooling. It also includes pre-school education.

Ask the question in P22: "What is the highest grade/year completed by ___?" for all persons 5 years old and over. Enter in P22 the two-digit code corresponding to the highest educational attainment, which are listed in the Code Book.

If the answer given by the respondent is in terms of the level of schooling only (e.g., elementary, high school, college) and not the specific grade or year completed, determine the specific grade or year by asking the respondent additional questions. The answer "Elementary" or "High School" is insufficient.

Examples:

1. Enter 11 if the person has only completed Grade 1, 13 for Grade 3 or 22 for 2nd Year High School.
2. If the person has not completed any grade at all, enter 00.
3. The code for pre-school is 01.
4. A student who is enrolled in 2nd year high school at the time of the census has completed 1st year and should therefore be reported as 1st year high school - 21.

Report also in P22 the post secondary course that a person has completed. Post secondary course refers to the stage of formal education following the secondary education level covering non-degree programs that have varying duration lasting up to three years, concerned primarily with developing strong and appropriately trained middle level manpower.

Post Secondary 1 year is the highest grade completed by a person who has taken a post secondary course for at least a year but has not yet completed the course at the time of Census 2000. Consider, for example, a person who at the time of the census is a 2nd year student of a 2-year course in Automotive Technology. Since he has finished his 1st year in Automotive Technology, he is considered under this category and the correct code is 31.
Post Secondary 2 years is the highest grade completed by a person who has taken at least two year but has not yet completed the course at the time of Census 2000. The appropriate code for this is 32.

In order to determine whether the vocational/technical course reported by the respondent is under post secondary education (formal education) the following probing questions should be asked:

1. Is the course offered/taken in school, college/university or NMYC? If in
NMYC, the course is non-formal and therefore, will not be considered as post secondary education.

If in school, college/university the following question should be asked:

2. Is completion of high school course a requirement for admission? If yes, the course is considered formal, hence, post secondary.

If the person has successfully completed his post secondary education, enter the code of the course/certificate completed in the code boxes and specify its title and corresponding duration on the space provided. The codes (50 - 58) are provided in the Code Book.

Examples:

2-Yr. Associate in Art, code 50
2-Yr. Certificate in Physical Education, code 51
6-Mo. Basic Computer System, code 54
6-Mo. Auto Diesel Technology, code 56

Take note of the following cases:

1. If a person finished a post secondary course and is currently a 1st year college student, his post secondary course should be reported.

2. If a person is currently enrolled in a (6-month or 1-year) post secondary course but has not finished the course, he should be reported as a high school graduate.

3. If a person is currently in 1st year college or post secondary, do not assume that he is only a high school graduate. Verify if he has taken/completed other courses (degree or non-degree courses).

If the person is a college undergraduate, i.e., he has not earned a degree; enter the code for the year of his completed education as 41 for 1st year college, 44 for 4th year college, etc.

Note that code 46 stands for 6th or higher year in college. If he has graduated from college but has never been enrolled in any post-baccalaureate course, the appropriate code may either be 60 to 68, depending on the college course finished. Different categories are listed in the Code Book.

Usually, it is difficult to differentiate certificate and diploma courses that are under post secondary education from post-graduate courses. In order to determine whether the course reported by the respondent is a post secondary or post-graduate course, the following question should be asked:

Is a baccalaureate or a college degree a requirement for admission to certificate or diploma course? If yes, the course is considered under postgraduate course. Otherwise, it is classified as post secondary course.

Examples:

Certificate in Development Economics - post graduate course
Diploma in Population Communication - post graduate course
Diploma in Junior Secretarial - post secondary
Certificate in Agri-Business - post secondary

The acquisition of a college degree implies the successful completion of a course study. Information on degree received should be collected only for persons who have completed a course study at the third level of education. Such information should include the title of the highest degree received, and an indication of the field of study if the title does not make it clear.
For a college graduate, enter the corresponding code of the specific Bachelor's or higher degree obtained. The codes (60 - 68) are provided in the Code Book.

Examples:

B.S. Commerce, code 63
B.S. Chemical Engineering, code 65
B.S. Math, code 64

For those who have pursued and completed two or more degrees of the same level and duration, report only one degree or whichever degree the person preferred to be reported.

Post-baccalaureate refers to any course for which an under graduate degree is required. Masters and doctoral degree students and graduates fall under this category. In addition, law or medical students who have earned a degree, e.g., BS Political Science, BS Zoology, BS Med. Tech., etc. but are still in law or medical school should also be considered under this category. The appropriate code for this educational level is 71. The same rule applies to graduate students who are still working for their master's degree, taking doctorate studies and for a person who have completed masters or doctoral degree. For both cases enter 71.

If an unusually high "highest educational attainment" is reported in relation to the age of the person, verify the report from the respondent. For example: 3rd year high school for a boy who is 13 years old or college graduate for a person who is 17 years old.

P23 Residence 5 years ago

The question on residence 5 years ago pertains to the place where a person was residing 5 years ago. Data on these are vital for projects concerning housing and industrial development.

Estimates of migration are needed for preparing population projections necessary for planning and policy purposes. Distribution of internal migration at certain geographic level will be better judged as to its implications to social changes given a detailed analysis of the volume and trend of internal migration.

Ask the question in P23: "In what city/municipality did ______ reside on May 1, 1995?" Enter code 0008 in P23 if the person's residence 5 years ago is the same as his present residence.
However, if his residence 5 years ago was in another city/municipality, write the name of the city/municipality and province on the space provided.

For those whose residence 5 years ago is in a foreign country, enter code 0007 in the code box.
If the respondent does not know the residence of the members of the household 5 years ago, ask the person himself about his residence 5 years ago. However, if the person cannot recall the name of the city/municipality and province where he lived 5 years ago after exhaustive probing, enter code 0009 for unknown in the code box.

Complete names of provinces should be written when provinces like llocos, Negros, Davao and Bicol were provided. Ask the respondent whether, he/she means llocos Norte or llocos Sur, Negros Oriental or Occidental, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte or Davao Oriental and what particular province in the Bicol Region.

In cases where the respondent knows only the province but not the municipality, enter the correct code of the province in the first two code boxes and code 99 for the last two boxes.
Filling Up Questions P13 to P15, P22 and P23

Example:

To complete the example given earlier about the Santiago household, look at the following information and the corresponding items in CPH Form 2 as shown in Illustration 7.2.
Ismael is an architecture graduate, while his wife, Rodora is a nursing graduate. Karmela is a secretarial graduate while her husband Jose, who is a contract worker in Saudi Arabia, is an electronics engineering graduate. Their son, Carlito is only in Grade 1. Marissa, on the other hand, quit schooling after she lost her hearing in a car accident. She was then in the middle of her 3rd year in college. Their helper Alma Cruz has not completed any grade at all but can read and write.

P24 Residence 10 years ago

The question on residence 10 years ago pertains to the place where a person was residing 10 years ago. Data on this are collected to fill the missing information on migration between 1990 and 1995.

Ask the question in P24: "In what city/municipality did ______ reside on May 1, 1990?". Enter code 0008 in P24 if the person's residence 10 years ago is the same as his present residence. However, if his residence 10 years ago was in another city/municipality, write the name of the city/municipality and province on the space provided.

For those whose residence 10 years ago was in a foreign country, enter code 0007 in the code box.

If the respondent does not know the residence of the members of the household 10 years ago, ask the person himself about his residence 10 years ago. However, if the person cannot recall the name of the city/municipality and province where he lived 10 years ago after exhaustive probing, enter code 0009 for unknown in the code box.

Complete names of provinces should be written when provinces like llocos, Negros, Davao and Bicol were provided. Ask the respondents whether, they mean llocos Norte or llocos Sur, Negros Oriental or Occidental, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte or Davao Oriental and what particular province in the Bicol Region.

In cases where the respondent knows only the province where the member resided ten years ago, enter appropriate code of the province in the first two code boxes and code 99 for the last two boxes.

Filling Up Questions P20 to P24 of CPH Form 3: An Example

The illustration below shows the same household of Ismael Santiago.
Among the household members, only Carlito attended school from June 1999 to March 2000. He attended a private school in their city.

P25 Usual activity/occupation

Data on occupation are essential for analyzing the growth, composition and distribution of the work force. They provide information on socio-economic status of the population which is essential in planning the necessary training programs aimed at full and effective utilization of the country's human resources.

Ask the question in P25: "What was ______'s usual activity/occupation during the past twelve months?" for all persons 10 years old and over. Write in the space provided the type of activity/occupation of the person. This will be coded later using the Code Book.

Through this question we can determine whether a person is a gainful worker or is a non-gainful worker.

The term usual activity/occupation refers to the kind of job or business which a person was engaged in most of the time during the last twelve months preceding the interview. In other words, usual activity/occupation is the person's principal means of earning a living like a palay farmer, carpenter, retail merchant, elementary school teacher, telephone operator, etc. during the past twelve months.

For persons who did not work during the past 12 months, their usual activity/occupation relates to the non-gainful activities they usually do most of the year or to their status. They will be reported in either of the following:

1. Housekeeper, own home
2. Student
3. Pensioner (quite old to work and receiving monthly pension or annuity. Report under "Disabled" if disabled but still young).
4. Retired (quite old to work and not receiving monthly pension or annuity, including those retired from the government service or private employment who can still work but do not care to work anymore).
5. Disabled (suffering from permanent illness or permanent disability)
6. Dependent (other than above), etc.

For purposes of this census, a person is considered as gainful worker or usually working most of the time during the past 12 months if he works for at least 10 hours a week for 6 months (26 weeks) or longer, including vacation or sick leave, in one or more of these classes of work:

1. work for pay (wage, salary, commission, tips, etc.);
2. work for profit in own farm, business, private practice of a profession or trade, and;
3. work without pay on own family farm or business.

For persons whose activities varied during the preceding 12 months, report as his usual activity/occupation that which he was engaged in for more than six months. However, if none of these activities lasted for more than six months, report the one which had the longest duration.
For persons working at two permanent jobs, the job at which they work longer hours should be reported. If they spend the same number of hours on both jobs, report the job from which they earn greater income.

Take note of the following cases:

1. If a person worked most of the time during the past 12 months but actually devoted more time to studying or housekeeping most of the year, report the gainful occupation he did and not student or housekeeper.

2. If for several years a person had been a school teacher but on May 1,
2000 has already quit his teaching job and is operating a palay farm, his usual occupation is still an elementary school teacher.

3. During the census, a person may be working in a job other than his usual occupation. For instance, an elementary school teacher works during the long school vacation as a merchant or a palay farmer or fisherman works temporarily as a carpenter. In these cases, the report should be "Elementary school teacher", "palay farmer", or "fisherman", respectively, and not the temporary jobs they are presently doing.

Always describe the specific job or occupation performed by the person in the establishment, office, farm, etc., such as radio technician, records clerk, typist, stenographer, lawyer, farm manager, elementary school teacher, bill collector, carpenter, hospital attendant, etc.
Answers such as agent, engineer, mechanic, employee, etc., do not describe adequately the work performed. Ask the respondent additional questions like "Does this person work for a life insurance company, advertising agency, etc.?" or "What kind of engineer/mechanic is he?"
If the respondent gives a long description of the actual duties of work of the person, report the occupation that fits the description.

Avoid such ambiguous descriptions as owner, partner, businessman, etc. They do not adequately describe the occupation of the person. They simply indicate the proprietary relationship of the person to the business and some owners do not do any work in connection with their business.

If a person is the owner of an enterprise and he manages it or participates in its management, report "Manager" as his occupation. However, in such enterprises emerge in wholesale or retail trade, hotel, dormitory, restaurant, cafeteria or other lodging or eating place, said owner managing or participating in the management of the enterprise should be reported as "wholesale merchant", "retailer", or "working proprietor ". Note however, that a partner in a business who is paid by the partnership to manage the business should be reported as "manager" and not "working proprietor".

Jobs/Occupations which need special care in reporting

Below are examples of jobs or occupations which need special care in reporting:

Unacceptable entry: Agent
Acceptable entry: Insurance agent, real estate agent, etc. Note that a PNP agent should be reported as "enlisted man", "PNP lieutenant", etc. Report as "police detective" or "private detective".

Unacceptable entry: Apprentice
Acceptable entry: An entry should include both occupation and the word "apprentice". The correct entry should be apprentice plumber, apprentice printer, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Assemblers
Acceptable entry: Specify type of machinery or products being assembled, e.g., mechanical machinery assembler, electrical machinery assembler, wood and related materials product assembler, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Attendant
Acceptable entry: Bar attendant, hospital attendant, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Businessman
Acceptable entry: Wholesale merchant, retailer, manager, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Clerk
Acceptable entry: Accounting clerk, filing clerk, records clerk, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Collector
Acceptable entry: Bill collector, garbage collector, market collector, toll collector, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Contractor
Acceptable entry: A contractor is engaged principally in obtaining building and/or other contracts and supervising the work. He should be reported as "building contractor", "road contractor", etc.

Unacceptable entry: Craftsmen or Skilled Worker
Acceptable entry: Specify type of skill such as miner, quarry worker, bricklayer carpenter, roofer, plumber, pipe fitter, spray painter, metal molder, sheet metal worker, blacksmith, toolmaker, metal worker, metal grinder, metal polisher, motor vehicle mechanic and fitter, radio and TV services, telephone installer, electrical line installer, glass engraver, printing engraver, basket weaver, wood treater, cabinet maker, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Driver
Acceptable entry: Tricycle driver, taxi driver, jeepney driver, heavy equipment driver, calesa driver, light van driver, bus driver, tram driver, heavy truck driver, heavy van driver, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Employee
Acceptable entry: Specify whether the employee is a statistician, receptionist, typist, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Engineer
Acceptable entry: Civil engineer, mining engineer, marine engineer, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Factory Worker
Acceptable entry: Weaver, knitter, sewer, tinsmith, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Farmer
Acceptable entry: Rice farmer, corn farmer, sugarcane farmer, coconut farmer, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Farm Worker
Acceptable entry: Skilled rice farm worker, skilled corn farm worker, etc.; farmhand, farm laborer, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Fireman
Acceptable entry: Locomotive fireman, city fireman (for city fire department), fire fighter (as in airfields), etc.

Unacceptable entry: Fisherman
Acceptable entry: Fisherman in deep-sea, fishpen, fishpond, coastal, inland, etc.; fishpond operator, prawn grower, prawn farm machinery operator, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Foreman
Acceptable entry: Foreman-carpenter, foreman-electrician, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Government official
Acceptable entry: Specify position such as mayor, congressman, senator, cabinet secretary, asst. cabinet secretary, commissioner, and justice. Councilor, barangay chairman, barangay councilman, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Helper
Acceptable entry: Store helper, bakery helper, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Inspector
Acceptable entry: Meat inspector, market inspector, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Manager
Acceptable entry: Board Director, specialized company manager such as: production and operations manager, finance and administration manager, personnel and industrial relations manager, sales and marketing manager, advertising and public relations manager, supply and distribution manager, computing services manager, research and development manager, small firm manager, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Mechanic
Acceptable entry: Auto mechanic, airplane mechanic, radio mechanic, etc. Do not confuse mechanic with machinist who is a skilled craftsman and who constructs and repairs all kinds of metal parts, tools, and machines through the use of blueprints, machine and hand tools, and precision measuring instruments.

Unacceptable entry: Midwife
Acceptable entry: Differentiate the "licensed midwife" from the "practical midwife", "hilof, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Nurse
Acceptable entry: Registered nurse, practical nurse, nurse's aide, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Operator
Acceptable entry: Bulldozer operator, elevator operator, telephone operator, mining plant operator, mineral ore and stone treating plant operator, well driller and borer, ore smelting operator, metal melter, caster and rolling-mill operator, metal heat-treating plant operator, metal drawer and extruder, glass and ceramics kiln operator, papermaking plant operator, chemical processing plant operator, power-generating plant operator, steam turbine operator, automated assembly-line operator, machine tool operator, chemical products machine operator, rubber and plastic products machine operator, wood, products machine operator, printing machine operator, binding machine operator, paper and paperboard products machine operator, spinning and winding machine operator, weaving and knitting machine operator, sewing and embroidering machine operator, textile bleaching, dyeing and cleaning machine operator, meat and fish processing machine operator, dairy products machine operator, grain and spice milling machine operator, fruit, vegetable and nut processing machine operator, sugar processing and refining machine operator, tea, coffee, cocoa and chocolate preparing and producing machine operator, tobacco products processing machine operator, brewer and wine and other beverage machine operator, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Police
Acceptable entry: Police officer, detective, patrolman, traffic police, etc. Note that in municipalities with a small police force an entry of policeman may be satisfactory.

Unacceptable entry: Secretary
Acceptable entry: The title "secretary" should be used for persons doing secretarial work in an office. The secretary who is an elected or appointed officer of a corporation, firm or other organization, should be reported as "executive secretary".

Unacceptable entry: Supervisor
Acceptable entry: Principal, superintendent, sales supervisor, teacher-supervisor, transport supervisor, housekeeping supervisor, farm overseer, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Teacher
Acceptable entry: Elementary school teacher, high school teacher, professor, instructor, substitute teacher or teaching assistant (elementary, high school or college), private tutor, university instructor, vocational-technical skill instructor, specialized trainer such as sales trainer, management trainer, instructor-trainer, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Technician
Acceptable entry: Civil engineering technician, quantity surveyor, surveyor's technician, mining technician, electrical engineering technician, electronics engineering technician, telecommunications technician, mechanical engineering technician, aeronautical engineering technician, automotive engineering technician, chemical engineering technician, metallurgical technician, mining engineering technicians; production engineering technician, draftsman, etc. Note that an engineering graduate or a licensed engineer is an engineer by qualification but may be hired as a technician and performing technician jobs. Report him as a technician, specifying his field.

Unacceptable entry: Unskilled Laborer
Acceptable entry: Whenever possible, specify the unskilled laborer as "street sweeper", "janitor", "stevedore", etc.

P26 Kind of business or industry

Industry refers to the nature or character of the business or enterprise or the place wherein the person works. Data on this provide information on the level and trend of industrialization and on important aspects of the country's potential for economic development.

For persons 10 years old and over with report of gainful usual activity/occupation in P25, ask the question in P26: "In what kind of business or industry did work during the past twelve months?" However, for persons 10 years old and over who are non-gainful workers (housewife, students, retiree, disabled, etc.) and for those below 10 years old, leave P26 blank.

The entries in this column and in P25 should be consistent with each other. The business or industry should describe specifically and adequately the character and nature of business or industry or the place where the work is being performed in connection with the job or occupation, such as palay farm, sari-sari store, gold mine, leather shoe factory, rice mill, etc. Do not be satisfied with answers like firm names such as Soriano and Co., LM Enterprise, etc., since they do not necessarily describe the business or activity. Probe and try to elicit from the respondent information about the kind of product (if manufacturing firm) or the kind of service that the company is engaged in.

Moreover, if work is pursued in a big company that is engaged in several types of activities, report the nature of the particular activity of that company in which the person is working.
If work is for government office or institution, the name of the office, bureau, public school, etc. may be accepted. If work is for the executive branch of a local government, indicate whether provincial, city or municipal government.

Moreover, when the government office engages in services other than administrative such as education, communication, health, transportation, construction, etc., persons working in such office must be reported in their corresponding activity, such as railroad, airport, insurance, high school, highway construction, etc.

Below are examples of how some officials and employees of the government should be reported:

Usual occupation: Accounting clerk
Business or industry: Central bank

Usual occupation: Registered nurse
Business or industry: Puericulture center

Usual occupation: Market collector
Business or industry: Municipal government

Usual occupation: Bill collector
Business or industry: Waterworks (MWSS)

Usual occupation: Bulldozer operator
Business or industry: Road construction (DPWH)

Usual occupation: Stenographer
Business or industry: Provincial government

Distinction should be made between manufacturing and retailing in cases where an establishment engages in both activities. The entry in this column should be according to the part of the establishment in which the person works. Likewise, manufacturing should be differentiated from wholesaling.

Example:

A traveling salesman working for a distributor of soft drinks will have an entry of "soft drink distribution" for industry. A traveling salesman for a soft drink factory itself will have "soft drink factory" for industry.

You must distinguish between two kinds of business specializing in selling. A wholesale store sells primarily to retailers, while a retail store sells directly to consumers.

For a person conducting his business in his own house, report his business just as you are reporting a regular establishment, such as dressmaking or tailoring shop, radio repair shop, law office, dental clinic, etc.

If a person does not have a permanent job and usually pursues his usual occupation by working for several employers engaged in different kinds of business or industry like many farm and manual laborers, report the kind of business or industry in which he usually works longest during the past 12 months.

Industries which need special care in classification
In certain industries, the common titles are inadequate. Enter the specific kind of business or industry. Below are examples of industries for which special care must be taken:

Unacceptable entry: Agency
Acceptable entry: Real estate agency, travel agency, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Assembly plant
Acceptable entry: Motor vehicle assembly plant, motor/bicycle assembly plant, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Box factory
Acceptable entry: Paper box factory, wooden box factory, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Business
Acceptable entry: Wholesale/retail offish, dry goods/textiles retail, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Buying and selling
Acceptable entry: Egg wholesale, vegetable retail, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Canning factory
Acceptable entry: Fruit canning factory, fish canning factory, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Factory
Acceptable entry: Candy factory, soap factory, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Farm
Acceptable entry: Corn farm, sugar cane farm, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Fishing
Acceptable entry: Fishpond, lake or river fishing, deep-sea fishing, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Manufacturing
Acceptable entry: Manufacture of household appliances, garments, toys, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Mill
Acceptable entry: Rice or corn mill, flourmill, sugar mill, knitting mill, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Mining
Acceptable entry: Coal mine, gold mine, copper mine, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Office
Acceptable entry: Law office, life insurance company, savings or commercial bank, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Plant
Acceptable entry: Ice plant, electric power plant, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Private firm
Acceptable entry: Specify kind of business engaged in by firm

Unacceptable entry: Repair shop
Acceptable entry: Shoe repair shop, radio repair shop, auto repair shop, welding shop, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Shoe factory
Acceptable entry: Leather shoe factory, rubber shoe factory, wooden shoe factory, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Shop
Acceptable entry: Dress shop, beauty parlor, barber shop, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Store
Acceptable entry: Wholesale dry goods store, sari-sari store, etc.

Unacceptable entry: Textile
Acceptable entry: Knitting, weaving or spinning mill, etc.

Pay special attention to the preceding instructions because ambiguous reporting of the kind of business or industry will result in inappropriate or wrong codes and consequently affect the data on economic characteristics of the population.

P27 Place of work

This question aims to determine the number of workers who commute to places outside the city/municipality where they are usually residing for the purpose of working.

Ask the question in P27, "In what city/municipality did work during the past 12 months?" for every person 10 years old and over.

For persons whose place of work is the same as his present residence, that is, the establishment or office where he works is located within the city/municipality where he resides, enter 0008 in P27. However, if the place of work is in another city/municipality, specify on the space provided the city/municipality and province where he works.

For persons whose place of work is in foreign country as in the case of overseas workers, enter 0007 in the code box.

For traveling salesman and their helpers, drivers and conductors of public utilities, officers and crew of inter-island vessels or of commercial fishing vessels, report the location of establishment or its branch office from which their trip originated and to which they report on their return. If there are two branches or more of these branches, including the main office, report the location of the branch where they usually collect their salaries or wages.

Always bear in mind that the name of the city/municipality alone is not sufficient; neither is the name of the province alone. The entry in this column must always be complete to include both city/municipality and province.

Complete names of provinces should be written when provinces like llocos, Negros, Davao and Bicol were provided. Ask the respondents whether, they mean llocos Norte or llocos Sur, Negros Oriental or Occidental, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte or Davao Oriental and what particular province in the Bicol Region.

In cases where the respondent knows only the province where the member is working, enter appropriate code of the province in the first two code boxes and code 99 for the last two boxes.

P28 Class of worker

The question P28 is to be asked for those who were engaged in an economic activity in the past 12 months: "For whom or where does/did _______ work?"

The response to this question should refer to the usual occupation recorded in P25.

Possible responses are categorized into seven (7) classes of workers:

1. Worked for private household (Domestic Services). If a person worked in a private household for pay, in cash or in kind. Examples are family drivers, gardener, yaya, household help and other persons in domestic service.

2. Worked for private business/enterprise/farm. All employees in private firms and farms are classified here.

Other examples of this class of workers are:

  • Persons working in public works project on private contracts
  • Public transport drivers who do not own the vehicle but drive them on boundary basis
  • Dock hands or stevedores
  • Cargo handlers in public market, railroad stations or piers, etc.
  • Palay harvester getting fixed share of harvested palay, sacadas and other farm workers.

3. Worked for government/government corporations. All government employees would be classified here. Examples of this class of workers are:

Employees in national and local government offices, agencies and corporation
Filipinos working in embassies, legation, chancelleries or consulates of foreign government in the Philippines
Filipinos working in international organizations of Sovereign States of Government like the United Nations, World Health Organization, etc.
Chaplains in the Armed Forces of the Philippines.

4. Self-employed without any paid employee. If a person worked for profit or fees in own business, farm, profession or trade without any paid employee. Examples include vendors, professionals with own offices/clinics, workers who worked purely on commission basis and who have no regular working hours.

5. Employer in own farm or business. If a person, working in his own business, farm, profession or trade had one or more regular paid employees, including paid family members (code 6 below). Some cases worth noting:

Domestic helpers, family drivers and other household helpers who assist in the family operated business, regardless of time spent in this activity, are NOT hired employees in the enterprise/business; hence a farm or business proprietor who is assisted purely by such domestic help is not considered an employer.

A retail store operator who is wholly assisted in the operation of his/her store by unpaid relatives living with him/her and who employs carpenters to construct a building for his store (with store operator supervising the work) is not an employer. However, if this operator is also the owner or partner of a firm with paid construction workers and staff, and the reported industry in P26 is building construction, then he is an employer.

6. Worked with pay on own family-operated farm or business.
If a person worked in own family-operated farm or business and receives cash or a fixed share of the produce as payment for his services. Note that whenever there is a household member with this code, there should be a household member with code 5 for class of worker.

7. Worked without pay on own family-operated farm or business. If a member of the family worked without pay in a farm or business operated by another member living in the same household.

Note: Questions P29 to P32 are different fertility indicators and should be asked for all females 15-49 years old. These fertility indicators are indispensable bases for studying the prospects of population growth, the probable development of the population's age structure and its possible effects on economic and social changes.

P29 Number of children born alive

Data on the number of children ever born alive to a particular woman is an aggregate measure of her lifetime fertility experience up to the moment the data are collected. Cross tabulation with other variables will enable computation of principal measures such as gross fertility ratio, the average number of children born alive to women who have reached the end of child-bearing period, the proportion of women who are childless by the end of their reproductive life, etc.

Information on the number of children born alive should be asked for all females 15 to 49 years old only. Number of children born alive should include all children born alive during the lifetime of the woman up to the census date. Exclude fetal deaths or stillbirths.

Born alive children should comprise all live-born children to the woman, whether legitimate or illegitimate, born of present or of previous marriages, and regardless of whether her children are living or dead, or might be living elsewhere at the time of the interview. Exclude fetal deaths or stillbirths; also adopted children and stepchildren.

The following definitions may help you in filling up this column:

1. Stillbirth - a birth in which the fetus never showed any sign of life at the time of delivery.
2. Adopted - a child or ward who is considered part of the family although may not be related by blood to the guardian.
3. Stepchild - a child of a woman's husband by a previous marriage.

Entry for this column should consist of two digits; thus, for women with 1 to 9 live-born children, prefix 0.

Examples: 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, etc.
In the case of a woman who has not given birth to a live baby, enter 00 in this column.

P30 Number of children still alive

Data on the number of children still living serve as indicators of the mortality of live-born children. The entry in this column refers to the live-born children reported in P29. Ask the question in P30: "How many of these are still living?"

Enter in this column the number of children who are still alive as of census date, 12:01 A.M. of May 1, 2000 whether such children are presently living with the household or not. Prefix 0 to entries less than 10.

In no case should the number in P30 exceed that in P29. If it does, verify from the respondent. It is possible that the respondent got mixed-up in reporting the number of children.
Thus, if a woman has an entry of 03 in P29, the same number should be reported in P30 if all 3 children are still living as of census date. If the entry in P29 is 00, enter also 00 in P30.

P31 Number of children born alive from May 1, 1999 to April 30, 2000

Data on the number of births in the last twelve months can be used in estimating the current fertility of women. These also serve as bases for studying the prospects of population growth, the probable development of the population's age structure and its possible effects on the economy and society.

The question in P31, "How many children were born alive to ______ from May 1, 1999 to April 30, 2000?" is applicable to every woman aged 15-49 years old including the widowed, separated or divorced. However, you need not ask the question for those with 00 entries in P29.

The question refers to the number of children born alive to a woman during the last 12 months, from May 1, 1999 to April 30, 2000. Prove further if the respondent gives an answer of two or more children born alive to a woman (which is unusual but possible). It is possible that a respondent will erroneously include a stillbirth or miscarriage, or a child born before or after the reference period of 12 months.

An answer of two or more children born alive to a woman is acceptable in cases of twins, triplets, etc., or if there was rather a short interval between two live-births, say one was born in May 1999 and the other in April 2000.

Enter the actual number of children born alive in the past twelve months like 1 for one child born alive, 2 for two children, and 3 for three live-born children and so on. If no child was born alive to the woman, enter 0.

P32 Age at first marriage

Age at first marriage when tabulated with number of children ever born provides information on the fertility patterns of women on their first marriage.

Ask the question "What was ________ 's age at first marriage?" only for females aged 15 years old to 49 years old and with entries of either of codes 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 in P9 (Marital Status).

Marriage here may either be a legal or consensual union (where the man and woman decide to live together without the benefit of clergy or civil ceremony).

Enter in this column the age when the woman first entered married life or a consensual union, even if she was married more than once. Normally in legal marriages, it is the age when the marriage was solemnized. In cases wherein the spouses lived together before legal marriage, the age to be reported would be the age when the spouses began to live together. In a consensual marriage, it is the age of the woman when she and the man began to live together as husband and wife.

Filling Up Questions P25 to P32 of CPH Form 3: An Example

See the illustration 8.3 for the correct way of filling up the items P25 to P32.
Ismael Santiago works as an architect in a private enterprise in the same municipality dealing with building constructions. His wife, Rodora serves as a nurse for 20 years at the Philippine General Hospital, Manila. However, only last April 2000, she decided to quit working and be a plain housewife. Karmela is a secretary in the same enterprise where his father is working. Her husband, Jose is working as an electrical engineer in Saudi Arabia.
Rodora got married to Ismael at the age 21. She had three children, but her only son died a few days after he was born. Her daughter, Karmela got married to Jose at the age of 22. Karmela had two children, both still alive. Anna, her youngest, was born only last January 1999.

7.4 Instructions on the housing census questions

The housing portion consists of questions on building characteristics (B1 to B5), housing unit characteristic (D1) and household characteristics (H10).

Generally, be guided by the following in filling up the housing questions:

1. For all housing questions, categories are presented with circles before them. Only one circle must be crossed out.

2. Fill up items B1 to B4 (Type of Building/House, Construction Material of the Roof, Construction Material of the Outer Walls, and State of Repair) by observation.
Even before you enter the building, you can already determine the answer to these questions.
However, if doubtful, ask the respondent.

3. If you use two or more booklets (for households with more than 8 members), fill up only the housing portion of the last booklet used. Leave the housing portion of the other booklets blank.

4. In cases where there is more than 1 housing unit in a building or there are more than 1 household in a housing unit, the following guidelines should be followed:

a. Ask question B5 Year Built, only from the respondent of any household in the same building, preferably from the first household interviewed.

b. Transcribe the same entries for B1 to B5 to the corresponding questionnaire items for other households living in the same building.

Ask Item D1 Floor Area from any household in the housing unit. If there are two or more households living in the same housing unit, ask this item from any of the households, preferably from the first household interviewed. Transcribe the same entries for D1 to the questionnaires of the other households residing in the same housing unit.

B1 Type of building/house

The distribution of households by type of building supplies information about the available housing accommodation at the time of the census, patterns of living, and building trends. Such details are essential for planning future housing needs. For housing programmes, information is required on the number of households that need to be provided with housing. The number of households living in marginal housing units (commercial/industrial/agricultural buildings used as living quarters such as barns, warehouses, mills, offices, etc., and other housing units such as boats, caves, etc.) provides a first approximation of this element of housing needs.

Cross out the circle the applicable type of building occupied by the household. The types of building are as follows:

[] 1 Single House - This is an independent structure intended for one household separated by open space or walls from all other structures. It includes the so-called "nipa hut" or a small house that is built as a more or less permanent housing unit or a "barong-barong" made of salvaged/makeshift/improvised materials.

[] 2 Duplex - This is a structure intended for two households, with complete living facilities for each. It is divided vertically or horizontally into two separate housing units which are usually identical.

[] 3 Multi-Unit Residential (3 or more units) - This is a building intended for residential use only, consisting of 3 or more housing units. These houses may consist of one or more stories in a row of three or more housing units, separated from each other by walls extending from the ground to the roof or a building having floors to accommodate three or more housing units.

Example:

a. Apartment building - a structure usually of several stories, made up of three or more independent entrances from internal halls or courts. An apartment has one common entrance from the outside.

b. Accesoria - a one or two-floor structure divided into three or more housing units, each housing unit having its own separate entrance from the outside. Another name for accesoria is row house.

c. Residential condominium - a high-rise building where the housing units are owned individually but the land and other areas and facilities are owned in common.

Note: A building that was originally constructed as a single house or duplex, but now partitioned into three or more rooms/groups of rooms (with separate entrance from a common hall or passage) without changing the outside structure or appearance, will be classified as a single house or a duplex, as the case may be.

[] 4 Commercial/Industrial/Agricultural - These buildings are not intended mainly for human habitation but used as living quarters of households at the time of the census.
A commercial building is a building built for transacting business or for rendering professional services, such as a store, office, warehouse, rice mill, etc.

An industrial building is a building built for processing, assembling, fabricating, finishing, manufacturing or packaging operations, such as a factory or a plant.
An agricultural building is any structure built for agricultural purposes, such as a barn, stable, poultry house, granary, etc.

[] 5 Institutional Living Quarters - Hotels, motels, inns, boarding houses, dormitories, pensions and lodging houses fall within this category. This group comprises permanent structures which provide lodging and/or meals on fee basis. Institutional buildings are buildings intended for persons confined to receive medical, charitable or other care/treatment such as hospital and orphanages, for persons detained such as jails and penal colonies, and other buildings like convents, school dormitories, etc.

Also included in this category are camps which are defined sets of premises originally intended for the temporary accommodation of persons with common activities or interests like military camps, and other camps established for the housing of workers in mining, agriculture, public works or other types or enterprises.

[] 6. Other Housing Units - This refers to living quarters which are not intended for human habitation nor located in permanent buildings but which are nevertheless, used as living quarters at the time of the census. Caves, old railroad cars, other natural shelters and mobile housing units such as trailer, barge, cart, boat, etc., fall within this category.

Note: When a building is intended partly for residential purposes and partly for commercial or industrial purposes, report as residential (code 1, 2 or 3) if half or more of the building is residential. Thus, if the second floor of a two-storey building is for housing, the building should be classified as residential. Likewise, if a one- storey building is divided into several units, and the front part of each unit is for business purposes and the back part is for living quarters, also report the building as residential.

B2 Construction material of the roof

The construction material of the roof and wall provides information of the construction, replacement and improvement of housing units.

This indicator provides data in evaluating construction statistics, programme implementation, and for estimating the investment, past and future, in housing construction. It also determines how many of the households are housed in structurally acceptable housing units. Structural acceptability of housing units implies that these are made of durable construction materials that will safeguard the household occupants from adverse climatic effects and provide protection and privacy.

Cross out the circle opposite the kind of material used in the construction of the roof. This item can be answered through observation but if you are in doubt, ask the respondent.

The kinds of construction materials of the roof are as follows:

[] 1 Galvanized Iron/aluminum
[] 2 Tile/concrete/clay tile
[] 3 Half galvanized iron and half concrete
[] 4 Wood
[] 5 Cogon/nipa/anahaw
[] 6 Asbestos
[] 7 Makeshift/salvaged/improvised materials
[] 8 Others, specify

If two or more kinds of materials are used, report the material most used. Thus, for a house with different kinds of roofs, report the material used in the main portion (usually containing the living room/sala and bedrooms). Specify the kind of construction material used for the roof if it is not one of the categories mentioned above it.
Bamboo when used as roofing is included in category of Wood.

Housing units in structures such as culverts, bridges, etc. should have a marked circle opposite Makeshift/salvaged/improvised materials.

B3 Construction materials of the outer walls

Cross out the circle applicable to the kind of materials used in the construction of the outer walls. Fill up this item only through observation but if in doubt, ask the respondent for the material mainly used for the outer walls.

The kinds of construction materials of the walls are as follows:

[] 01 Concrete/brick/stone
[] 02 Wood
[] 03 Half concrete/brick/stone and half wood
[] 04 Galvanized iron/aluminum
[] 05 Bamboo/sawali/cogon/nipa
[] 06 Asbestos
[] 07 Glass
[] 08 Makeshift/salvaged/improvised materials
[] 09 Others, specify
[] 10 No walls

For a house or building in which half of the stories are walled with concrete/brick7stone and the other half, with wood, marked the circle opposite the category Half concrete/brick/stone and half wood. Mark also this category wherein the walls are made of about half of each of the two groups of materials.

For a two-storey house especially in rural areas wherein the ground floor is used for poultry, storage of grains, farm implements, etc., report the material used in walling the second floor, unless the walls can be classified under Half concrete/brick/stone and half wood. In other cases where in the walls are made of different materials, report the material dominantly used.

Housing units in non-building structures such as culverts, bridges, etc. should have a marked circle of category Makeshift/Salvaged/Improvised Materials.

Cross out the circle of category "others" and specify the kind of material used for the outer walls if it is not one of those mentioned above.

B4 State of repair

This provides information on the current status of the building which is of special significance to housing programmes. It is also useful for housing priorities and for the identification of groups in need of housing repair.

Determine the current state of repair of the building/house and cross out the circle opposite the appropriate selection.

1 Needs no repair/needs minor repair - This building is usually new or has a good building maintenance, i.e., no deterioration is apparent from the outside.

2 Needs major repair - The building cannot fully protect the occupants from the elements (rain, wind, temperature). It may have cracks in the interior walls, leaking roof, holes on the floors, broken windows, etc. which can only be mended by major repair.

3 Dilapidated/condemned - This building is beyond repair. Dilapidated parts are found in pillars, roofs and outer walls needing renovation. Condemned buildings, wherein substandard materials/procedures were used in the construction or which are structurally defective, are also included here.

4 Under renovation/being repaired - This is a building that was fully constructed and finished but is now being repaired for some deterioration or damages. This also includes buildings being renovated to make additional structures or to modify/repair existing structures.

5 Under construction - The construction work has started but not yet completed and the construction is still going on.
Construction means all on-site work done from site preparation, excavation, foundation, and assembly of all components and installation of utilities and equipment of buildings/structures.

6 Unfinished construction - This is a partly constructed building but at the time of visit, construction is temporarily or permanently stopped, that is, no construction activity is going on for quite some time.

B5 Year building/house was built

This provides the basis for appraising the building/house inventory in terms of durability, the expected rate of replacement, and the estimate of the annual rate of building/house construction during the inter-censal period or the preceding 10 years. It also provides the estimate for maintenance costs and an insight into the housing patterns of the population.

The year the building was built refers to the year when the construction was completed and when ready for occupancy and not when construction began. Generally, building construction commenced and finished within the same year, although there are cases when the period of construction extends to several years. Report the year when the building was finished.

If the building is being constructed and vacant, mark the circle opposite the category Not applicable to signify that the question is not applicable to the building. If the building is being constructed but already occupied, enter the year when it was occupied.

Cross out the circle opposite the appropriate selection.

[] 01 2000
[] 02 1999
[] 03 1998
[] 04 1997
[] 05 1996
[] 06 1991-1995
[] 07 1981-1990
[] 08 1971-1980
[] 09 1961-1970
[] 10 1960 or earlier
[] 98 Not applicable
[] 99 Don't Know

If the respondent finds difficulty in giving the year the building/house was ready for occupancy, help approximate the year by mentioning some historical/national events. The respondent himself may mention an event that occurred when the building was built.

Examples: [several examples follow]

D1 Floor area of the housing unit

Density of occupancy in terms of floor area per person is a measure of the adequacy of housing. In line with the aim of housing policy to provide adequate housing space to a level consistent with the maintenance of health of the occupants, it is important in planning to adopt housing standards.

The data on floor area will provide planners information on the current status of the density of occupancy of existing housing units in the country.

Cross out the circle of the selection made.

[Table omitted].

Floor area refers to the space enclosed by the exterior wall of the housing unit. In case of several floors, get the area of each floor in square meters or square feet and add together to get the total floor area of the housing unit.

There are many ways in approximating the total floor area. You may use any method which is more convenient to you. You may use a meter stick, visual approximation (using your eyes only) or your pace factor (see Appendix 4). In case the respondent does not know the floor area of the housing unit, you can approximate the floor area using any of the above mentioned methods. Familiarize yourself with the length of a meter so that you can do visual approximation.

An example of getting the estimate of floor area is shown in Illustration 7.3. In this illustration, it is assumed that the width and length of the floor spaces are already determined using one of the methods discussed above.

To get the estimated floor area (EFA) of the around floor, use the following formula:

EFA ground floor = 10 meters x 7 meters = 70 sq. m.

Using the same procedure for the second floor,

EFA second floor =10 meters x 9 meters = 90 SQ. m.

To get the total estimated floor area of the housing unit, which will be the answer to the inquiry "What is the estimated floor area of this housing unit?"

EFA ground floor + EFA second floor =70 + 90= 160 sq.m.

For this example, mark the circle opposite the range of values that includes the given answer, in this case, of category 150-199.

H1 Fuel for lighting

The proportion of households with access to electricity can provide planners useful indication of areas where community lighting needs to be extended. Data on types of fuel can be analyzed to forecast future demands for various sources of energy and hence plan for power installations.
Cross out the circle opposite the category which corresponds to the fuel used by the household for its lighting facility. If the household is using electricity, mark the circle for this item even if it is not used most of the time. If two or more types of lighting are used, except electricity, e.g., kerosene and oil, oil and candles, etc., report the type of lighting which is used most of the time.

Cross out the circle, therefore, of the category corresponding to the type of lighting used more often than the other. The types of fuel for lighting and their codes are as follows:

[] 1 Electricity
[] 2 Kerosene (gas)
[] 3 Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)
[] 4 Oil (vegetable, animal, etc.)
[] 5 Others, specify

If the household uses a generator, report the fuel being used to run the generator.

Refer to Illustration 8.4 for the different types of fuel for lighting.

[Illustration 8.4 is omitted]

H2 Fuel for cooking

The information on fuel for cooking is relevant in assessing energy planning decisions, energy conservation programs and in developing marketing strategies. It also serves as a benchmark for the study of changes in household energy used and user patterns over time. It is also useful in monitoring supply and demand requirements for alternative fuels.

The question in H2 asks for the kind of fuel the household users most of the time for cooking. Mark the corresponding circle for the appropriate item. If two or more kinds of cooking fuel are used, e.g., electricity and LPG; LPG and wood; kerosene and charcoal; etc., report the fuel which is used most of the time for cooking.

[] 1 Electricity
[] 2 Kerosene (gas)
[] 3 Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)
[] 4 Charcoal
[] 5 Wood
[] 6 Others, specify
[] 7 None

For power from generators, report the fuel used to run the generator. See illustration 8.5 for the different kinds of fuel for cooking.

H3, H4 Source of water supply for drinking and/or cooking, for laundry and/or bathing

The information on main source of drinking water provides the number of households with ready access to a potable water supply, as well as the availability of piped water for each housing unit. The provision of a piped water installation for every housing unit should be one of the primary objectives of housing policy as well as of public health policy.

Determine from the respondent the household's main source of water for drinking and/or cooking
(H3) and for laundry and/or bathing (H4). Enter the appropriate code in the box provided. If there are two or more sources of water for drinking, report the source used most of the time during the past twelve months.

The different sources of drinking water and their codes are as follows:

[] 01 Own use, faucet, community water system - The household gets its water supply from a faucet inside the house/yard directly connected to a water pipeline from the community water system such as the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS) or the local water network system.

The method on how they purify the water or the real source of water is irrelevant. Thus, for water systems which have deep well as their source of water, report under this category as long as they subscribe to community water system.

[] 02 Shared, faucet, community water system - The household gets its water supply from the faucet of another household, establishment, or office, which is connected to the community water system.

[] 03 Own use, tubed/piped deep well - Water is taken from a tubed/piped well which is at least 100 feet (5 ximkm{(on(:8(neet pipes or 30 meters deep) and for private use of the household or households in the same building or compound.

[] 04 Shared, tubed/piped deep well - Water is taken from a deep well, which is at least 100 ft. or 30 meters deep of another household, establishment, or office or from a deep well which was constructed for public use.

[] 05 Tubed/piped shallow well - Water is taken from a tubed/piped well which is less than 100 feet deep.

[] 06 Dug Well - The household gets its water supply from a well, which may be provided with a protective device against contamination or pollution. A shallow well (dug and with water depository) which is provided with a pump and cover and is free from seepage from the side, and an ordinary dug well ("balon") also belong to this type.

[] 07 Spring, lake, river, rain, etc. - The household gets its water supply from natural bodies of water, or water is accumulated from rainfall.

[] 08 Peddler - Included in this item are water bought in tanks, drums, pails, etc. (peddler). These are the usual sources of water supply of households in low water pressure areas with no community water system.

[] 09 Bottled Water - Mineral/distilled water bought in bottles, or gallons are under this category.

[] 10 Others, Specify - Includes other sources not mentioned in categories 1 to 9 above.
Refer to Illustration 8.6 for the different sources of water supply.

H5 Tenure status of the housing unit

The extent to which households own or rent the living quarters which they occupy is of special significance to housing programmes. Data on tenure status is also useful for housing priorities and policies, in promotion of house ownership and identification of groups in need of housing assistance.

Housing unit. A structurally separate and independent place of abode which, by the way it has been constructed, converted, or arranged is intended for habitation by one household.
Ask the respondent the question, "Do you own or amortize this housing unit occupied by your household or do you rent, rent-free with consent of owner, or rent-free without consent of owner?"

Cross out the circle corresponding to the tenure status of the housing unit by the household.

The tenure status of the housing unit and their corresponding codes are as follows:

[] 1 Owned/being amortized - if the household is the owner and has legal possession of the housing unit or the household claims to own it. Included also are those housing units which are being amortized or paid on installment basis.

[] 2 Rented - if the occupant actually pays rent either in cash or in kind.

[] 3 Rent-free with consent of owner - if the household occupies the housing unit with the permission of the owner and without paying any rent in cash or in kind to the owner. Included here are the households of farm tenants/lessees who occupy rent-free houses belonging to the owner of the lands they farm; also those employees given free housing as part of fringe benefits (they are made to vacate the housing unit upon separation from work.)

[] 4 Rent-free without consent of owner - if the household occupies the housing unit without the consent or knowledge of the owner. Examples are squatters who are occupying public and private buildings.

Specifically:

1. if the crossed out answer in H5 is Rented, skip to H9.
2. if the crossed out answer in H5 is Rent-free w/ consent of owner or Rent-free w/o consent of owner, skip to H10

H6 Acquisition of housing unit

Ask the question in H6, "How did you acquire this housing unit?" only if the entry in H5 is Owned/being amortized. Mark the circle which describes how the household acquired the housing unit.

The different categories for this item and their corresponding codes are:

1 Purchased
2 Constructed by the owner/occupants with or without the help of friends/relatives
3 Constructed by hired/skilled workers - The owner of the housing unit took charge of purchasing construction materials and hiring construction workers and directly supervised the construction of the housing unit
4 Constructed by an organized contractor - The owner entered into a contract with a general contractor for the latter to supply either labor only or both labor and materials
5 Inherited
6 Others (lottery, gift)

If the answer in this question is Inherited or Others (lottery, gift), skip to H8.

H7 Sources of financing

The data on source(s) of financing give information on the extent to which housing assistance is provided by the government. Specifically, these will monitor government participation in terms of financing or administering the construction of new residential units.
Ask the question in H7 only if an answer in H6 is Purchased, Constructed by owner/occupants with or without the help of friends/relatives, Constructed by hired/skilled workers, or Constructed by an organized contractor.

The different sources of financing and the corresponding method of selections are follows:

Yes No
[] [] Own resources/interest-free loans from relatives/friends
[] [] Government assistance: PAG-IBIG, SSS, GSIS, DBP, etc.
[] [] Private banks/foundations/cooperatives
[] [] Employer assistance
[] [] Private persons
[] [] Others, specify

For each of these sources of financing, mark each circle with an x for Yes or No responses.
If the household has availed of a source of financing not included on those listed, cross out the circle for Yes in "Others" and specify the source of financing, otherwise, mark the circle for No.

H8 Tenure status of the lot

Ask the respondent the question, "Do you own or amortize this lot occupied by your household or do your rent, rent-free with consent of owner, or rent-free without consent of owner?
Cross out the circle corresponding to the tenure status of the lot on which the housing unit is built.

The categories of tenure status of the lot are as follows:

1 Owned/being amortized - Ownership of land includes mere occupancy of any public land in rural areas. This also includes house owners paying the land on installment basis or holders of certificate of land under the Land Reform Program or house/lot awardees of housing loan from PAGIBIG, SSS, GSIS or commercial banks.

2 Rented - There is a fixed amount paid by the occupant in cash or in kind.

3 Rent-free with consent of owner - The household occupies the lot with the permission of the owner and without paying any rent in cash or in kind to the owner, tenant/lessee or subtenant/sub-lessee.

4 Rent-free without consent of owner - The household occupies the lot without the permission of the owner.

Filling Up the Housing Questions: An Example

Illustration (7.4) shows an example of the correct way of filling up the housing census questions.

[Illustration 7.4 is omitted]

H9 Monthly rental of housing unit or lot

The information on monthly rental of housing unit or lot is used in reviews of government housing policy, and in considering matters such as the need for rent controls. It enables analysis of income level to rental level for particular groups.

Ask the question in H9, "How much is the monthly rental?" only if entry in H5 or H8 is "Rented".

The total monthly rental of the housing unit should exclude rental for furnishings and payment for electricity and water. Rental for the housing unit, which includes furnishings, or payment for electricity and water, can be estimated by subtracting the estimated rental for furnishings or amount for the consumption of water and electricity from the total monthly rental.

Report the monthly rental even if the rent is still unpaid or paid by someone who is not a household member.

Cross out the circle corresponding to the range of cost of monthly rental of housing unit or lot.

[] 1 Below P100
[] 2 100 -199
[] 3 200 - 499
[] 4 500 - 999
[] 5 1,000 - 1,999
[] 6 2,000 - 4,999
[] 7 5,000 - 9,999
[] 8 10,000 and over

H10 Usual manner of garbage disposal

The proportion of households with access to sanitary manner of garbage disposal provides knowledge of the environmental living conditions and is therefore essential for health planners in the formulation of plans and programs to improve general health conditions.

Inquire from the respondent the manner by which the household disposes its kitchen garbage such as leftover food, peelings of fruits and vegetables, fish and chicken entrails, etc. If the household has various ways of disposing its kitchen garbage, ask for the manner used most of the time.

Described below are some of the more common methods of disposal used in the country.

Determine which of these methods best describes the practice of the household. Cross out the circle of one of the selections below.

1 Picked-up by service garbage truck - when the local government or a private contractor manages the systematic collection of garbage in the community through the use of garbage trucks/carts.

2 Dumping in individual pit (not burned) - when garbage is simply thrown in pits whether inside the yard or vacant lots and left to decay.

3 Burning - when the household dumps its garbage in an open space or pit and burns it.

4 Composting - when garbage is composted, that is, allowed to decay under controlled conditions and the composted materials are collected later for use as soil conditioner or fertilizer.

5 Burying - when the garbage is thrown in pit and then covered with soil.

6 Feeding to animals - when the garbage is given to animals as feed.

7 Others, specify - if the household you are interviewing disposes its kitchen garbage in a manner different from those

H11 Kind of toilet facility

The data on kind of toilet facility provide the minimum data required for the evaluation of facilities available to the housing units. Like safe drinking water source, a sanitary toilet facility is a measure to prevent diseases and improve the health condition of household members. This indicator likewise determines the sanitation status of households.

Cross out the circle corresponding to the type of toilet facility used by the household.

The different types of toilet facilities commonly used in buildings and houses throughout the country are:

[] 1 Water-sealed, sewer/septic tank, used exclusively by the household

[] 2 Water-sealed, sewer/septic tank, shared with other households

[] 3 Water-sealed, other depository, used exclusively by the household

[] 4 Water-sealed, other depository, shared with other households

Water sealed - as the name implies, is the type of toilet where after water is flushed or poured into the bowl, a small amount of water is left in the bowl and seals the bottom of the bowl from the pipe leading to the depository.

Sewer/septic tank - a tank in which the solid matter or sewage is accumulated to be disintegrated by bacteria. This is commonly called "Poso Negro".

Other Depository - if the depository is other than a sewer/septic tank.

[] 5 Closed Pit - it is a type of toilet without a water-sealed bowl and the depository is constructed usually of large circular tubes made of concrete or clay covered on top and has a small opening. It may or may not have a box for sitting or squatting over the opening; e.g., antipolo, etc.

[] 6 Open pit - it is the same as closed pit but without covering.

[] 7 Other (pail system, etc.) - classify here a toilet wherein fecal matter is accumulated in a pail to be picked up for disposal from time to time or any kind of toilet facility not belonging to the preceding types.

[] 8 None - for households using no toilet facility.

Refer to Illustration 8.7 for the different types of toilet facilities.

[Illustration 8.7 omitted]

H12 Presence of household conveniences

This provides information on selected household conveniences, the presence of which in the household is considered important in connection with programmes of public information or education to know by what means of communication the population can be most easily reached. This also provides a basis for leisure statistics. The presence of motor vehicles in the household provides data about access to private transport. It can also provide information for the construction of roads and solution to traffic problems.

For the different household conveniences listed, cross out the circle to indicate Yes or No answer to the inquiry "Does this household have the following household conveniences in working condition?"

Yes No
[] [] Radio/radio cassette
[] [] Television set
[] [] Refrigerator/freezer
[] [] Video cassette/recorder
[] [] Telephone/cell phone
[] [] Washing machine
[] [] Motorized vehicle

The category Radio/radio cassette includes transistor, radiophone, stereo or karaoke. The motorized vehicle includes motorcycle, car/jeep/van, motorized banca/boat and tractor.

Exclude here radios, televisions, telephones/cell phones, refrigerators/ freezers, video cassette recorder, washing machine, motorcycles, cars/jeeps/vans and motorized bancas/boats that have not been in working condition for six months or longer (although intended to be repaired). Also exclude those motor vehicles (i.e, motorcycles, cars/jeeps/vans or motorized bancas/boats) which are used exclusively for business purposes.

H13 Land ownership

For land ownership, cross out the circle opposite the categories mentioned to indicate a Yes or No answer to the inquiry "Does any member of this household own the following?"

Yes No
[] [] Other residential land(s)
[] [] Agricultural land(s), landowner
[] [] Agricultural land(s) acquired through CARP, Agrarian Reform Beneficiary
[] [] Other land(s)

If a household owns residential land(s), cross out the circle opposite the category "Other residential land(s)" for Yes, otherwise, mark the circle for No. Do the same for succeeding categories.

The third category "Agricultural land(s) acquired through CARP, agrarian reform beneficiary" pertains to land ownership through the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program.

1. Emancipation Patent Holder (EP)- this refers to an agrarian reform beneficiary whose land title was acquired through operation land transfer (OLT) program, or rice and corn lands under P.D. 27.

2. Certificate of Landownership Award (CLOA) - this refers to an agrarian reform beneficiary whose land title was acquired under the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Law (CARL), better known as R.A. 6657. Such title is awarded to agrarian reform beneficiaries in private lands acquired thru voluntary land transfer, compulsory acquisition; and in DAR settlement and landed estates.

3. Homestead Patent (HP) - refers to an agrarian reform beneficiary in settlement areas whose land title was awarded prior to 1989.

4. Leasehold Contract (LC) - refers to tenurial instrument awarded to a lessee in landowner's retained area.

The fourth category "Other Land(s)" include commercial lands, industrial lands, ancestral domains and ancestral lands. The last two categories are distinguished from Torrens Title, and other tenurial instruments granted by a government agency or by the court.

H14 Language/Dialect generally spoken

Language/dialect generally spoken at home provides a measure of the linguistic homogeneity or difference in the population. It can also be used to measure the extent of actual use of the language/dialect within a household.

Ask the question in H14, "What is the language/dialect generally spoken at home by members of this household?"

The languages/dialects and their corresponding codes can be found in the Code Book.
If two or more languages/dialects are spoken in the household, enter the code for the language/dialect which is commonly spoken by majority of the household members.

Note that "Visaya" is not a dialect. Inquire if it is Hiligaynon (llonggo), Cebuano, Waray, etc.,

H15 Residence five years from now

Ask the question in H17: "In what city/municipality does this household intend to reside on May 1, 2005?" Enter code 0008 in H15 if the household's intends to reside 5 years from now in the same present residence. However, if the household would like to reside 5 years from now in another city/municipality, write the name of the city/municipality and province on the space provided. Codes shall be transcribed later using the Code Book.

Complete names of provinces should be written when provinces like llocos, Negros, Davao and Bicol were provided. Ask the respondents whether, they mean llocos Norte or llocos Sur, Negros Oriental or Occidental, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte or Davao Oriental and what particular province in the Bicol Region.

For those household who intends to reside 5 years from now in a foreign country, enter code 0007 in the code box.

Filling Up the Housing Questions: An Example

Illustration (8.8) on the next three pages shows an example of the correct way of filling up the housing census questions.

[Illustration 8.8 omitted]

7.5 Ending the interview

After completing the interview for all members household, review the questionnaire thoroughly to check that they are complete, consistent and correct. Verify any doubtful entry and make the necessary changes/corrections. Record the time the interview when it ended and complete the other items such as final result of visit and the population items in the Interview Record the time the interview ended and complete the other items in the Interview Record. Then sign the Certification portion. Before leaving the household, thank the respondent for his/her cooperation.

Chapter IX

Enumeration of institutional population

This chapter discusses the detailed instructions on how to accomplish CPH Form 4 - the Institutional Population Questionnaire. This questionnaire which is a 4-page booklet gathers information about persons considered part of the institutional population.

9.1 Who will enumerate the institutional population

You will be able to determine how and who will enumerate the institutional population as soon as you have accomplished CPH Form 1 for a particular institution.

Three situations to consider in the enumeration of institutional population are the following:

Case 1. For institutional living quarters, namely: hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses and boarding houses, which have 20 or less residents, you will have to list and interview each resident and accomplish CPH Form 4. Do not forget to write in the remarks column of CPH Form 1 "c/o (your name)".

Case 2. For hotels, motels, dormitories, lodging houses, and boarding houses with more than 20 members and for other institutional living quarters do the following:

  • Contact the manager/head/person-in-charge of the institution. Explain to him/her the objectives and methodology of the census.
  • Request him/her to ask his/her staff to fill in CPH Form 4 with the aid of their records and based on the instructions provided in CPH Form 8. However, if the institution's manager requests that the residents be individually interviewed, you should do the interview and follow the procedure as in Case 1 above.
  • Before you leave CPH Form 4 to the manager/head/person-in-charge, ask him the total number of female and male population in the institutional living quarter and enter in columns 9 and 10, respectively of CPH Form 1. Leave as many CPH Form 4 as may be required, depending on the number of residents of the institution.
  • Inform him/her that the accomplished CPH From 4 will be collected by your TS (give his/her name) exactly a week after your visit. Do not forget to write in the remarks column of CPH Form 1 "c/o TS".

Case 3. For institutional living quarters wherein nobody is eligible for enumeration, assign CPH Form 4. Fill up only the geographic identification (city/municipality, province, barangay, enumeration area number, the serial number, type of institutional living quarters and address). Write on the remarks column of CPH Form 1 "c/o (your name)" and the reason why no one was enumerated.

If you encounter an institutional living quarter in your EA and you do not have CPH Form 4, proceed to enumerate the members of that institutional living quarter using CPH Form 2 as an improvised CPH Form 4. The information will be transcribed to the appropriate form by your team supervisor.

In this case, be sure to:

1. Write in big bold letters the word institutional - (Name of Institution) on the line for Name of Household Head.

2. Fill up geographic identification portion. Replace "household serial number" with "institutional living quarter serial number" and write the serial number in the appropriate boxes. Also replace "col. number of respondent" with "type of institutional living quarters" and write-in the code for type of institution in the first box and leaving the second box blank.

3. Replace the question on relationship to the household head with a question on the residence position or status of the member of institutional living quarters.

4. Leave the item on Family Nucleus, Overseas Workers and Residence 5
Years Ago blank.

5. Fill up rows P4 to P7, P9 to P10, P13 to P15 and P22 to record the characteristics of the residents of the institutional living quarters.

6. Transcribe the entries of these improvised questionnaires in CPH Form 4 later.

9.2 Persons to be enumerated as members of the institutional population

The following are to be included as members of institution for each type of institutional living quarters:

a. Hotels, motels, inns, pension and lodging houses, dormitories, etc.

1. Proprietor, manager and employees living in the establishment, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.

2. Permanent lodgers/boarders (those who have stayed or are expected to stay for one year or longer) and those temporary lodgers/boarders who have stayed for six months or longer as of May 1, 2000, or have been away from their own families for the same period. However, exclude those who usually go home at least once a week.

3. Lodgers/boarders who are not residents of the Philippines and who have been in the Philippines for one year or longer as of May 1, 2000, or are expected to stay in the Philippines for one year or longer. However, exclude those who have a temporary place of residence elsewhere in the Philippines to where they usually go home. Exclude also diplomatic representatives of UN, ILO, USAID officials who, like diplomatic representatives, are subject to reassignment to other countries after their tour of duty in the Philippines, and members of their families.

b. Hospitals and Nurses' Home

1. All patients, including those confined, in mental hospitals, leprosaria or leper colonies, pavilions of tuberculosis sanitaria where patients stay more or less permanently, and rehabilitation centers for drug addicts.

2. Patients who have been confined for six months or longer as of May 1, 2000 in other kinds of hospitals and in wards for temporary confinement in tuberculosis sanitaria.

3. Nurses in nurses' homes who do not usually go home at least once a week.

4. Staff members and employees living in hospitals/nurses' homes, except those living therein with their families and those who usually go home at least once a week.

c. Welfare Institutions (Home for the aged and Infirm, Orphanage, Boys' Town, etc.)

1. All inmates or wards, including those who have just been confined.

2. Staff members and employees living in the institutions, except those living therein with their families and those who usually go home at least once a week.

d. Corrective and Penal Institutions

1. All prisoners in national prisons and reformatories (Welfareville).

2. Prisoners and detainees in provincial or city/municipal jails who have been continuously confined for six months or longer, including confinement in another jail elsewhere, as of May 1, 2000, or those whose sentence is for six months or longer even if the sentence is on appeal.

3. Staff members and employees living in these institutions except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home at least once a week.

e. Convents, Nunneries, Seminaries, and Boarding Schools

1. Monks, priests, ministers, nuns, seminaries, etc. However, priests or ministers of sects other than the Roman Catholic Church who live in the convent or house close to church or chapel with their own families are to be considered as members of households.

2. Students in boarding school (schools where students are required to stay in the school campus).

3. Staff members, employees and helpers living in the premises, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home at least once a week.

f. Military Camps, Stations (PC, Army, Air Force and Navy) and Philippine Military Academy (PMA)

1. Officers and enlisted men/draftees, except those who live in the premises with their own families and those who usually sleep most nights with households or in hotels, lodging places or dormitories. Include those belonging to the unit in the camp or station but who are away on military operation or mission or aboard naval vessels, except those whose families are living in the camp or station (their own families will report them).

2. PMA cadets and trainees whose training will last for six months or longer.

3. Detainees who have been continuously confined for six months or longer, including confinement in another camp or station elsewhere, as of May 1,2000.

4. Civilian employees living in the camp or station, except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home at least once a week.

g. Logging, Mining and Construction/Public Works Camps; Plantations and Agricultural/Fisheries Experimental or Breeding Stations, etc.

1. Proprietor, manager, contractor and employees who do not live with their own families in the camp/station premises and are supplied with lodging (bedding, etc.) and/or meals by the company, firm contractor or agency, except those who usually go home at least once a week.

h. Ocean-going and Inter-island/Coastal Vessels or Deep-sea Fishing Vessels

1. Filipino crew members of ocean-going vessels (whose own families live in the Philippines) at port as of 12:01 A.M. May 1, 2000, except those who usually go home to their own families in the Philippines at least once every six months.

2. Any crew member of inter-island/coastal vessel or deep-sea fishing vessel at port on any day during the enumeration, if the crew member has no home other than the vessel.

i. Refugee Camps

1. Filipino citizens working and living inside the camps except those living therein with their own families and those who usually go home to their respective families at least once a week.

9.3 How to accomplish CPH form 4 - institutional population questionnaire

One booklet of CPH Form 4 may contain information for twelve (12) persons.
The cover page of the questionnaire contains the geographic identification and the certification portion, while the inside pages consist of items P1 to P12 to be gathered from the institutional population.

Booklet Number

There are two boxes allotted for this item. Refer to the instructions in Section 7.2 (p. 84), but this time prefix zero (0) when the booklet number is less than ten, e.g., booklet [0][1] of booklet [0] [2] .

Geographic Identification

Transcribe the province, city/municipality, barangay, enumeration area and their corresponding codes from CPH Form 1. Copy the building serial number and institutional living quarter serial number from columns 2 and 5, respectively, of the listing page.

Type of Institutional Living Quarters

Identify the institutional living quarters as to its type and enter the code in accordance with the following coding scheme.

[1] Hotels, Motels, Lodging Houses, Dormitories, etc. - These are establishments that provide lodging and meals and various personal services for the public.

[2] Hospitals and Nurses' Home - These are institutions where the needy, aged, young or where the sick or injured are given medical or surgical care.

[3] Welfare Institutions - These are institutions intended for seeing or improving the welfare of disadvantaged social groups.

[4] Corrective and Penal Institutions - These are living quarters intended for housing the prisoners and detainees.

[5] Convents, Nunneries, Seminaries, and Boarding Schools -
These are institutional living quarters intended for the housing of nuns, seminarians and other religious entities, and students.

[6] Military Camps and Stations - These are camps established for the temporary accommodations of military men.

[7] Logging, Mining and Construction/Public Works Camps -
These are camps established for the housing of workers in mining, agriculture, public works or other types of enterprises.

[8] Ocean-going and Interisland/Coastal Vessels - These are vessels that are used as living quarters of the crew members.

[9] Refugee Camps - These are camps established for the housing of refugees.

[0] Others - These are institutional living quarters not mentioned above.

Note: The codes for types of institutional living quarters are found on the upper portion of the inside pages of the questionnaire.

Address

Enter here the number and name of the street where the institutional living quarters is located.

Column Number

Every questionnaire is provided with 12 columns for recording names and characteristics of the institutional living quarters. Each column has two empty boxes at the uppermost part. In these you will write the column number. This number automatically identifies each member of the institutional living quarters. Thus, the first member is entered on the first column with column number 01; the second member will be on the second column with column number 02; and so on. And just like in CPH Form 2 and 3, put a check mark before the first name of the respondent.
Ask the respondent the questions located on the upper right portion of the inside pages of the form. Cross out the appropriate circle assign to one of the answers to the question "Are there more than 12 members in this institutional living quarters?". You will be guided how to use another booklet for this institutional living quarters.

Next ask the respondent the question "How many persons are residing in this institutional living quarters as of May 1, 2000?". Write the given answer in the boxes provided. When the members are more than 20, the enumeration will be done by the manager/head of the institution, and the TS will collect the questionnaires. The answer provided will also help you in determining whether or not you have listed all the members of the institutional living quarters in P1. As you ask this question, be sure to explain to the respondent on whom to include.
If the institution has more than 12 members, get another booklet and the next column number for the next institutional member will be in sequence to the last column number indicated in the first booklet of CPH Form 4 that was just accomplished.

Whenever you accomplish more than one CPH Form 4, be sure to indicate the number of booklets as required in the cover page of the questionnaire.

P1 Name

Write the names of the members, family name first, followed by the given name. List the names of the members of the institutional population in the order as listed in the coding scheme for P2. However, if a mistake is committed in the order of entering the names, let the list stand as is.

P2 Residence Status

Identify the residence status of the member by entering the code in accordance with the following coding scheme.

[1] Manager, director, in-charge
[2] Staff member/employee, including physicians and nurses
[3] Officer or enlisted man, trainee
[4] Officer or crew member in merchant vessel
[5] Priest/seminarian/nun
[6] Lodger/boarder
[7] Patient (hospital, sanitarium, etc.)
[8] Inmate/ward (home for the aged, orphanage, etc.)
[9] Prisoner/detainee
[0] Others

Note that in a particular type of institutional living quarters, only one or two or a few of the codes are applicable. For instance, the proprietor (manager) of a hotel and his employees who do not live with their own families in the hotel and do not usually go home at least once a week will be coded, respectively, 1 -manager, director, in-charge and 2 - staff member, employee, etc.

P3 to P12 Date of birth to highest grade completed

For items in columns P3 to P12, follow the instructions given for the same items in CPH Form 2 as discussed in Sec. 7.3 (pp. 92-100) of this manual. However, take note of the discrepancy in the numbering of items such as P3 Date of Birth in CPH Form 4, this is P4 in CPH Form 2.

Refer to Illustration 9.1 for the correct way of filling up the institutional population questionnaire.

[Illustration 9.1 omitted]