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Republic of Peru
National Institute of Statistics and Informatics
IX Population and IV Housing
National Censuses
1993
Enumerator's Manual

[Pages 1-8 were not translated into English]

[1. Importance of a Census]
[p. 9]

District Census OrganizationDistrict: It is the lower political subdivision of the country. Generally, it is in turn subdivided in urban and rural areas.
Urban area: It is the territory occupied by the Populated Areas, which are the capitals of the district and those that have a minimum of 100 dwellings grouped next to each other.
Urban Census Area [A.E.U. ]: It is the part of the territory assigned to one enumerator, who will take a census of the dwellings and households on the day of the Census.
Rural area: It is the part of the territory of a district comprising rural Populated Areas, which extend from the borders of urban Populated Areas until the borders of the district.
Rural Census Area [A.E.R.]: It is the part of the territory assigned to an enumerator, who will take a census of the dwellings and households over a period no longer than 15 days.
[Pages 10-23 were not translated into English]
[p. 24]

[5. Specific Instructions for Filling out the Census Form]
[5.1 First Section: Location of the Dwelling not reported]

5.2 Second Section: Characteristics and Services of the Dwelling
Question No. 1: Type of DwellingEnumerator: Determine the type of dwelling, observing the private dwelling and taking into account the definitions. Circle the corresponding number.
Dwelling: For the purposes of the Census, it is any structurally separate and independent premise, made up of a room or group of rooms, meant for lodging one or more census households.
Also considered dwellings are those premises that, even though they are not meant for lodging people, are occupied as a place of residence by a census household at the time of conducting the Census.
"Separate" means that the dwelling is surrounded by walls, partitions, etc., and covered by a roof that allows one or more people to isolate themselves from others who form part of the community.
"Independent" means that the dwelling has direct access from the street by way of stairs, a hallway, corridor, etc., or by way of a road (in the case of rural dwellings). This means that the occupants can enter and leave their dwelling without passing through rooms occupied by other people outside of their household.
[There is a graphic representing question 1 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
[p. 25]
The concepts of separation and independence are represented graphically below.
[There is a drawing of a floor plan for a group of rooms.]

According to this graphic, how many dwellings are there?
According to the definition, there are 2 dwellings. The dwelling of household "A" and that of household "B" meet the requirements of separation and independence, because they are surrounded by walls and their occupants don't pass through rooms occupied by other people in order to leave or enter the dwelling.
The space for household "C" is not considered a dwelling, because it is not independent. In order to enter or leave it, one has to pass through the dining room for household "B."
In conclusion, there are two dwellings, one that houses household "A" and the other which houses households "B" and "C."
Private Dwelling: It is a dwelling meant to serve as lodging for one or more census households. They are classified as:
[Each of the eight examples below is accompanied by a drawing which corresponds to the description.]

Independent house: Is one that has a direct exit to the street, road, etc., and makes up a single dwelling.
Apartment in a building: Is a dwelling that forms part of a building of two or more stories and which has access to public areas through a hallway, corridor, stairs, and/or elevator. Also classified in this group are dwellings on the first floor of the building that have direct access to the street.
Dwelling in a quinta: Is a dwelling that is part of a group of one- or two-story dwellings located along an open-air patio and that have independent water supplies and drainage.
[p. 26]
Dwelling in a tenement house: Is a dwelling that is part of a group of dwellings located along a corridor or patio and that, generally, share a water supply and drainage facilities.
This category includes dwellings located in allies, urbanized land, and on wasteland.
Shack or cabin: This is a dwelling that is generally located in rural areas, built with natural materials of local origin, such as: stone, cane, straw, stone with mud, wood, etc.
Improvised dwelling: This is any lodging or independent construction that is provisionally constructed with light materials (woven plant material, crushed cane), waste materials (cardboard, tin), or with stacked bricks or adobe. This type of dwelling is generally found at the edge of large cities, forming slums, human settlements, invasions, etc.
Premises not meant for human habitation: These are permanent premises that haven't been constructed, adapted, or transformed for human habitation, but that are being used as dwellings on the day of the Census. Included in this category are dwellings located in stables, granaries, factories, warehouses, commercial or office buildings, wineries, etc.
Not included in this category are buildings that, even though they weren't originally constructed to be used for human habitation, have been transformed or adapted to serve that purpose.
Other types: This category refers to premises that are not meant for human habitation nor situated in permanent buildings, but that are used as premises of habitation on the day of the Census.
Examples: cave or other natural refuge, mobile dwellings, camping tent, canopy, yacht, trailer, etc.

[p. 27]

Question No. 2: Occupancy condition of the dwelling[There is a picture of question 2 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Determine if the dwelling is occupied or unoccupied and circle the corresponding number, taking into account the following definitions:
A) Occupied:

With people present: This is a dwelling that, on the day of the Census, is occupied and the people who live there are present.
With people absent: This is a permanently occupied dwelling, but where, on the day of the Census, the people who live there are not present. This condition should be confirmed by neighbors.
If the neighbors tell you that the occupants are momentarily absent, don't circle number 2. Keep that form and continue with the enumeration of the next household. Upon finishing the work in your Enumeration Area, return to the dwelling you left pending. If the people are still absent, just circle number 2 (with people absent) and consider your task completed.
[There is a drawing of a person knocking on the door of a residence with no one home.]
Occasional use: This is a dwelling that isn't being used on the day of the Census because it is used for summer vacation, relaxation, seasonal work, etc. This condition should be confirmed by the neighbors.
[There is a drawing of a summer house.]
B) Unoccupied
This is a dwelling that isn't occupied by anyone on the day of the Census, due to being:

a) For rent or sale
b) Under repair
c) Other reason (closed down, legally inhabitable)

[There is a drawing of a building for rent and a building under construction.]
[p. 28]
Enumerator:
From this moment on the information should be provided by the head or person responsible for the household.
Question No. 3: The dwelling that you live in is:Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for a response. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
[There is a picture of question 3 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Take into account the following definitions:

Rented: When the dwelling is occupied by a tenant, in exchange for the payment of a periodic fixed quantity, generally monthly.
Owned, being paid in installments: When the right of ownership is being acquired by one of the members of the household, through buying on credit, over a medium or long term, or mortgage debt.
Owned, completely paid for: Is a dwelling whose property rights have been acquired by one of the members of the household through purchase, inheritance, or other means. If it has been purchased, it should be completely paid on the day of the Census.
Used with the authorization of the owner, without payment: When the dwelling is being occupied with the consent of the owner and without any payment being made (free).
De facto occupied: When the dwelling has been constructed on land not one's own and the person doesn't have a recognized ownership right over the dwelling or the land.
[There are drawings representing the above five ownership conditions.]
Other form: This includes any other way of occupying a dwelling not included in the previous categories. It includes antichresis (a person, borrowing money of another, hands over his property to the creditor, allowing the use and occupation thereof for the interest on the money lent).

[p. 29]

Question No. 4: Construction material of the dwelling
A) The predominant material in the exterior walls is:Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
If it is a material that is not listed, circle the number that corresponds to "Other material" and specify the name of it.
[These instructions are accompanied by a drawing of a wall made of adobe and stones and a picture of part A of this question on the Enumeration Form. Adobe is the predominant material in the drawing, and the corresponding option is circled on Enumeration Form.]
B) The predominant material in the roof is:Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
If it is a material that is not listed, circle the number that corresponds to "Other material" and specify the name of it.
Keep in mind that some dwellings have a concrete roof, but then also have a covering or adornment of corrugated iron, roofing tiles, etc. In this case, circle number 1.
[These instructions are accompanied by a drawing of a roof made of concrete covered by roofing tiles and a picture of part B of this question on the Enumeration Form. The option corresponding to concrete is circled.]
C) The predominant material in the floors is:Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
If it is a material that is not listed, circle the number that corresponds to "Other material" and specify the name of it.
[The instructions are accompanied by a drawing of a dwelling with floors made of cement and floor tiles and a picture of part C of this question on the Enumeration Form.]
[p. 30]

Question No. 5: The water supplied in the dwelling comes from:Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
[There is a picture of question 5 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Take into account the following definitions:

Public water system: Is a system of pipes located in the subsoil of a public thoroughfare, through which potable water is provided to dwellings.
This service (the faucet) can be located:
  • Inside the dwelling: When the water connection is inside the dwelling.
  • Outside the dwelling but inside the building: When the water connection is located on the patio, in the passageway, etc. of an alley, shantytown [corralones], etc.
Public use fountain: When the dwelling is supplied with water that comes from a faucet or fountain located in the street or another public place.
Well: When the dwelling is supplied with water from the subsoil, which comes from a well, that can be located inside or outside of the dwelling, regardless of how it is collected and distributed in the dwelling.
Water truck or similar: When the dwelling is supplied with water from a water truck, wagon, water carrier, etc., regardless of where the water comes from.
River, irrigation ditch, spring, or similar: When the dwelling is supplied with water that comes from a river, irrigation ditch, spring [manantial, puquio], lake, etc., regardless of how the water is collected and distributed in the dwelling.
[There are drawings that represent each of the options for water supply listed above.]
Other: When the water is supplied by a means other than those previously mentioned. Example: rainwater, melted snow, etc.

[p. 31]

Question No. 6: The dwelling has toilet facilities connected to:Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
[There is a picture of question 6 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Take into account the following definitions:

To a public system: Is a system of pipes located in the subsoil of a public thoroughfare, through which dwellings get rid of human waste.
Depending on the location of the toilet facilities (toilet, lavatory, latrine, etc.), it can be:
  • Inside the dwelling: When the toilet facilities are inside the dwelling.
  • Outside the dwelling but inside the building: When the toilet facilities are within the perimeter of the building, as in the case of shantytowns [corralones] and tenement houses.
Septic tank or pit: When the human waste is sent directly to a well, which receives no treatment whatsoever.
To an irrigation ditch or canal: When the human waste is eliminated directly through an irrigation ditch, river, channel, etc.
[Each of the above responses to this question is represented by a drawing.]
Doesn't have toilet facilities: When the dwelling doesn't have any toilet facilities.

[p. 32]

Question No. 7: Do you have electric lighting?Read the question. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
[There is a picture of question 7 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]

Question No. 8: Without counting the bathroom, kitchen or passageway, how many rooms are there in the dwelling in total?Read the question. Wait for an answer. Record the response using digits in the corresponding box.
[There is a picture of question 8 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Take into account the following definition:
Room: Is a space located in a dwelling, enclosed by walls that go from the floor to the ceiling and that provide, at least, enough surface area to fit an adult-sized bed.
Therefore, bedrooms, dining rooms, living rooms, living-dining rooms, studies, servants' quarters, rooms used for professional or commercial purposes, etc. are rooms, as long as they conform to the aforementioned criteria.
The attic, if it conforms to this definition and is at least two meters tall, is considered a room.
If the dwelling has only one room that is used as a kitchen, dining room and bedroom at the same time, write the number 1 in the box.
[p. 33]

Question No. 9: How many households occupy the dwelling?
Read the definition of household carefully and slowly.
Then, read the question. Wait for an answer. Circle the number that corresponds to the response.
[There is a picture of question 9 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Keep in mind the following definition:
Household: Is the group of people, related or not, who occupy part of or a whole dwelling, share their main meals, and together take care of other fundamental basic needs. As an exception, a household can be made up of a single person.
Instructions for the Enumerator
If the dwelling has only one household, continue with the completion of the third section: "Household characteristics".
If the dwelling has more than one household, follow the following procedure:

- Determine the principal household by asking which of the heads of household is the dwelling's owner or tenant. When this is not possible, consider the principal household to be the one with the greatest number of members.
  • For the principal household, continue with the third section "Household characteristics."
- For the secondary households:
  • Use one or more forms, as necessary.
  • Record the same information from the first section "Location of the dwelling" of the principal household.
  • Leave the second section, "Characteristics and services of the dwelling," blank.
  • Continue the interview with the third section, "Household characteristics."

[There is a picture of the Instructions for the Enumerator on the Enumeration Form.]
[pp. 34-35 are missing in the original language document]
[p. 36]

[5] C) Does the household have any of the following means of transportation?:Read the question and each one of the options. Wait for one or more responses. Circle the numbers corresponding to the answers, as necessary.
[There is a picture of part C of this question on the Enumeration Form.]

5.4 Fourth Section: People that make up the household
The information in this section will be provided by the Head or person responsible for the household.

Question No. 1: In this household, including newborns and the elderly, how many people spent the night prior to the day of the Census here?
In this question, take into account:

All members of the household who slept in the dwelling the night prior to the day of the Census.
Children who were born before 0:00 hours on the day of the Census.
People who died after 0:00 hours on the day of the Census.
Relatives or friends who are living in the household due to reasons of health, vacation, etc., and who slept in the dwelling the night prior to the day of the Census.
Members of the household who, for work or social reasons, didn't sleep in the dwelling the night prior to the day of the Census, but who are present when the enumeration takes place. Example: doctor, nurse, police officer, etc.
Only for the rural enumerator
Take these instructions into account for each household in you Enumeration Area, even when one of the members of the household isn't present in the dwelling during the enumeration.
[There is a picture of question 1 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
[p. 37]

Question No. 2: What is the first and last name of each person?
Read the question to the informant, but before recording keep in mind that:
In the box: Complete relationship of people in the household, column (B), you should record the first and last names of each of the people who live in the household, following the indicated order:

- Head
- Spouse or partner
- Single children or stepchildren without kids
- Children or stepchildren who are married or in a consensual union and their families
- Parents and parents-in-law
- Other relatives (aunts and uncles, siblings, cousins, etc.)
- Household workers
- Boarders.
Other people not related to the head (friends, godparents and their families, son of the household worker).

Enumerator:
When recording the unmarried children or stepchildren, do so from oldest to youngest, according to age.
Married or cohabitating children will be recorded along with their respective wife and children after the unmarried children.
[There is a picture of question 2 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
[p. 38]

Use of the forms
Remember that the form has space for only 6 people, and if there are more than 6 people in the household you should use one or more additional census forms.
On the additional forms, circle No. 1 in the box Additional Form, copy the information from the first section: Location of the dwelling from the main household form, and leave the second, third, and fourth sections blank.

Total number of people enumerated in the household, by sex
This box will be filled out upon finalizing the interview in each household.
In the "total" box, record the number of people who have been enumerated in a given household.
In the boxes for men and women, record, respectively, the number of people enumerated in that household. For this purpose, review Question 2 in the fifth section of the Census Form (sex) for those enumerated.
[A picture is provided of a completed version of this part of the Enumeration Form, accompanied by a drawing of the corresponding household.]

[p. 39]

5.5 Fifth Section: Population Characteristics
In this section of the form, information related to the population is requested. It contains 23 questions.
Before beginning to fill out question No. 1, keep the following in mind:

Use one page per person.
[A drawing of two different pages, each with one name on it, is provided.]
In the box, record "Person No." and the number that corresponds to each person, beginning with No. 1, then No. 2, and so on, following the number order indicated in column A of the fourth section: Complete relationship of people in the household.
The number "Person 1" always corresponds to the head of household.
In the box "First Name," record only the first name of each one of the members of the household. Example: Pablo, Luis, MarĂ­a, etc.
In the case of newborns who don't yet have a name, record the phrase "Newborn" in the box.

For All People[Applies to questions 1 - 6]
Question No. 1: What family or other relationship do you have with the head of household?Read the question. Wait for the informant's response and then circle the number that corresponds to the response.
[There is a picture of question 1 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Take into account the following definitions:
Head of household: Is the person, man or woman, that the members of the household consider as such or who supports the household (principal supporter).
The Head of household will answer the questions for those younger than 12 and the disabled. If the head is absent, his wife or the oldest son can answer the questions.
[p. 40]
Question No. 2: SexCircle the number that corresponds to the sex of the person being enumerated.
[There is a picture of question 2 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]

Question No. 3: What is your age in years completed?Read the question and wait for the informant's response. Then, record the information in the appropriate box.
[There is a picture of a completed question 3 from this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:
The information in this question should be recorded to two digits. When necessary, put a zero before it. Example: if the informant states that they are 7, record: 07.
In "Box 1" Completed years: The age, in completed years, of people older than one will be recorded. If the informant states that they are over 98, record 98.
In "Box 2" Months: For children younger than a year, the number of months will be recorded.
For children who are less than a month old: record "00" in "Box 2."
Remember that the boxes are exclusive: This means that if the person is one year or older, their information will be recorded in box 1 "Completed Years" and you will leave box 2 "Completed Months" blank.
If the informant doesn't remember their age, help them in one of the following ways:

Ask for their year of birth and make the necessary calculation. For example, if the person says that they were born in May of 1942, at the time of the Census they will be 51 years old (1993 - 1942 = 51).
Request a personal identity document (military I.D., voter registration card, birth certificate, etc.) that helps you determine their age.

Question No. 4: In what district and province were you born?Read the question and wait for the informant's response.
[p. 41]
[There is a picture of question 4 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Keep in mind that:

  • If the person was born in the district being enumerated, just circle number 1, which corresponds to "Was born in this district".
  • If the person reports being born in another district, specify the name of the district and the province on the appropriate line.
  • If the person was born abroad, record only the name of the country on the line: Name of the province or country.

Question No. 5: Do you have any of the following disabilities:Read the question and each one of the options. Then, circle one or more numbers, based on the informant's answers.
[There is a picture of question 5 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
If the informant reports having a physical handicap that is not included in any of the alternatives, you should circle number 9 (Other) and write it on the corresponding line.
If the informant reports not having any handicap, circle number 0.

Question No. 6: Is your mother alive?Read the question. Wait for the informant's response and circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 6 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:
The question refers to the existence of the biological mother, not the existence of an adoptive mother.
Remember that, beginning with the following question, information is requested from people 5 years of age and older.
[p. 42]

For people 5 years of age and older[Applies to questions 7 - 11]

Question No. 7: In what district and province did you usually live in July, 1988?Read the question and wait for the informant's answer.
[There is a picture of question 7 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:

  • If the person was living in the district being enumerated, just circle number 1, which corresponds to "Was living in this district".
  • If the person states that they were living in another district, specify the name of the district and the province on the corresponding lines.
  • If the person was living abroad, record just the name of the country on the line: Name of the province or country.

Question No. 8: The mother tongue, language or dialect you learned as a child is:This refers to the native language or dialect that the person learned in their childhood, regardless of whether or not they currently speak it.
Read the question and each one of the alternatives. Then, circle the appropriate number.
[There is a picture of question 8 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]

Question No. 9: Are you able to read and write?Read the question and wait for the informant's answer.
[There is a picture of question 9 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
If the person states that they know how to read and write in any language, put a circle around number 1 (Yes).
If the person only knows how to write their name and/or some numbers, then put a circle around number 2 (No).

Question No. 10: Do you or did you attend any educational institution of regular instruction?This question refers to attendance of a study center belonging to the regular educational system.
[There is a picture of question 10 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
[p. 43]
Not considered in such attendance is participation in courses in dressmaking, computers, etc.
Read the question and, based on the response, circle the appropriate number. If the informant reports that they have never attended, circle number 3 and continue on to question 12.

Question No. 11: What is the last year, grade of study or level that you completed?This question is only for those who answered with option 1 or 2 in question 10.
Read the question. Wait for the informant's response. Then, circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 11 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
If the informant reports having passed Primary, Secondary, Regular Basic, or Trade School Basic, in addition to circling the number that corresponds to that level, you should record the year or grade passed in the box at the right.
If the informant reports Superior (Non-University) or Superior (University, complete, or incomplete), circle the corresponding number.
Remember that:

Initial or preschool: includes day care (nido) and Kindergarten.
Primary: According to the current Educational System, it includes from 1st to 6th grade, whether for minors or adults.
Secondary: According to the current Educational System, it includes from 1st to 5th grade, whether for minors or adults.
Regular basic (daytime): Includes from 1st to 9th grade of Regular Basic Education.
Basic vocational (nighttime): Includes from 1st to 9th grade of Trade School Basic education.
Higher (Non-University): This includes Normal Schools, Professional Education Superior Schools, Superior Technology Institutes, Armed Forces and National Police Non-Commissioned Officer Schools, and Business Administration Superior Schools.
[p. 44]
Superior (Non-University) will be considered completed when the person has finished the last cycle, grade, or year of the program that they studied. Otherwise, it will be considered incomplete.
Higher (University): This includes universities, Armed Forces and National Police Officer schools, religious seminaries, the Superior Institute of Art of Peru, the National Pedagogical Institute, and the Diplomatic Academy of Peru.
Superior (University) will be considered completed when the person has finished the last cycle, grade, or year of the program that they studied. Otherwise, it will be considered incomplete.

Remember that, beginning with the next question, information is only requested for people 6 years of age and older.
For people 6 years of age and older[Applies to question 12 - 17]
Question No. 12: What profession or trade do you have?Read the question and then record the answer given by the informant.
[There are drawings of a doctor, a lawyer, a teacher, and an engineer, as well as a picture of question 12 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:

Profession: Is the qualification or specialization acquired in University and Non-University Superior Centers within the country or abroad by the person being enumerated.
A person will be considered a professional when they have at least satisfactorily finished the last year or cycle of the program that they studied (graduated).
Trade: Is the specialty that a person learns by virtue of a personal skill learned on their own or in a learning center.

[There is a drawing of a woman sewing.]
The profession acquired or the trade learned by the person being enumerated will be explored, even when the person isn't practicing it on the day of the Census. If the person reports having two professions or trades, the one they consider being the main one will be recorded.
If the person reports not having a profession or trade, draw a diagonal line through the question.
[p. 45]
Enumerator: These questions will also be asked to people 6 years of age and older.

Question No. 13: Last week you were:Read the question and each one of the options until you get an affirmative response. Then, circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 13 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
If you circled the number 1, 2, 3 or 4, continue with questions 14 and up.
If you circled the number 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 0, continue with question 18, but only if the person is 12 years of age or older. If the person is younger than 12, end the interview for this person.
If the person is a minor, elderly, invalid, recruit, etc., circle the number 0 "Other" and specify [their status] on the respective line.
Remember what is understood by Last week: The week prior to the day of the Census and includes from Sunday to Saturday.

Working for some income?: If, in the week prior to the day of the Census, the person worked at least 15 hours or more for a salary, wage, or on their own.
Did you not work but had a job?: If, in the week prior to the day of the Census, the person had a job but didn't work because they were on vacation, were sick, on strike, etc.
Helping a relative without any payment?: If, in the week prior to the day of the Census, the person was working in a family member's business but without receiving any payment.
Looking for work, having worked before?: If, in the week prior to the day of the Census, because of having been let go, having quit, or having finished a prior job, the person applied for work or asked relatives, friends, or others about work opportunities.
[p. 46]
Looking for work for the first time?: If, in the week prior to the day of the Census, the person looked for work for the first time. That is, the person has never worked and is looking for work whether by applying or asking friends, relatives, or others.
Were you taking care of your home and didn't work?: If, in the week prior to the day of the Census, the person was just taking care of their household, without performing any compensated work.
Studying and you didn't work?: If, the week prior to the day of the Census, the person was studying and didn't perform any compensated work.
Were you living off of your pension or retirement and didn't work?: When the person receives an allocation from the State or a private entity without performing any compensated work.
Were you living off of your investments and didn't work?: When the person receives income or dividends from their goods (dwellings) and/or capital, without performing any compensated work.
Other?: Include minors, recruits, the elderly, cloistered nuns, disabled people, etc.

Questions 14 to 17 refer to last week, or to the last time employed.
Question no. 14: What is the main occupation that you performed?Read the question. Wait for an answer and then record the specific name of the main occupation that the person performed last week or the last time that they worked.
[There is a picture of question 14 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Below are some examples that allow you to see the correct form for making the notations.
[p. 47]

Incorrect notation Correct notation
Professional Mining engineer, agricultural engineer, medical surgeon, dental surgeon, pharmacist, attorney, economist, psychologist, primary school teacher, secondary school teacher, public accountant, sociologist, etc.
Office worker Typist, secretary, office assistant, project manager, general director, personnel director, office manager, general manager, administrator, cashier, etc.
Business person Wholesale grocery dealer, retail grocery dealer, domestic appliances dealer, street vendor of clothing, street vendor of fruit, etc.
Manual laborer Baker, restaurant cook, welder, lathe operator, blacksmith, tractor operator, unskilled farm worker, shepherd, etc.
Domestic employee Cook, housekeeper, butler, nanny, etc.
Military Sergeant in the Peruvian National Police, colonel in the Peruvian Army, lieutenant commander, etc.

Keep the following in mind:

If the informant has two or more occupations, you will record the one that provides the greatest income. If they provide the same income, you will record the one that the informant devotes more time to. If they provide the same income and the informant devotes the same amount of time, you will record the one that the informant considers to be more important.
If the informant is an attorney, agricultural engineer, etc. by profession and works, for example, as a Director of personnel, you will record Director of personnel.

[p. 48]

Question No. 15: What does the business, organization, or company in which you work do?Read the question. Wait for the response, and then record the specific name of the main activity of the place of work or that the informant performs on their own.
Below are some examples that allow you to see the correct form for making the notations.
[There is a graphic of question 15 in this section of the enumeration form.]

Incorrect notation Correct notation
Small farm Cultivation of "panllevar" [#tr]
Cultivation of fruit trees Cultivation of cotton
Cultivation of sugar cane Milking stable, fattening stable, etc.
Workshop Blacksmith's workshop, car repair workshop, lathe operator's shop, bicycle repair shop, carpentry workshop, etc.
Store Retail grocery sales, shoe sales, vegetable sales, restaurant, etc.
Farm Poultry farm, pig farm, etc.
Factory Shoe production, cheese and/or butter production, making of articles of clothing, soap production, alcohol production, soda production, etc.
Public Administration Health Ministry, municipality, National Institute of Statistics and Computing, etc.

[p. 49]

Question No. 16: In your place of work, were you a:Read the question and each one of the options. Then, circle the appropriate number.
[There is a picture of question 16 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember the following definitions:

Laborer: Is a person who performs a predominantly manual occupation and works for a public or private employer, receiving compensation for their work in the form of a wage, such as weekly pay.
White collar or professional employee: Is a person who performs a predominantly intellectual occupation and works for a private or public employer, receiving compensation for their work in the form of a salary, commission, payment in kind, etc., such as monthly pay.
Unpaid family worker: Is a person who works at least 15 hours a week in a company or business directed or run by a member of their family without receiving any payment for the work.
Domestic worker: Is a person who performs compensated services in another person's house.
Independent or own-account worker: Is a person who runs their own company or business or who practices a profession or trade on their own, without having any paid workers in their charge.

[There are drawings after each of the above response options to represent them visually.]
[p. 50]

Question no. 17: In your workplace, how many people work?Read the question and each one of the options. Then, circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 17 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that beginning with the next question information is only requested for people 12 years of age and older.

For people 12 years of age and older[Applies to questions 18 -19]
Question No. 18: Your marital status is:Read the question and each one of the options. Then, circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 18 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:

Partner in a consensual union: Is a person who lives as if married without having had a civil or religious wedding ceremony.
Married: Is a person who has had a civil and/or religious wedding ceremony and lives with their spouse.
Widowed from marriage or consensual union: Is a person who, after the death of their spouse or partner in a consensual union, has not remarried, nor lives in a de facto or consensual union.
Divorced: Is a person who has ended the marital bond through a legal decision and who has not remarried, nor lives in a de facto or consensual union.
Separated from a marriage or consensual union: Is a person who is separated from their spouse or partner in a consensual union and doesn't live in a de facto or consensual union.
Single: Is a person who has never been married nor lived or lives in a de facto or consensual union.

[p. 51]

Question No. 19: What is your religion?Read the question and, depending on the response, circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 19 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember the following:

If the person reports another religion, circle the number 3 and on the line "specify", record the name of the religion.
If the person reports not having any religion, circle the number 4.

Remember that beginning with the next question information is only requested for women 12 years of age and older.

For women 12 years of age and older[Applies to questions 20 - 23]
Question No. 20: How many children born alive have you had in total?Read the question and wait for the response. Then, record in the box, using digits, the number of children reported.
[There is a picture of question 20 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:

A child born alive is considered to be a child that, upon being born, showed some sign of life, such as breathing, crying, or moving, even though they may have died shortly thereafter.
If the person reports that they haven't had children, record "0" in the box and conclude the interview with this person.
Stepchildren and adopted children are not included in this question.

[p. 52]

Question No. 21: How many of your children are currently alive?Read the question and, according to the person's response, record in the box, using digits, the number of children reported.
[There is a picture of question 21 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
If the person reports that they don't currently have any children who are alive, then record "0" in the box.
Remember that: You should take into account all of the children, whatever their age and sex may be, and whether they live with her [the mother] or not. Stepchildren and adopted children are not included in this question.

Question No. 22: In what month and year was you last child (live birth) born?Read the question. Wait for the informant's response and record in the corresponding boxes the number of the month and the last two digits of the year of birth of the last child born alive.
[There is a picture of question 22 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Use two digits to record the month and year.
Example: April of 1960

Month: 04
Year: 60
Remember that:
Stepchildren and adopted children are not included in this question.

Question No. 23: Is this last child currently alive?Read the question and wait for the informant's response. Then, circle the corresponding number.
[There is a picture of question 23 in this section of the Enumeration Form.]
Remember that:
This refers to the last child born alive and who is alive on the day of the Census, whatever their age may be.
[pp. 53-55 were not translated into English]
[p. 56]

7. Special enumeration cases
Special enumeration cases are those that apply to:

a) Occupants of collective dwellings
b) Transients
c) People without a dwelling
d) People who are working on the day of the Census

7.1 Enumeration of Occupants of Collective Dwellings
In collective dwellings, only the first, second and fifth sections of the Census form will be filled out. A diagonal line will be drawn through the third and fourth sections.
Collective Dwelling: The premises or group of premises meant for human habitation by people who usually don't have family ties and who generally live together for reasons of health, teaching, religion, work, tourism, or other causes.
Examples: hotel, hospital, clinic, convent, care center, jail, boarding school, barracks, shelter, war ships, police stations, etc.
The enumeration of this type of dwelling will be carried out by the personnel in the collective dwellings or by special enumerators.

7.1.1 Instructions for filling out the first and second section
Before starting to fill out the Form, ask the person in charge or the representative of the collective dwelling if any private-use dwelling exists, such as for example the administrator's house, the guard's house, etc.
If one or more private dwellings exist, carry out the enumeration of them, using one Census Form for each one, and following the instructions from chapter 5 of this manual.
Then, you will proceed to carry out the enumeration of the people that live together in the collective dwelling. For this purpose, proceed in the following manner:
[p. 57]

Fill out the first section of the form, taking the information from Doc.CPV.03.33: Directory of collective dwellings in the district.
In the second section of the Census form, only question 1B, relating to the type of collective dwelling, will be filled out. Circle the appropriate number. If the type of collective dwelling is not listed, record the appropriate type of collective dwelling in the option "Other type".
Draw a diagonal line through questions 2 through 9 of the second section, and also through the third and fourth sections.
Begin the Enumeration of the people that live together in the collective dwelling starting with the fifth section of the Census form.

The numbering of the forms will be done according to the instructions in point 4.2.3.

7.1.2 Instructions for filling out the fifth section
Enumerate:

  • The people who work and live in the collective dwelling and don't have a private dwelling either inside or outside the collective dwelling.
  • The people who reside in or are admitted to the collective dwelling (guests, boarders, patients, etc.)
  • The people who work in the collective dwelling (doctor, nurse, administrator, etc.) and have their private dwelling elsewhere, but who didn't take advantage of the Special Enumeration ahead of time and are in the dwelling on the day of the Census.
  • Coordinate with the person in charge of the collective dwelling (administrator or representative) the order that you will follow to enumerate each of the people, being careful that as you move through the areas of the collective dwelling you don't fail to enumerate anyone.
  • The first person to enumerate will be the person in charge of the collective dwelling if they are included in any of the situations previously mentioned. Next you should enumerate each of the people that live in the collective dwelling. Use as many forms as is necessary.
  • For each of the people, draw a diagonal line through question 1, Family or other relationship to the head of household.
  • For identification, formulating the questions, and recording the information, follow the instructions given in section 3 of this manual.
[p. 58]
Don't Enumerate as part of the collective dwelling people who work there (doctor, nurse, administrator, etc.) and who have a private dwelling within the collective dwelling.

[7.2] Enumeration of Transients
Transients are: People who, on the day of the Census, are traveling in the country and who haven't been enumerated in any dwelling.
[There is a drawing of people at an airport.]

People coming from abroad who enter the country up until 0:00 hours on the day of the Census.
The crew of domestic and international ships which, at 0:00 hours on the day of the Census, are anchored in domestic ports.

Transients will be enumerated by a team of special enumerators, depending on the situation, at control points, airports, etc. where their trip ends, if this happens on the day of the Census. If the trip is prolonged and doesn't end on the day of the Census, the travelers will be enumerated at the first airport, port, control point, etc. where their means of transportation stops.

7.2.1 Instructions for filling out the first and second section
On each census form used, do the following:

Leave the box for Form No. blank.
In the first section of the Form, record the name of the province and district in which you are conducting the enumeration.
In the second section, question 1B (Collective dwelling) circle number 16, which corresponds to "Other type", and on the line write "Transient".
Make a diagonal line through sections three and four.

[p. 59]

7.2.2 Instructions for filling out the fifth section
Enumerate each of the transients, bringing together people linked by friendship or relatives, for the purpose of resolving any questions that may come up with respect to the person being enumerated.
Make a diagonal line through question 1, family or other relationship with the head of household, for each person interviewed.
For forming the questions and filling out the corresponding information, follow the instructions given in section 3 of this manual.

7.3 Enumeration of people without a dwelling
This refers to people (children and adults) who don't have a dwelling. Their places of shelter are parks, plazas, and the surrounding areas, and they are found alone or in groups.
These people will be enumerated by a group of special enumerators in Police stations, churches, public premises, etc. and, in some cases, in the public thoroughfare.
[There is a picture of a homeless man.]

7.3.1 Instructions for filling out the first through the fourth sections
In the first section of the Form, record the name of the province and district in which you are conducting the enumeration.
In the Second Section question 1B, option "Other Type", record "Without Dwelling" on the "Specify" line.
In the third and fourth sections, draw a diagonal line.
[p. 60]

7.3.2 Instructions for filling out the fifth section
Individually enumerate each one of the people who don't have a dwelling.
Make a diagonal line through question 1, family or other relationship with the head of household, for each person interviewed.
For forming the questions and filling out the corresponding information, follow the instructions given in section 3 of this manual.

7.4 Enumeration of people who work on the day of the Census
People who work on the day of the Census because they provide services in public or private establishments and who, because of the nature of the job that they do, will not stop work on the day of the Census, will be enumerated days prior to the Census, in accordance with the instructions given by the heads of Enumeration.
These people are: employees of potable water and sewer companies, electric energy companies, communications and telecommunications companies, means of social communication, medical and hospital services, transportation services, security companies, firemen, police officers, military personnel, and census officials.
[There is a picture of a police officer.]
The Census Form and the Special Population Form will be used in this enumeration.

A Census Form will be given to Census officials so that they may fill in the information pertaining to their dwelling, households, and the people that live there.
If the Census official lives alone, they will hand in the completed form to their respective Census office, so, before the day of the Census, they will post a "Dwelling enumerated" label on the main door of their dwelling.
[p. 61]
If the Census official does not live alone, they will leave the completed form in their dwelling, with the information corresponding to the dwelling, households and people who live there, which will be picked up by the Enumerator for the corresponding area on the day of the Census, and who will post the "Dwelling enumerated" label.

For other people who work on the day of the Census and are not Census officials, proceed in the following manner:

If the person lives alone, they will be enumerated in the District Office on a Census Form. At the end of the enumeration they will be given a "Dwelling enumerated" label so that they can post it on the main door to their dwelling.
If the person does not live alone, they will leave the Special Population Form, which only contains information for that person, in their dwelling. During the Enumeration, the Enumerator for the respective A.E.U. [Urban Census Area] will transcribe that information onto the Household Census Form.

The instructions for filling out the Form are those that are specified in section 3 of this manual.