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National Institute of Statistics
Census Central Office
III General Population and Housing Census, 2007
Enumerator's Manual

[Pages 1 3 have not been translated into English]

[Page 4]

1. General Principles of the Census

1.1 Objectives of the Census

The General Population and Housing Census is aimed essentially at collecting statistical data that allow us to know precisely about the number and characteristics of the inhabitants of the Country, as well as the housing stock available. For example, with the 2007 Census we will learn information about each part of the country, such as:

  • How many inhabitants and dwellings there are;
  • How many children, adults and elders there are;
  • How many men and women there are in the Country and their level of education;
  • What kind of work each one has;
  • Predominant construction material in the dwellings;
  • Where the water used to drink comes from;
  • Who has or not electric power at home;
  • How many people in the households died, etc.

1.2 Who should be enumerated?

The Census will include all Mozambicans and all persons residing within the national territory.

Since the number of persons and their characteristics change with time, it is necessary that all responses to Questions of the Enumeration Form refer to the same period of time, which is called census moment. The census moment is the exact time that serves as a common reference for the responses to Questions of the Enumeration Form. That is, when responding to a Question of the Enumeration Form the respondent should refer to the situation they were experiencing on August 1, and not provide information concerning the day of the interview.

Knowing about the census moment is fundamental for one to learn precisely about the number of persons and dwellings in each Province, District, City, Village, etc. at a certain moment. For the 2007 Census, the census moment will be 12:00 a.m. of August 1, 2007.

In practice it will not be possible to enumerate all households on the first day of August. Therefore, most part of the population will be enumerated after that date. Thus, in order to obey the concept of census moment, the Enumerators should observe the following cases carefully:

Should be enumerated

  • All persons who usually live or not in the dwelling and stayed there in the night of July 31 to August 1, 2007;
  • Persons who died after Twelve a.m. of August 1, 2007;
Should not be enumerated
  • All persons born on August 1, 2007 or after
  • All persons who died before August 1, 2007
Who should be enumerated?
National Citizens:

  • Residents present at the census date
  • Residents temporarily absent at the census date
  • Nonresidents present at the census date

Foreign Citizens:

  • Residents that are diplomats residing in Embassies/ Representations
  • Residents that are not diplomats and are present at the census date
  • Residents that are temporarily absent in time or less than 6 months after the census date
  • Nonresidents that are present at the census moment

1.3. Method for Collecting Data

The method for data collecting adopted in the census will be the interview home by home, for the population who lives in households. The population residing in living quarters (hotels, boarding houses, student residence, nursing homes, orphanages, prisons, etc.) will be enumerated in those sites.

1.4. Who should answer the enumeration form?

Data on the characteristics and conditions of the Dwelling (Section E), Agricultural and Fishing Activity (Section G), Mortality (Section H), as well as the personal information regarding minors, the absent persons, disabled and deceased will be provided by the head of their household.

If the head of household is absent, sick or unable to provide information, it will be provided by a member designated by the household.

All adult and qualified persons, either living in the households or living quarters for longer than 6 months, if present, must personally answer the Personal Questions of the Enumeration Form.

2. Concepts, Definitions, and Basics

Household - It is understood that a household is the group of persons connected or not by kinship ties, who live in the same dwelling and share the same meals (food from the same pan) and most part of the house's expenses.
If in a house there are rooms occupied by domestic workers and their families, or rented to another family, they must be considered as separate households.
People living by themselves in a dwelling should also be considered as a household.

Head of Household- The person in charge of the household or the one who, for the purpose of the census, is indicated as such by the other members. In every household there should always be a head who is someone who resides there, being present, or not, at the moment of the enumeration, as long as their absence is for less than or equal to 6 months.

Attention: Not always does the person who responds on behalf of the household is its head. Always ask who the head of household is and register that person as such.
Living Quarters- This term refers to the establishment where people live permanently or temporarily. In general, persons residing there have no kinship ties and share a common life for health, educational, tourism, military or religious reasons, among others.
For the purpose of the census, this category includes hotels, dorm buildings, schools, military barracks, orphanages, hospitals, pensions, prisons, and other similar establishments.
If there are family dwellings inside the living quarters for administrative or general service personnel, those must be considered as independent households.

Census Moment- It is the moment to which the information collected during the Enumeration refers to. For the 2007 Census, the census moment is considered as 12:00 a.m. of August 1, 2007.

Nationality - It is an individual's legal citizenship at Enumeration. The nationality is regarded as a link established between the citizen and a certain State. The nationalities to be considered are the ones present in the person's I.D., Passport or Identification Document of Foreign Resident (DIRE).

Place of Birth - It is the place where the respondent was born.

Usual Resident- Refers to the person who usually lives in the household, either or not present at the moment of the interview.

The absence of a person in the household must be less than 6 months. If the absence is equal or more than 6 months, the person should not be enumerated in the household.

Present Resident- Refers to all of those who have the household as a usual residence and stayed there on the reference night, from July 31 to August 1, 2007, regardless of being, or not, physically present at the moment of the interview.

The following cases >should be considered as Present Residents:

  • All persons who stayed at the household on the reference night, either or not physically present at the moment of the interview;
  • Persons who, on the reference night, did not sleep in their houses because they were at a party, club/bar, ceremonies or funerals;
  • All the persons who, for labor reasons, did not stay in their houses on the reference night (Taxi drivers, Police Officers, Doctors, Nurses, Guards as well as EDM, ADM and other institutions' Picket workers).

Should not be considered as Present Residents:

Persons who stayed in the household on the reference night, but do not usually reside there, whether or not present at the moment of the interview. They must be classified as Visitors.
Absent Resident- It is the person who usually resides in the household but, for various reasons, on the reference night (July 31 August 1, 2007) did not sleep at his usual residence, for being absent for a period equal to or greater than 6 months.
The following example should be considered as an Absent Resident:

A person who did not stay in their usual residence for they were temporarily abroad or out of the place of residence, as long as it is was for a period equal to or less than 6 months, but intends to return.

Should not be considered as Absent Resident cases such as:

  • A polygamous man who stayed at the house of a wife on the reference night, but at the moment of the interview was in another wife's house. He should be enumerated where he stayed on the reference night as a Present Resident, regardless of being or not present at the moment of the interview.
  • If a polygamous man did not stay at either house on the reference night, he should be interviewed only in the house where he was found.
Visitor - Refers to persons who do not usually reside in the household, but stayed there on reference night, even if not present in the dwelling at the moment of the interview.

Usual Residence- Refers to the place where the person usually lives.

Marital Status is the person's status according to the laws, habits and customs regarding marriage or marital life. The marital statuses which are objects of this census are the following:

Single is the status of a person of any gender at the age of 12 or more, who is not and has never been married by the civil register, church or traditionally;
Married is the status of a person who is united by civil or religious marriage;
Living together as married partners is the status of the person who lives with their spouse but is not married by civil or religious register. The polygamous men and their wives will be considered as being "Living together as married partners", even if that man has had an official marriage to one of his wives;
Divorced is the person who separated from or divorced their spouse, either or not by law. If a person was under that status but has remarried or reconciled, consider that person as Married or Living together as married partners;
Widowed is the person whose spouse died. If a person was under that status but has remarried or has been living with someone else, consider that person as Married or Living together as married partners.
Children born alive is the number of children a woman has had along her life, either or not alive now, either or not physically present on the date of the enumeration, either or not living with the parents.
The children who were born alive (showing vital signs), but who died after delivery should also be included.

Should not be included: children who were born already dead, i.e., those who after the moment of separation from the mother's body, did not breathe nor showed vital signs. SHOULD also NOT be included the stepchildren, i.e., the children that the husband of the woman surveyed had with another woman. The grandchildren, nephews and nieces must also not be registered as the children of the woman surveyed.


Children currently alive is the number of children who are currently alive, regardless of being physically present at the moment of the interview, usually living or not in the household. For example: married children who live in their own house, children working or studying in the country or abroad.

Children born in the last 12 months is the number of children who were born within August 1, 2006 and July 31, 2007.

Dwelling (home) for the purpose of the census, the dwelling (home) is every place used to house people.

Enumeration area is a geographical area (urban or rural) where the Enumerator will work during the enumeration process.

3. Duties, Materials, and Procedures Throughout Data Collection

3.1 General Duties and Methodology

The main duty for the Enumerator is to interview the households, collect data and register them correctly in the Enumeration Form. The enumeration will be done home by home.

Persons who live in the streets, avenues, parks, etc., should be enumerated, preferably, in the 1st day of the Census. Those people will be enumerated by special brigades organized by the Census Executive Agency (OER), which will work in the
Neighborhoods and Localities. The place where those people sleep/spend the nights should be identified prior to the start date of the Census.

In the Census there will be Urban Enumerators and Rural Enumerators. The first will work in cities and villages in brigades composed of 4 Enumerators. Each Urban Enumerator will work in an Enumeration Area with around 150 households. The Rural Enumerators will work in the rural area in brigades composed of 3 Enumerators. Each Rural Enumerator will work in an Enumeration Area with around 100 households.
Each brigade will constitute an Area of work which will be directed by a Controller.

Each Enumerator should:

  • Engage in the work with discipline, good behavior and responsibility;
  • Before starting the work, make the reconnaissance of the limits of their Enumeration Area;
  • Fill out the Enumeration Forms correctly - without mistakes, omissions or duplications of households and persons;
  • Hand in the Enumeration Forms to the Controller on a daily basis;
  • Ensure good cooperation with the population;
  • Keep permanent contact with the Controller, always asking him/her questions about how to fill out the Enumeration Form, or other aspects of the job, and;
  • Inform their Controller about the problems which require his/her intervention.

3.2 Documents and Enumeration Material

The Controller will distribute documents and necessary material to each Enumerator so that they can fully accomplish their task. The Enumerators will be responsible for keeping those materials (pens, plastic bags, verification Forms, records, sketch maps, Enumerator card, tags).

At the end of the enumeration, the Enumerator should return the following material to the Controller:

  • All Enumeration Forms filled out (ordered in sequence from the first to the last);
  • All void and spare Enumeration Forms ;
  • Verification forms;
  • Sketch maps;
  • Enumerator cards (the spare ones);
  • Tags of enumerated dwellings and non-enumerated dwellings (the spare ones).

3.3 Procedures During Data Collection

3.3.1 How to Avoid Duplications and Omissions?

The Enumerators must be careful to avoid the duplication or omission of persons and households. Each Enumerator will have a sketch map which will serve as support for their orientation in the Enumeration Area where they will work during the enumeration. To avoid omissions or duplications of households or persons, they should also strictly respect the limits marked in the sketch maps.

3.3.1.1 Duplications

Duplications occur when a household, a person or dwellings are enumerated two or more times.

For example, there will be duplication when a worker, who lives on a work site, is interviewed there and, on the weekend when he comes to stay with the family, he is interviewed again. In cases like that, the worker should be interviewed on the work site if he has not yet been interviewed at home, and should not include his family. The family will be enumerated in their usual residence.

Another example of duplication is when a person who has already been enumerated is interviewed again in another place on a visit to friends, family or a trip.

3.3.1.2 Omissions

Omissions occur when a household, a person or a dwelling is not enumerated.
In case the Enumerator does not find anyone at a certain address, they should ensure whether there are people living there. If so, they should fill in the header of the Enumeration Form with all the information they get and return later on or on another day until they find a member of the household.

At the end of the work in the Enumeration Area, the Enumerator should meet with the person in charge at the site to ensure, once more, that all households have been enumerated.

In case they have omitted a household or one of its members, they should go to the site in order to enumerate them. The Controller should be informed about that.

How to Avoid Omissions and Duplications:

  • Before starting the work, Enumerators should identify the limits of their Enumeration Area;
  • Respect the limits of the Enumeration Areas;
  • Before finishing the interview in a household, make sure nobody was forgotten, mainly the children;
  • At the end of every interview with the household, stick the Enumerated Dwelling tag to the door or other visible place.
3.3.1.3 Sketch Maps

Sketch maps allow you to find your Enumeration Area and correctly identify your limits, thus avoiding the omission and duplication of households.

Let us see some elements of the sketch maps.

a. Scale
Every sketch map has a scale that indicates the distance between two points. The scale of the maps for the urban area is 1/5000, which means that 1 centimeter in the map is equivalent to 50 meters in land. For example, a distance of 10 centimeters in the map represents 500 meters (1/2 Km) in land.
Most of the maps for the rural area were drawn in a 1/50.000 scale, which means that 1 centimeter in the map equals 500 meters (1/2 Km) in land. For example, a distance of 10 centimeters in the map represents 5 km in land.
b. Limits of the Enumeration Area
Most of the Enumeration Areas were delimited to coincide with the limits of the administrative divisions at its lowest level. Therefore, the urban Enumeration Areas can be constituted of one or more blocks.
Likewise, in the rural areas, the Enumeration Areas coincide with the administrative limits of the Village/Settlement, etc.
Each Enumeration Area has a limited number of households (80100 in the rural area and 100150 in the urban area). However, certain EAs can have a greater or lower number of households than expected for an Enumeration Area, depending on the concentration or dispersion of the households.

To avoid omissions or duplications of households, respect the limits of the enumeration area, enumerating all persons residing there and do not trespass your limits.

c. Returning the sketch maps
The Enumerator should use the maps with care and return them after the enumeration along with the Enumeration Forms and other materials that have been given by the Controller.
3.3.2. Prior Reconnaissance of the Enumeration Area
Two days prior to the start of the enumeration process, the Enumerator should make the reconnaissance of their Enumeration Area so as to recognize its extension and identify its limits and inhabited areas.
Most of the limits of the Enumeration Areas are visible. In the urban areas they are, for instance, roads and avenues, whereas in the rural area they are rivers, paths, mountains, etc. However, the help of a local guide is very useful to understand the limits of the Enumeration Area and find the inhabited areas, as well as to identify minefields.

3.3.2.(1). How to Enumerate in Living Quarters
A Living Quarter is an establishment where people live temporarily or permanently not constituting a household. Examples of Living Quarters include: hospitals, maternity hospitals, orphanages, nursing homes, educational centers, hotels or boarding houses, dorms, work camps, prisons. In these cases, the enumeration should be organized by the Census Executive Agency in order to enumerate the people who are staying in those sites and have stayed there in the reference night.

In the Living Quarters there may be three categories of people:

  • Those who only work in the site, but live in their households, should be enumerated in their households;
  • Those who work, live and have their meals in the site should be enumerated in the Living Quarter;
  • Those who are temporarily in the site as residents or inmates (patients, orphans, students, guests, etc.) should be enumerated in the Living Quarter.

People who reside in the Living Quarters will be enumerated by a special brigade constituted by the local staff properly qualified for the task.

3.3.3. Confidentiality
All statistical information provided by the households or persons is confidential.

What does confidentiality mean?

It means that that the statistical information provided by people is secret; it must NOT be passed on to any other person.
It also means that after the Enumeration Form was filled out it must NOT be seen by anyone, except for the respondent (when requested), the Controller and the superior hierarchies of the Census.
It means, too, that NOT EVEN the local and juridical authorities, the police or others may have access to the completed Enumeration Forms.
The data collected may be published only in the form of grouped statistical data, for instance, by province, city, village, etc. and never about a specific household or person.

The confidentiality of the statistical data is determined in the Law of the General Housing and Population Census and in the National Statistical System. Its goal is to establish reliability so that people can give true responses without fearing any kind of reaction against them.

The Enumerator should strictly follow the requirements of confidentiality in all phases of their work, under penalty of possibly being sanctioned by law.

3.3.4. How to Gain Confidence from the Enumerated Persons

In order to establish a trustful environment with the persons to be enumerated, the Enumerator should:

  • Clearly explain his duty and show their Identification Badge;
  • Stress the confidentiality of responses;
  • Avoid having people from outside the household overhearing the interview;
  • Keep the completed Enumeration Forms in a safe place, and always hand them to the Controller at the end of every working day;
  • Do not misuse the information provided by the families, i.e., do not tell anyone about what was responded by the households;
  • Avoid wearing inappropriate clothes at the interviews, such as short or transparent skirts, etc.

4. The Enumeration Form

4.1. General Instructions on How to Fill out the Enumeration Forms

In order not to omit anyone in the household, write down in Section C the names (first and last) of all the persons who usually reside in the household. After, write all the visitors who stayed in the household on the reference night, whether or not present at the interview.

The first name to be listed is the head of household's, followed by the rest of the members in order of kinship in relation to the head, starting with the spouse, child/children (from the youngest to the oldest) and then the rest of the relatives and people with no kinship.

If there is more than one wife in the household, after the name of the head of household write the name of the first wife and children, followed by the second wife and children. This will be done if the second wife and children live in the same dwelling and lead a life as one household. Otherwise, consider them as independent households.
ENUMERATOR: The list with the members of the household should be done directly in the enumeration form. do not use drafts.

If there are visitors in the household, they should also be enumerated.
After listing all names, go to Section D to collect personal data from each member of the household.

Remember that adults should provide data personally. For children, absent people, the mentally disabled, deaf, mute and the deceased (who died after TEWLVE a.m. of August 1, 2007), the data will be provided by the head of the household or someone nominated by the household.

When Section D is finished, go on to Section E to collect data about the dwelling.
In Questions where there is a |_| blank space, mark |x| in the number that corresponds to the answer.

In Questions where the answer is numeric, mark |1|2|if the number is 12, and |0|5|if the number is 5. When you read Internal Use, do not write anything.

Most of the Questions should have only one answer. Whenever you have any difficulty or doubt, ask the assistance of your Controller. Questions which do not apply to the person being enumerated, for instance because their age is not appropriate, nullify the space with an oblique line.
[Illustration omitted]

Avoid erasing the Enumeration Form. Write the responses when you are sure that the person surveyed understood the Question and the response is correct.
Remember: To avoid mistakes in the transcription, never rewrite the erased Enumeration Forms. For example, you have written the wrong response for P5, instead of Visitor (alternative 3) you have marked X for alternative 1. Correct it by writing || for the wrong response:
[Illustration omitted]

For Questions that require open-ended responses, for instance, P28 "What was (the person)'s main occupation/duty this week or the last time he/she worked?", if you have wrongly written a response, write a horizontal line over the wrong response and write the correct response above, below or next to it.

For Questions which the Enumerator should fill in with numbers, for instance, P4 "How old is (the person)?" and P31 "How many hours a day has (the person) worked in the last week of July (2531), this year?", if you have wrongly written a number, write a horizontal line over it. Correct the mistake by writing the correct number above, below or next to the wrong response.

Enumerator: On each site, please check whether there are people living in the premises of the main dwelling, garages, attics or warehouses.

4.1.1 How to Conduct the Interview

In order to obtain fair collaboration from the population, at the start of the interview the Enumerator should:

  • Greet, say his name and show the Enumerator Badge;
  • Say briefly what their duty is, the objectives of the Census and the kind of information to be collected;
  • Stress the confidentiality aspect of the information to be collected;
  • Request complete and true responses to all questions o the Enumeration Form ;
  • Always accept the answers and raise questions only in case they notice the questions were misinterpreted or the response is inconsistent.
  • In case someone refuses to collaborate with the enumeration, show them the Census Law, particularly Articles 6 and 7, which refer to the Obligatoriness in responding and Confidentiality;
  • At the end of the interview, thank the household for their cooperation and participation in the Census.

4.1.2 How to Formulate the Questions on the Enumeration Form

The way you formulate the Questions and register them in the Enumeration Form is highly important. As you ask questions, you should:

  • Speak slowly, using clear and simple language;
  • Read the Questions and alternatives for responses, when applicable;
  • Wait for the responses and write them down correctly in the space provided,
  • Repeat the Questions when necessary so as to obtain the right responses. If after having repeated the person still does not comprehend it, explain by using your own words or translate it into the local language, but do not change its meaning nor suggest a response.

4.1.3 How to Fill Out the Enumeration Form

In order to save time, on the day prior to the interview, fill in Section A of the Enumeration Form - Geographical Location - transcribing the information from the sketch maps of your Enumeration Area.

For the Enumeration Areas which have more than a block, you should write the number of block as you enumerate the households. For this purpose, you should ask the households which block they stay on.

Always be attentive that when helping another Enumerator in another Enumeration Area you should write in A7 the number of the EA where you are giving assistance.

4.1.4. Number of Enumeration Form per Household/Living Quarters

You should use one Enumeration Form for each household/living quarter. Each Enumeration Form admits 9 persons. For the ones which have more than 9 persons, more than one Enumeration Form should be used until completing the enumeration for the household/living quarter.

After the interview, you should fill in Section B (B1B4) for the first Enumeration Form only, and for the second Enumeration Form fill in B1 (Name of head of household/living quarter).

After enumerating the household or living quarter, stick the Enumerated Dwelling tag (White) to show that its members have been enumerated.

For the purpose of the Census there will be two kinds of tags; White for the dwellings which have been enumerated and Orange for those in which no one was found to show that its residents have not yet been enumerated.

Attention:

  • Stick only one tag to the dwellings which have two or more independent households;
  • For places where you find two or more dwellings as part of the same dwelling, only the main dwelling should receive a tag;
  • If you have used the Orange tag in a dwelling because you no one was found there, but after going back there you found someone, place the White tag and remove the Orange one after enumerating the household. Do NOT leave two tags of different colors in the same dwelling.

4.2 Specific Instructions on How to Fill Out the Enumeration Form

4.2.1 Section A: Geographic Location of the Dwelling

As mentioned before, this section should be filled out by the Enumerator prior to starting the field work. All Enumeration Forms should contain names and codes of the places which are being enumerated. (Section A of the Enumeration Form). The names and codes can be found in the sketch maps. Copy them to the Enumeration Forms.
[Illustration illegible and omitted]

A 12. House Number

Write in this space the sequential number of the dwellings as you enumerate them. For example, the first dwelling enumerated will be |0|0|1|, the second |1|1|2| and so on.
If there are two or more independent households living in the same dwelling, each one will have the same house number.

A 13. Number of Households in this Dwelling

For this Question you should indicate the total number of independent households you have enumerated that live in the dwelling. You should write the number in the Enumeration Form of the main household only. If you use more than one Enumeration Form for the same household, write the number in the first one only.

A 14. Number of this Household

For this Question you should write the sequential number of the independent households existing in the same dwelling. For example, in the same house there are 2 independent households. The first will take number 1 and the second will take number 2.

Note that the numeration is sequential only if it refers to the same dwelling. This means that you will have to start the numeration over whenever you move on to a new house, and not based on the number of the last dwelling you have registered.

A 15. Home Address

Write the Street name, No., floor, and Flat No. The space allowed for description should be used in cases where there are streets with no number. In cases like this, you should write one or more reference points to help identify the dwelling. For example: close to the Central Market, on the right side of S. Antonio Church, etc.

4.2.2 Section B: To Be Filled Out after Interview

B1. Name of Head of Household or Living Quarter

As mentioned before, each dwelling unit should have a head, who is nominated by its members. Write in the Enumeration Form, the name of the head of household/living quarter.

B2. Number of People Enumerated

At the end of the interview, the Enumerator should count all the people that they have enumerated and list them according to sex. The enumerator should only register the persons who usually reside in the dwelling unit. To make it easier, count the ones who, in Section C, were indicated with a circle in letter R (Resident).

When a household/living quarter has more than 9 people and 2 or more Enumeration Forms have been used, the verification should be done for the first Enumeration Form only, including all persons enumerated in the continuation Forms. For this verification, visitors should not be included.

B2. Number of Visits

It is possible that throughout the work you will not find anyone in the households or you might not be able to enumerate all of its members, thus having to go back there another time. Mark the number of times after meeting with the household and completing the enumeration for all members. For example, if you have visited the household 3 times, mark an X in the box for number 3. If the number of visits is equals to or greater than 4, mark an X in number 4.

B4. Declaration

After filling out the Enumeration Form and before saying goodbye, the Enumerator should review it, check whether they have not forgotten to ask any Questions and make sure all of them have been filled out. After that, they should write their Enumerator Number and name, sign it and date the Enumeration Form. The Controller will do the same, after reviewing it.

4.2.3 Section C: Persons' Names

For this section you should, first of all, list the people who usually live in the household, including those who passed away after TWELVE a.m. of August 1, 2007. After, the visitors who stayed in the dwelling in the night of July 31 - August 1, 2007, regardless of being physically present at the interview.

First, write the name of the head of household and after the rest of the members in order of kinship to the head, starting with the spouse, child/children (from the oldest to the youngest) and finally the rest of the relatives and people with no kinship to the head of household.

  • Be attentive to the fact that the name listed in b1 should be the first in section c (head of household).
  • In order to avoid the omission of children, ask whether there are children in the household

If there is more than one wife in the household, after the head of household register the first wife and children, followed by the second wife and children. This will be done if both wives live in the same dwelling and lead a life as part of only one household. Otherwise, consider them as independent households.

As you fill in the names of the people, ask whether they are residents or visitors and circle letters R (Resident) or V (Visitors). This will help in the preliminary verification that you will do after the interview, in Question B2. Do not forget to list the visitors who stayed in the dwelling on the reference night and then left.

If there are more than 9 people in the household, use the additional Enumeration Forms and mark an X at the top right side of the Enumeration Forms that have a continuation. That is, mark an X in every Enumeration Form used for the household, except for the last.

4.2.4 Section D: Questions About the Population

In this Section the Enumerator will collect information about each of the members of the household who are in Section C. Before filling out the Enumeration Form, remember the following:

Attention:

  • Start with the Head of Household;
  • Adults respond to questions of the Census in person;
  • The head of household will answer on behalf of the minors, disabled, absent and deceased;
  • Use Section D of the Enumeration Form to register individual data, including those about CHILDREN and NEWBORNS;
  • Attention to the fact that for each set of questions there is an indication to the age of those who are supposed to answer them.

Questions to All the Population Listed in Section C

P1. PERSON No. _ _
NAME ____________________
In the Enumeration Form, write the No. and the name of the person following the alphabetical order indicated in Section C. The first person to be registered in the Enumeration Form is the HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD, regardless of sex, followed by their spouse and children (from the youngest to the oldest).
The first page of Section D (Question about the population) is reserved to the head of household,

As the Enumeration Form does not allow very much space, there is no need to write the complete name; the first and last names are enough. For example, Casimira Xavier, Inácio Munguambe, Amélia Francisco, etc.
If it a child still unnamed, write BABY. Children who still do not have a name are frequently omitted.

Enumerator, attention:

  • To avoid the duplication, in case of a polygamous man, ask if he stayed in his house in the reference night. If not, he should be interviewed in the house where he stayed at that night.
  • If the polygamous man insists on being interviewed in the house where he is at the moment of the interview, do so by using the second page of section D. Write him off Section C and write in the notes that that is the case of a polygamous man who has been enumerated in the household where he stayed that night.
  • If at the interview someone who is usually the Head of Household is out of their residence for longer than 6 months, do not register them in the Enumeration Form . In this case, consider the wife or another relative indicated by the family as the Head.

P2. What is (the person)'s relationship to the head of the household

This question intends to know how each person in the household is related to the head of household. Read the question and wait for the response. Then, mark an X in the corresponding number. There must be one answer only.

Note that in each household there should be only one Head. That is why the first page of Section D is dedicated to the head of household, while the other pages are for the rest of the members, who will be enumerated in the order mentioned above.

Note: The kinship should be defined in relation to the head of household.

The kinship relations used for the purpose of this Census are:

  • Husband/wife is the person united by marriage, or is Living together as married partners, to the head of household.
  • Son/daughter is the biological/adopted child of the head of household.
  • Father/mother are the head of household's parents.
  • Stepson/stepdaughter is the biological son of the head of household's husband/wife.
  • Son in law/daughter in law is the husband or wife of the head of household's daughter or son.
  • Grandson/granddaughter is the son or daughter of the head of household's son or daughter
  • Other kinship refers to the person who belongs to another category not mentioned above (for instance, cousins, nephews, godsons, etc.).
  • No kinship refers to the person who has no kinship with the head of household (Example: two friends who decide to share a flat but are not relatives.)

P3. What is (the person)'s sex?

All the information collected in the Census will be cross-examined using the persons' sex. Always ask their sex, especially when the person is not present at the interview. Remember that there are names that appropriately do not identify a person's sex.
If the person is present, their sex can be easily identified.

Write an X in box number 1 if the person's a male and 2 if a female.

P4. What is (the person's) age?

This Question is also important because it will allow us to analyze all the information in terms of age. For example, illiteracy, unemployment and mortality rates are calculated based on people's ages.

Write the age of each member of the household correctly.

The person's age should be indicated in numbers of completed years according to their last birthday. For instance, if the person was born on August 31, 2006, they has not yet completed 1 year old on August 1, 2007. In this situation, the Enumeration Form should be filled out as follows: |0|0|0|. If the person is 9 years old, you should write |0|0|9|in the Enumeration Form.

Be aware that:

The age is to be written in 3 digits. If the person being enumerated is 7 years old, write 00 before the age, as in: |0|0|7|.

To determine the age of persons who do not know how old they are:

1- Ask when the person was born and look up that date in the table for age conversion (Attachment A)
2 - In case the person does not know their birth year, request their I.D., Birth Certificate or other document issued by official establishments which can be used to see the person's age or birth year. (Please see in Attachments the CONVERSION TABLE).

If the Enumerator cannot determine the age through those methods, they should try to obtain it by comparing it to other members whose age is known, or using the following procedure:

a) Use the dates of local or national historical events so that the person can try to remember their age or date of birth. To the age the person was at the time of that event, you should add up the number of years passed since the event and calculate their actual age.

b) Compare the physical characteristics of the person whose age is unknown with someone else's whose age is known.

Pay close attention to the children (if they can walk already they may be around 1 year old, or if they can speak they may be around 2).

c) To determine a child's age, if the mother has more children, you should:
  • Know the age of one of the children
  • Follow the order and interval between their birth so you can calculate the age of the child whose age is unknown.
d) For the cases which are difficult to calculate the age do not look for easy solutions by simply attributing them ages ending in zero or five. One should always distinguish the ages in years, as for example 36, 43, 78, etc.

P5. Say whether at 12:00A.M. of August 1, 2007 in this household, (the person) was a/an:

This Question is intended to verify the number of residents in the household, either present or absent, and also the number of visitors on the night of August 1, 2007. Read the Question and each of the alternatives for the answer (present resident, absent resident or visitor).

Be aware that:
You should consider as Present Residents the following cases:

All the persons who stayed in the household on the reference night, either or not present at the interview
Persons who did not stay in their houses on the reference night due to work, or because they were at a party or club.
All persons who, due to work, did not stay in their house on the reference night (Taxi drivers, Police Officers, Doctors, Nurses, Guards, as well as EDM, ADM and other institutions' Picket workers).

You should NOT consider as Present Residents
Persons who stayed in the household on the reference night, but do not usually live there, either or not present at the interview. They should be classified as Visitors.
You should consider as Absent Residents the following example:

A person who has not stayed in their usual residence on the reference night for they were temporarily abroad or out of their dwelling, as long as it was for a period of time equals to or less than 6 months, but intends to return.

You should NOT consider as Absent Residents cases like the following:

A polygamous man who stayed in one of his wives' house on the reference night, but was in another wife's house at the moment of the interview. He should be interviewed in the place where he stayed on the reference night as a Present Resident regardless of being or not present at the moment of the interview

You should consideras Visitors persons who do not usually reside in the household, but stayed there on the reference night, even if they are not present at the interview.
Be aware that this Question admits only one response.
For persons residing in Living Quarters you should consider the following situations:

If at the interview the students and others are on vacation in the dwelling where they lived in before going to the living quarters, they should be enumerated as Present Residents of that dwelling.
The students and others who, at the interview, are present at the Living Quarter should be enumerated as Present Residents of that living quarter.
In case the household declares they have one of its members living a Living Quarter, that member should not be enumerated in the household.
Students and others who are involved in the works of the 2007 Census far from their residence area should be enumerated as Visitors in the site where they are working and as Absent Residents in the living quarters where they usually reside. In this case, they should leave all the information about them with the head of the living quarter so that they can be enumerated.

P6. Say whether (the person) is

Read the question and each of the alternatives for response (black, mixed, white, Indian, Pakistani or other). Write an X in the box with the corresponding number.
A person's race is not always of easy identification. In order to be sure, you should ask them what their race is. Remember that there should always be an answer to this Question.

When asked about your race/origin, you should respond:

Black
Mixed
White
Indian

P7. Where was (the person) born?

We intend to know the individual's place of birth. A person can have been born in a city and live in another. This Question will be used to estimate migration. Read the Question and wait for a response.

If the respondent mentions a District or Village which is inconsistent with the Province, the enumerator should make the corrections by talking to the respondent. In case the doubts remain, check it with a member of the household or use the table with the Districts and Villages in Attachment B.

Be aware that:

If the respondent answers HERE, write the name of the Province or District when it refers to a Rural Area or write the name of the Province and City/Village when it refers an Urban Area of the site you are enumerating;
If the person was born in another place inside the national territory they should indicate the name of the Province, District or City. The Enumerator should avoid writing the name of localities, Administrative Posts or townships;
If the person was born abroad, write the name of the country.
Examples of how to fill it in:
If the respondent was born in a rural area, indicate the names of the Province and the District.
[Illustration omitted]
If they have been born in an urban area, indicate the names of the Province and City/Village where they were born.
[Illustration omitted]
Finally, if they were born Abroad, indicate the name of the Country.
[Illustration omitted]

P8. What is (the person)'s nationality?

Read the Question and wait for the response. The reference should be the nationality indicated in the person's I.D., Passport or Identification Document of Foreigners (DIRE).

For the Mozambicans, just mark an X in the box where you read 001|_| Mozambican.
For the foreigners, ask their nationality and write it in the appropriate space. Example: Angolan, Brazilian, Portuguese, South African, Tanzanian, Zambian, etc.
Attention:
Do not use the language spoken by the respondent to determine their nationality. Always ask their nationality.

P9. Does (the person) have any disability?

This is a very delicate question. Some people do not like to talk about their or their relatives' disabilities, especially if it concerns the minors. For that reason you should try and be gentle when asking that question.

Consider as a disability any of the following: blindness, deafness, amputated/atrophied arm(s) or leg(s), paralysis, mental and others.

If the respondent does not have any disability, write an X in box number 1 and go to P11. If they have any physical disability, write an X in the box that corresponds to the kind of disability.

This question admits more than one response. This means that if the respondent has an amputated arm and is blind, you should mark an X in the boxes that correspond to numbers 2 and 5.

P10. What has caused the disability?

For all persons who, in the previous question, have marked any kind of disability you should ask what the causes of the disability were. We intend to know how that person acquired a certain kind of disability. For example, if an individual has an amputated arm and says that he lost his arm while working, you should mark an X in box number 5 (labor accident).

Be aware that this question also admits more than one response. If, for example, in the previous question an individual had two kinds of disability, for this question they should indicate the cause for each type of disability.

P11. What is (the person)'s religion or belief?

For the purpose of the Census you should consider all religions or beliefs, regardless of being or not registered or organized. In case you have any doubts concerning the religion of the minors, you should register the one declared by one of the parents.
Read the Question and wait for a reply. If the respondent answers they attend the Anglican Church, mark an X in box number 2. Sometimes it is not easy for people to say what religion they profess because they simply know the name of the church. For example they could say it is Saint Sebastian Church and, in this case, mark an X in box number 7 (Other) and write LEGIBLY the name of the Church in the space provided. DO NOT USE ACRONYMS for names of religions. In case its name is too long, write it in some space available or use the space allowed for the notes.

Be aware that:

For the category No Religion you should include the persons who declared they do not have a religion, including those who said they were animists, atheists or agnostics.
Atheists are those who do not believe in the existence of God.
Animists are those who attribute to things a soul like the human's
Agnostics are those who are skeptical about the existence of any deity for there is nothing that proves it.

P12. Is (the person)'s biological mother alive?

This Question intends to know whether the respondent's biological (true) mother is or not alive. That is, it should not be considered as mother their stepmother, adoptive mother, tutor or the person who is in charge of their education and other responsibilities.
Read the Question and wait for a response. Mark an X in box number 1 the person's mother is alive, in box number 2 if the mother is not alive and in box number 3 if they do not know.

P13. Is (the person)'s biological father alive?

As in the previous Question, we intend to know the same information about the biological father. It should not be considered as father their stepfather, adoptive father, tutor or the person who is in charge of their education and other responsibilities.
Read the Question and wait for a response. Mark an X in box number 1 the person's father is alive, in box number 2 if the father is not alive and in box number 3 if they do not know.

Questions to people aged 1-17 only

P14. Has (the person) been registered in the civil registry?

This Question intends to know, among people aged 117, if they have been registered in the Civil Registry. Read the Question and wait for a response. If the response is Yes, mark an X in box number 1 and go to P16. If the respondent is not registered in the Civil Registry, mark an X in box number 2.

P15. Why hasn't (the person) been registered in the civil registry?

For those who, in P14, responded they were not registered in the Civil Registry, we intend to know the reasons that led to it. Ask the Question, wait for a response and mark an X in the corresponding box. For example, if the respondent answered that registering a child is not important, mark an X in box number 2 and ask the next Question (P15).

Questions to people 1 year old and above only

P16. Where was (the person) living on August 1, 2006?

With this Question we intend to know the person's place of living one year prior to the start date of the Census, that is, August 1, 2006. Read the Question and wait for a response.

If the respondent mentions a district or village which is not consistent with the province, the Enumerator should make the corrections by talking to the respondent. In case the doubts remain, check the information with some member of the household or use the table of districts and villages in Attachment B.

Be aware that:

If the respondent answers HERE, write the name of the Province or District when it refers to a Rural Area or write the name of the Province and City/Village when it refers an Urban Area of the site you are enumerating;
If the person was somewhere else inside the national territory, they should indicate the name of the Province, District or City. The Enumerator SHOULD NOT write the names of Localities, Administrative Posts or Townships;
If the person was abroad, write the name of the Country.
Examples of how to fill it in:
If on August 1, 2006 the respondent was living in a rural area, indicate the names of the Province and District only.
[Illustration omitted]
If on that date the Respondent was living in an urban area, indicate the names of the Province and City/Village.
[Illustration omitted]
Finally, if they were living abroad, indicate the name of the Country.
[Illustration omitted]

For people aged 5+ only

P17. Where was (the person) living 5 years ago (in 2002)?

With this Question we intend to know the person's place of living 5 years prior to the start date of the Census, i.e., August 1, 2002. If the respondent mentions a district or village which is not consistent with the province, the Enumerator should make the corrections by talking to the respondent. In case the doubts remain, check the information with some member of the household or use the table of districts and villages in Attachment B.

Be aware that:

If the respondent answers HERE, write the name of the Province or District when it refers to a Rural Area or write the name of the Province and City/Village when it refers an Urban Area of the site you are enumerating;
If the person was somewhere else inside the national territory, they should indicate the name of the Province, District or City. The Enumerator SHOULD NOT write the names of Localities, Administrative Posts or Townships;
If the person was abroad, write the name of the Country.
Examples of how to fill it in:
If 5 years prior to the start date of the Census the respondent was living in a rural area, indicate the names of the Province and District only.
[Illustration omitted]
If on that date the Respondent was living in an urban area, indicate the names of the Province and City/Village.
[Illustrations omitted]
Finally, if they were living abroad, indicate the name of the Country.
[Illustration omitted]

P18. Say whether (in any language):

With this Question we intend to know whether the respondent Can read and write, Can read only or Cannot read nor write in ANY LANGUAGE. For this Question there should be only one response.

Be aware that:

If the person can read and write in SOME LANGUAGE, mark an X in box number 1;
If the person can read only, mark an X in box number 2;
If the person cannot read nor write, mark an X in box number 3.

P19. Does (the person) know how to speak Portuguese?

Read the Question and wait for a response. You should consider that the person is able to speak Portuguese when they can talk in Portuguese, i.e., they are able to understand and express themselves in this language, even if they cannot speak it correctly. For these cases, write an X in box number 1. If the person cannot speak Portuguese, write an X in box number 2.

P20. In what language did (the person) learn to speak?

This Question refers to language in which the respondent learned to speak in childhood, regardless of being or not able to speak it now.

For example, Mr. Antônio learned to speak in Echwabo. So, the right response is Echwabo, regardless of being or not able to speak other languages.
There should be only one response.

P21a. What language is most frequently used at home?

Read the question and wait for a reply. With this Question we intend to know the most frequently used language at HOME, whether or not they use other languages at school or work. Note that it is also correct if person states that at home they use one of the languages declared in P19 or P20.

Back to the example with Mr. Antônio, as we know he learned to speak in Echwabo, but at home the language he uses the most is Portuguese. Therefore, the language that id most frequently used at home is Portuguese.

P21b. Besides the ones mentioned, what other language does (the person) use in communication?

Read the Question and wait for a response. With this Question we intend to know persons' abilities to speak one or more languages. These data are important because they allow us to know in what language we can transmit information of public interest.
Therefore, the correct response should be one different from that given in Questions P19, P20 and P21a. If the respondent cannot speak any other language different from the ones they mentioned previously, write NONE.

P22. Say whether (the person):

This Question refers to the school attendance at a regular educational establishment, either public or private, including the distance learning courses.

Mark an X in box number 1 if the respondent is currently attending school;
Mark an X in box number 2 if the respondent is not currently attending school;
Mark an X in box number 3 if the respondent has never attended school. Please go to P26.

Be aware that:
Participation in sewing, computing and language courses (except for academic level) is not considered as school attendance.

P23. What level of education does (the person) attend or, if no longer studying, the highest level they have attended.

This Question should be responded by those who answered 1 or 2 in P22. For example, Mr. Taibo attends Upper Technical School, mark an X in box number 8.
If the Person responded 1 for P22 (Is currently attending school) they should indicate what level it is.

If the Person responded 2 for P22 (has attended school) they should indicate the highest level they have attended, even if incomplete. For example, Mrs. Maria attended College but did not finish it. You should mark an X in box number 10: Higher Education.

Be aware that you should include:

In Literacy all persons who attended literacy courses taught by institutions of the Ministry of Education, companies, religious institutions, etc.
In Primary Teacher Training Course all persons who attended teacher training courses at the Primary level only. Those who attended teacher training courses at college level should be included in alternative 10 of P23.
For persons who studied abroad, the level of education should be set within those established in this country.

For Higher Education you should include all persons who attend or have attended any course at a Higher level, either in or out of the country. For example, you should include within this category those who attend or have attended:
[Illustration with list of institutions is omitted]

In the Census we will find people who attended different educational systems. SEE THE LAST PAGE OF THE ENUMERATION FORM to check the equivalence in relation to the actual system.

P24. Has (the person) completed the level indicated in the previous question?

All persons who responded to P23 should indicate whether they have or not competed the level declared. If the response is (Yes), mark an X in 1 and go to P25. Otherwise, mark 2 (No) and go to P26.

P25. If (the person) has completed higher education, please indicate the highest level.

Only those who finished Higher Education should respond this Question. The levels to be taken into account are:

Bachelor's degree - mark an X in box number 1: (This option is valid for college degrees whose study plans include this educational level);
Licentiate - mark an X in box number 2;
Master's degree - mark an X in box number 3;
Doctor's degree - mark an X in box number 4.

Remember this question requires only one response.

Questions to people aged 7+ only

P26. What activity did (the person) do in the last week of July (25-31), this year?

Read the Question and mark the corresponding response. If you marked the alternatives 1, 2, 3 or 4 go to P28. If you marked the box number 5, go to P27 and ask whether in the past week the person has been to the machamba, has produced or sold goods in the market, shops, street market or at home. If you marked the box with a number from 6 to 11 go to P32.

[Note: The word machamba refers to small plots of land used for agricultural purposes].

Be aware that:

In the rural area peasants tend to respond they do not work if, during the Census, the agricultural season is "dead/not productive". If the respondent did not effectively work, mark an X in box number 2 of P26 "Did not work but had a job".
It is common that in the dead seasons the peasants lead other activities such as build or repair their houses, sell goods, etc. For these cases, you should ask about their main activity.

You should consider as people who have worked those who fit one of the following situations:

  • Workers on vacation during the Census. Mark an X in box number 2;
  • Hospitalized persons, persons on maternal leave, workers who did not work on the reference week due to pregnancy, strike or natural disasters, as long as on the reference week they still keep their employment relationship or USUALLY PERFORM SOME KIND OF ACTIVITY. Mark an X in box number 2 of P26;
  • Seasonal workers. Mark an X in box number 2 of P26;
  • Members of the household who, on the reference week, helped (without pay) the head of household with the works in the Machamba, business, garage, sewing, etc. Mark an X in box number 3 of p26. These persons, in P30, should be considered as family worker without pay; alternative 10.
  • For persons who have an institutional affiliation and during the enumeration were working for the Census 2007, you should validate their affiliation. For example, a public school teacher who is involved in the works of the Census should be considered as having worked (P26=1) and P30=1;
  • Students who are involved in the works of the Census should be considered as students in P26
  • All of those who, during the enumeration, do not have any type of institutional affiliation (for example, recently graduated students, candidates of various levels of education, etc.) and who are working for the Census, should be considered as having worked (P26=1) and P30=12.

Consider as someone who:

Worked - a person who, in addition to HOUSEWORK, USUALLY MAKES ITEMS TO BE SOLD SUCH AS CAKES OR CLOTHES, GOES TO THE MACHAMBA OR PERFORMS ANOTHER PAID ACTIVITY TO INCREASE THE HOUSEHOLD'S INCOME, should not be considered as domestic;

NOTE: You should avoid assuming that housewives do not perform any economic activity.

Did not work, but had a job - refers to a person with a regular occupation who did not work on the reference week because they were sick, on vacation, on maternal leave, on labor strike, or other. You should pay close attention to the situation of the peasants who did not work during the dry season. Mark an X in box number 2. Go to P28;
Helped a relative: a person who assisted members of the household with their duties or worked for them, but without pay.
Example:
A member of the household who helped a relative in the Machamba, garage, fishing, selling of goods and is not given any pay in money or goods.
Looked for a new job - refers to people who did not work on the reference week because they had been dismissed, had resigned or whose contract of employment expired, and is awaiting for another employment opportunity. Mark an X in box number 4. Go to P28;
Performed Domestic work: a person who looked after their own house. Mark an X in box number 5. Go to P27;
Served the FADM : a person who was a member of the Armed Forces of Mozambique (FADM) on the reference week. Mark an X in box number 7. Go to P32;
Studied only: a person who, on the reference week, was enrolled in a school or Official Educational establishment, either Private or Public.
Employed students should not be considered as students. They should be marked in the alternatives of people who work (1, 2 or 3);
Retired/reserve: a person who did not work on the reference week, lives on reserve pension or is retired. Mark an X in box number 9 and go to P32.
However, a person who is in army reserve or retirement and is performing a paid activity should be marked in the alternatives of people who work (1, 2 or 3);
Was unable to work: a person who did not work on the reference week because they were permanently unable to work due to old age or some physical or mental impossibility. Mark an X in box number 10 and go to P32;
It is important to note that in this category you should not include workers who did not work on the reference week for health reasons. These persons should be considered as people who did not work but have a job (alternative 2).
Other: a person who does not fit any of the previous situations. Mark an x in box number 11. Go to P32.

P27. If domestic, say whether on the last week of July (25-31) this year, (the person):

To all of those who responded domestic for P26 (alternative 5), ask whether on the week of 25 31 July they went to the machamba. If so, mark an X in box number 1. If they produced or sold goods in the market or at home such as: bread, tomatoes, onions, cakes, fish, fruit, etc., mark an X in box number 2. If they dedicated time to sewing, mending shoes, tin crafts, etc. in order to make money, also mark alternative (2).

However, those who actually dedicated time exclusively to housework (looking after children or relatives), mark an X in box number 3 and go to P32.
ATTENTION: You should not consider as domestic the domestic workers (washer person, cooks, nannies, etc.) since these should be classified as workers.

P28. What was (the person)'s main occupation/duty this week or the last time he/she worked?

All of those who, in P26, marked alternatives 1, 2, 3 or 4 should respond this Question. It is intended to know what the person's main occupation/profession is at their workplace, regardless of the activities conducted there. For example, Mr. Carlos works as a car electrician for Águas de Moçambique, a company that deals with water supply. WRITE "CAR ELECTRICIAN".

Be aware that:
Those who are seeking for a new employment should indicate the profession/occupation they had in the last time they worked.
In case the respondent has more than one profession/occupation, they should indicate the one they believe is the main one.
You should avoid writing vague or incomplete responses, for example:

Wrong Response: Worker
Correct Response: Warehouse worker; Travel Agency employee
Wrong Response: Technician
Correct Response: Radio technician; Telecommunications technician

[Illustration with more similar examples is omitted]

P29. What kind of activity is performed in the place where (the person) currently works at?

With this Question we intend to know the main type of activity (field of operation) the institution where the respondent works focuses on. The Enumerator should write the kind of activity developed, and NOT the NAME OF THE INSTITUTION OR COMPANY.

Read the Question and then write the specific name of the main activity which the company or institution performs, or the activity performed by the respondent on his own.

For those who work in private houses (domestic workers), you should write WORKER OF A HOUSE.

NOTE: Many people perform activities for their livelihood in the streets, at home or in other places. For these cases, you should write the type of activity (field of work) they perform.

Example: For people who declare they sell cakes at home (in P28) you should write "sells cakes", for those who sell coal at home you should write "sells coal", for the ones who cultivate land or practice agriculture (peasants) (in P28), you should write "agriculture or cultivate land".
Back to Mr. Carlos's example, as we know, the field of operation of the company he works for is water supply, and not electricity.

Be aware that:
Persons who declared in P26 that they Looked for a new job should indicate the field of operation of the last company they worked for.

Example:
Cement production, making or repairing of shoes, beverages, corn/cotton/orange/sorghum cultivation, educational, bank, beer/soda manufacturing, etc.

P30. Say whether (the person) is a worker of:

This Question should be responded in relation to the occupation/profession indicated in P28.

Be aware of the following definitions:

  • 1.the Public Administration/ Government Agency - includes all persons who work for the Government, either centrally or locally. Mark an X in box number 1. Example: persons working in the Ministries and other government institutions, teachers of public schools, health personnel at the community health centers and public hospitals, etc.;
  • 2.the Local Autarchies: includes all persons who work in City Councils. Mark an X in box number 2;
  • 3.a Government-owned Corporation: included all workers of government-owned corporations, i.e., those who have a the government as the major co-participant. Examples: Airports of Mozambique (ADM), Bank of Mozambique, CFM, Post Office of Mozambique, EDM, EMOSE, LAM RM, TDM, TPM, PETROMOC, MCEL, TOTOLOTO, EMOPESCA, Regional Water Administration (ARA), etc. Mark an X in the box number 3;
  • 4.the Private Sector: includes all workers of companies with full capital or having most of its part private. Examples: Mozal, beer brewing company 2M, Soda Industry (Coca-Cola), Hotel Polana, etc. You should also include within this category those persons who work to others, such as shoemakers, barbers, carpenters, masons, salespersons, chapa (semi collective transportation) drivers and conductors, etc. Mark an X in box number 4;
  • 5.the Cooperative sector: includes all persons who work for a cooperative of which they are not members or associates. Examples: workers of the General Union of Cooperatives. Mark an X in box number 5;
  • IF THE PERSON IS A MEMBER OR ASSOCIATE OF A PRODUCTION COOPERATIVE (PEASANTS, CATTLE BREEDERS) YOU SHOULD MARK OPTION 4.
  • 6.a Nonprofit Institution: includes all persons who work for institutions or organizations that lead nonprofit activities. Examples: Workers of a church or mosque, union, professional or scientific society, consumer's association, political party, social/cultural/recreational/sports club, charity/counseling/assistance organization, etc. Mark an X in box number 6;
  • Note: the workers of national or foreign NGOs (ADPP, FDC, CVM, MULEIDE, JOAQUIM CHISSANO FOUDATION, OXFAN, VISÃO MUNDIAL, SAVE THE CHILDREN, CARITAS, CARE INTERNATIONAL, HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL, RED CROSS, WORLD LUTHERAN FEDERATION, SOS, etc.) belong to this category and not to international organizations.
  • 7.Domestic worker in a Private House: includes all persons who work as employees in someone else's house. Examples: domestic workers and guards not affiliated to any company. Mark an X in box number 7;
  • 8.Self-employed worker with Employees: includes all persons who work and have paid employees. Example: a mechanic who works in his garage and employs people, etc. Mark an X in box number 7;
  • 9.Self-employed worker without Employees: includes all persons who work without employees and have all the income for them. For example: a peasant who works in his machamba without employees, a mechanic who works on his own in his garage, etc. Mark an X in box number 9;
  • Note: If the person has the help of members of their household without pay that person should be considered as a self-employed worker without employees.
  • 10.Home worker without pay: includes all persons who are working for the household without pay. Mark an X in box number 10.
  • Note: You should consider as "home worker without pay", for instance: the member of the household who helps the head of household with the work in the machamba, garage, etc., as long as they do not any pay.
  • 11.International Organizations/ Embassies: includes all persons who work in organizations established through official political agreements among its members having international labor statute, and being recognized by law. Examples: PNUD, FNUAP, FAO, UNICEF, FMI, THE WORLD BANK, EUROPEAN UNION, SADC, etc.
  • Note: Do not confuse international organizations with foreign NGOs for the latter are part of nonprofit organizations.
  • 12.the General Population and Housing Census: refers to persons recruited to work in the Census who do not have any other labor or educational affiliation. For example, students and teachers in service who are involved in the works of the Census should not be included within this category.

P31. How many hours a day did (the person) work in the last week of July (25-31), this year?

You should indicate the number of hours a day the person worked in the last week of July (2531) this year. The number of hours worked is used to identify the employed population according to the number of hours worked and the analyses of employment concerning the hours spent at work.

NOTE: In the estimate of hours worked you should take into consideration the time when the person's working hours start and finish. Therefore, the hours worked will be the result of the difference between the start and finish times of the activity in one day.

Be aware that:

Work refers to any activity aimed at the production of goods and services for self-consumption or for the market. Persons can perform their activities in various ways, such as: persons who work for others, employers, self-employed workers, family workers, etc.;
If the respondent has more than one occupation, they should count the hours devoted to the main activity.

For people aged 12+ only

P32. What is (the person)'s marital status?

This Question intends to know the marital status of persons who are 12 or more years old. Read the Question and wait for a response. Mark an X in the box that corresponds to the respondent's answer, being aware that:

Single is a person of any sex who is not or has never been married, either by the civil registry, the church or even traditionally. Be aware that some people could say they were single when, in fact, they were divorced. To ensure the correct response, ask all persons who said they were single if they have ever lived a married life with someone. If the respondent answers they are single, mark an X in box number 1.
Married is a person who wedded civilly or religiously and lives with their spouse. Mark an X in box number 2.
Living together as married partners: is the status of a person who lives with their spouse but is not married by the civil religious registry. Mark an in box number 3.
Pay close attention to the following cases:
Persons married by the civil registry or church, but also live with other partners (in polygamous regime) should be included within this category.
Consider as "Living together as married partners" an individual who is officially married but is now separated (not a legal divorce) and is living with another partner.
Divorced/Separated is the person who was married and now is braking the marital bonds (either or nor by law). Mark an X in box number 4. If the person remarried you should consider them as Married or Living together as married partners, depending on the case.

For women aged 12-50 only

P33. How many children born alive has (the person) had?

Read the Question, wait for a response and ask how many children of each sex they had. Then, write that number in the corresponding space.

ATTENTION:

Each woman should indicate her own children by sex, either or not alive. They should not include the adopted children or those who belong to their husband's marriage to another woman. For example, the stepmothers should not consider their stepchildren as their children;
We consider as born alive the child who showed some vital sign at birth, i.e., breathing, crying or moving, even if he/she died shortly after;
You should not the children who were born dead, i.e., those who after the separation from the mother's body were not able to breathe or did not show any vital sign;
You should also not include those children who were born after TWELVE a.m. of August 1, 2007.
Examples of how to fill in the Enumeration Form:
a)If a woman has never had a child, fill in P33, P34, P35 and P36 as follows:
1. Male [0] [0]
2. Female [0] [0] and finish the interview with this woman;
b)If a woman has 3 children, from which 1 is a man and 2 are women, fill it in as follows:
1. Male [0] [1]
2. Female [0] [2]

P34. How many of (the person)'s children are alive?

Read the Question and wait for a response. This Question is related to P33. The respondent should declare the number of children of each sex who are still alive from the total of children declared in P33. Write the number in the corresponding space.

For example, for a woman who had 3 children from which 2 are alive, one male and one female, fill in P34 as follows:

1. Male [0] [1]
2. Female [0] [1]

Enumerator, attention:

The respondent should indicate all children, regardless of their sex and age, either or not living with her;
You should not include their adopted children or those who are from their husband's marriage to another woman;
You should also not include those children who were born after TWELVE a.m. of August 1, 2007.

The way you should fill in this Question is similar to P33's.

P35. How many children born alive has (the person) had in the past 12 months?

Read the Question and wait for a response. This Question is also related to P33. The respondent should say, out of the total number of children declared in P33, how many children were born during the year prior to the census, i.e., between August 1, 2006 and July 31, 2007. Write the response in the corresponding space.

Be aware that:

You should not include the children who were born after TWELVE a.m. of August 1, 2007.

Example:

Let us suppose that in the past 12 months she gave birth to twins, one male and one female. You should fill in the Form as follows:
1. Male [1]
2. Female [1]

P36. From those children born alive in the past 12 months, how many are alieve?

Read the Question and wait for a response. This Question is also related to P34. The respondent should say, from the total number of children declared in P35, how many are alive at the moment of the interview. Write the response in the corresponding space.

Be aware that:

You should include here the biological children only;
You should not include the children who were born after TWELVE a.m. of August 1, 2007.

The Enumerator should pay close attention while filling in this response, for the number declared cannot be greater than the one from the previous Question (P35). It can only be equal to or less than it.

Continuing with the example from P35, but supposing that the male child died. We will have:

1. Male [0]
2. Female [1]

Questions About the Dwelling

4.2.5. Section E: Characteristics and Condition of the Dwelling

This section should be responded by the head of household or by the person assigned for such. If there is more than one dwelling unit in the household, the following Questions should refer to the main unit.

A Dwelling is any place used for housing people, as long as at the interview it is being used for this purpose.

For the purpose of the Census we will consider two types of dwellings: Private and Collective. Persons who are enumerated in the streets or bridges will be considered as HOMELESS.

E1. Type of dwelling:

Observe the dwelling and classify it correctly. If you happen to have any questions, ask it to the respondent.

Remember that there can be only one response. It is either Private or Collective, or yet HOMELESS for persons who are enumerated in the streets, under the bridges, etc. If the dwelling is "Collective", finish the interview. Thank the persons for their collaboration and go on to the next household or living quarter.

Private Dwellings are those which are used to house the households and can be a: House, Flat/apartment, Hut, Precarious Dwelling (shack, houses made of tin or cardboard, etc.), Mixed dwelling, Basic dwelling, Part of a commercial building, or other.

In the institutional dwellings such as schools, prisons, barracks, hotels, etc., the independent dwellings should be considered as private dwellings.

Be aware of the following definitions for private dwellings:

House: refers to a single-family dwelling unit that has (a) bedroom, bathroom, kitchen inside the dwelling, and that was built using durable materials (cement blocks, bricks, zinc plates/asbestos, concrete slab, and tiles). It may have 1 or more stories;

Flat/Apartment: refers to a dwelling unit that has (a) bedroom(s), bathroom, and kitchen, belongs to a multifamily dwelling unit, with 1 or more stories, and is constituted of a block or a group of blocks;

Hut: refers to a dwelling whose predominant material in the construction comes from vegetal origin (grass, straw, palm tree, culm, bamboo, reed, adobe, weaved sticks, etc.);

Precarious dwelling: refers to dwellings built with precarious materials such as paper, canvas, cardboard, tins, bark, etc.) and adobe;

Mixed dwelling: refers to a dwelling built with durable materials cement blocks, bricks, zinc plates/asbestos, concrete slab and tiles), material of vegetal origin (grass, straw, palm tree, culm, bamboo, reed, adobe, weaved sticks, etc.) and adobe;

Basic dwelling (train house): refers to a dwelling unit that has bedrooms only, and not bathrooms and/or kitchen, built with durable materials (cement blocks, bricks, zinc plates/asbestos, concrete slab and tiles). Within this category we may include a set of bedrooms grouped together that share the same facilities (bathroom, kitchen, water);

Note: In case you find bedrooms grouped together (train house) as showed in the picture below, and in each one of them lives a household, you should collect dwelling characteristics and condition for each of the households.

Each bedroom (train house) may have different characteristics concerning the type of construction material. For instance, one bedroom may have the flooring or ceiling different for the others.
[Illustration omitted]

Part of a commercial building: refers to a dwelling unit which is part of an office building. There is no separation between the shop/store and the house, i.e., the house is an extension of the shop/store;

Other: refers to all types of dwelling not included in the previous categories. Examples: tents, caravans, boats, etc.

Collective dwellings or Living Quarters are institutions occupied by persons whose relationship is limited to the administrative subordination and obedience to the rules that are applied there.

E2. This dwelling is:

Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Write an X in the corresponding number. If the response is number 1 (occupied), go to E4. If the answer is number 2 (vacant), fill in the Questions about the outer walls and what the dwelling is covered with.

E3. Why is the dwelling vacant?

Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Write an X in the corresponding number. If you have marked number 3 (it is under construction), finish the interview and move on to the next household or living quarter. If the response is 1, 2, 4 or 5 try to collect as much information as possible about the characteristics of the dwelling, asking Questions E4, E5 and E6.

E4. The dwelling is:

Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Write an X in the corresponding number.

Attention:

Owned: when the rights of property of the dwelling belong to the household. Are included within this category the households that are still paying for the house to an institution, bank or person;
Rented: when the house is occupied by tenants from APIE, EMOSE or another proprietor to whom they pay a monthly or periodic fee;
Lent or borrowed temporarily: when it was temporarily lent by the employer, friends or relatives;
Other: refers to any other kind of occupation of the dwelling (the house is not rented, nor owned, or borrowed).

E5. The dwelling was built with walls of:

Read the question and each of the alternatives. Wait for an answer. Mark with an X the number corresponding to the predominant material in the construction of the house exterior walls. The following types of walls construction materials were considered: concrete block, brick, wood/zinc, adobe, reed/sticks/bamboo/palm, weaved sticks (mud and wattle), tin/cardboard/paper/canvas/bark, other materials.

There should be only one answer.

E6. The dwelling is covered by:

Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Write an X in the number that corresponds to the predominant material in the construction of the house cover.

The following types of cover were considered: Concrete Slab (cement), Tiles, Asbestos plates, Zinc plates, Grass/culm/palm tree leaves and others.
There should be only one answer.

E7. The house floor is made of: (excluding kitchen and bathrooms)

Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Write an X in the number that corresponds to the predominant material in the construction of the house floor.

The following types of construction materials were considered: Wood or parquet, Marble/Granite, Cement, Mosaic/Ceramic, Adobe (dirt floor), nothing and other materials.

There should be only one answer.

E8a. How many rooms is the dwelling divided into? (excluding kitchen and bathrooms)

Read the Question and wait for the response. This Question refers to the spaces in a dwelling which are surrounded by walls from the bottom to the top/ceiling or some height close to the ceiling.

Write the total number of rooms in the dwelling, excluding the kitchen and bathrooms. Write the number of rooms even if they are not actually bedrooms, like for example, dining room, living room, etc.

The so-called common rooms (dining and living rooms) count as one, not 2.
Example:

If a dwelling has one room/space only, write |0|1|.

E8b. From those, how many are used as bedrooms?

Read the Question and wait for a response. From the total number of rooms mentioned in E8a, how many are used as a place to sleep? Write the number of rooms even if they are not actually bedrooms, like for example, dining room, living room, etc.

Example:

If a household lives in a two-bedroom apartment and they use the living room to sleep, write |0|3|.

If, in addition to the main two-room dwelling, a household has 4 one-room huts that they also use to sleep, write |0|6|.

E9. What is the main source of water used to drink by this household?

The Question refers to the main source of water used to drink.
Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Mark an X in the number that corresponds to the response. There can be only one response.

Be aware of the following definitions:

Piped water inside the dwelling: when the connection to water is found inside the dwelling with one or more faucets (e.g. in the kitchen, bathroom);
Piped water outside the dwelling: when the connection to water is found outside the dwelling but within the property, or when water is brought from the neighbor's;

Water from fountain: when the water supply of the dwelling comes from a water fountain. Fountains may have one or more faucets and are usually made of cement;

Water from well/ covered borehole with hand pump: when the dwelling is supplied with subsoil water which is brought upwards by a hand pump. The well or borehole are protected/covered;
Water from well without hand pump: when the water supply of a dwelling comes from an uncovered well;

River/ Lake water: when the water supply of the dwelling comes from a river, lake or similar sources, regardless of how it is stored or distributed in the dwelling;

Rain water: when the water supply of the dwelling comes from rain water;

Bottled water: when the water supply of the dwelling comes from mineral water which is bottled in plastic or glass vessels.

Other: refers to other to other sources not included in the previous categories, such as spring water.

E10. The dwelling has:

This Question refers to the type of toilet or latrine available in the dwelling.
Read the Question and each of the alternatives. Wait for the response. Mark an X in the corresponding number.

The following categories have been included:

Flush toilet linked to septic tank: often used in dwellings that have piped water supply.

Improved latrine: consists of a cesspit made of concrete slab often concave that is 1.20 1.50m in diameter. The cover has a thick layer of concrete that helps control the disease vectors and minimizes the problem of odor. To allow privacy and protection, the latrine is protected by a hut covered by culm.

Improved traditional: consists of a cesspit made of wood or mortar slab (round or squared) and an outer protection to allow privacy and the resistance of the cesspit. To support the feet, feet supports are made in the wood or mortar slabs. For privacy and protection, a superstructure of bamboo, culm or other material is built.

Non-improved latrine: consists of a cesspit of 60cm in diameter and 1.5 5m in depth. It is covered by bamboos/wood to allow support for the user. The surface is finished using a mixture of animal manure and earth. Hollow or wood blocks are used for feet support. A gasket is built to allow privacy and protection.

Does not have flush toilet/latrine: when the occupants use the river, bush, etc. in order to relieve themselves.

E11. What is the main source of energy used for lighting in this dwelling?

Read the question and wait for the response. Mark an X in the corresponding number.
The following energy sources were included: 1. Electricity, Generator/ Solar panel, Gas, Oil/ Paraffin/ Kerosene, Candles, Storage Battery, Firewood, and others.

4.2.6 Section F: Durable Goods and Access to Information and Communication Technologies

F1. Does the household have? (admits more than one answer)

Read the Question and wait for the response. Mark an X in all alternatives where responses are positive. If the household does not have the listed goods leave blank the space to write down the answer. Notice that this Question admits more than one response.

The following assets were considered: radio, TV, telephone, computer, car, motorcycle, and bicycle. Note that you must write down only the goods in working condition.

If the household does not have any of the goods listed, mark an X in alternative number 8 "None of the above".

F2. In the last 12 months, how many members of this household used:
This question relates to the use of information and communication technologies, regardless of place of use, it may have been at home, at work, at an internet cafe, etc.

Read the question and wait for the answer. Mark with an X the alternative corresponding to the technology used and in the spaces to the right record the number of people who have used this service. Note that this question admits more than one response.

F3. How many people in this household have a cell phone?
Read the question and wait for the answer. Record the number of people who have mobile phones in the space reserved for this purpose. For example, if only one person in the household has a cell phone, write down: 01.

If no household member has a mobile phone, write down: 00.

Note: These are phones that work, are operating, and are currently used for communication.

4.2.7 Section G: Agricultural and Fishing Activity

This section has the objective to know some general aspects of the agricultural and fishing activities performed by the household. The results will be the base for the Agricultural Census.

The questions in this section must be made to all households residing in rural and urban areas.

G1. Does any member of this household practice any agricultural activity on their own initiative?

Read the question and write down the answer. This question refers to agricultural activities performed by the members of the household, either on their own initiative or on the family's machamba.

Those members of the household who perform agricultural activities as an occupation, for instance, on a company's machamba or in someone's property should not be included within this category.

The Enumerator should explain what is intended with this Question, i.e., it refers to agricultural and fishing activities performed by the members of the household on their own initiative or on the family's machamba. If one or more member of the household performs agricultural activities, mark an X in box number 1. Otherwise, mark an X in box number 2.

G2. Does this household have an aquaculture tank?

When asking this Question the Enumerator should explain to the head of household what an aquaculture tank is. If the household has aquaculture tanks, mark an X in box number 1 and write the number of tanks in the space provided. Otherwise, mark an X in box number 2 and ask the next Question.

G3. Does any member of this household practice artisanal fishing?

This Question is intended to know whether some member of the household performs fishing activities. Therefore, those who do so for someone else should be excluded from this Question. If one or more members of the household perform fishing activities, mark an X in box number 1. Otherwise, mark an X in box number 2 and ask the next Question.

G4. Does this household have cashew trees?

This Question is intended to know whether the household has cashew trees. The Enumerator should explain that to the head of household or another person on their behalf. If the household has cashew trees, mark an X in box number 1 and write the number of cashew trees in the space provided. Otherwise, mark an X in box number 2 and ask the next Question.

G5. Does this household have coconut trees?

This Question is intended to know whether the household has coconut trees. The Enumerator should explain that to the head of household or another person on their behalf. If the household has coconut trees, mark an X in box number 1 and write the number of coconut trees in the space provided. Otherwise, mark an X in box number 2 and ask the next Question.

G6. How many of the following animals does this household raise?

This Question is intended to know the number of animals raised by the household. For each of the alternatives, you should indicate the number of animals they raise. If the household does not raise some of the animals listed in the Form, write 0000 and DO NOT LEAVE IT BLANK.

For example, Mr. Sitoi's household has 1 cow, 2 oxen, 10 pigs, 23 chickens and 21 ducks.
[Illustration omitted]

Section H: Mortality

The objective of this section is to know about the structure and level of mortality by sex and age. Mortality is an important indicator to measure the health condition of the population and the level of development of a country. Therefore, it is important that the information about deaths in the household is collected accurately. However, remember that it is a very delicate and touchy subject. Try to be careful when asking the Questions.

H1. In this household, has anybody passed away in the past 12 months? (from August 1, 2006 to July 31, 2007)

Ask whether someone in the household passed away in the past 12 months. Always be careful not to omit information about the deceased persons, especially the newborns.
In order to be sure, ask whether within that period of time some newborn or baby passed away.

Attention:

Make sure that the respondent understood the reference period (the past 12 months), i.e., from August 1, 2006 to July 31, 2007.
The Question refers to persons who lived in the household and died.
They should not include relatives who died in their households.

Mark an X in box number 1 if the members of the household declared that someone passed away in the past 12 months, and go on to Question H2.

If no one in the household passed away in the past 12 months, write an X in box number 2 and finish the interview.

H2. If so, please specify: the name, sex, and age of those who passed away.

If you marked an X in box number 1 in H1, specify the name, sex and age of the persons who passed away. If the deceased was an infant who still did not have a name, write BABY.

ENUMERATOR: In case the deceased person was a woman aged 12-50 ask whether the death occurred during pregnancy, delivery or 42 days after pregnancy or delivery.

Remember that it is difficult for the population to know whether the death occurred exactly within the 42 days. You should ask whether it occurred approximately 2 months after pregnancy or delivery.

Be aware that pregnancy also refers to those who did not reach delivery. That is, the woman may have died after an abortion.

Example: In the past 12 months 3 persons in a household died, one male and 2 females, at the following ages: an 8 month baby boy; Joana, 33 years old, who died during pregnancy, and Vânia, 42 years old, who died during delivery.
[Illustration omitted; for women aged 12-50 only]

5. How to Finish the Interview.

As they finish enumerating all members of the household or living quarter, the Enumerator should review the Enumeration Form as follows:

a) Make sure the header contains all the information regarding identification and, in case more than one Form has been filed out, check its numeration.
b) Make sure all Questions in the Form have a response and the space provided for the answers have been crossed out when those Questions do not apply.

As soon as they finish verifying the Form, the Enumerator should hand in the census card containing the names to each person registered in the Enumeration Form.

The Enumerator finishes the interview with the household, thanks them for their collaboration and asks whether they still have any doubts.
[Pages 71 - 77 have not been translated into English]

Translator's note: Number 3.3.2 was duplicated in the original document. To correct the duplication, number 3.3.2.(1) has been added.