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[Mexico]
2010 Population and Housing Census
Census Data Collection
Interviewer's Manual of the Long Questionnaire

The INEGI and the 2010 Population and Housing Census

1.1 What is the INEGI?

The National Statistical and Geographical Institute is an autonomous public organization at the service of Mexico.

What does the INEGI do?
It generates, integrates, and provides geographical statistical information of national interest through studies, questionnaires and censuses, like that of the Population and Housing.

1.2 What is the Population and Housing Census?

It consists of counting all the population and dwellings of national territory; additionally, information about their main characteristics is obtained.

What information is obtained?

  • How many people there are in all the localities of the country
  • How many are men and how many are women
  • How many children, young adults, adults, there are and their ages
  • How many know how to read and write
  • What are their occupations
  • The total number of dwellings
  • The construction materials of the households
  • The services of light, water, drainage, and others
[p. 2]

What is the purpose of the information?

  • So that Mexican society knows how many we are, where we live, what education we have, if the girls and boys go to school, etc.
  • To identify the needs of housing, water, drainage, schools, hospitals, etc.
  • So that the investigators have updated facts about our country and use them in their analysis and studies on national development.
  • So that the businessmen can locate where to establish a new business.
  • So that we know how Mexico compares with other countries.
What is the confidentiality of the information?
By law, it is the obligation of those who carry out the census to not reveal the obtained information. When the INEGI publishes it, it does so in a general form, without referring to people or households in particular.

How is it carried out?
Every single locality and block of the country is covered in order to record the properties and obtain information about the housing and its occupants by means of a questionnaire.

When is it carried out?
The population and housing census is undertaken every ten years (ending in zero). The data collection of the 2010 Population and Housing Census will be performed between May 31 and June 25.

Who participates?
A collection of people involved with specific activities: training, information gathering, monitoring activities, communication, among others. This organized collection is called the operating structure.

[Section 2 which discusses enumerator training are omitted here]

[p. 5]

3. Basic definitions

In this chapter are the fundamental definitions that you should know in order to gather the information presented.

3.1 Concepts about the national geo-statistical framework
The following are some useful concepts for understanding the geographical aspects in your workplace:

National geo-statistic framework
The national geo-statistic framework (MGN) is a system designed by the INEGI in order to refer correctly to the statistical information of a census or questionnaire in the corresponding geographical places.

The MGN is made up of geo-statistic areas of three organizational levels:

  • State geo-statistical areas (AGEE)
  • Municipal geo-statistical areas (AGEM)
  • Basic geo-statistical areas (AGEB)
  • Basic rural geo-statistical area
  • Basic urban geo-statistical area

The localities and blocks are found in the interior of these areas.

[p. 6 containing a map of areas is omitted here]

[p. 7]

State geo-statistical area (AGEE)
This corresponds to the geographical area of each one of the 32 federative entities of the country.

They are identified with a two-digit code, in agreement with their official names in alphabetic order.
For example:
01 - Aguascalientes
02 - Baja California
32 - Zacatecas

Municipal geo-statistical area (AGEM)
This corresponds to the geographical space of each one of the municipalities that make up the federative entities and political delegations of the Federal District; currently there exist 2,456 at the national level.

The code of these areas is formed with three numbers.

For example:
001 Armería
010 Villa de Álvarez

[p. 8]

Basic geo-statistical area (AGEB)
This is the territorial expansion that corresponds with the subdivision of the municipal geo-statistical areas.

Each AGEB has been assigned a code composed of three digits, a hyphen, and a number from 0 to 9 or the letter A. On the maps, the codes appear within an oval.

These codes are unique within each municipality, so that there will never be a repetition within a municipality, regardless of whether or not the AGEB is urban or rural.

The AGEBs are classified as two types:

Basic urban geo-statistical area
This is the geographic area composed of a collection of blocks that generally go from 1 to 50, delineated by streets, avenues, walkways or any other easily identifiable feature of the terrain and whose use in the ground is principally housing-related, industrial, service-related, commercial, etc. These are only assigned to the interior of the urban localities.

Basic rural geo-statistical area
This is the geographic area located in the rural part of the municipality, whose territorial extension is variable and characterized by its ground use as either dealing with agriculture and livestock or forestry. It contains rural localities and natural extensions like swamps, lakes, desserts, etc., delineated generally by natural features (rivers, streams, ravines, etc.) and cultural features (train tracks, electric lines, highways, trails, paths, pipelines, property lines, etc.).

[p. 9]

Locality
This is every place occupied by one or more dwellings, which may or may not be occupied; this place is recognized by a name given by law or custom.

Each locality is identified with a four-digit code, which is assigned by a municipality in ascending order starting with 0001, until all localities have been covered. Generally speaking, the code 0001 corresponds to the head municipality.

For example:
0001 - Aguascalientes
0094 - Granja Adelita
0096 - Agua Azul

In accordance with their characteristics and the statistical objectives, the localities are classified as urban or rural.

Urban localities
These are those [localities] that have a population bigger than or equal to 2,500 habitants or that are head municipalities, regardless of their population.

Rural localities
These are those [localities] that have a population less than 2,500 habitants and are not head municipalities.

The block
This is the geographical space of varying surface area that is made up of one dwelling or a group of dwellings, buildings or terrains that have housing, commercial, industrial, or service-related uses, among others. Generally, it can be enclosed in its entirety and is delineated by streets, walkways, trails, paths, sidewalks, streams, property lines, etc.

The blocks are classified as urban or rural, in agreement with the environment of the locality in which it belongs.

Each one of the blocks is identified with a three-digit code, assigned in an ascending order starting at 001 until all the blocks of the urban AGEB or all the blocks of the rural locality are covered.

[p. 10-12, consisting of cartographic enumerator instructions, are omitted here.]

[p. 13]

3.2 Concepts about property, housing, habitual residents, and adequate informers

Among the main activities that the interviewer must carry out are identifying and classifying the properties that exist in each work area with the objective of recording them in the Property List, and in the case they are inhabited, capturing in the questionnaire their principal characteristics as well as those of their residents.

Some of the definitions that provide the necessary elements for classification purposes are found below.

Property
For census objectives, the property is a construction, terrain, or premise, where the main characteristic is its immovability or impossibility to relocate without destruction or damage.

For example:
Dwellings, buildings, vacant lots, venues, commercial establishments, etc.

[p. 14 showing an image of types of properties is omitted here]

[p. 15]

Dwelling
This is the space generally delineated by walls and roofs of any material, with an independent entrance, that was constructed for the habitation of people, or that at the moment of data collection is used to live -- that is, to sleep, prepare food, eat, and protect oneself from the environment.

The independent entrance permits the occupants to enter from and go out to the street, the field, or rather the space common to other dwellings, like a hallway, patio, or stairs, without passing through the rooms of another dwelling.

The private inhabited dwelling
This is the dwelling that at the moment of data collection has habitual residents, whether or not it has been constructed or adapted for such.

This includes whatever corner, refuge, mobile installation, improvised or local that at the moment of data collection is used for the habitation of people.

The private households with inhabitants are classified as:

1. Independent house
2. Apartment in an apartment building
3. Dwelling in tenement building
4. Dwelling in a room in the attic
5. Premise not intended for habitation
6. Mobile dwelling
7. Shelter
Uninhabited dwelling
This is a private dwelling that at the moment of data collection does not have habitual residents, it is not utilized as a premise with economic activity, it is not used in a temporary way, and it is completely constructed and ready to be inhabited.

[p. 16]

Dwelling of temporary use
This is a private dwelling that at the moment of data collection is intended for vacationing, resting, or staying a few days, weeks, or months of the year, it neither has habitual residents nor is used as a premise for economic activity.

Collective dwelling
This is a premise intended to provide housing for large groups of people who submit themselves to living and behavioral norms based on motives of health, education, discipline, religion, work, and social assistance, among others, and that at the moment of data collection has habitual residents.

The majority of these premises have a sign or social reason that identifies them.

The collective dwellings are classified as:

1. Hotel, motel, inn
2. Boarding house, guest house, house of assistance
3. Hospital, clinic, healing house, medical treatment center
4. House for minors, orphanage, house for infants
5. House for elders, nursing home
6. Domestic abuse shelter
7. Homeless shelter
8. Boarding school, student residence
9. Convent, monastery, religious community housing, seminary
10. Jail, prison, penitentiary, penal colony
11. Rehabilitation center for juvenile delinquents, correctional facilities
12. Work camp, work barracks, medical residence
13. Military, naval, or police base, camp, or outpost
14. Camp for the displaced
15. Migrant shelter
16. Other classes
[p. 17]

Other types of properties:

Private dwelling with business
This is an inhabited private dwelling and business with economic activity that at the moment of data collection is found in the same property and share the same entrance or access door.

Business with activity
This is a space generally delineated by walls and roofs of any material, with independent entrance, that at the moment of data collection is used solely for economic activities, like producing a good, commercializing a product, or borrowing a service.

This includes private dwellings that at the moment of data collection are exclusively for economic activities.

Empty business
This is a space generally delineated by walls and roofs of any material, with an independent entrance, that was constructed with the intent of carrying out some economic activity and that at the moment of data collection is not being used for neither economic activity nor housing.

[p. 18]

Vacant lot
This is a space without buildings that is found in the interior of an urban block; it can be delineated by fences or walls.

Building in ruins
This is a construction whose high level of deterioration does not permit inhabitation nor the possibility of another activity, and that at the moment of data collection does not have permanent residents nor is used for economic activities.

Building under construction
This is a construction project in process that at the moment of data collection does not have permanent residents nor is utilized for economic activities.

As an interviewer, you are responsible for enumerating all the permanent residents of the dwellings located in the work area that you were assigned. Because of this, it's necessary that you know the concepts described below.

Permanent resident of a private dwelling
This is a person who normally lives in the dwelling, because he/she generally sleeps, prepares food, eats, and protects himself/herself from the environment there.

Permanent resident of a collective dwelling
This is any person who normally lives in a collective dwelling and is subject to the living and behavioral norms for reasons of health, education, discipline, re-adaptation, religion, work, and social assistance, among others, where he/she generally sleeps, consumes food, and protects himself/herself from the environment.

The permanent residents of a collective dwelling are the people who:

  • Don't have another place of permanent residency.
  • Have been there for six months or more.
[p. 19]
  • Arrived for permanent stay, regardless of the time passed since the arrival.

Adequate informer
This is the head of the household, the spouse, or anyone age 15 or older, who is a permanent resident of the dwelling and knows the information solicited.

[p. 20-36, consisting of enumerator geographic and walking instructions, are omitted here.]

[p. 37]

4.3 Procedure to record different types of property

In order to record each type of property in column 10, it will be necessary to identify it.

Code 1: Private dwelling
If in the column for private dwellings (7) you have a digit and in column 9 you circled that there were residents, record in the column type of property (10) code 1, private dwelling, and proceed with the interview.

If [the respondents] do not live there, investigate the living situation, since it could deal with an uninhabited or temporary dwelling. In both cases, record code 1 in column 10 and in the column "Results of the visit (11)", and record the corresponding code.

Considerations:
Remember that a dwelling must have an independent entrance from the street, hallway, staircase, patio, corridor, or garden, that is to say, its occupants can enter or leave from the entrance without passing through the rooms of another dwelling.

When there are separate rooms in the same space and the informer can't make up his or her mind about the total number of dwellings in the premises, ask if all the rooms are from the same dwelling.

[p. 38]

If the informer continues to hesitate, ask if they share the food costs with the occupants of some other room. If they share them, consider that it is one single dwelling; if not, that means that there exist two or more dwellings.

Code 2: Particular dwelling with business
There are dwellings that are closely related to an active business, since within the premises there is some good or service produced or commercialized, or because a part of its structure is set up for economic activity.

The procedure for capturing the information in these cases depends on the type of access that both the dwelling and the business have.

1. Building with only one access
When a business with activity is seen, but at the back, on the side, or even above the business, [and] there exists a dwelling that only has access passing through the aforementioned business, the process is the following:

  • Complete the question for the column for businesses (8) and record the information in that column.
  • Complete the question for the column verification of residents (9) and circle the code 1 "Yes".
  • Record code 2 "Particular dwelling with business" in the column type of property (10).
  • Start the interview and capture the information from the dwelling.
[p. 39]

The list should be completed in the following way:

  • In the case that there are no residents, circle code 3 in column 9 and record code 4, "Active business" in the column type of property (10).
  • If the structure that is observed from the outside is the dwelling but, upon investigating the number of dwellings existing on the premises, you realize that in addition there is an active business on the inside (for example, a dispatch, an office, etc.), note the answer in the column for dwellings (7) and record code 2 "Private dwelling with business" in column 10

.

There exists one variant of the previous case and it is the building used for some type of economic activity, in which someone also lives.

What is important in this case is to identify that it is inhabited, and it should be recorded as a "Particular dwelling with business" in column 10.

[Pictorial example omitted]

[p. 40]

2. Dwelling and business with independent access
When the dwelling and the business come with independent access from the street or hallway, even though inside the business [area] there is a different access to the dwelling, record two properties on the property list.

[Image and example of form omitted here]

Code 3: Collective dwelling
Even though the majority of the dwellings that you find on the block or locality correspond to private dwellings, there is the possibility that in your area collective dwellings exist.

Remember that collective dwellings are grouped in 16 different classes. When you find yourself with one of these, after recording the following data and the address of the property, make sure that the establishment is indeed a collective dwelling.

[p. 41]

In order to do so, perform the following procedure:

  • Locate the administrator of the establishment and ask the question from the column for businesses (8) and record the total number of premises that he indicates.
  • Ask the question from the column verification of residents (9). If the response is affirmative, consider it like a collective dwelling and circle code 1, and jot down code 3, "Collective dwelling" in column 10.
  • If there are no habitual residents, in column 9 circle the code 3, record code 4 "Active business" in column 10 and don't do the interview.
Private dwelling inside a collective dwelling
When you have finished recording the property, whether it be an active business or a collective dwelling, confirm whether or not there exists some private dwelling on the inside.

Assume that the informer does not know the definitions of private and collective dwelling that you are using, so you must explain them with your own words.

For example:
After having recorded the information of a hotel, ask the informer: "Within this same premise, does there exist some dwelling with an independent entrance, in which one or more people live?"

If the investigation brings you to determine that yes, there is one or more private dwellings on the inside of the collective dwelling, record them the following way:

  • On a new line, note the data and the address of the dwelling (the same for a collective dwelling or an active business, with the exception of the previous number),
  • Record in the column for dwellings (7) the number of private dwellings on the premise.
  • Circle code 1 "Yes", in column 9.
  • Write in column 10, code 1 "Private dwelling" and gather the information for the Long Questionnaire.
[p. 42]

Code 4: Active business
These are all those businesses or establishments that only carry out some economic activity, like a grocery store, pharmacy, tortilla shop, school, workshop, restaurant, office, museum, recreational park, medical office, factory, among others, and there are no people living in the said establishment.

The procedure for recording [this information] is the following:

  • Note in the column for businesses (8) the information that the informer gives you.
  • In the column verification of residents (9) circle code number 3.
  • Record code 4 "Active business" in column property type (10).
  • Record code 7 "No habitual residents" in column results of the visit.

Considerations:

  • Remember that you must ask the question about verifying the residents before determining that no one lives there.
  • It could be that you find buildings intended to be inhabited, whose appearance is that of a dwelling, but that at the moment of data collection they are only performing some economic activity; being so, record them as an active business.
Code 5: Empty business
It also could be the case that you find buildings constructed to carry out some economic activity, like a factory, store, department store, workshop, storage, office, or school, among others, that at the moment of the data collection are not being used; that is to say, that no economic activity is being carried out within them, but are not being used as dwellings either. These cases correspond to empty businesses.
[p. 43]

The process to record this type of property is the following:

  • Investigate with the neighbors and record the column 8 the information they give you.
  • In column 9 circle code number 3.
  • Record code 5 "Empty business" in column 10.
  • Record code 7 "No habitual residents" in column 11.

Remember that you must ask the question about the verification of residents before determining that no one lives there.

Code 6: Building in ruins or under construction

Ask if someone lives there; if the answer is affirmative, you have to consider it like a private dwelling in the column property type (10) and obtain the information for the Long Questionnaire.

If the response is no, then it is considered a building in ruins or under construction.

In order to record the property, perform the following procedure:

  • Record the number zero (0) in the column for dwellings (7)
  • Write code 6 "Building in ruins or under construction" in the column property type (10)
  • Record code 7 "No habitual residents" in the column results of the visit (11)
Code 7: Empty lot
When the property corresponds to an empty lot, in accordance with the definitions seen previously, do the following:

  • Record "000" in the column for dwellings (7).
  • In the column property type (10), record code 7 "Empty lot"
  • In the column results of the visit (11), record code 7 "No habitual residents".
Code 8: Erroneous record
There are dwellings that have more than one entrance from the same street or from different streets, making it possible that you accidentally duplicate the record.

For example:
The house on the corner has two entrances from different streets; and you register it two times. When the supposedly second home opens the door for you, you realize that you had already recorded it earlier.

Confirm with the person the situation and do the following:
In the column property type (10), assign the code 9 "Erroneous record" to the apparent second dwelling that you recorded and comment in section 13. Your observations of the last page of the property list should explain why you duplicated it.

4.4 Other cases in the recording of property

The following is the way to record other situations that can present themselves in the Property List will be specified.

Recording properties with pending information
Once you have recorded the address, if it is not possible to know the total number of properties (dwellings or businesses) on the premise, do the following:

  • Record number 1 in the column for dwellings (7) or for businesses (8), according to its corresponding designation.
  • In the column property type (10), record the type of property that you observe.
  • In the column results of the visit (11), record code 3 "Occupants absent at the time of visit".
[p. 46]

When you return to the property and determine the number of dwellings or businesses that exist on the premise, it's probable that it deals with more than one dwelling or business; if this is the case, correct the previous information with two horizontal lines and note the correct information.

Verify the existence of residents and circle the corresponding code in column 9.

Record of recovered property
As seen earlier, it is possible that for some property you don't obtain information on the total number of dwellings or businesses on the premise, and because of that, you have only recorded a single property in column 7 or 8.

When you return to the property you will already have recorded other information in the following lines and that upon the second visit they tell you that in the premise exists more than one dwelling and/or business.

In these cases, write in the corresponding column the response obtained and record the rest of the properties in the first blank line of the property list, after the last property you have recorded thus far. Don't forget to write the interior numbers or the corresponding features, according to the case.

Also, from the left sign of the column comparison (1), draw an asterisk in all those new properties that pertain to the same premise that had been left as pending in the first visit.

Finally, in the observation section, indicate that the consecutive properties that were placed with an asterisk correspond to the premise that you recorded initially.

[p. 47]

Important aspects for property recording
Below some aspects to consider for recording property are presented such as: the identification of independent dwellings, obtaining the information with absent occupants, and the operating route for recording the property.

Identifying the independent dwellings
Especially in the urban areas, there exist dwellings whose characteristics can difficult the identification or distinction of each one and it's possible that you end up omitting dwellings.

In order to avoid omitting and to detect all the dwellings that are found throughout your route, it's useful to consider elements like those mentioned below:

  • Color change of the façade.
  • Change of construction type.
  • Identification of signs, for example, "Welcome to the house of the Rodríguez Lara family".
  • Light or water meters.
  • Height of the construction.
  • Different type of metalwork on the doors and windows.
[p. 48]

Also, it's important that you observe if within the premise there exists some stairway that can lead to a different dwelling in the upper part or hallways that can be access to dwellings that are found in the back part.

Obtaining the information of properties with absent occupants
When you arrive at a property and [the residents] do not open the door even when you have insisted, you must ask about the situation of the property with the people of up to two or three properties to the right side, left side, and in front of the said property.

In the case of being inhabited, ask the time at which the residents can be found, so that you record it on the Property List and return to capture the information.

[p. 49-68, consisting of enumerator instructions on communication and presentation, are omitted here.]

[p. 69]

Criteria for identifying the class of the private dwelling

If it deals with a private dwelling, circle the class of the corresponding dwelling in accordance with the observation and considering:

  • If it deals with a fixed construction, mobile or improvised installation
  • If it forms fart of a collection of dwellings in a building or terrain
  • If it shares walls, roofs, or floors
  • If it is a business with habitual residents

Apply the following specific criteria:

Independent house
This is a fixed construction of any material that generally does not share walls, roofs, or floors with other dwellings and has access from a public space: street, field, or path.

  • There can be variety in the same space or premise.
  • This includes private dwellings with businesses, as long as the space used to carry out the economic activity isn't used for sleeping.
Apartment in an apartment building
This is part of a group of apartments in a building constructed with resistant materials of various floors or levels, in which it shares some wall, roof, or floor with another dwelling of the same building. It has access from a common space: hallway, stairway, or elevator.

  • Each apartment has independent water and lavatory installations.
Dwelling in a tenement building
This is a fixed construction that is part of a collection of dwellings grouped on the same space that share some wall, roof, or floor with another dwelling. It has access from a common space: patio or hallway.

[p. 70]

  • Generally the water and lavatory installations are shared.
  • The collection of dwellings is recognized as neighbors or collection of rooms
Dwelling in a room in the attic
This is a fixed construction that that is located on the terrace of an apartment building and that at the moment of the data collection is inhabited by people independent from those that reside in the apartment to which it belongs. It has access from a common space: stairway and hallway.

Premise not intended for habitation
This is a fixed construction that was built for economic activity and that at the moment of the data collection is inhabited, such as a store, workshop, storage, factory, office, barn, stable, among others.

Mobile dwelling
This is an installation or vehicle that can be moved or transported from one place to another and that at the moment of the data collection is inhabited, such as trailer, caravan, mobile home, automobile, boat, yacht, circus tent, campaign house, and boxcar.

[p. 71]

Shelter
This is a place or improvised installation such as a private dwelling that at the moment of the data collection is used to live, such as a cave, under a tree, a sewer, a drainage tube, a tunnel, under a bridge, in a door space, a shelter made with palm branches, among others.

  • This includes the building in construction or in ruins that is inhabited at the moment of the data collection.

[p. 72]

Criteria to determine the class of the collective dwelling

If it deals with a collective dwelling, record it in section 7 "Class of collective dwelling" of the basic questionnaire that deals with it.

The collective dwellings are classified as:

1. Hotel, motel, inn
This is a premise that provides the service of temporary housing to people, in exchange for a payment and that at the moment of data collection has habitual residents.

  • It has a sign that identifies it.
2. Boarding house, guest house, house of assistance
This is a premise that provides the service of accommodation to people for certain periods of time, in exchange for payment.

  • In some cases it has a sign that identifies it; in other cases the property has the appearance of a private dwelling.
3. Hospital, clinic, healing house, medical treatment center
This is a premise that provides attention and medical treatment, and because of that, accommodations to people who have been admitted for some physical or psychiatric suffering. The services provided may or may not be charged.

  • Generally it has a sign that identifies it.
  • It includes a rehabilitation center for people with addictions.
[p. 73]

4. House for minors, orphanage, house for infants
This is a premise that provides accommodation and other services, such as food, dress, and education to orphan minors or the unprotected.

  • It generally has a sign that identifies it.
5. House for elders, nursing home
This is a premise that provides accommodation and other services, such as food and medical attention to the elderly. The services provided may or may not be charged for.

  • It generally has a sign that identifies it.
6. Domestic abuse shelter
This is a premise that provides accommodation, food, medical, psychological, and legal support, among others, to women and children that seek refuge for some situation of violence in their private dwellings.

  • It generally has a sign that identifies it.
7. Homeless shelter
This is a premise that provides accommodation for sleeping, and in some cases, food to the needy or unprotected that lack a dwelling.

  • It generally has a sign that identifies it.
[p. 74]

8. Boarding school, student residence
This is a premise that provides accommodation and food, among other services, to students that are admitted or enrolled in some educational level. The services provided may or may not be charged for.

  • It generally has a sign that identifies it.
9. Convent, monastery, religious community housing, seminary
This is a premise that accommodates people from a religious community or those preparing for the priesthood or religious order. Besides accommodations, the people share food.

  • In some cases it doesn't have a sign that identifies it.
10. Jail, prison, penitentiary, penal colony
This is a premise specially constructed by the State to imprison people age 18 or older who committed some crime or infraction of the law, and because of that are deprived of their freedom and other rights.

11. Rehabilitation center for juvenile delinquents, correctional facilities
This is a premise specially constructed by the State to imprison people younger than 18 who committed some crime or infraction of the law, and because of that are deprived of their freedom; and there is intent to correct the criminal behavior of the inhabitants.

  • In some cases it is known as a reformatory or juvenile detention center.
[p. 75]

12. Work camp, work barracks, medical residence
This is a premise that provides temporary accommodation to people who work in exchange for a payment, or complete their required internship hours in a hospital center.

  • These are generally located next to their same work centers.
  • This includes camps of laborers that construct works of infrastructure (highways, dams, etc.), covered wagons of agricultural workers, petroleum platforms, and merchant ships.
13. Military, naval, or police base, camp, or outpost
This is a premise that accommodates members of the army, marine, or police who are located in strategic places to safeguard the national territory, the security of the population and maintain the public order. In addition to accommodation, food is offered to them.

  • This includes marine ships.
14. Camp for the displaced
This is a premise that is improvised to provide temporary communitarian accommodations to people affected by disasters or catastrophes. In addition to accommodation, food and other services are offered to them.

15. Migrant shelter
This is a premise that provides temporary accommodation to people who are headed, generally, to the countries to the north of Mexico: The United States or Canada. In addition to accommodations, food and other types of attention are offered to them.

16. Other classes
This includes other classes of collective dwellings that cannot be placed in the previous classifications, for example, brothels and communes, among others.

[p. 76]

6.3 Section I. Housing characteristics

In this section, instructions will be presented for the questions that investigate the characteristics of the private inhabited dwellings.

If the class of the private inhabited dwellings is a premise not intended for inhabitation, a mobile dwelling, a shelter, or a collective dwelling, don't apply this section. Start the interview with the section II, List of People.

1. Walls, 2. Roof, 3. Floor
The first two questions identify the basic materials with which the walls and roof of the dwelling are constructed, and in the case of the floor, identify if it has covering.

Waste material consists of pieces of cardboard, rubber, tires, and containers among others.

  • Circle the code [for the] material that is similar; if the response is a material that is not on the list of options, clarify with the informer mentioning the possible responses.
  • When the informer indicates that [the roof and/or walls] are made with two or more distinct materials, mention that [the question] deals with the [material] that covers the greater part. In the case that they are found [to be] in the same proportion, circle the code that corresponds to the first option.

[p. 77]

4. Kitchen
One looks to see if the dwelling has at its disposal a room or space designated for food preparation.

Room: This is a space of the dwelling delineated by fixed walls and roof of any material, except of fabric and furniture, where its occupants carry out some daily activities, like eating, resting, sleeping, and cooking, among others.

A dwelling has a room for cooking when in one of them there is a stove or fire to prepare warm food, even though it could also be used as a bedroom, living room, dining room, among others.

Consider that the dwelling does not have a room to cook when the food is prepared under sheds or in spaces that only have a roof but no walls.

5. Bedrooms and 6. Rooms
Question 5 only considers the rooms that are habitually used to sleep, even though they have other uses.

[p. 78]

There are dwellings with various rooms and these are recognized commonly for the principal function that is carried out in them, like kitchen, living room, dining room, room, and bedroom among others. Record the total number of rooms that the dwelling has in Question 6.

There are dwellings with a single room that is used for distinct functions, like sleeping, cooking, and eating, among others. In these cases, record number 1 for both questions.

If there is some garage, storage, grain barn, or business that has a different function than sleeping, only count it if it is used for sleeping.

Confirm that the total number of rooms is always greater than or equal to the number of rooms used for sleeping. If it's not so, clarify the situation with the informer and correct the responses.

Areas used for storage do not count.

[p. 79]

7. Electricity
The electric energy that is used to illuminate the dwelling can come from different sources: the public power supply, the private plant, the storage heater, among others.

Circle option 1 "Yes", even if the service is suspended temporarily.

8. Water availability
With this question, whether or not the occupants of the dwelling have access to running water is identified and distinguished into those that:

  • Have running water inside the dwelling.
  • Only have a water faucet on the property.
  • Carry the water from a public faucet or from another dwelling.
  • Are habitually supplied from another source when there is no running water.

Circle code 1 when the housing has water from the kitchen faucet, the shower, and the sink, among others.

[p. 80]

The water from pipes generally is stored in cisterns, washbasins, metal cans, and other containers.

If they respond with some code from 3 to 6, don't apply question 9 "Water resources".

9. Water supply
This question finds out the frequency at which the running water coming from a public supply arrives at the dwelling.

Apply the question only in the dwellings that have running water inside or on the property.

10. Toilet, 11. Exclusive use, 12. Water discharge
This question finds out if the residents of the dwelling use sanitary plumbing to remove human excrement and urine, if it is for the exclusive use of that dwelling, and if the sanitary plumbing eliminates the waste materials through discharges of water.

Sanitary plumbing is understood as: toilet, lavatory, water closet, toilet bowl, latrine, black hole, or septic tank. Form these questions referring to the specific word that is used in the place where you are gathering the information.

The toilet can be located within the dwelling or on the property.

[p. 81]

Consider that it doesn't have a toilet when the residents of the dwelling defecate level with the ground in the open air (corral, patio, field, garden, woods, etc.)

The sanitary facility is shared when the residents of two or more dwellings are accustomed to use it habitually.

The sanitary facility has direct discharge of water when it's regulated with a lever or pedal.

There are sanitary installations that don't admit water for functioning, for example, dry latrines, black holes, and septic tanks.

If the response to question 10 is negative, go on to question 13 "Drainage".

13. Drainage
This question investigates if the dwelling has drainage at its disposal, and distinguishes the place where the dwelling removes the residual water.

The dwelling has drainage if it has a system of tubes that eliminate the water used in the toilet, sink, shower, or similar installations.

[p. 82]
These are synonyms of drainage: tubing, drain, piping, sewer, among others. When you ask the question, mention the common name in the locality where you do the interview.

14. Fuel
This question identifies the material or energy that is used with greatest frequency to cook or warm food.

  • Code 1 refers to the LP (liquid petroleum) gas that is distributed in cylinders or is discharged in stationary tanks.
[p. 83]
  • Circle code 2 when natural gas is distributed via conductors where the consumption is recorded on a meter; generally the piping leaving the pavement and entering the dwelling can be observed.
  • Circle code 5 when the response is electric stove, grill, electric oven, or microwave.
  • Circle code 6 when the informer signals a fuel different from the response options or indicates that he/she neither cooks nor warms food because he/she eats food outside the dwelling or for some other reason.

15. Trash disposal
This question identifies the habitual way that people eliminate trash from their dwellings.

[p. 84]

16. Tenancy
This question records whether the owner resides in the dwelling, whether the occupants pay rent, or if they occupy it in another way.

Consider who is the owner or landlord, even if he/she reports having a debt or mortgage.

[Consider] if the dwelling is occupied with a different situation, covering the cases of dwellings on loan, in legal problems, intestate, or occupied without the permission of the owner.

17. Acquisition
This question is asked in dwellings that are the property of one of its occupants, and [the enumerator] investigates the way in which the dwelling was acquired.

It was bought already built (when it was obtained in exchange for a payment in full or on credit, so that it can be either totally paid or with a debt or mortgage).

It was commissioned to be built (when they contracted a worker, brick-layer, architect, engineer, or construction company for its construction).

It was constructed by the owner himself, who could have participated in the construction alone or with other inhabitants of the dwelling, family members, or friends, all of whom were not contracted or paid.

It was obtained in another way, including the dwellings that were received by inheritance, donation, or gift; as well as any other situation.

18. Equipment
This question looks to find out some of the installations that the dwelling has, which provide the residents with conditions of well-being and comfort, like the type of stove, if there exists tanks to store water, basic installations for personal hygiene, and electric meters.

  • Wood or coal stove with chimney. This is an installation for cooking or production of heat via the use of wood or carbon that has a duct to take away the smoke that is produced by using the stove.
[p. 85]
  • Cistern or underground water tank [aljibe]. These are containers constructed or prefabricated to store large volumes of water.

In a residential complex, apartment building, or tenement house there can exist a single cistern or tank used in common for all the dwellings, so that in these cases it is considered that the dwelling has it.
19. Goods and TIC
The objective is to investigate if the occupants of the dwelling have at their disposal electric home appliances, automobiles, or articles and services of information and communication technologies (TIC).

The radio refers to whatever appliance that permits one to listen to some frequency (AM and FM) of public broadcasting.

If they inform you that some appliance or automobile belongs to the business or institution where one of the dwelling occupants works, consider that they do not have it.

[p. 86]

6.4 Section II. List of people

This section lets you know the number of people who normally inhabit the dwelling.

1. List of people
Read the complete question; avoid reading only parts or reducing it.

Record on each line the number of people who normally live in the dwelling. Start with the head of the household, that is, the person recognized as such by the other residents of the dwelling.

Consider as a habitual resident every person who normally lives in the dwelling, sleeps, prepares food, eats, and protects himself/herself there.

Habitual residents are the people who:

  • At the moment of the interview are present in the dwelling and don't have any other fixed place where they live.
  • Are recently born but still haven't arrived at the dwelling because they are in the hospital.
  • Are temporarily absent because of vacations, hospitalization, business trip, school internships, or some other similar cause.
  • Daily cross the border to work in some other country, so that they live in Mexico on the weekends.
  • Are of foreign nationality and normally live in the dwelling.
  • Are employed as domestic workers and sleep in the dwelling, like their relatives.

They are not habitual residents if they:

  • Are visiting and normally live in another dwelling.
  • Have left to live in another place to study, work, or for some other cause.
  • Are foreign diplomats, like their families.
  • Are employed as domestic workers and do not sleep in the dwelling.

If the informer still has doubts on who the habitual residents of the dwelling are, ask where the person sleeps for the majority of days of the week. If he/she sleeps in the dwelling where the interview was conducted for the majority of the time, then he/she is a habitual resident.

[p. 88]

If doubts persist, then ask the informer how much time it has been since the person has been away from the dwelling. If it is fewer than six months, consider him/her a resident, but if it is more than six months, do not include him/her.

When there are people in the dwelling with the same name, note the name and in parenthesis the kinship relationship the person has with the head of the household, so that you distinguish them.

When no one is identified as the head of the household because the people who inhabit the dwelling are a group of friends, students, or others, record the first person who the informer names as the head of the household.

Circle the registration number of the person who is providing you the information about the people in the dwelling.

Use another Long Questionnaire when there are seven or more people in the dwelling; in the second Long Questionnaire annul and write the number to continue the list of people: 7, 8, 9, etc., until completing the total number of people in the dwelling; repeat the same procedure if you need to use more questionnaires in the dwelling.

[p. 89]

For the collective dwellings, adapt the question in the following way:

"Please, tell me the name of all the people who normally live in (name or social reason of the collective dwelling), including the names of small children and the elderly".

2. Verification of the List of People
This question seeks to confirm that the number of people listed is exactly the number of people who inhabit the dwelling.

The informer frequently forgets to mention some person, and because of this, in order to avoid his/her omission, it is important that you correctly ask that question, since the counting of all the people is one of the central objectives of the census.

Read the question: "Then, there are (indicate the total number of people listed) people who live here?" If the response is yes, record the number and circle code 1; if the response is no, correct the list and continue.

6.5 Section III. Characteristics of the people

In this section the information of the people who inhabit the dwelling, like the sex, age, level of studies, income, among others, is obtained.

Before requesting the information for each person, copy all the names in the spaces designated for them, and for each person start with the phrase: "Now I'm going to ask about (mention the name of the person you previously noted)", so that the informer knows about whom you will be asking the information.

[p. 90]

For all persons
[Questions 1-11 are for all persons.]

1. Sex
If by the name of the person you can identify that it deals with a woman or a man, or if you are soliciting the informer's information, don't ask the question, only mention the name of the person and the sex that corresponds to them tied to the age question.

Example:
Sonia is a woman: "How old is she?"

Ask the sex of the person only if the name is uncommon like: Andárani, Yuritzi, Erubey, Éder, or if it is used for man or a woman like: Guadalupe, Rosario, Inés, Asunción, Refugio, Soledad, among others.

2. Age
With this question, it is known that the age represents the completed years of the people in the dwelling at the moment of the interview.

If the informer doesn't remember or [cannot] specify the age of some person, help him with some event (marriage, a child's birth, year in school, among others) or ask him to consult a birth certificate, voter's ID, personal identification card (CURP), driver's license, or some other document where the birth date appears; help him calculate the age.

[p. 91]

Register three zeros ("000") if the person is younger than 1 year, and [if he/she] is hours old, days old, weeks old, or younger than 12 months.

3. Family relationship
This question seeks to identify the relation that the people inhabiting the dwelling have with the head of the household; for example, husband/wife, son/daughter, grandson/granddaughter, among others.

Don't ask this question if it deals with a collective dwelling.

Ask about the kinship always referring to the head of the household and not with the informer, unless he/she is the head. Remember, there can only be one head per dwelling independent of whether it is a woman or man.

Don't read the question when you refer to the first person on the list, only confirm that he/she is the head and circle code 1; for the rest of the people ask the question including the name.

Circle code 1 for the first person listed when they don't declare a head of the household and ask the kinship questions in relation to him/her.

Investigate if it refers to a partner when they declare the word "Friend". If it is, circle code 2, but if they mention that they are work friends, schoolmates, or roommates, record the aforementioned in the space with the option "Other".

Write on the line of the option, "Other", if what the informer declares does not appear in the options 2 to 7. Like: domestic workers (domestic employee, servant, nanny, majordomo, gardener, chauffeur, or other), including their families.

[p. 92]

4. Mother's identification, 5. Father's identification
These questions identify the mother and/or the father of each person who lives in the dwelling where the interview was carried out.

When the answer is affirmative, proceed to identify who from the list of people is the mother or the father.

Return to section II of the List of People, look for the serial number of the person and note it in the space designated for the question.

If the dynamic of the interview allows you to know previously who is the mother or the father or some person from the list, because the informer has provided this information, confirm the following way:

  • "Jazmin's mother is Mrs. Patricia".
  • "You told me that Juan is the father of all the children, so Juan is the father of Raúl".

6. Entity or country of birth
Circle code 1 if the person was born in the same federal entity where you are performing the interview.

Circle code 3 if the person was born in the United States of America.

When the person was born in a different state than that of the interview, or in a country that is not the United States of America, write the name of the state or country on the line.

If the response is the name of a municipality or delegation, neighborhood or locality, investigate to which state of the Mexican Republic or to which country he/she belongs and register it. In case the exact information is not obtained, record what the informer tells you in the corresponding line.

[p. 93]

If the person tells you that he/she was born in Mexico or Mexico City, ask that he/she clarifies if it corresponds to the federal district or the state of Mexico.

7. Use of health services
This question finds out where the people are seen when they have health problems.

When asking this question, the response options are only read when it is very evident that the informer doesn't know what to answer.

If the informer's response is that the person is seen in more than one health institution, ask, "To which does he/she go with the most frequency?" And circle the code that corresponds.

When the response is the name or number of the clinic, ask if it pertains to the IMSS, ISSSTE, or some hospital of the Pemex, the Army, the Marines, the Secretary of Health (SSA) or some other; circle the code of the option that corresponds.

[p. 94]

Consider the following and circle:

  • Code 2, if the response is ISSSTE and deals with federal government workers.
  • Code 3, if the declaration is an institution of the state social security such as: ISSSET, ASSSEMyM, ISSSTEZAC, ISSSPEA, or ISSSTESON, the state ISSSTE is circled.
  • Code 7, if the person is seen in a private medical clinic or Farmacias Similares.
  • Code 8, if the person goes to a benefit institution such as: DIF, Red Cross, Green Cross, Ambar Cross, medical dispensary; midwife, health promoter, or other.
  • Code 9, if the person doesn't use health services or the response is one of the following: he/she uses health services in a country outside Mexico, he/she goes to a folk healer, witch, herbalist, or similar places.

8. Entitlement to health services
This question records people from the dwelling who have a right to medical service.

A person has a right to medical service when:

  • The company, factory, or company for which the person works pays the medical service to a private or public health institution.
  • He/she personally pays a voluntary or optional insurance in the IMSS.
  • He/she is pensioned or retired with some social security institution like: IMSS, ISSSTE; or Pemex, the Army, or the Marines.
  • He/she is enrolled and pays a quota in some government program such as Popular Insurance, or Medical Insurance for a New Generation.
[ p. 95]
  • He/she has private medical services or insurance for major medical expenses from private health institutions, as is the case of the bank employees or some of the government workers.
  • He/she acquired a private medical insurance on his/her own account.
  • He/she is a beneficiary of a worker or incumbent of the right to medical service.

Take into account the following and circle:

  • Code 2, if the response is ISSSTE and deals with federal government workers.
  • Code 3, if the declaration is of the state social security institutions such as: ISSSET, ISSSETMyM, ISSSTEZAC, ISSSPEA, or ISSSTESON, the state ISSSTE is circled.
  • Code 7, when the informer knows that the person has a right to medical service, but can't identify that institution.

Example:
If the informer declares that the person has a right to medical service in a clinic, ask if it is provided from the factory or business where he/she works, if it is paid by him/her or he/she is enrolled in the Popular Insurance, and try to locate the response in the IMSS, ISSSTE, Pemex, the Army, the Marines, or another.

Consider that the person has rights to medical service if at the moment of the interview, he/she is going through the process to receive medical attention in institutions like the IMSS, ISSSTE, Pemex, the Army, the Marines, or another; circle the option code that corresponds.

If the person is a student of some education institution that provides the right to medical service, circle the option code that corresponds.

[p. 96]

Circle code 8 for the people who don't have rights to medical services when:

  • They receive medical service in the IMSS Opportunities (before IMSS Solidarity or IMSS Coplamar).
  • They solicit medical attention in the health centers or hospitals of the SSA.
  • They receive medical attention in the hospitals, private clinics, and pay for the service at that moment; private medical practices, Farmacias Similares, among others.
  • They claim to receive medical service in institutions as: SSA, DIF, Red Cross, Green Cross, Amber Cross, medical dispensaries, or other benefit institutions.
  • They only have the right to medical service in the United States of America or another country.

For this question, you can circle up to two response options; if the informer declares more, circle the first two that the informer says.

9. Religion
Write the name of the religion as the informer declares it, without using abbreviations.

If the response is Protestant, Evangelical, or Christian, ask to which church, congregation, or religious denomination they ascribe, since these are not religions themselves but rather beliefs that include various religions.

Example:
Interviewer: "What is Oscar's religion?"
Informer: "Protestant".
Interviewer: "To which church, congregation, or religious denomination does he belong?"
Informer: "He's a Jehovah's Witness".

Insist in knowing the name of the religion taking care to not bother or make uncomfortable the informer, in the case that the response is generic, such as: "Independent", "That of his/her parents", "That of the neighborhood", among others.

[p. 97]

10. Disabilities
This question identifies the people who have difficulties completing activities in daily life such as walking, seeing, speaking or communicating, listening, learning, or attending to their personal care.

For each question consider the following:

  • Ask all the people who live in the dwelling.
  • You can circle up to six codes when a person declares more than one difficulty.

People with disabilities are those who:

  • Have difficulties and limitations moving or getting around, going up stairs because of the lack of one or a part of one's leg; this also includes those whose legs are impaired or display movement restrictions, in such a way that they need the help of another person, wheelchair or other apparatus, like walkers or artificial legs.
  • Display total loss of vision in one or both eyes, as well as those with weak vision and those who while using glasses can't see very well because of their advanced visual problem.
  • Have difficulty communicating with others, due to the speech limitations or because they can't chat or converse in a comprehensible way. Remember to not include small children in this situation because due to their young age they still have natural difficulty speaking because they are still learning to do so.
  • Can't hear, as well as those who display difficulties hearing (weak audio), in one or both ears, or those who even while using an audial device have listening difficulties due to the advanced state of the problem.
  • Can't attend to their own personal care or display difficulties and limitations completing activities such as bathing themselves, getting dressed, or consuming food.
  • Declare limitations or difficulties learning a new task of paying attention for a determined amount of time, as well as limitations remembering information, or performing activities that should be completed in daily life.
  • This also includes the people who declare a mental problem like mental retardation or alternative conduct and behavior.

If the person declares that he/she has some sickness or suffering (diabetes, cancer, arthritis, among others), ask what limits or prevents him/her to complete the daily activities in the dwelling, work, or at school, according to the options of the responses indicated in the question.

[p. 98]

When the person discloses information or knows the response by direct observation, use the confirmation of the other members of the dwelling, but never record the response without verifying the information with the informer.

If after having read all the response options, they declare that the person doesn't have difficulties, circle code 17 and continue to question 12 "Indigenous languages" if the person is age 3 or older; if not, continue to the following person.

11. Reason for disability
The purpose is to know the reason for which the people of the dwelling have difficulties completing activities in daily life.

This question is only asked if a circle is put around the code of some difficulty in "Disabilities"; in order to do so relate said difficulty with the response codes of question 11 "Cause of disability".

Read the text for the question about the reason for disability for each declared difficulty and record the code in the box that corresponds to the difficulty reported.

In the boxes of the codes, note the code that appears to the right of each one of the options, which must correspond to the difficulty circled in question 10.

Keep in mind that when one person has more than one difficulty, you must have a cause code registered for each one of them.

[p. 99]

Before noting the cause code, consider the following:

  • Code 1, because he/she was born that way. [This occurs] when the cause of the difficulty is at birth, as well as the causes originating during the pregnancy or in the moment of birth.
  • Code 2, because of sickness. [This occurs] when the difficulty was acquired because of health problems after birth. (This also includes disabilities caused by addictions).
  • Code 3, because of an accident. For all the difficulties originating in accidental situations occurring in any place; this could be at work, in the street, at home, or others. This also includes acts of violence, assaults, fights, acts of terrorism, and others.
  • Code 4, because of advanced age. This includes those who display difficulties whose principal cause is related to the physical or mental limitations and difficulties that come with age.
  • Code 5, because of another cause. Note this only in cases for which the cause of the difficulty is not congenital or due to sickness, addiction, accident, or aging.

Example:
Juan declares to the interviewer that Maria has difficulty walking due to an automobile accident where she can no longer mover her legs; in addition, she has difficulty hearing, because she already is very elderly. Record the information as [codes 10 and 13, respectively].

[p. 100]

For people age 3 or older.
[Questions 12-20 are for persons age 3 or older]
12. Indigenous language, 13. Name of indigenous language, 14. Speaks Spanish
These questions find out if some person who lives in the dwelling speaks some dialect or indigenous language, and if so, the name of it and if he/she speaks Spanish as well.

It's important that you emphasize in the phrase of the first question, "Now I want to ask you", so that you are introducing a new theme to the informer.

Always ask the first question, even though you consider that in your work area indigenous languages are not spoken. Record the name of the indigenous language just as you hear it, without using abbreviations.

When the response is "He/she speaks the language", "The one that is spoken in the area", "The one of his/her parents", among others, ask, "What dialect or indigenous language is it?" and record it. If he/she responds: "A little", "Almost none", "A few words", among others, circle code 3.

In the case of the following languages, ask for clarifications: if it's Chontal, ask if it is from Oaxaca or Tabasco; if it's Amuzgo, ask if it's from Oaxaca or Guerrero, and if it's Tepehuano, if it's from Chihuahua or Durango.

Foreign languages like English, French, German, Italian, or Japanese are not indigenous languages.

In question 14, Speaks Spanish, record that he/she doesn't speak it if the answer is "A little", "Almost none", "A few words", among others.

[p. 101]

15. Understanding of indigenous language
Through this question the people who do not speak an indigenous language but understand it are identified.

Investigate further when the informer answers "A little", "A little bit", "Some", among others, and ask, "Does Juan understand the dialogue between two people who speak the language?" If the response is yes, circle code 1, but if the response is no or "A little" is affirmed, circle code 3.

16. Ethnic self-identification
A person is or is considered indigenous if he/she identifies himself/herself as such, for the fact of:

  • descending from native or ancestral populations
  • conserving the traditions or customs of the indigenous community to which he/she belongs

When asking the question, substitute her or him, according to how it corresponds; for example, about Sara you ask: "In agreement with Sara's culture, does she consider herself indigenous?" About Mateo the question would be: "In agreement with Mateo's culture, does he consider himself indigenous?"

17. School attendance
Consider that the person attends school when he/she is enrolled and goes as a student or pupil to some education center like:

  • Preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school, technical or commercial school, as well as remote middle school or remote high school.
  • Professional (university, technology institute, teacher training college, among others), masters or doctorate (graduate).
  • Open education or education for adults (except literacy classes).
[p. 102]
  • Courses taken via the Internet, at the undergraduate degree or its equivalent, masters, or doctorate.

Consider that the person doesn't go to school when:

  • He/she only goes to classes to learn to read and write (literacy).
  • Takes classes to learn a trade or craft such as sewing, beauty, electricity, computation, music, among others.

18. Education
Record the last year or grade that the person passed in school and circle the level code that corresponds.

Keep in mind the following considerations:

  • If the person at the moment of the interview is enrolled in some grade or school year, note the previous year or grade that he/she passed.
  • If he/she finished studying in less years in the System of Open Education, record the years passed as if he/she had passed in the regular education system.

Examples:

  • If he/she finished the elementary school in the National Institute for Adult Education (INEA) in a year and a half, record six years and circle level 2 code.
  • If he/she finished middle school in the INEA in a year, record 3 years and circle the level 3 code.
  • When the response is a bimestre, trimester, quarter, semester, circle the number equivalent to the years passed as follows:
  • 2 semesters, 3 trimesters, 4 quarters, 6 bimestres -- is equal to one year. But if the year has not concluded, record the last grade finished.
  • Record the last grade passed and circle the level 4 code if he/she studied in high school and technical school and the same time.
[p. 103]
  • If he/she studied in the teacher training college, ask if it was a basic teacher training college -- if so, ask the grades or years passed and circle the level 5 code. If the response is an undergraduate teaching training college, write the grades and years passed and circle option 9.
  • When trades are declared such as: carpentry, blacksmith work, beautician work, cooking, plumbing, sewing, electricity, among others, or technical or commercial careers such as: auto mechanic, bilingual secretary, private accountant, computer technician, food technician, among others, investigate what prerequisite was needed to enroll (elementary or middle school), record the years passed in the career, and circle the level code in the corresponding option.

It is important that you consider the grade passed that the informer mentions, since this determines the level in which you should record it (consult the equivalency table aforementioned).

For example:
Interviewer: "What is the last year that Carlos passed in school?"
Informer: "He studied private accounting".
Interviewer: "How much time did his schooling last and what education did he need to enter the career?"
Informer: "Two years and he needed middle school".

  • Record in the level 8 code the last grade of technical or commercial studies passed with high school finished. When the response is Superior University Technician, record the last grade passed and circle that same level.
  • Investigate if the career is technical (1 to 2 years) or at the undergraduate level (3 or more years). If it is a technical career, record the grade passed and circle the level 8 code. Note the last grade passed and circle the level 8 code. Note the last grade that the person passed and circle level 10 if he/she declares a university degree.
  • Also consider as a masters the medical concentration (general surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, etc.), record the grade, and circle the level 11 code. In the same way, record and circle the years passed in the level 12, 'Doctorate' for the different concentrations and subspecialties of medicine (cardiovascular surgery, cardiology, pediatric cardiology, etc.)
  • If he/she studied in another country, ask that he/she signals the equivalency of the studies, such as the years passed, and record them in the level that corresponds.
  • If the response is that the person is on vacation, note the age or grade and education level that he/she has just finished or concluded.
[p. 104]
  • Note the years passed in the level code that corresponds if the response is the name of the school where he/she studied (UNITEC, CONALEP, CBESTIS, etc.), or the name of the major that he/she finished or is studying (accounting, architecture, social work, nursing, etc.) -- in these cases ask to what level the studies correspond and record the corresponding option.

19. Past education
When you have noted in question 18 "Education" some years in the teacher training college, technical or commercial careers, undergraduate or professional, masters or doctorate, ask, "What studies did he/she need to take to enter this major?" Circle the respective code.

If the response is "Basic teacher training college", circle code 3.

20. Name of degree/course of studies
When they declare basic teacher training college, teacher training college, technical, commercial, superior technical university, professional, masters, or doctoral studies, write the name of the major that the person studies or studied: elementary school education, secondary education, electronics, topography, industrial maintenance, topography engineering, civil engineering, electronic engineering, Hispanic languages, masters in demography, doctorate in statistics, among others.

[p. 105]

For people age 5 or older
[Questions 21-22 are for persons age 5 or older]

21. Literacy
Consider that a person knows how to read and write when at least he/she can read and write a message in some tongue or language, however this might be.

Also record code 1 when he/she can't read and write because of some accident, sickness, or advanced age, but knows or knew how to do so.

A person doesn't know how to read and write if he/she can only write his/her name, some words, numbers, and read announcements.

Repeat the question after responses like: "Not a lot", "More or less" or "I write letters poorly", to verify if he/she really knows how to read and write.

22. Entity or country of residence in 2005, 23. Municipality of residence in 2005
These questions identify the municipality, delegation, or entity of the Mexican Republic where people lived 5 years ago in June of 2005, and distinguishes [those] who lived in the United States of America or in another country during these dates.

When the response in 22 "Entity or country of residence in 2005" is the name of a municipality or delegation, locality, neighborhood, or city, investigate to which state of the Mexican Republic or country it belongs, and write it on the corresponding line.

If the informer doesn't have the exact name of the municipality, state, or country, record the information that he/she provides as is in the space, "In another state" or "In another municipality", according to the case.

[p. 106]

Help the informer, if necessary, to remember related events like births or children's ages, end of school classes, town parties, family or social festivals, or whichever other event that is useful.

For persons age 12 or older
[Questions 24-35 are for persons age 12 or older]

24. Marital status
This question finds out if the person actually lives in a free union or if he/she is married, single, widowed, separated, or divorced.

Ask the question even if the person is young, to avoid omitting adolescent unions or marriages.

[p. 107]

When the informer mentions that at some time the person was married or in a free union, register him/her as separated, divorced, or widowed, according to the case, but never as a single person.

25. Identification of partner
Ask this question only when the informer mentions that the person is married or in a free union, to know if the partner or spouse lives in the same household and, being so, identify who it is.

Return to Section II, list of people, look for the serial number of the person who is the spouse and note it in the space designated for this question.

26. Activity status, 27. Verification of activity status

For better operation of the questions in this category, it's important that you emphasize the phrase: "Now I'm going to ask you about your labor situation", since this will help the informer understand the new theme. Read this phrase before asking question 26.

This question seeks to find out which of the people who inhabit the dwelling worked the week prior to the data collection.

[p. 108]

Consider that a person worked if:

  • He/she completed some economic activity for more than one hour the week prior to the data collection in exchange for an income, salary, earnings, wages, or other form of pay in terms of money or goods (like beans, corn, or other products).
  • He/she participated or helped in the collaboration or sale of agricultural, herding, self-sufficient
  • activities, construction, or some other economic activity.
  • He/she was in training or doing an internship
  • He/she completed some economic activity without receiving a salary.
  • The business is or is not part of the family, it is or is not part of his/her property, it does or does not have installations, or if he/she worked on his/her own.

Circle code 2 of question 26, when the person did have work but didn't go to work because:

  • He/she had medical leave or maternity leave.
  • He/she was on vacation.
  • There were not primary resources or the machinery wasn't working.
  • He/she was waiting for the rainy season to start working in the field.
  • There was a technical stop in the work or he/she didn't go for other reasons.
[p. 109]

When this is the case, investigate the characteristics of the job that he/she normally completes. If the person completed more than a month at the job, ask which was his/her primary task, as recognized as such by the informer or the worker. If he/she has some doubt, ask which of those tasks is the most important? If the doubt persists, investigate to which task he/she dedicated the most time the last week.

Circle code 3 when the person already found work but the week previous to the data collection still hadn't started to work.

When the person, in addition to work, studied or did chores around the house, consider that he/she did work, even though he/she dedicated more hours to studying or the household chores.

Ask question 27 only if the people in question 26 expressed not having a job the week before the data collection.

Keep in mind that the options for question 27 are activities that people generally don't consider as work.

For example:
Interviewer: "Now I'm going to ask you about your labor situation. Did you work last week?"
Informer: "No, I didn't work".
Interviewer: "You had work, but you didn't work?"
Informer: "No".
Interviewer: Did you look for work?
Informer: "No, sir, I'm a housewife".
Interviewer: "Then, you dedicate yourself to the household chores?"
Informer: "Yes, that's right".
Interviewer: "Even though you told me that you dedicate your time to the household chores, did you help with the family business last week?"
Informer: "Well, sometimes I take out my stove and sell quesadillas here outside, to help us a little with the expenses".
Interviewer: "Last week you sold quesadillas".
Informer: "Yes, only on Tuesday".

[Illustration of form shows code 6, "Housework" for Question 26, and code 2 "Sells product" for Question 27.]

[p. 110]

28. Occupation or trade
The occupation or trade of a person is obtained through two questions to find out what he/she carried out the week before the data collection.
- The first identifies what the person did in his/her job, that is to say, the tasks or activities that he/she completed.
- The second looks for the common name of the occupation, trade, or position that the person carries out.

On occasions, the informer only knows the tasks that the person carries out but not the name of the occupation, or the other way around. If this is the case, investigate using the technique of confirmation and your experience, so that upon recording the response the informer hears what you are writing.

Examples:
Interviewer: "What did Eduardo do in his job last week?"
Informer: "He is a taxi driver".
Interviewer: "So, he drove a taxi?"
Informer: "Yes".
Interviewer: "His occupation is taxi driver?"
Informer: "Yes".

[p. 111]

Interviewer: "What did Adela do in her job last week?"
Informer: "She is a Social Service nurse".
Interviewer: "Adela cares for the sick?"
Informer: "Yes".
Interviewer: "She is a nurse".
Informer: "Yes".

Interviewer: "What did Juana do in her job last week?"
Informer: "She works shifts in the houses".
Interviewer: "Oh, then, last week Juana did chores in other homes?"
Informer: "Yes, that's right".
Interviewer: "She's a domestic worker".

When the informer responds with general or confusing names of tasks, occupations, or trades, investigate further without bothering in order to obtain a clear and more precise answer.

Examples:
General responses: he/she works a lot, worker, he/she teaches, laborer
Clear and precise responses: he/she supervises the cashiers, auto-service supervisor, gives swim classes, swim instructor

Likewise, when the response about what the person did or the name of the occupation is not fine-tuned or congruent, investigate further with other questions in order to obtain a simple and clear response.

Examples:
Tasks: gives injections, fills out time cards
Occupation or trade: secretary, doctor
Then: "Is he/she a nurse or a secretary? Does he/she fill out time cards or is he/she a doctor?"

If the person completed more than one job, ask what was the main job, as recognized by the informer or the worker. If he/she has a doubt ask: "For

[p.112]

you, which of these jobs is the most important?" If the doubt continues, investigate to which he/she dedicated more time the last week.

29. Position at work
This question finds out if at work the person is employee, worker, day-laborer, unskilled laborer, helper, boss, worker, self-employed, or a family worker without pay.

An employed person is:

  • Employee or worker, if he/she works for a business, private company, or government company for payment
  • Day laborer or unskilled laborer, if he/she works for payment in agriculture or construction
  • Helper, if he/she works in exchange for a payment of salary by helping at the business or company.
  • Owner or employer, if he/she has his/her own business and is distinguished by contracting salary workers or day laborers.
  • Self-employed, if he/she works on his/her own and doesn't contract or have salary workers, but can receive help from other people not receiving pay.
  • Unpaid family worker, if he/she helps with the family businesses, stores, workshops, farms, agricultural parcels without receiving any pay for the work he/she does. This also includes the people who helped non-family businesses, always and whenever he/she hasn't received any pay.

When the person completed chores in outside homes, circle code 5.

Also, circle this code for those that worked only in exchange for a commission. But if he/she receives a base salary as well, then circle code 1.

When the informer has a doubt, investigate further with other questions like: "Juan works for someone? Do they pay Juan an income or a salary? Does Juan work in his own business? Does Juan contract workers?" among others.

If the person had more than one job, only record the job position of his/her principal occupation.

[p. 113]

30. Employee benefits
This question finds out the labor benefits that the employees, workers, day laborers, unskilled workers, or helpers receive with pay on behalf of the company, factory, or place where they worked the week before the data collection.

Consider that the people have labor benefits if they receive them even if they don't make use of them.

If they signal that last week the worker had more than one job, solicit all the labor benefits that he/she was receiving.

31. Hours worked
This question finds out the time that the person dedicated to the work activities.

When the informer has a doubt about specific total hours, ask:

  • "What days did he/she work?"
  • "At what time did the person enter and leave work? And how many days did he/she work last week?"
  • For the type of schedule, if it is continuous, sum the hours from when he/she enters until he/she leaves; but if it's discontinuous, do not sum the time that he/she uses to go out to eat.
  • When it is a person who sells some product or food, ask that he/she also counts the time it took to prepare it.

Add the hours worked when the person has carried out more than one job the week before the data collection.

Solicit an approximated amount or an average, when he/she doesn't remember the hours worked or doesn't know the specific information.

32. Work income
This question records the quantity of money that the person receives, obtains, or earns for his/her work, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, or annually.

[p. 114]

Upon recording the response, first calculate how often he/she receives the income, and after, the quantity received, without leaving spaces to the right.

Adjust the quantity of the considered periods when they identify a different period.

Solicit an approximate amount or average when the response is that the income varies, he/she doesn't know the exact quantity, he/she doesn't remember the amount of the income or the period, or says that he/she earns minimum wage. Confirm the quantity with the informer before writing the amount.

Add the income received when the person has completed more than one job the week before the data collection.

33. Economic activity sector
The economic activity completed in the business, company, or place where the person worked the week before the data collection is found out through two questions:

  • First investigate the common name of the place where the person worked the week before the data collection
  • Second, solicit what the place is dedicated to, that is, what is done, sold, transported, cultivated, extracted, produced or fabricated, what services are offered, what is constructed, among others.

Regarding the activity of the business, company or place where the person worked, always ask, according to the case, for:

  • The main material used in production
  • The product they sell
  • The product they repair.

Use this information to clearly write what they produce, sell, or repair.

For example:
They make cardboard boxes.
They make wooden boxes.
They make and sell houses.

They sell plates, pots, and others.
They sell life insurance.
They sell used clothing.
They sell spare parts for trailers.

They repair shoes.
They repair autos.
They repair used clothing.

When the person responds that he/she works on his/her own, in the second question (to what is the business dedicated) repeat what is noted for Occupation, that is, what the person did. Always be sure that the informer listens to what you write.

Examples:
"What did the person do?" Arranged gardens, sold fresh fish
"Where did the person work?" In different houses, in the market
"What are they dedicated to where he/she works?" Arranging gardens, selling fresh fish

If the person doesn't have a fixed place to work, note the place most frequented or as they indicate it, for example: in his/her own house, in the street, in the market, from door-to-door, outside the school, or in different houses.

If the person had more than one job, only register the economic activity from the work place where he/she carried out the principal occupation.

34. Municipality, entity or country of work
These questions find out the municipality or delegation, as well as the entity of the Mexican Republic or country where the business, company, or place is located where the person worked the week before the data collection.

They are two questions, the first identifies the municipality and the second the entity or country where the business, company, or workplace is located.

[p. 116]

If the person mentions that he/she worked in the home, for example, he/she washed or cleaned different clothes, prepared food to sell, among others, circle code 1.

When the response is that he/she doesn't have a fixed municipality to work, because he/she sells some kind of product and moves around between different municipalities, solicit where he/she goes with highest frequency and record it. But if he/she doesn't have a fixed place to work, write he/she doesn't have a fixed work place in the spaces of "In another municipality" and "In another state or country".

If he/she responds with the name of a municipality or delegation different than the municipality of the interview, note the name, investigate the state of the Mexican Republic to which it belongs and record it. In the case of not obtaining the exact information, write what the informer says in the line "In another state or country".

If the response is Mexico or Mexico City, solicit if it refers to the Federal District or the state of Mexico.

35. Other sources of income
This question identifies persons age 12 or older who receive money from sources different than those of work.

The income considered in this question is characterized by not having to be returned or paid and are received with some frequency, even though not regularly.

Example:
"My daughter went to live in the United States and sends me a few dollars once in a while".

[p. 117]

Don't include loans, credit, financing, or the money received from those other people who live in the same dwelling.

Remember that for each option you should circle a response.

For women age 12 or older
[Questions 36-41 are for women age 12 or older]

36. Number of children, 37. Deceased children, 38. Surviving children
These questions allow us to know how many daughters and sons were born alive to each woman age 12 or older, how many of them have passed away, and how many live currently, whether or not they live with the mother.

A child born alive is one who upon birth had some movement, cry, breath, heartbeat, or whatever other sign of life, even if afterwards he/she died.

These questions are also asked to single women even if they appear young, if they are age 12 or older. Keep in mind that there are many adolescent mothers.

Don't consider as deceased children those who were miscarried or stillborn.

Make sure that the total [sum of] sons and daughters born alive is equal to the number of surviving sons and daughters plus those who passed away. If there is a difference, comment on it and fix it with the informer.

Record "00" for question 36, when the informer mentions that the women never has had daughters nor sons born alive; in this case, continue with the following person or continue to section IV, International migration.

[p. 118]

39. Date of birth, 40. Survival, 41. Age at death
The questions investigate some facts about the last daughter or son born alive, like the date of his/her birth, if he/she lives currently, and in the case of death, the age when he/she died.

Remember that these types of dates can be sensitive. Support the informer with, if necessary, related events like: baptism, intervals of the ages of the children, births of children or relatives, lactating periods, and other events that are useful.

In question 41 "Age at death", record only one response in days or months or years.

6.6 Section IV: International migration

Once you have concluded with the record of characteristics of all the people, continue with this section.

The objective is to know the number of people who in the last five years left to live in another country, and to know if they already returned, even if they have left for little time.

1. International migration status, 2. Number of people, 3. Migrants, 4. List of people
These questions investigate how many people who live or lived with the group of people who inhabit the dwelling left to live in another country from June 2005 to date.

Don't consider the people who entered or left the country for the following reasons:

  • Vacations
  • Visiting relatives or friends
  • On a work assignment
  • Out shopping
  • Other causes that don't make them change residency
[p. 119]

If they declare that there are more than four people who went to live in another country, use a different questionnaire; cancel the number of people printed and note on the side the consecutive number that corresponds.

[p. 120]

5. Residency status, 6. Sex, 7. Age, 8. Emigration date
These questions identify if the migrants were part of the group of residents of the dwelling the last time that they went to live in another country, their sex, their age, and the date they left.

The information should correspond to the last time that the person went to live in another country, regardless of whether or not he/she has gone various times in the last five years.

Record the completed years that he/she had when he/she left for the first time in question 7, Age, and the month and year that the person left the country the last time in question 8, Emigration date.

9. Place of origin, 10. Country of destination, 11. Country of residence, 12. Date of return
These questions record the name of the state where the person was living when he/she left the last time, the name of the country to which he/she went, and the country where he/she lives currently.

In addition, if the person already returned to Mexico, the date of return is solicited, even if he/she doesn't actually live in the dwelling of the interview.

13. Current residency status
This question identifies if the person who returned to the Mexican Republic currently lives or not in the dwelling of the interview.

[p. 121]

If the person resides in the dwelling where the interview was carried out, circle code 1, and return to section II, list of people, look for the register number that the person has and note it in the designated space for it.

In case it doesn't appear in the said list, clarify the situation with the informer, and if he/she really is resident of the dwelling, add it to the list and apply the Long Questionnaire. Don't forget to note the registration number in question 13.

When the person didn't return to the same dwelling where the interview was carried out, circle code 3, and continue with the following person and pass to section V.

6.7 Section V. Access to food

1. Access to food

The objective is to find out if one of the members of the dwelling stopped eating during some occasion due to a lack of money or resources, during the last three months.

Solicit the informer to provide the information required of the dwelling.

Read all the options and circle only one code for each one.

[p. 122-146 detailing various enumerator operating procedures are omitted here]