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National Institute on Statistics and Computing
Census 2007
National Censuses 2007
11th Population Census and 6th Housing Census
Enumerator's Manual

Lima, July 2007
Doc. CPV.08.11 B
Definitive
[Introduction and Table of Contents are not presented here]
[p. 5]

Chapter one: National Censuses 2007: 11th Population Census and 6th Housing Census
[General information on what is a Housing Census, why to implement it and type of Census is not presented here]

1.4 What will the Census District Organization be like?
The organization will be:

In the Urban Areas: It will comprise urban census zones, sections and areas.
In the Rural Areas: It will comprise rural census sections and areas.
Urban Area: It is part of the territory of a district, comprising Populated Areas, where all of them have a minimum of 100 dwellings grouped next to each other, which receive the name of "Urban Populated Areas".
Rural Area: It is part of the territory of a district, comprising Rural Populated Areas, which extend from the borders of the urban Populated Areas until the borders of the district.
Populated Area: It is the place of the territory of a district which has a name and is inhabited by several families; or exceptionally, by only one family or one person with the intention to live there permanently.
The dwellings in a Populated Area can be next to each other, forming blocks, streets, and squares, like towns or cities; partially scattered, like hamlets, annexes, etc.; and completely scattered, like dwellings in agricultural areas.
Depending on the distribution of dwellings, a Populated Area can be urban or rural.
Urban Census Area [A.E.U. ]: It is the part of the territory assigned to an urban enumerator, who will take a census of the dwellings and persons existing there the day of the Census. It generally comprises 15 dwellings.
Rural Census Area [A.E.R.]: It is the part of the territory assigned to a rural enumerator, who will take a census of the dwellings and persons existing there over a period no longer than 15 days. It has one or more Rural Populated Areas and generally comprises more than 100 dwellings. By exception, there could be Rural Census Areas with less or more than 100 dwellings.
[Pages 6-13 not translated, they include general instructions for the enumerator on how to organize fieldwork and how to fill out the Census form"]
[p. 14]

Chapter four: Specific instructions for filling out the First Section, "Localization of the dwelling and number of household"

Dwelling Number: Number sequentially each dwelling (occupied or unoccupied) that is enumerated in the "Dwelling Number" box according to its appropriate sequence as determined by the scouting in your rural or urban zone.

In urban areas, number sequentially all the dwellings you come across (occupied or unoccupied) within the boundaries of your urban census zone, which you identified the day before the Census Day with your Section Leader [Jefe de Sección].
The number of the first dwelling will always be number one, and the numbering of the following dwellings should always be sequential: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,... and so on until you get to the final dwelling at the end of your Urban Census Zone. You may come across dwellings that are not on your list, but you should enumerate them and list them according to the order determined for your Urban Census Zone. Remember that the numbering and the total number of dwellings on your list is a reference point.
In rural areas list sequentially all the dwellings (occupied and unoccupied) that you come across in each populated area [centro poblado], beginning with number one and going forward until the last dwelling. Enumerate the dwellings in each populated area which is part of your Rural Census Zone.

Additional Form: Use the "Additional Form" box only when you have to record information about more than 10 people in the household. In this case use one or more additional forms, as the situation dictates.
Example: In dwelling number three, there is only one household, in which 13 people slept the night before the Census Day. Use two forms, one for the main form and another, additional form, as follows:

  • On the main form, record the information about the first 10 people, i.e. from the first to the tenth.
  • On the additional form, record the information about the remaining people, i.e. from the eleventh to the thirteenth.

Fill out the "Dwelling Number" and "Additional Form" box for each census form used in this household as follows [the following is an example which included graphics with correctly filled-out boxes]:

  • On the main form, write the number "3" in the "Dwelling Number" grid spaces and do not circle number 1 in the "Additional Form" box.
  • On the additional form, fill in the same dwelling number (3) and circle number 1 in the "Additional Form" box.

[p. 15]

Dwelling: A dwelling is a building or independent building unit that is built, adapted or converted so that it may be inhabited by one or more people, either permanently or temporarily. It should have direct or independent access from the street or through public-use spaces, like hallways, patios, or stairs.
It is normally separated by walls and a roof so that the people who live in it may separate themselves from others for cooking and eating, sleeping, and protection from the environment.
Examples [the examples are accompanied by a drawing of a different type or view of a building]:

  • The dwelling has direct access to the street. Its inhabitants can go out of and into their dwelling without going through anyone else's rooms.
  • The dwellings in this building of independent attached units [quinta] do not have direct access from the street, but rather through hallways and stairs. Its inhabitants can go out of and into their dwelling without going through anyone else's rooms.
  • The dwellings along this blind alley [callejón] do not have direct access from the street, but rather from the alleyway common to all dwellings [patio], and its inhabitants can go into and out of their dwelling without going through anyone else's rooms.

Box A: Geographic LocationBefore you begin scouting your Urban or Rural Census Zone, transfer the name and code of the department, province and district, as well as the name of the populated area [centro poblado], to box A, "Geographic Location." Transfer the information from the Urban Census Zone List of Dwellings or from the Rural Census Zone List of Populated Areas, as appropriate.

Box B: Census Location in Urban AreasWhile you are in the Zone Office and before you begin scouting your Urban Census Zone, transfer the information related to the zone number, section number and urban census zone number from the Urban Census Zone List of Dwellings.
Transfer the information related to the block number and building number [número de frente], to the respective grids in box B, "Census Location: Urban Area," on the census form. Do this according to the scouting you do in your Urban Census Zone.
If the Section Leader tells you that there have been any cartographic changes in your urban census zone, fill out box B, "Census Location: Urban Area," by transferring the appropriate information from the updated Urban Census Zone Diagram.
[p. 16]
In the spaces for grid 5, "Zone Number," the information may be in numeric form. If it is, use the first three spaces in the grid, leaving the fourth one blank. If it's alphanumeric, use the first three spaces for the numerical part, and write the appropriate letter in the fourth space.
[Below the text is a correctly filled out form for a numeric and alphanumeric annotation.]
In the spaces for grid 8, "Block Number," the information can be in numeric form or in alphanumeric form. Follow the same instructions as for grid 5.
[Below the text is a correctly filled out form for a numeric and alphanumeric annotation.]
Keep in mind that if you are enumerating an Urban Zone, then in box B: "Census Location," you do not record information in the spaces for grid 10, "Section Number," or 11, "Rural Census Zone," because that information corresponds to rural zones.
[Below the text is a correctly filled out form showing the first section and a "Urban Census Zone list of dwellings".]
[p. 17]
Box B: Census Location in Rural Areas
Transfer the "Section Number" and "Rural Census Zone Number" information from the "Rural Census Zone Populated Areas List" to the census form.
In the spaces for grid 11, "Rural Census Area Number" [A.E.R. number], if the information corresponds to a simple Rural Census Area number [A.E.R. simple], or a compound Rural Census Area number [A.E.R. compuesto], use the three grid spaces corresponding to first and last, respectively.
Example 1: If the enumeration takes place in the rural census area with the simple number 005-005, the correct annotation is "005" in both first and last.
Example 2: If the enumeration takes place in rural census area number 007-008, the correct annotation is "007" in first and "008" in last.
[Next to each example there is a filled out form.]
Keep in mind that if the enumeration takes place in a rural zone you do not record the information in the following grid spaces of box B, "Census Location": 5, "Zone Number"; 6, "Section Number"; 7, "Urban Census Zone Number"; 8, "Block Number"; and 9, "Building Number." These boxes correspond to urban areas.

Box 12: Dwelling Address
Fill out this box with the information obtained in the field. Only the Urban Enumerator should fill this box out.
The information about the dwelling address in your list of dwellings is to be used as a reference only.
[p. 18]
Type of Road: You must circle the number corresponding to the type of road:

[] 1. Avenue
[] 2. Urban Road [jirón]
[] 3. Street
[] 4. Urban Passage Road; [pasaje]
[] 5. Highway
[] 6.Extension [Prolongación]
[] 7. Other (side of a hill, irrigation ditch [acequia], etc.)
Name of Road: You must write the name of the road on which the dwelling is located. If there is no name, write SN (no name).
Door Number: Write the number on the dwelling's main door. If there is no number write SN (no number).
Examples:

Door number: SN
Door number: 303
Door number: 108D
Apartment Building [block]: If the dwelling is located in an apartment building of a complex [conjunto habitacional], write the number or letter in the corresponding box.
Inside (int.): Write the number or letter which identifies the dwelling in a building, attached independent unit [quinta], tenement building [casa de vecindad], or units grouped around a blind alley [callejón], etc. If there is no number write SN (no number).
Examples:

Int: 305k
Int: B
Int: 204A
Int: SN
Floor: You must write the number of the floor on which the dwelling is located. Keep in mind the following:

  • If the dwelling is part of a building and is located on the rooftop [azotea], write A in the space corresponding to "Floor". If the dwelling is located in the basement write the letter S. If there is more than one basement with private dwellings in the building, write S1, S2, S3, etc., as appropriate.
Numeric annotation: Floor: 9
If in the basement: Floor: S1
If on the roof: Floor: A
  • If the entrance to the dwelling is located on a second, third or higher floor, write the respective number in the grid space corresponding to "Floor," even if the entrance for the door to the dwelling is reached through another door which leads directly to the street.
Example: Rosita's dwelling is located on the second floor, but to get there from the street you go through a door leading to a patio, which in turn leads to a stairway to the second floor. Write the number 2 in the space for "Floor."
[p. 19]
Block and Lot Number: Some dwellings don't have a number on the door because dwellings in that area are divided into blocks and lots. In this case write the block number and the lot number in the corresponding spaces.
Example:

Block: 50
Lot: 25
Block: H
Lot: A
Block: A2
Lot: 25A, Lot: B10
Kilometer Number: Write the kilometer number at which the dwelling is located. Examples are 5, 11.5.
Example: The address for dwelling number five is Tulipanes Avenue. There is no door number, it's on block H10, lot 21, and it's located on the second floor with direct and independent access.
[Below the text is a correctly filled out form.]

Box C: Number of HouseholdsQuestion 13: Sir (Madam): How many groups of people (households) cook separately in this dwelling?

  • Read the question clearly and slowly, wait for the answer, and then write the number corresponding to the total number of households in the dwelling in the appropriate box. Read this question to the head of household. The head of household is the person who is recognized as such by other members of the household and who lives permanently in the dwelling.
  • If the respondent answers that there is only one group of people, or that only one person lives there, write "1" in the appropriate box.
  • If there is a person or group of persons in the household who cook their food separately, consider each group as a household.
Household A household is a person or group of persons, related or not, who occupy all or part of a dwelling. They share at least the main meals and provide for their other basic needs from a common budget.
[p. 20]
Box 14: Household Number
If there are several households in the dwelling, ask the respondent which of them is the main household. The other households will be called secondary households.
In box 14, "Household Number", write the name of the household which you are currently enumerating. The main household will always be household number 1.
Example: If there are 3 households in a dwelling, the correct way to write the information is as follows:

14. Household Number: 1
Census form of the first household (main household)
14. Household Number: 2
Census form of the second household (secondary household)
14. Household Number: 3
Census form of the third household (secondary household)
Private Dwelling with a Single Household:

Luis, his wife Elena, their son Luis, and their niece Maria occupy the same dwelling and share food expenses.
Juan, his wife Ana, and their children, Pedro and Sara, share the same dwelling and food expenses (common budget) with Alex's family: his wife Ida and their 2 children, Alex and Ada.
[p. 21]
Individual Dwelling with Two Households
Example 1: José, his wife Angela, and their daughter Mía eat together. José pays for the food and Angela cooks.
José has given a room to Raquel, his childhood friend, and she buys her own food and cooks separately for herself and her young son, Denis.
Example 2: Adán, his wife Eva, and their children Rita and Kike eat together. Adán pays for the food.
Sofía, Adán's daughter, and her husband, René, have separate expenses and eat on their own.
Private Dwelling with Three Households
Jonás, his wife Lili, and their son Rony eat together. Jonás pays for the food for all three of them.
Rosa rents a room from Jonás and eats separately. She pays for her own food.
Leví, Jonás' nephew, is a teacher, and eats separately from the rest of the people in the dwelling. He pays for his own food.
Example of Dwelling and Household
Let's look at the following graphic, which shows three groups of people who occupy a dwelling and cook their food separately.
[Below there is a drawing showing each of the three groupings in separate rooms.]

The first group, household A, occupies most of the rooms (dining room and 2 bedrooms) of the house and access the street directly from their [dining] room.
The second group, household B, occupies one room in the dwelling, given by household A, and goes through household A's dining room to get to the street.
The third group, household C, occupies a room which they rent from household A and goes through household A's dining room to get to the street.

To summarize, there are 3 households in this dwelling.
[p. 22]
A Dwelling with More Than One Household
In cases where there is more than one household in a dwelling, use one census form per household. The instructions for filling out the census form for the main and secondary households are as follows:

Form for the Main Household:
1. Fill out the "Dwelling Number" box.
2. Fill out all the questions in the first section: "Localization of the Dwelling and Number of Households."
3. Fill out all the questions in the second section: "Household Characteristics and Services."
4. Fill out all the questions in the following sections:
  • Third section: Household Characteristics
  • Fourth section: Household Makeup
  • Fifth section: Population Characteristics
  • At the end of the interview fill out the "Enumeration Summary" box with the appropriate information.
Form for the Secondary Household(s):
1. In the "Dwelling Number" box for the secondary household, copy the dwelling number from the main household's census form.
2. Copy the information from the first section of the main dwelling, "Household Localization and Number of Households," up to question 13. In question 14 write the number of the household you are enumerating.
3. In the second section, leave blank the questions from the second section, "Dwelling Characteristics and Services."
4. Fill out all the questions in the following sections:
  • Third section: Household Characteristics
  • Fourth section: Household Makeup
  • Fifth section: Population Characteristics
  • At the end of the interview fill out the "Enumeration Summary" box with the appropriate information.
Example: There are two households in the dwelling of Dominga Suárez López. Her household is the main household and is made up of two persons. The secondary household is made up of three persons: Ana Gonzáles Piu and 2 colleagues from work.
Use a census form for the main household and another census form for the secondary household.

[Page 23 not presented here, it includes instructions for the enumerator on how to fill out Census forms for a dwelling with more than one household]
[p. 24]

Chapter five: Specific instructions for filling out the second section, "Dwelling characteristics and services"
Fill out the second section, "Dwelling Characteristics and Services," for the main dwelling only.
Question 1: Type of DwellingBecause this question is completed according to your own observation, you must have a clear idea of each one of the options. Circle a single choice for the appropriate option.
If you circle any of the options 1 to 8 in item 1A, "Private Dwelling," continue to question 2 in this section.
If you circle any of the options 9 to 15 in item 1B, "Collective Dwelling," go to the fifth section: Population Characteristics.
If you circle option 16 in item 1C, "Other Type," go to the fifth section, "Population Characteristics."
Reminders

  • Item 1A, "Private Dwelling," should only be filled out during the enumeration of private dwellings (normal enumeration).
  • Item 1B, "Collective Dwelling," or 1C, "Other Type," should only be filled out during the enumeration of institutional dwellings, transients (in border checkpoint stations [garitas] ports, airports, etc.), or for the homeless (special enumeration).
[p. 25]
Private Dwelling: This is a dwelling intended for one or more persons who are related by blood or, if not related by blood, who live as a family. Among types of private dwellings are the following:
[Each of the 8 categories below is accompanied by a drawing which corresponds to the description.]

1. Detached House. A detached house is a building which has an exit leading directly to the street, road, etc. and constitutes a single dwelling.
2. Apartment in a Building. An apartment in a building is part of a building of 2 or more floors and has access to public spaces through a hallway, open-air passageway [corredor], stairway, and/or elevator. It includes dwellings on the first floor of the building with direct access to the street.
3. Attached Independent Units [vivienda en quinta]. These units are part of a complex [conjunto de viviendas] of one or two floors. The units are grouped around an open patio and have independent water and sewer service.
4. Dwelling in a tenement [vivienda en casa de vecindad, solar], units grouped along a blind alley [callejón], or shanties built on a vacant lot [corralón]. A tenement is made up of buildings grouped around a patio or open-air passage. The buildings generally have shared water and/or sewer service
5. Shack or cabin. This is a dwelling which is normally located in rural areas and built completely (floors, walls, and roofs) of natural, local materials, such as stone, bamboo [caña], straw, stone and mud mixed, wood, etc.
6. Improvised dwelling. This is any independent shelter or construction, built as a temporary construction with lightweight materials: woven straw or reeds [estera], beaten bamboo [caña chancada], waste materials (cardboard, plastic, etc.), layered bricks, or adobe. These are generally found areas on the outskirts of a city, forming settlements or new towns, etc.
[p. 26]
7. Premise not intended for human habitation. This is a permanent premise that was not built, adapted, or converted to a human habitation but which is, on the day of the census, being used as a habitation. This category includes dwellings located in stables, barns, factories, warehouses, commercial buildings or offices, etc. This is an exception to the general rule.
8. Other. This is a resource that is not intended for human habitation but which, on the day of the census, is being used for habitation. Examples are: caves, abandoned vehicles, or other natural shelters. This is an exception to the general rule.
This includes any type of lodging which can be transported, such as a tent, camper, etc., or a housing unit which can be moved, such as a boat, a yacht, a trailer, etc., and which was being used as permanent housing for one or more persons on the day of the census.
Collective Dwelling: A collective dwelling is intended for habitation by persons, usually without family ties, who are subject to administrative rules and who live together for reasons of education, health, religion, work, or tourism, among others. Among collective dwellings there are 2 varieties: institutional and non-institutional.
[The text below is accompanied by 3 drawings of various types of institutional and non-institutional dwellings.]

1. Institutional
  • Hospitals, clinics, and sanitariums
  • Jail or rehabilitation center
  • Retirement home, children's home, orphanage, etc.
  • Other
  • Convents, monasteries and the like
  • Boarding schools: high school, university, teaching schools, military schools, seminary schools, barracks [cuartel], etc.
  • Camps or barracks [barracas] (military, workers, etc), warships or merchant ships, police, etc.
2. Non-institutional
Hotel, hostel, or lodging. It includes motels, boarding house, guest houses, etc.

[p. 27]

Question 2: Dwelling Use StatusGiven that you will fill this question out according to your observations, you should have a clear idea of the concept and the alternative options. Circle only the number of the response which corresponds to what you see.
If you circle option 1, then go to question 3.
If you circle any of the options 2-7, go to the following question.
Reminders

  • Before you circle the number of any of the options 2-7, confirm with the neighbors that there is no one living in the dwelling. Once you've confirmed this, fill out a census form with the number of the appropriate dwelling, and then go to the next dwelling.
  • If you come across a building [which is not on your zone diagram], confirm with the neighbors that it is intended to be a dwelling. Once you have confirmed that the building in question is intended to be a dwelling and that there is no one living in it (unoccupied) because it is still under construction, fill out a census form with the number of the appropriate dwelling and in the box for that question circle the number for option 5: "Under Construction or Repair."
  • If you circle any of the options 2-7, remember to leave blank the question in box 13, relating to "Total Households," and box 14, "Household Number," in the first section.
Example: If the enumerator arrives at a dwelling and someone greets him/her, then it is an "Occupied dwelling with People Present," and the enumerator circles option 1 and goes on to question number 3.
Occupied Dwelling
[Each of the examples below, for occupied and unoccupied dwellings, is accompanied by a drawing demonstrating the concept.]

1. People present. This dwelling is occupied by people who are present on census day.
2. People absent. This dwelling is occupied by people who are not present on census day.
[p. 28]
3. Occasional use. This dwelling is not occupied the day of the census because the occupants only live there during the summer, over break, during planting or harvesting, etc.
Unoccupied Dwelling
1. For rent or sale. This dwelling is not occupied on census day because it is expected to be rented or sold. There is typically a sign or note indicating its status.
2. Under construction or repair. This dwelling is not occupied on census day because it is still being constructed or repaired.
3. Abandoned, closed. This dwelling is not occupied on census day because it has been abandoned or closed up [clausurada] for legal or security reasons, etc. This excludes dwellings that are in ruins.
4. Other. This dwelling is not occupied on census day because it is in ruins, etc.

Question 3: What is the Dwelling's Predominant Building Material?
3A. The predominant material of the exterior walls is:For option 8, "Other material," take into consideration any type of material not mentioned in the previous options, such as split bamboo [caña partida], palm leaves, stacked stones, etc. Ask which building material was used for the majority of the exterior walls of the dwelling.
[p. 29]
In some areas of the jungle the dwellings are like the one in the drawing (without walls). In this case, circle option 8, Other Material. [The text is accompanied by a drawing.]
The predominant material of the exterior walls: This refers to the construction material of the majority of the outside walls of the dwelling. It excludes fences or walls which surround the house.
Example 1: If half (50%) of the exterior walls are of thatch [quincha] and the other half (50%) are of wood, there is no one material that predominates. In this case circle the number of the best option, which is 3: wood (palm [pona], wood from the tornillo tree, etc.)
Example 2: If 60% of the walls are made of brick and 40% are made of adobe, circle option 1, "Brick or cement block," because that is the material which predominates.
3B: The predominant building material of the floors is:In option 7, "Other Material", take into account any type of material not mentioned in the above options, such as stone, brick, sand, paving stones [empedrado], etc.
Predominant building material used for the floors: This refers to the building material for the majority of the floors in the dwelling's rooms.
Example: The bedroom floor in Ernestina's dwelling is made of parquet, but the rest of the rooms in the dwelling have cement flooring. Circle option 2, "Cement."
Question 4: How is the dwelling supplied with water?If you circle one of the options 4-8, go to question 6. Otherwise, go to question 5.
In option 8, "Other," take into account any type of supply not mentioned in the above options, such as rainwater, snow, etc.
[p. 30]
Reminders

  • If the dwelling is supplied with water through various means, record the one that is used the most.
  • If the dwelling is supplied with water from underground which accumulates in a well, enters the dwelling through piping, and is treated two to four times per year, circle option 1: "Public network within the dwelling (drinking water)." However, if the water is not treated, circle option number 5, "Well."
  • Water which comes from a river or spring, is not treated in any way, and enters a dwelling through piping which the residents have installed themselves, is not potable. In this case, circle option number 6, "River, irrigation ditch, spring, or similar."
Water Supply: This refers to the origin of the water used in the dwelling, and the way it is supplied to the household.
[Each of the 8 categories below is accompanied by a drawing reproducing the written description.]

1. Public Network within the Dwelling (potable water). This is when the dwelling has its own connection to potable water within the dwelling.
2. Public Network outside the Dwelling but within the Building (potable water). This is when the connection to potable water is located in the courtyard, shared passageway or alley [pasadizo de los callejones], or lot around which shanties are situated [corralón],etc.
3. Public Tap (potable water). This is when the dwelling gets its drinking water from a tap or basin located in the street or other public place, regardless of how the water is stored and distributed inside the dwelling.
4. Water Tanker or Similar. This is when the dwelling gets its water from a tanker truck or water-seller's cart, etc. regardless of how the water is stored and distributed inside the dwelling.
[p. 31]
5. Well. This is when the dwelling is supplied with water from underground, originating from a well which may be located inside or outside of the dwelling, regardless of how the water is stored and distributed inside the dwelling.
6. River, irrigation ditch [acequia], spring or similar. This is when the dwelling is supplied with water originating from a river, irrigation ditch, spring, lake, etc., regardless of how it is stored and distributed within the dwelling.
7. Neighbor. This is when the dwelling is supplied with water from the neighbor's public network, well, etc. It may be given or sold.
8. Other. This is when the water is supplied in a way other than what is listed above. Examples are rain, melted snow, etc.

Question 5: Does the dwelling have water service seven days a week?If you circle option 1, "Yes," go to question 5A, "How many hours per day?", and write the answer in the grid space. Then go to question number 6.
If you circle option 2, "No," go to question 5B, "How many days per week do you have water service?", and write the answer in the appropriate grid space. Then read question 5C, "How many hours per day?", and write the appropriate response.
Reminders
  • Question 5, "Does the dwelling have water service seven days a week?" should be filled out only if you circled one of the options 1-3 in question 4.
  • If the respondent answers that he/she has water seven days a week because it is stored in his/her tank, cistern, etc., ask in a friendly way if they actually have water service every day or only some days.

[p. 32]
Question 6: What are the bathroom or toilets in the dwelling connected to?If the respondent doesn't answer affirmatively to any one of the options 1-5, circle option 6, doesn't have.
Public Sewer System. This is the system of pipes located underground on public land by which dwellings rid themselves of human waste. Depending on where the connection to the toilet/bathroom [servicio higiénico] is located (water, toilet, etc.), it may be:
[Each of the following six categories below is accompanied by a drawing reproducing the written description.]

1. Public sewer system within the dwelling. This is when the connection to the toilet/bathroom [servicio higiénico] is located inside the dwelling.
2. Public sewer system outside of the dwelling but within the building complex. This is when the connection to the toilet/bathroom is within the perimeter of the building complex, as is the case of housing units grouped around a blind alley, or shanties built on a vacant lot.
3. Septic tank. This is when human waste is sent directly to a septic tank which is treated with lime, ashes, or other substances which break down the waste. An example of this is muriatic acid, etc.
4. Cesspit, latrine. This is when human waste is sent directly to a pit which is not treated in any way. Don't count the use of bleach/lye or detergents as agents which break down the waste.
[p. 33]
5. River, drainage ditch or canal. This is when human waste is disposed of directly into a drainage ditch, river, canal, etc.
6. Doesn't have. This is when the dwelling doesn't have any toilet/bathroom.

Question 7: Does the dwelling receive electric lighting from the public network?Reminders
  • This question refers to whether the dwelling receives electric lighting from the public network, which comes from companies which distribute electric energy. It includes electric lighting provided by generator or municipal power supply [motor municipal].
  • If the respondent responds that he/she "draws" electricity from the street pole or his/her neighbor, circle option 2.

Question 8: How many rooms does the dwelling have in total, excluding the bathroom, kitchen and garage?If there is more than one household in the dwelling, the information about the total number of rooms in the dwelling should come from the respondent from the principal household.
Reminder

  • If the rooms are separated by curtains, fabric, plastic, cardboard, etc. they should not be counted separately. For example, if José has a single room whose sides are separated by curtains, you would write the number "1."
[p. 34]
Room. This is the space located in a dwelling, bounded by walls which generally go from the floor to the ceiling, and which has a surface area large enough to fit an adult-size bed.
The following are considered rooms: bedrooms, dining rooms, dining room/living room/kitchen combinations, studies, maids' rooms or utility rooms [cuarto de servicio], rooms used for professional purposes, and rooms used or intended for commercial purposes such as lodging.
The following are not considered rooms: hallways, entryways or sitting areas [sala de estar], laundries, kitchen/eating areas [cocina/comedor], and garages which are used as garages.
[The concept of room is shown using a floor plan as an example, which indicates the areas that are considered rooms or not.]

Question 9: Is the dwelling you occupy:For option 6, "Other", write down any other means of occupying the dwelling. If the head of household answers that the dwelling was built on a piece of land that he/she took over [invadió], but for which he/she currently holds a title issued by the Cofopri [Organism for Informal Property Formalization], circle option number 4, "Completely paid for."
Rented. This is a dwelling that is occupied in exchange for payment of a fixed amount on a periodic basis, usually monthly, to the owner of the dwelling.
Owned, taken over [propia, por invasión]. This is when a dwelling has been built and [the builder] has no recognized right to the dwelling or the land.
Owned, paying off in installments. This is when the property rights have been acquired through purchase by means of medium- or long-term credit or a mortgage.
Owned, completely paid for. This is when the property rights have been acquired through purchase. It includes properties acquired by inheritance or in other ways.
Provided by job or another household/institution.

  • Provided by job. This is when it is occupied in exchange for services rendered.
  • Provided by other household or institution. This is when it is occupied with the consent of a relative in another household, or of an institution, without payment (free) and with no exchange of services.
Other. This includes any other form of occupation of the dwelling. An example is antichresis (which is giving a dwelling as guaranty for a loan), etc.
[p. 35]

Chapter six: Specific instructions for filling out the third section, "Housing characteristics"
Procedure for the third section, "Housing Characteristics," for all households in the dwelling (primary and secondary).
Question 1: Does the household have...?Option 7 for item 1A, "Household Electrical Appliances," and option 5 for item 1B, "Services," should not be read out loud. Circle them if the respondent answers that he/she has none of the household electrical appliances and services mentioned among the preceding options.
Reminders

  • Don't make any assumptions based on what you see. For example, the refrigerator or television you see may not work.
  • If the respondent answers that he/she has devices or appliances that aren't working, ask if they will soon be repaired. If the respondent doesn't plan on repairing them, do not include them.

Question 2: What is the most common energy or fuel used in the household for cooking?Take into account only the fuel which is used most frequently in the household.
If you circle any of the options 3-6, go to question 2A, "Do you have a chimney in the place where the kitchen is located?"
Include branches, dry leaves, straw, etc. in option 7, "Other."
Option 8, "They don't cook," should not be read out loud. Circle this option only if they do not cook their food in the household.
[p. 36]
Chimney. This is the duct whose purpose is to vent or expel to the outside smoke created when using the kitchen to prepare food. This duct may be of metal or other material and should be located directly where the smoke or byproduct of the kerosene, coal, wood, or dung escapes.

Question 3: How many of the people who used to be part of this household are living permanently in another country?There is no period of reference for this question. Include all people who were part of and lived in the household and who emigrated to live in another country permanently.
If the respondent says that no one who was a member of the household left to live permanently in another country, write 0 in the appropriate box. If there were 10 or more, write 9.
Example: German (the head of household) says that his son Fernando, who used to be part of the household, has been living permanently in Argentina for five years. Write 1 in the box that corresponds to "Number of persons."
[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing box 3 from the Census Form correctly filled out according to the example.]

Question 4: Is there anyone with a disability, that is, a person with a permanent physical or mental impairment which limits one or more of his/her activities of daily living? Does anyone in this household have a permanent impairment or restriction?In option 5, "Other impairment or restriction," include Down syndrome, mental retardation, senile dementia, Alzheimer's, autism, psychiatric disturbance, etc.
Option 6, "No one with a disability," should not be read out loud. Circle this option only if no one in the household has a permanent impairment or restriction.
Disability. This is when a person has permanent physical, visual, auditory or mental impairments that substantially limit one or more of the activities of daily living in the manner or within the range considered normal for his/her age.
[p. 37]

Chapter seven: Specific instructions for filling out the fourth section, "Household make-up"
The information in the fourth section, "Household Make-up," should be given by the head of household.
Question 1: How many people slept here the day before the Census Day? Don't forget newborns, seniors and visitors.All people who slept in or were in the dwelling the night of Saturday October 20 to Sunday October 21 should be counted and recorded.
The information recorded in question 1 should coincide with the number of people recorded in question 2 of this same section.
If you are in a rural area keep in mind that, for every household, this question always refers to October 21. This is the case even if a person who slept in the dwelling the night before the census is not in the house at the time of the enumeration.
The "Census Moment" (zero hour on the day of the census). Keeping in mind that there is a 24-hour time system based on a cycle that begins at zero hours and ends at 24 hours, zero hour on census day is the moment that October 20th ends and October 21st begins. It's the point of reference used to determine which people in a dwelling will be enumerated.
[p. 38]
Using the concept of the "census moment," enumerate as follows:
Enumerate:

  • All people who slept the night before census day in the dwelling: household members, household employees, relatives, friends, and visitors.
  • Children who were born before zero hour on the day of the census.
  • People who died after zero hour on the day of the census.
  • As an exception to the general rule, enumerate people who, for business or social reasons, did not sleep in the household the night before census day and who will not be enumerated in any other place but who are present [at the time of the enumeration]. For example, people who were working that night as night watchmen, police, nurses, security guards, fire fighters, those who returned from a trip, etc.
Do not enumerate:

  • People who did not sleep in the dwelling the night before the census, and who will be enumerated elsewhere.
  • Children who were born after zero hour on census day.
  • People who died before zero hour on census day.
Example: The day before the census, Juanita, her five children and a household employee slept in Juanita's household. Her husband, a security guard, did not sleep in the household the night before census day because he was on duty, but he is present at the time of the enumeration of the household and will not be enumerated in any other place. Thus, in the grid for question 1, write the number 8.
[A graphic below shows box number 1 from the census form correctly filled out in accordance with the above example.]
Question 2: What is the name and paternal surname of each one of the people who slept here the night before the census day?
On each line record the first name and paternal surname of each person who slept in the dwelling the night before the census day. Keep in mind that:

  • The first line (Person 1) is for the head of household. The head of household is the person who will give you his/her own name and paternal surname.
  • The head of household is the person who will tell you the first name and paternal surname of all the other people who slept in the dwelling the night before the Census Day.
  • For newborn babies born before zero hour on Census Day but not yet named, write "newborn," followed by the paternal surname, in the appropriate line.
  • Record people according to their relationship with the head of household in the following order:
[p. 39]
  • Head of household (on the first line).
  • Spouse or partner.
  • Single children and/or stepchildren and/or adopted children without children. Record by age, from oldest to youngest.
  • Single children and/or stepchildren and/or adopted children with children. Record by age, from oldest to youngest, followed by their children.
  • Married or partnered children and/or stepchildren and/or adopted children, followed by their spouses and children (family).
  • Sons-in-law or daughters-in-law
  • Grandchildren
  • Parents or parents-in-law
  • Other relatives (aunts and uncles, siblings, cousins, etc.)
  • Household workers
  • Boarders
  • Other persons not related to the head of household (friends, co-godparents, godchildren, etc.)
Example: Juan Vargas Vera is the head of household. The night before the Census Day the following people slept in the household: His wife, Juana Albán Rosado; his eldest daughter Marita Vargas Albán (single mother), along with her young son José Vargas Vargas; his second daughter, Luisa Vargas Albán; and her husband Manuel Granda Suárez.
[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing box 2 from the Census Form correctly filled out in accordance with the directions.]
Household with more than 10 people
If there are more than 10 people in the household, use one or more additional forms as needed. There is only enough space to record 10 people in question 2 of the forth section, as well as in the fifth section. Fill out the additional form as follows:

1. Copy the information in the "Dwelling Number" grid spaces from the main form onto the additional form and circle number 1 on the additional form in the "Additional Form" box. Then copy all the information from the first section, "Dwelling Localization and Number of Households" in the same way.
2. Leave blank the second section, "Dwelling Characteristics and Services." Leave blank the third section, "Household Characteristics."
3. Go to the fourth section and fill that out. Leave question 1 blank and only fill out question 2, recording the first name and paternal last name of the rest of the people, starting with person number 11.
4. Continue enumerating in the fifth section, requesting information about the rest of the people in the household, beginning with person 11.
[p. 40]
Example: In César Montenegro's household you will need to use an additional form to continue filling out the information for person number 11, his grand-daughter Mariela Montenegro.
[Page 40 not presented here, it includes instructions for the enumerator on how to fill out Census forms for a household with more than 10 people"]
[p. 41]
Enumeration summary box
Fill out this box when you finish enumerating a household, collective dwelling, or other.
When you finish enumerating a dwelling (individual dwelling)
  • Before filling in the "Total," "Males," and "Females" spaces, verify that the total number of people recorded in section five, "Population Characteristics," is equal to the total number of people recorded in questions 1 and 2 of the fourth section. If the information doesn't match, make the appropriate corrections.
  • In the grid for "Total," write the total number of people in the household. Include each person recorded in the fifth section.
  • In the grid for "Males," write the total number of males in the household. Include each male recorded in question 2 of the fifth section.
[p. 42]
  • In the grid for "Females," write the total number of females in the household. Include all females recorded in question 2 of the fifth section.
  • If you used additional forms because there were more than 10 people in the household, fill out the information corresponding to this space only on the main form (the first form you used). Leave the "Enumeration Summary" box blank on the additional forms.
Example: Observe how the "Enumeration Summary" boxes are filled out for César Montenegro's household.
[Next to the text there are two graphics, one of the main form and one of the additional form, correctly filled out according to the instructions above.]
When you have finished enumerating a "Collective" or "Other" type dwelling:
  • Count up all of the people recorded in the fifth section when you are filling out the grid spaces for "Total," "Males," and "Females" in the "Enumeration Summary" box. Keep in mind that if you used more than one census form you must count up the people you recorded on each of them.
  • In the grid for "Total," add up all of the people, including every person recorded in the fifth section, taking into account all the forms you used.
  • In the grid for "Males," add up all of the males, including every male recorded in question 2 of the fifth section, taking into account all the forms you used.
  • In the space for "Females," add up all of the females, including every female recorded in question 2 of the fifth section, taking into account all the forms you used.
[p. 43]
  • If you used additional forms, fill out the corresponding information in this box only on the main form (the first form you used). For the rest of the additional forms, leave the "Enumeration Summary" box blank.
Example: In the "Buen Descanso" retirement home you enumerated 25 people (15 men and 10 women). To correctly fill out the "Enumeration Summary" box, add up all the people recorded in the fifth section of the three forms used (the main form and two additional forms) and record the information on the main form only.
[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing the third and fourth sections of the three forms (the main form and two additional forms) filled out according to the instructions above.]
[p. 44]

Chapter eight: Specific instructions for filling out the fifth section, "Population characteristics"
In the fifth section, "Population Characteristics," you are able to compile information about 10 people. Each person gets a page.
Request information for this page directly from each person aged 12 and older.
Ask the head of household for information about people aged less than 12, or people who are limited in their ability to hear or make themselves understood.
Person number and name boxesIn the "Person Number" box, number each person beginning with number 1 and according to the order in which they were enumerated in the "Person Number" column in the fourth section. In this box, number 1 always corresponds to the head of household.
In the "Name" box, write only the first name of the person.
Person. A person is a member of the household or a visitor who slept in the dwelling (individual or collective) on the night before the Census Day.

For All People[Applies to questions 1-8]
Question 1: What is your relation to the head of household?

  • If you are interviewing the head of household (the first person recorded in question 2 of the fourth section), don't ask them this question. Instead, circle option 1, "Head of Household."
  • Do ask the rest of the people their relationship to the head of household and circle the corresponding option.
[p. 45]
Head of household. This is the person recognized as such by other household members and who lives permanently in the dwelling.
Other Relative. This includes blood relatives of the head of household: aunts and uncles, cousins, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews, siblings, etc.
Boarder. This is a person who pays the head of household for the right to live in the dwelling and to eat within the household.
Example: Juan Pérez is the head of household. If you interview his daughter, Camila, then you would circle option number 3, "child/stepchild," for this question.

Question 2: SexReminder
If the person's sex is not clear from the name, ask the respondent. Examples are María José, Santos, etc.
Example: You are interviewing Camila, so for this question you will circle option 2, "Female."

Question 3: How old are you in completed years?Record the age of the respondent on Census Day, and not the age he/she is going to be.
Do not record information in both the "Record years only" and the "Record months only" spaces.

  • If the person is one year old or more, write the number of years only in the "Record years only" space. If the person is more than 98, write 98. For those aged less than 10 years, write the number using a single digit.

[Next to the text, there are graphics of the "How Old Are You?" box show examples for a seven year old and a one-hundred-and-one year old.]

  • If the person is less than one year old, write the number of months only in the "Record months only" box. For those aged less than 10 months, write the age with a single digit. If less than one month, write 0 (zero) in the grid for months.
[p. 46]
[Next to the text, there are graphics of the "How Old Are You?" box show examples for a nine month old child and a child who is only a few days old.]
Example: Lupita Sandoval was born in March,1967. On October 21, 2007, she is 40 years old in completed years, so you write "40" in the box "Record Years Only."

Question 4: Do you have a birth certificate on file with the civil registry office? Having a birth certificate means that the person's birth has been registered in the civil registry office. If the respondent answers that he/she does not have a birth certificate because he/she hasn't picked it up from the civil registry office yet, or has lost it, circle number 1, "yes."
Birth Certificate. This is the document that proves a person's identification by means of his/her registration with the civil registry office.
Civil Registry. This is the public office in charge of recording births, marriages, deaths and other acts which alter a person's civil status. It issues certificates that prove a person's identity and maintains citizens' civil records.

Question 5: Are you a permanent resident of this district?

  • If the person lives in the same district you are enumerating, circle number 1, "Yes," and go to question 6.
  • If the person lives permanently in a district other than the one you are enumerating, circle number 2, "No." Go on to question 5A and write the name of the district and department on the appropriate lines.
  • If the person lives permanently in another country, circle number 2, "No." Go to question 5A and write the name of the country, making sure to write it only on the line corresponding to country.
Reminder
A person's place of permanent residence is the place he/she considers it to be.
[p. 47]
Example 1: Andrea is being enumerated in the Callao district. She tells you that she is a permanent resident in the district so you circle number 1, "Yes," and then go on to question 6.
Example 2: Juan is being enumerated in the Talara district. He tells you that he is a permanent resident of El Tambo district in the state of Junin and is here for his job. Circle number 2, "No," and write "El Tambo" on the line for district and Junin on the line for department.
[Next to the text there are two graphics reproducing box 5, each one filled out in accordance with examples 1 and 2.]

Question 6: Were you living in this district five years ago?

  • If the person hadn't been born yet, circle option 1, "Had not been born yet" and go to question 7.
  • If he/she lived in the district you are enumerating, circle number 2, "Yes", and go to question 7.
  • If the person lived in a district other than the one you are enumerating, circle number 3, "No". Go on to question 6A and write the name of the district and department on the appropriate lines.
  • If the person lived in another country, circle number 3, "No". Then go on to question 6A and write the name of the country, making sure you write it only on the line corresponding to "country."

Question 7: When you were born, did your mother live in this district?

  • If the respondent's mother lived in the same district you are enumerating, circle number 1, "Yes", and go to question 8.
  • If the respondent's mother lived in a district other than the one you are enumerating, circle number 2, "No". Then go on to question 7A and write the name of the district and department on the appropriate lines.
  • If the respondent's mother lived in another country, circle number 2, "No". Then go on to question 7A and write the name of the country, making sure to write it only on the line corresponding to country.
[p. 48]
Example: You are enumerating Hedilberto in the district of Rímac, department of Lima. He tells you that when he was born his mother was a permanent resident of the district of Chalcos in the department of Ayacucho, so for this question you circle number 2, "No," and write Chalcos and Ayacucho on the lines corresponding to district and department, respectively.
[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing box 7, correctly filled out in accordance with the example.]

Question 8: What kind of insurance do you have? If the respondent has health insurance from the armed forces, police, or a private insurer, circle option 3, "Other health insurance."
If the respondent does not have any health insurance, circle option 4, "None." Remember that this option should not be read out loud.
Example: Aurelia only has the PNP health insurance because her husband is the head of the National Police Force. In this case, circle option 3, "Other health insurance."
[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing box 8, correctly filled out in accordance with the example.]

For persons aged three and older[Applies to questions 9-12]
Question 9: What was the first language you learned to speak?

  • If the respondent says that the first language learned was "Other indigenous language," circle option 4 and write the answer on the "Specify" line.
  • Do not read out loud option 7, "Is deaf-mute." Circle this option only if the informant did not learn to speak a language because he/she is deaf-mute.
[p. 49]
Language. This refers to the language or dialect which the person first learned to speak, whether or not he/she currently speaks the language.
Example: Lucas was born in the mountains of Peru. As with his parents, the first language he learned to speak was Quechua. Many years ago he moved to Lima, where he learned to speak Spanish, which is the language he currently speaks. For this question, circle option 1: "Quechua".

Question 10: Do you know how to read and write?Reminders

  • If the person states that he/she knows how to read and write in any language, circle number 1, "Yes".
  • If the respondent only knows how to write his signature, his name, and a few numbers, circle number 2, "No".
  • If the person writes and reads using the Braille system, circle number 1, "Yes".

Question 11: What was the last level and grade or year you successfully completed in school?

  • If the respondent only passed the last pre-primary grade [transición], circle option 3, "Primary", and write 0 (zero) in the grid space.
  • If the respondent states primary, ask which year or grade he/she passed and write it in the appropriate grid space. The individual "Grade" and "Year" spaces may not contain both pieces of information.
  • If the respondent states secondary, ask which year he/she passed and write it in the appropriate grid space.
  • If the respondent states non-university higher education, find out whether the degree was completed or not and circle the appropriate option.
  • If the person studied in a non-traditional setting [Educación No Escolarizada, when students do not attend classes in a physical school on a daily basis], write the year passed and the appropriate level.
[p. 50]
No Level. This is when the person never attended a school. Include children who were in pre-primary classes [Educación Inicial] on the day of the census.
Pre-primary. This includes those who finished the following classes: early childhood center [estudios de nido], day-care [Cuna guardería], kindergarten, national pre-primary non-traditional program [Programa Nacional no Escolarizado de Educación Inicial] (Pronoei) and day care for children less than 4 years old [Wawa wasi].
Primary. According to the current educational system, this includes grades one through six. In the previous educational system it included the final pre-primary grade [transición] and grades one through five for both children and adults.
Secondary. According to the current educational system, this includes years one through five for both children and adults.
Non-University Higher Education. This includes teacher training schools [escuelas normales]; professional training schools [escuelas superiores de educación profesional]; non-commissioned officer training in the armed forces; business schools; technical colleges; and teaching colleges [institutos superiores pedagógicos]. In all of these schools the length of study is generally at least three years.
University Higher Education. This includes universities; officer training schools for the police and the armed forces; seminary schools; the Peru College of Art; the National Teaching College; nursing college; journalism school; and the Diplomatic Academy of Peru. In all of these schools the length of study is at least four years.
Examples:

  • Ana only passed the last year before primary school [transición]. Circle option 3, "Primary," and write 0 in the box which corresponds to year. Leave the space for "Grade" blank.
  • Lupita passed sixth grade. Circle option 3, "Primary," and write 6 in the space which corresponds to grade. Leave the space which corresponds to year blank.
  • Leví studies psychology at the university and has passed his fourth year. Circle option 7, "University Higher Education -- Incomplete."
  • Ricky is studying accounting in a college [instituto superior], not a university. He passed his fourth-semester of classes. Circle option 5, "Non-University Higher Education -- Incomplete."

Question 12: Do you currently attend a high-school, school, college or university?[p. 51]
Reminders

  • If the person is attending an early childhood center [nido], day-care [cuna guardería], kindergarten, national pre-primary non-traditional program [programa nacional no escolarizado de educación inicial] or day care for children less than 4 years old [wawa wasi], circle number 1, "Yes".
  • If the person is studying in a non-traditional setting [educación no escolarizada, when students do not attend classes in a physical school on a daily basis] circle number 1, "Yes".
  • If the respondent is attending advanced master's- or doctorate-level classes circle number 2, "No".
  • If the respondent is taking short courses in sewing, computing (fewer than three years), cosmetology, handicrafts, etc, or classes in a vocational school [centros de educación ocupacional] circle number 2, "No."

For persons aged six and older[Applies to questions 13-19]

Question 13: Did you work at least one hour last week for payment in cash or kind?If the respondent answers that he/she worked last week, circle number 1, "Yes", and go to question 16. Otherwise, circle question 2, "No", and go to question 14.
Reminders

  • Read the question slowly and clearly to make sure the respondent is clear about the reference period, which is last week.
  • Include paid employees in this question.
  • Unpaid domestic work (housewife) is not included.
  • Traditional barter arrangements and traditional unpaid collective work for the benefit of the community [modalidad de Ayni o Minka] are not included.

[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing the dates in question in calendar form.]
Last week. This refers to the calendar week previous to the census day, from Sunday to Saturday. The national censuses take place on Sunday, October 21, so "last week" is from the 14-20 October.
[p. 52]
Last week, did you work at least one week for payment in cash or kind? This is when the person worked at some job for at least one hour last week, and for which he/she received payment in cash or kind, even if it was for a very small amount.
Examples: Doctor, newspaper vendor, farmer.
[Each job title is accompanied by a drawing of the job represented.]

Question 14: Why you did not work last week?If you circle any of the numbers between 1 and 4, go to question 16.
Option 5, "Didn't work" should not be read out loud. Circle this option only if the respondent does not answer the previous options in the affirmative. Then continue on to question 15.
[Each of the 4 examples below is accompanied by an explanatory drawing.]

1. Didn't work, but had a job. This is when the person had a job but didn't work last week because he/she was on vacation, on strike, on leave, etc., and was paid.
2. Didn't work, but has his/her own business. This is when the person works for him/her self, but was temporarily absent last week and his/her company continued to operate and generate revenue.
[p. 53]
3. Did odd job(s) for payment in cash or kind. This is when he/she worked for at least one hour at an odd job or in casual employment last week, and received payment in cash or kind for the work.
4. Helped out on the farm or in the store or business of a family member without receiving any pay. This is when the person worked at least 15 hours last week in a family member's business without receiving any pay. This is the case for those who work in the field as unpaid family workers. An example of this would be agricultural assistants.

Question 15: If you did not work, what were you doing last week?Circle just one option.
If the person is 12 years old or older, go to question 20.
If the person is less than 12, end the interview and continue with the next person.
[Each of the 7 examples below is accompanied by a drawing.]

1. Looking for work and has worked before. This is when a person who has worked before took specific steps last week (sent out a résumé, visited potential employers) to look for work as an employee or an independent worker. It includes people who sought money or supplies to start their own business or company; who applied for permits or licenses to start their own business; and who were repairing their premises, machinery, or equipment.
2. Looking for work for the first time. This is when the person was looking for work last week for the first time (the person had never worked before). This person took specific steps (sent out a résumé, visited potential employers, etc.) to find work as an employee or independent worker.
[p. 54]
3. Was studying and did not work. This is when the person was studying last week in one of the following: primary school, secondary school, non-university higher education, or university higher education. This person did not do any paid work, nor did he/she look for work.
4. Living off pension or retirement income and did not work. This occurs when the respondent receives a monthly payment from the state or a private organization and did not do any paid work, nor did he/she look for work.
5. Living off investment income and did not work. This occurs when the respondent receives investment income derived from his/her assets (real estate, etc.) and/or capital and did not do any paid work, nor did he/she look for work.
6. Was taking care of the house and did not work. This occurs when the person worked only in the home the week prior to the Census Day and did not do any paid work, nor did he/she look for work.
7. Other. This category includes all people not included in previous categories. Examples include minors who are not in school, those enlisted in the military, etc.

[p. 55]

Question 16: What was your main employment last week?Write the exact name of the person's principal employment last week.
If the respondent replies that he/she had more than one job, ask politely which one he/she considers his/her principal employment. He/she should specify.
[Next to the text is a graphic reproducing box 16 from the Census Form, correctly filled out in accordance with the instructions.]
Reminder
Write the person's principal employment last week, and not the profession or trade he/she studied or learned if that is not his/her job. If the respondent is a teacher, for example, but worked last week as a school principal, write "School principal."
Principal Employment. This is whatever the respondent considers it to be and refers to the work the person did last week to produce goods and services.
The following is a table showing examples of employment, and how to record them correctly [table]:

[Column headings:]
(A) Correct
(B) Incorrect
Correct: Primary education teacher, secondary education teacher, etc.
Incorrect: Teacher.
Correct: Wholesale clothing salesperson in a mall, retail salesperson in a market stall, electrical appliance salesperson, etc.
Incorrect: Wholesaler/retailer.
Correct: Baker, restaurant cook, taxi driver, welder, lathe operator, tractor operator, agricultural laborer, shepherd, cleaning person, etc.
Incorrect: Laborer.
Correct: Farmer, operator of an agricultural enterprise, livestock breeder, poultry breeder, dairy farm operator, etc.
Incorrect: Agricultural worker
Correct: Typist, secretary, office assistant, general manager, head of HR, office manager, general manager/CEO, manager, cashier, private security, security guard, etc.
Incorrect: Office staff.
Correct: All-purpose domestic help, cook, housekeeper, butler, nanny, etc.
Incorrect: Domestic servant
Correct: Colonel in the Peruvian army, commander in the marines, non-commissioned officer in the Peruvian National Police, captain in the Peruvian National Police, etc.
Incorrect: Soldier or police officer

[p. 56]

Question 17: What type of activity did the business, organization or company in which you work engage in last week?

  • Write the specific name of the activity which the respondent's place of employment performs, or which the respondent performed for his/her place of employment. If the respondent works for him/herself, write the work that he/she performed.
  • As an exception to the general rule, if the respondent writes that he/she works for a public institution, organization or agency, indicate the name. Examples are "Ministry of Education", "Children's Hospital", "Peruvian Army", etc.

[Next to the text there is a graphic reproducing box 17 from the Census Form, correctly filled out in accordance with the instructions.]
Branch of Activity. This is the branch of activity expressed in terms of the type of goods produced or services provided by the company or business in which the person works.
The following is a table showing examples of branch of activity, and how to record them correctly [table]:

[Column headings:]
(A) Correct
(B) Incorrect
Correct: Fruit farming, cotton farming, vegetable farming, sugarcane farming, cattle ranching, small-animal husbandry, etc.
Incorrect: Small farm, livestock.
Correct: Engraved gourd making, hand-crafted pottery making, filigree making, textile production, altarpiece production, etc.
Incorrect: Handicrafts.
Correct: Blacksmith shop, car repair shop, lathe operator's workshop, bicycle repair shop, etc.
Incorrect: Workshop.
Correct: Primary school, secondary school, primary and secondary school, technical college, private university, public university.
Incorrect: Teaching.
Correct: Metalwork shop, furniture-making shop, etc.
Incorrect: Carpentry.
Correct: Retail grocery store, bread sales in the street, vegetable sales in a market stall, restaurant, pharmacy, hardware shop, etc.
Incorrect: Trade/commerce.
Correct: Shoe making, cheese and butter making, clothes making, ceramic production, etc.
Incorrect: Factory.
Correct: Taxi service, taxi pulled by a motorcycle, passenger transportation services, car wash, plumbing services, security services, etc.
Incorrect: Services.

Question 18: What type of employment did you have at your job last week?Read the question and each of the options slowly, continuing until you receive a positive response from the respondent. Circle the corresponding option.
Reminder
Record agricultural laborers as laborers if they are paid in cash or kind for their work.
[p. 57]
[Each of the 6 examples below is accompanied by a drawing illustrating it.]

1. White-collar or professional employee. This is a person whose job is primarily intellectual. He/she works in an institution, organization, or private or state company in exchange for monthly or bi-weekly payment in the form of a salary or commission, or payment in kind. Examples would be a sales cashier in a store or a professional who works for an institution or a company.
2. Laborer [obrero]. This is a person whose job is primarily manual. He/she works in a company or private or state business for weekly, bi-weekly, or daily pay in the form of salary, or per unit produced, or on commission. Examples would be factory workers in a shoe factory or a bricklayer's assistant.
3. Self-employed worker. This is a person who runs his/her own business or works independently and has no paid employees. Examples would be a sign painter, or a fruit vendor in the street.
4. Employer. This is a person who runs his/her own company or business, or independently practices a profession or trade, and has one or more paid employees. Examples of this would be a certified public accountant that has two paid assistant accountants.
5. Unpaid family worker. This is a person who works without pay in a family company or business run by a relative, regardless of whether or not they live in the same household.
6. Domestic employee. This is a person who works in a private dwelling in exchange for pay. These services are related to specific tasks within the household, such as washer-woman, cook, housekeeper, butler, chauffer, etc.

[p. 58]

Question 19: How many people worked at your place of employment last week?If the respondent doesn't know exactly how many people worked at his place of work, ask him/her to tell you approximately how many.
Reminders

  • This question refers to the total number of employees, including the headquarters and all the branches of a business, organization, or company.
  • If the respondent is younger than 12, end the interview with this person.
  • If the informant is 12 or older, continue the interview with question 20.

For persons aged 12 and older[Applies to questions 20-21]

Question 20: What religion are you?

  • If the respondent says that he/she is Seventh Day Adventist, Jehovah's Witness, Orthodox, Buddhist, Jewish, Mormon, Muslim, or Hare Krishna, among others, circle option 3, "Other."
  • If the respondent says that he/she does not have a religion, circle option 4, "None."

Question 21: What is your current civil or marital status?Take into account the civil or marital status of the respondent on Census Day.
If the respondent and his/her partner claim a different civil status, politely ask again in order to determine the correct civil status.
Example: If the respondent states that he/she divorced a long time ago and is currently cohabiting, then circle option 1, "Cohabiting."
[p. 59]
Cohabiting (de facto union). This is a person who lives with his/her partner without having married him/her in either a civil or religious ceremony.
Separated (from a marriage or co-habiting arrangement). This is a person who is separated from his/her partner and is not cohabiting or in a de facto relationship.
Married. This is a person who married in a civil and/or religious ceremony and is living with his/her partner.
Widowed (from marriage or cohabitation). This is a person who has not remarried after the death of his/her spouse, nor has this person entered into a de facto union or cohabitation.
Divorced. This is a person whose marriage bonds have been broken by a legal decree and who has not remarried and is not living in a de facto union or cohabiting.
Single. This is a person who has never married or lived in a de facto union or cohabitation.

For women aged 12 and older[Applies to questions 22-25]
Question 22: How many live-born children have you had in total?If the respondent has not given birth to any live-born children in her life, write 0 in the appropriate space. Then, if the respondent is 18 or older, skip to question 26. Otherwise, conclude the interview with this person.
Reminders

  • This question gathers information on all of the respondents' live-born children, regardless of who the father was.
  • Take into account all live-born children, even if that child is no longer living with the mother, or is no longer living.
  • Do not take into account terminated pregnancies, miscarriages, still-births, adopted children, or children of the husband only.
Live-born. This is a child who showed signs of life at birth, such as breathing, crying or movement.

Question 23: How many of your children are still living?If the person answers that no children are currently living, write 0 in the appropriate space and go to the next question.
[p. 60]

Question 24: In what month and year was your last live-born child born? The information corresponding to month should be recorded using one or two digits, as appropriate.
The information corresponding to the year should be recorded using four digits.
Reminder
Number the months as follows:

[] 1 January
[] 2 February
[] 3 March
[] 4 April
[] 5 May
[] 6 June
[] 7 July
[] 8 August
[] 9 September
[] 10 October
[] 11 November
[] 12 December

Question 25: How old were you when your first child was born?Write the respondent's age in the "Age in Years" grid.

For persons 18 and older[Applies to question 26]
Question 26: Do you have a national ID card?

  • If the respondent indicates that he/she has completed the process for getting a national ID card but still hasn't received it, or has lost it, or it was stolen, circle option 1, "Yes".
  • If the respondent indicates that he/she only has an election booklet [Libreta Electoral de 3 Cuerpos, the voter ID card that previously served as a national ID card], circle option 2, "No".
  • If the respondent indicates that he/she does not have a national ID card because he/she is a foreigner, circle option 2, "No".
National ID Card. This is the public document which is personal and non-transferable. It is a required document.

[Pages 61-80 not translated. This includes: chapter nine, "Instructions for Using and Filling out Supplementary Documents"; chapter ten, "Scouting the Enumeration Zone"; and annexes (sample diagram of enumeration zone, sample list of dwellings for an urban zone, enumeration summary form)].