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Aiuto alla compilazione in lingua inglese
English guide to the completion of the Census form

9th October Law No. 122 of 30th July 2010, Art. 50
15th General Population and Housing Census

Instructions for filling in the Household Form Version CP. 1

Section I - Information about household and dwelling

1 - Type of dwelling and household

Question 1.1
Dwelling refers to a room (or set of rooms) that is:

- Regularly dedicated to residential use;
- Separate (i.e. surrounded by walls and covered by a roof);
- Independent (with at least one external access that is either independent or through shared entry areas - road, courtyard, stairs, landings, common balconies, terraces, etc. - access, in other words, does not require passing through other dwellings);
- incorporated in a building (or constitutes a building).

Other dwelling type refers to dwellings that do not satisfy the above definition (being mobile, semi-permanent or makeshift), occupied by one or more individuals as regular or temporary housing (e.g. caravan, tent, camper, cabin, shed, cave, garage, basement, barn, etc.) as of the date of the Census.

Accommodation at a diplomatic or consular center refers to dwellings located in foreign countries.

Collective residential structure refers to facilities used to house large groups of people and/or one or more families. This category includes hotels, hospitals, rest homes for senior citizens and reception centers and institutes of various kinds (religious, healthcare-related, welfare support, educational, etc.).

If the family is being housed in a diplomatic or consular center, check box 3.

If the family's place of usual residence is in a collective residential structure, check box 4.

Example: families with a place of usual residence in a tourist complex or hotel rooms, families residing in structures that do not qualify as dwellings and that are located inside collective residential structures (e.g. a hospital custodian's family that lives inside the structure itself).

In Section 1, families living in another type of lodging or Lodging at a diplomatic or consular location should only answer the questions in points 1 (type of dwelling and family), 5 (car and parking space) and 6 (telephone and internet connection).

In Section 1, families living in Collective residential structures should only answer questions 1.1 and 1.4.

Question 1.2
Check box 1 if only one family lives there; check box 2 if two or more families live there. Note that two families living in the same dwelling are only considered multiple families in the absence of kinship ties or personal relationships.

Question 1.3
This question should only be answered by families that checked box 2 in question 1.2. If applicable, use the dedicated section to enter the questionnaire code for each cohabiting family (excluding your own) and the last and first name of its head of household. The questionnaire code is the unique 13-digit identifier located in the top right-hand corner of the first page of each Household form.

If more than 4 families live in the dwelling, please call the following toll-free number: 800-069701.

Question 1.4
Check box 1 if the dwelling is owned in full or in part by at least one of the people who live there. Box 1 should also be checked if residence in the dwelling is attributable to right of user or some other right in rem (e.g. use, dwelling) or in the case of subsidized housing, or when only the bare property was purchased, or when the owner is living in part of his/her house while renting out the rest.

Check box 2 or 3 when the dwelling is not owned by anyone who lives there and is being rented (box 2) or occupied under some other form of entitlement (box 3), that is, for free or in exchange for services.

2 - Property/ownership and structure of the dwelling

Question 2.1
Check one box only to indicate the owner of the dwelling. If the property is owned jointly by multiple subjects (individuals, businesses, etc.) indicate the owner with the largest stake in the property. For bare property, indicate the owner of the bare property.

Question 2.2
Use square meters (rounded, no decimals) to indicate the dwelling's internal surface area, i.e., the floor surface minus the walls (walkable surface area), but excluding balconies, terraces and secondary structures (e.g. basements, attics, garages, etc.). If the dwelling has multiple floors or includes rooms with independent access, the sum should include the total surface area of all of the different parts.

Question 2.3
Indicate the total number of rooms in the dwelling excluding bathrooms, kitchens, kitchenettes, extra spaces and secondary structures (e.g. cellars, attics, garages, etc.). While calculating this sum, keep in mind that:

- Rooms with independent access but functionally attached to the dwelling and being used by the family should be considered part of the same dwelling;
- Large rooms divided into different parts with different functions or separated into two or more rooms by arches or mobile dividers should be counted as multiple rooms;
- Multi-purpose rooms with kitchen corners should be included in the count.

Use the following definitions to answer the question appropriately:

Room: a space that receives air and light directly from the outside and that is large enough to hold a bed while leaving enough space for one person to move around. Bedrooms and living rooms, for instance, qualify as rooms as long as they meet the above characteristics. Kitchens, kitchenettes, extra spaces and bathrooms, on the other hand, do not count as rooms even if they satisfy these criteria. Rooms without windows do not count unless they serve a domestic function, like a bedroom.

Rooms with independent access: rooms (that are physically separate) with direct outside access that does not depend on any other rooms in the main body of the dwelling. Rooms like these are used by the same people who live there and serve as a functional complement to the dwelling.

Associated structures: cellars, attics, garages, etc., i.e. rooms that are designed and used regularly to service the dwelling (but not necessarily located in the same building).

Accessory space: spaces that serve as access areas for rooms, bathrooms and sanitary facilities, storage closets and similar. These include entryways, internal stairways, hallways, bathrooms, dressing rooms, storage closets, etc.

Kitchen: a room (or part of a room) equipped with cooking equipment and appliances and a permanent dish-washing system, and used for these purposes whether or not eating, sleeping or other activities take place in the same space. Three categories serve to classify different types of kitchens based on size and purpose:
a) full kitchen: a "traditional" room-sized (see definition of "room") kitchen equipped and used primarily for cooking and eating;
b) kitchenette: a kitchen that is smaller than a room, almost always just big enough to contain the necessary appliances;
c) kitchen corner: part of a larger room set aside for eating meals and also as a kitchen nook, a portion of which includes kitchen appliances. The room is used in different ways, and the kitchen itself is not its primary purpose.

Question 2.4
These are rooms used exclusively for work (the studio for a freelance professional, the office of a self-employed worker or the workshop of a craftsperson) by one or more people who live in the dwelling.

Question 2.5
Multiple responses allowed for this question.

See question 2.3 for the definitions of kitchen, kitchenette and kitchen corner. If there is more than one kitchen, indicate how many. Only check box 4 if there is no kitchen, kitchenette or kitchen corner.

3 - Water and sanitation systems

Question 3.1
If yes, multiple responses are allowed.

Check box 3 if your drinking water does not come from public water utilities or a well, but instead from an indirect source such as a cistern that is refilled periodically. Check box 4 if the only water available inside the dwelling is not fit to drink.

Question 3.2
Availability of hot water (for sanitary purposes in the bathroom and/or kitchen: sanitary hot water) refers only to water that is heated by a permanent system, not on the stovetop or with other systems.

Question 3.3
Answer "Yes" (box 1) if your hot water is supplied exclusively by the heating system of the dwelling itself. Answer "No" (box 2) if your hot water comes from a separate system, such as a gas- or electric-powered water boiler. Answer "No" (box 2) if your hot water is entirely or partly heated by solar panels.

Question 3.4
Multiple responses are allowed.

Answer only if there is a hot water production system that is separate from the heating system.

Question 3.5
Showers and bathtubs refer to fixtures that are permanently connected to a water supply with drainage for waste water, and that are located inside the dwelling or in rooms with independent access.

While answering, keep in mind that a shower and a bathtub located in the same room should be counted as two fixtures if they are separate, while a bathtub that contains a shower fixture should be counted as one fixture.

Question 3.6
Toilets refer to fixtures that are permanently connected to a water supply with drainage for waste water, and that are located inside the dwelling or in rooms with independent access.

4 - Climate control system (heating, air conditioning, renewable energy)

Question 4.1
Answer "No" (box 2) if the dwelling does not include any kind of heating system, or only includes mobile space heaters that run on electricity, gas or other power sources.

Question 4.2
Multiple responses are allowed.

Use the following definitions to answer the question appropriately:

-Centralized system: designed to heat all of the dwellings in the same building, and housed in a dedicated utility room (cellar, basement, etc.) that does not belong to any specific dwelling. This includes systems connected to public district heating networks.

-Permanent independent system: designed to heat a single dwelling and usually located inside it or nearby (e.g. a heating unit located in a dedicated room or balcony/terrace; solar panels located on the roof, etc.) and that is controlled independently.

-Individual permanent devices: not connected to a centralized or permanent independent system, but not mobile, e.g. fireplaces, individual built-in gas radiators, heat pumps, electric surface elements, stoves that burn wood, kerosene or LPG (liquid petroleum gas).

Indicate the type of fuel or energy that each heating unit runs on. Each checked box corresponds to both a unit type and the fuel or energy source that powers it. For example, check box 10 to indicate an independent system for that dwelling's exclusive use and fueled by LPG, or check box 1 to indicate a centralized system that runs on methane or natural gas. Check the appropriate boxes for multiple responses - for instance, if the dwelling has both an independent methane-gas-powered unit and a wood-burning fireplace, check boxes 8 and 25.

Question 4.3
Answer "Yes" (box 1) if the dwelling is equipped with a system that generates electricity from renewable energy resources. Renewable energy resources are "non-fossil energy resources (wind, solar, geothermal, wave energy, tidal energy, hydraulic, biomass, waste gas, landfill gas from treatment processes and biogas)" - article 2 of Legislative Decree no. 387/03.

Question 4.4
Answer "Yes" (box 1) if the dwelling is equipped with a permanent air conditioning system (e.g. split permanent or mono- block permanent, with radiant panels in the floors/walls/ceiling, etc.). Answer "No" for mobile air conditioning units.

5 - Car and parking space

Question 5.1
Available refers to both automobile ownership and any other opportunity for exclusive use of a car (long-term rental, user, assignee, etc.) by a family member.

Question 5.2
Garage: refers to an enclosed space that is designed for and used for storing one or more automobiles.

Parking space in communal garage: in reference to reserved, personal use, located in an enclosed area designed for and used for storing a number of automobiles. For example, condominium garages beneath apartment buildings and dedicated parking garage structures.

Uncovered parking space: a reserved, personal space located in the open, e.g. in a courtyard, under the raised bottom floor of a building, uncovered on the top floor of a parking garage or similar.

Indicate whether the family has access to at least one (if more, specify how many) personal, guaranteed parking space in or near the building they live in. Access means that use of the parking space is guaranteed (at any time) due to ownership, rental arrangement, privilege free of charge, etc.

6 - Telephone and Internet connection

Question 6.1
Check box 1 ("Yes") if there is at least one working landline telephone (with a phone company contract). Check box 2 ("No") if the dwelling has no telephone system, or if there is a telephone system but without an active phone company contract.

Question 6.2
Check box 2 ("No") if no family members have a cellular phone.

Question 6.3
Indicate the number of family members who have at least one cellular phone.

Question 6.4
Check box 1 ("Yes") if an Internet connection of any kind is available.

Question 6.5
Multiple responses are allowed.
Check box 3 if there is a broadband WI-FI or a broadband WIMAX connection.

Section II - Information about regular inhabitants of the dwellings

1 - Personal information

The question on "relatives and cohabitants of the head of household on the Household form" and the questions on gender, civil status and date of marriage serve to gather information about families and households and, more specifically, to learn more about their composition, size and type (e.g. how many couples have children, how many children live with only one parent, how many people live alone, etc.).

Question 1.1
Indicate the kinship or cohabitation relationship with the head of household as indicated on the Household form. The head of household on the Household form is the person under whose name the family form is filed in the Municipal Public Records Office.

- The head of household on the Household form or reference person (person 01 from List A) has already answered these questions and need not answer them again.
- The individual who lives together with the head of household on the Household form as their partner should check the box for category 03, regardless of whether they form part of a different-sex or same-sex couple.
- Children are directly identified as such by the head of household and/or their spouse/partner.
- Children of the spouse/partner of the head of household only should check box 06 ("Child of spouse/partner only"), even if the parent is deceased or does not live in the dwelling.
- Parents (or spouse of a parent) of the head of household's partner should check box 08 ("Mother/Father-in-law of head of household").
- Relatives (other than children) of the head of household's spouse/partner only should check the box for the corresponding kinship tie, even if the head of household's spouse/partner does not live in the dwelling.
- Relatives of the head of household and/or the spouse/partner who have not been included in the responses (uncle of the head of household or the spouse/partner, cousin of the head of household or the spouse/partner, etc.) and who live in this dwelling should check box 16 ("Other relative of head of household and/or spouse/partner").
- Individuals who live in this dwelling but who have no kinship ties with the head of household or the spouse/partner should check box 17 ("Other cohabitant with no personal ties, kinship or relationship"). If such individuals constitute a family of their own, they should fill out another Household form.
- People who work for the family (housekeepers, family helpers) and live in the dwelling should check box 17. If they constitute a family of their own, they should fill out another Household form.

Question 1.2
"Gender" is the essential variable for interpreting and comparing statistical data about men and women.

Question 1.3
The date-of-birth question allows us to minimize the risk of errors in the information used to calculate ages in years.

The date of birth should be written in numbers, not letters. The day and the month should be indicated using two digits, adding a prefix of 0 as needed (for example: 05/06/1967).

Question 1.4
The question about place of birth (place where the birth occurred) is asked so that it can be combined with other data (e.g. place of residence) to reveal population movements within Italy and between Italy and other Countries:

- Individuals born in the municipality they currently reside in should check box 1 ("In this municipality").
- Individuals born in a different Italian municipality should indicate the municipality where they were born. Indicate the name of the municipality, not the name of the town or zone (hamlet, inhabited center, etc.). Please include the two- letter abbreviation for the province that the municipality belongs to as of the Census date.
- Individuals born abroad should use the current name of the foreign country where the place of birth is located. Indicate the foreign country of birth in the Italian language and the Latin alphabet.

Question 1.5
The question on registration with the municipal Public Records Office allows us to identify the place of residence with greater precision. The municipality of public registration is where the individual in question can request identification documents and certifications of basic public records. The head of household need not respond if the first page of the Household form bears a pre-printed address:

- Individuals registered in the Public Records Office of their official municipality should check box 1 ("Yes, in this dwelling") or box 2 ("Yes, but in a different dwelling or cohabitation").
- Individuals registered in the Public Records Office of a different Italian municipality should indicate the name of that municipality. Indicate the name of the municipality, not the name of the town or zone (hamlet, inhabited center, etc.). Please include also the abbreviation for the province that the municipality belongs to.
- Individuals not registered in the Public Records Office of any Italian municipality should check box 4 ("No, not in any Italian municipality").

Note that the term cohabitation refers, for example, to educational institutions (boarding schools, seminaries, etc.), welfare institutions (orphanages, family housing, rest homes for the disabled and senior citizens, etc.), healthcare institutions (hospitals, clinics, etc.), prisons, ecclesiastical housing, military centers (military hospitals, military prisons, barracks, etc.), hotels, boarding houses, rental properties and similar, merchant ships (cruise ships, etc.), and so on.

Question 2.1
Married individuals who no longer live with their spouse due to personal difficulties with their relationship should check box 3 ("De facto separated"), not box 2 ("Married").

Married individuals who live separately from their spouse due to necessity or other contingencies, alternatively, should check box 2 ("Married"), not box 3 ("De facto separated").

"Formerly married" individuals (i.e., who obtained the dissolution or cessation of the civil status of marriage pursuant to Law no. 898 of 01st December 1970) should check box 5 ("Divorced").

Question 2.2
Anyone who has been married at least one time should respond, including individuals who are currently married, separated (whether de facto or de jure), divorced or widowed.

The date of the marriage itself should be indicated in numbers, not words (for example: 05/1969); for multiple marriages, use the date of the most recent marriage.

Question 2.3
The question on civil status prior to the most recent marriage provides additional information about the formation of couples and thus different types of households.
Indicate your civil status prior to the most recent marriage, even if you have only been married one time.

Anyone who has been married at least one time should respond, including individuals who are currently married, separated (whether de facto or de jure), divorced or widowed.
The citizenship questions serve to determine how many Italian residents are citizens of Italy and how many are citizens of other countries. When combined with the age distribution of the resident population, citizenship information helps us calculate the size and makeup of the eligible voting population.

The questions on parents' place of birth (mother and father) serve to reconstruct the origins of each individual, especially immigrants and their descendants.

3 - Citizenship

Question 3.1
Foreigners should check box 2 and specify the name of their foreign country of citizenship in Italian using the Latin alphabet.

Individuals with another citizenship in addition to their Italian citizenship should indicate Italian citizenship only (by checking box 1).

Foreign citizens with multiple citizenships (but not Italian citizenship) should indicate a single foreign country of residence according to the following order of preference: a) European Union Countries, b) other Countries. For multiple citizenships within group a) or within group b) countries, select a single foreign country of your choice.

Individuals without any citizenship should declare themselves stateless (by checking box 3). The stateless category also applies to people whose citizenship status has yet to be clarified following the dissolution, separation or unification of different States.

Question 3.2
Italians who are citizens by birth should check box 1 ("Yes") even if they were born abroad.

Italians who became citizens after applying for and being granted citizenship by a competent authority, or who acquired Italian citizenship by marriage, ordinary or extraordinary naturalization or birth in Italy and with uninterrupted legal residency since the age of 18 should check box 2 ("No"). Box 2 should also be checked if Italian citizenship was acquired "automatically" - for example:

a) a minor who acquired Italian citizenship by being adopted by an Italian citizen, or through acknowledgement of maternity or paternity (or legal declaration of filiation) by an Italian parent;
b) a cohabitating child (minor) who acquired Italian citizenship.

Question 3.3
If you checked box 2 in question 3.2 (Italian citizen, but not by birth), then:

- specify whether Italian citizenship was acquired by marriage or in another way (naturalization, for example);
- indicate the foreign state of prior citizenship, in Italian using the Latin alphabet.

Questions 3.4 and 3.5
If your parents were born abroad, indicate the current name of the foreign country where their place of birth is located. Indicate the foreign country of birth in Italian using the Latin alphabet.
The questions in point 4 allow us to identify internal and international migrants. Internal migrants are individuals who used to reside in a different municipality from the one they reside in at the time of the survey. International migrants are individuals who resided in a different country at some point in their life, regardless of their specific country of birth and citizenship.

Question 4.1
Check the box corresponding to your location as of the date of the Census.

Check box 1 ("In this dwelling") or 2 ("In this municipality, but in a different dwelling or residence") even if the individual was absent from his/her municipality on 09th October 2011, but returned on 10th October 2011 and did not complete the survey elsewhere.

Note that the term cohabitation refers, for example, to educational institutions (boarding schools, seminaries, etc.), welfare institutions (orphanages, family housing, rest homes for the disabled and senior citizens, etc.), healthcare institutions (hospitals, clinics, etc.), prisons, ecclesiastical housing, military centers (military hospitals, military prisons, barracks, etc.), hotels, boarding houses, rental properties and similar, merchant ships (cruise ships, etc.), and so on.

Question 4.2
Respondents should indicate whether they were ever residents anywhere abroad, regardless of their Country of birth and citizenship and regardless of any other residency transfers that might have taken place inside Italy.

You only need to check box 1 if you lived abroad for at least 12 months (for family, work, study or other reasons) and if your arrival (or return) to Italy involved registering (or re-registering) at the Public Records Office of an Italian municipality.

Question 4.3
Those who were residents abroad should indicate the month and year of their last permanent transfer to Italy.

Question 4.4
Those who were residents abroad should indicate the foreign country of last residency as defined by current international borders, in Italian using the Latin alphabet.

Question 4.5
For ages 1 year and above.

Individuals who checked box 3 - place of usual residence in a different Italian municipality one year ago - should indicate the current name of that municipality. Indicate the name of the municipality, not the name of the town or zone (hamlet, inhabited center, etc.).

Question 4.6
For ages 5 years and above.

Individuals who checked box 3 - place of usual residence in a different Italian municipality five years ago - should indicate the current name of that municipality. Indicate the name of the municipality, not the name of the town or zone (hamlet, inhabited center, etc.).

Individuals who checked box 4 - place of usual residence abroad five years ago - should indicate the name of the foreign country in Italian using the Latin alphabet.

Questions 5.1 and 5.2
For ages 6 and under.

The head of household on the Household form or reference person (person 01 from List A) need not answer these questions.

Children under the age of 6 who do not attend daycare or nursery school (scuola dell'infanzia, formerly scuola materna) and are already in first grade (primary school) - children born between 10th October and 31st December 2005, for instance - should answer question 5.1 by checking box 3 ("Elementary school").

Children under the age of 6 who do not attend daycare, nursery school (scuola dell'infanzia, formerly scuola materna) or first grade (primary school) should answer question 5.1 by checking box 4 and finish by filling in the individual Form.

Questions 5.3 and 5.4
For ages 6 and older.

The educational qualifications listed here are the ones awarded in the Italian educational system.
- First graders in elementary school (primary school) should check box 02.
- Individuals with two or more educational qualifications for the same grade should indicate the one they consider most relevant to their actual occupation.
- Individuals (especially foreign citizens) who gained higher educational qualifications while abroad should check the box for the corresponding Italian qualification.
- Foreign citizens without any educational qualifications should choose between category 01 ("No educational qualification and cannot read or write") and 02 ("No educational qualification but can read and write") in reference to their native language.
- Only those who checked box 06 or 08 in question 5.3 should answer question 5.4.

The following instructions need to be followed to provide appropriate responses to questions 5.3 and 5.4:
-Category 03: Elementary school qualification (or equivalent) corresponds to completion of the first level of basic education. The qualification awarded on completion of a type C qualification awarded by public schools is comparable to the elementary qualification;

-Category 04: Middle school qualification (or vocational school), as awarded prior to the institution of comprehensive middle schools, corresponds to completion of the second level of basic education. An elementary school qualification (or equivalent) is required for admission to this level;

-Category 05: Compimento inferiore/medio, Music conservatory or National Academy of Dance.
These correspond to intermediate qualifications awarded by a Music Conservatory or National Academy of Dance prior to the reforms of 1999 (Law no. 508/99) in A.F.A.M.
This category includes the final diploma awarded by a Music conservatory or Dance Academy but not the upper secondary school diploma.
Holders of a final diploma from the Music conservatory or Dance Academy and an upper secondary school diploma should check box 12 ("Diploma from the Academy of Fine Arts, etc.");

-Categories 06, 07 and 08: Vocational school, Teacher training school and Art school diplomas from Vocational schools, Teacher training schools or Art schools are divided into:

- vocational school qualification, teacher training school license or art school qualification awarded at the end of an upper secondary school study program that lasts less than 4 years (2-3 year programs); insufficient to begin university studies. A middle school (or basic vocational foundation) qualification is required for admission. Individuals whose highest educational qualification is the vocational school qualification, teacher training school license or art school qualification should check box 1 in question 5.4;
- high school diploma (or state exam) awarded upon completion of a 4-5 year course of upper secondary studies that is sufficient for beginning university studies. A lower middle school (or vocational school) qualification is required for admission to the course. Individuals whose highest educational qualification is the high school diploma (state exam) awarded by a vocational school, teacher training school or art school should check box 2 in question 5.4;

-Category 09: Technical school diploma awarded upon completion of a 4-5 year course of upper secondary studies that is sufficient for beginning university studies. A lower middle school (or vocational school) qualification is required for admission;

-Category 10: Teacher training school diploma awarded upon completion of a 4-5 year course of upper secondary studies that is sufficient for beginning university studies. A lower middle school (or vocational school) qualification is required for admission;

-Category 11: High school diploma (classical, scientific, etc.) upper secondary school diploma awarded upon completion of a course of studies at a classical, scientific, linguistic, artistic or socio-psycho-pedagogical high school. It is attained upon completion of a 4-5 year course of upper secondary studies and is sufficient for beginning university studies. A middle (or vocational school) school qualification is required for admission;

-Category 12: Diploma from the Academy of Fine Arts, Dance, Dramatic Arts, ISIA, etc., Conservatory (former system) refers to courses that were active prior to the institution of Higher Artistic, Music, and Dance Training (A.F.A.M.) courses and includes:

- final diploma awarded by an Academy of Fine Arts, National Academy of Dramatic Arts, National Academy of Dance, Music Conservatory or Higher Institute for Artistic Industries (ISIA) under the former system prior to the reform of the
A.F.A.M. sector (Law no. 508/99).
Check category 05 if you also do not have an upper secondary school diploma. Check box 14 even if you attended the supplementary post-diploma course.
- diploma awarded by a School for Interpreters and Translators prior to Law no. 697/86 (see category 15);

-Category 13: University degree (2-3 years) under the former system (including schools dedicated to specialized programs and vocationally-oriented community colleges) awarded upon completion of a university degree program or other specialized programs. It is attained after a course of studies lasting no less than 2 but no more than 3 years (degree in statistics, elementary school supervision, ISEF degree under the former system, degree in paleography or musical philology, etc.). In international terms, the university degree represents the first step of the level I university course of studies (e.g. bachelor's degree - or first degree - in England). Admission to these programs requires an upper secondary school diploma (4-5 year program);

-Category 14: Academic degree of Higher Artistic, Music and Dance Training (A.F.A.M.), level I.
This refers to programs that were enacted after the A.F.A.M. sector reforms (Law no. 508/99), which are accessible after obtaining an upper secondary school diploma. These include academic degrees awarded by an Academy of Fine Arts, National Academy of Dramatic Arts, National Academy of Dance, Music Conservatory or Higher Institute for Artistic Industries (ISIA), which are programs under the new system.
They correspond to degrees awarded upon completion of three-year programs;

-Category 15: Three-year degree (level I) under the new system.
Following the reforms in higher education, two consecutive cycles were defined: the Level I degree and Level II degree (laurea specialistica/magistrale). The three-year level I Degree is a three-year program, and includes the qualifications awarded by an Advanced school for linguistic mediators) established after the reform (Law no. 697/86);

-Category 16: Academic degree of Higher Artistic, Music or Dance Training (A.F.A.M.), level II.
These refer to programs enacted following A.F.A.M. sector reforms (Law no. 508/99), and are only accessible with a level I upper secondary school diploma or three-year degree. They include academic degrees awarded by an Academy of Fine Arts, National Academy of Dramatic Arts, National Academy of Dance, Music Conservatory or Higher Institute for Artistic Industries (ISIA), which are programs under the new system.
They correspond to the degrees awarded upon completion of two-year programs;

-Category 17: Degree (4-6 years) under the former system, single-cycle level II degrees (laurea specialistica/magistrale) under the new system includes:

- Extended degree under the former system, the qualification obtained upon completion of a university course of studies lasting no less than 4 and no more than 6 years. Admission to these programs requires an upper secondary school diploma (4-5 year program). In international terms, this degree represents the second step in the first cycle of university education (e.g. the French maitrise);
- Single-cycle Level II degrees (lauree specialistiche/magistrali) include Pharmacy, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Architecture/Construction Engineering (lasting 5 years), Medicine (6 years) and Law (active since 2007-2008). The first 3 years of these programs do not culminate in any qualification, which is not awarded until the entire program is completed.

Question 5.5
While specifying the highest level of education that was successfully completed, refer to the indications in questions 5.3 and 5.4. Do not report post-graduate and post-A.F.A.M. educational qualifications, such as Master's degrees, specialization, PhDs, etc.

Question 5.6
This refers to regional/provincial vocational training courses that last 6 months or longer and that require an upper secondary school diploma for admission.

Level II programs are reserved for upper secondary diploma holders aged under 25 (the age limit is higher for degree holders, etc.) and/or unemployed individuals aged 25 or over with the appropriate educational or vocational credentials.

Higher Technical Education and Training Courses (IFTS) are programs financed by the European Social Fund and Regional government to train specialized Technicians and professional figures to a post-secondary level (e.g. Higher technical education for insurance claims management, for Telecommunications, for Organization and marketing of integrated tourism, etc.). The Regions award a Higher Technical Specialization qualification that is valid nationwide and equivalent to Level 4 in the ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) classification.

Questions 5.7 and 5.8
This refers to regional/provincial vocational training courses that last 24 months or longer and that require a middle school qualification for admission.

Only those who checked box 1 in question 5.7 should answer question 5.8, doing so by specifying the regional/provincial training program.

Three-year Programs for Vocational Training and Education (IFP). These courses fulfil the requirement to complete compulsory education and provide a vocational qualification (e.g. tourism promotion and reception, sales point operator, etc.). Check box 1 if you finished this program after 2005.

Legislative references: Agreement of 19th June 2003 on occasion of the Unified Conference Experimental vocational training and education programs; Agreement of 15th January 2004, no. 1901, on occasion of the Regional-State Conference; Agreement of 28th October 2004 on occasion of the Unified Conference - Definition of criteria and recommendation of models for final and intermediate certification and recognition of credits.

Other Regional/provincial vocational training programs dedicated to young unemployed individuals who have completed mandatory schooling and/or unemployed individuals aged over 25. Check box 2 if you completed a two-year regional/provincial vocational training program or finished a three-year program prior to 2006.

Questions 5.9 and 5.10
Refer to the instructions for questions 5.3 and 5.4 while answering this question. The years required for earning post- laureate or post-A.F.A.M. credentials, such as masters, specialization, PhDs, etc., should not be considered.

If you have an academic qualification (i.e. you checked any of boxes 03-17 in question 5.3), you should answer question 5.9. Do not answer question 5.10 unless you checked box 1 in question 5.9. If so, indicate the total number of years required since entering the educational system to obtain the qualification abroad. For example, a bachelor's degree in the United States or England requires 16 years of schooling; a master's degree in England requires 17 years, while a master's degree in the United States requires 17 or 18 years of schooling.

Question 5.11
Box 1 should be checked by everyone aged 6 and over who is enrolled in primary, lower or upper secondary education, university or an A.F.A.M. program.

Question 5.12
This refers to vocational training programs (free-of-charge or paid for) organized/financed by various parties (businesses, public or private entities) for any of a variety of different activities: language courses, computers, hairdressers, pastry-makers, etc.

Questions 5.13 and 5.14
For question 5.13, respond with answer number 2 ("No") if you gained a non-university Master's degree in a program run by a private entity or vocational school. Multiple responses are allowed for your response to question 5.14.

Level I master's degree programs requiring a Level I three-year degree or Level I A.F.A.M. Degree for admission and that last one year.

Level II master's degree programs requiring a Level II degree (laurea specialistica/magistrale) or Level II A.F.A.M. degree for admission and that last one year.
Specialization school followed completion of the Degree under the former system, the single-cycle Level II degree (laurea specialistica/magistrale) or the specialized Degree under the new system, and requires a course of studies lasting not less than 2 years designed for training specialists in specific professional fields at specialization schools.

Box 3 ("Specialization school") should also be checked by holders of a "special degree" (second degree upon completion of studies), which requires at least 4 additional years of study after the basic degree (e.g. Aerospace engineering).

A Research doctorate (doctorate in Research Training) follows the basic degree (degree under the former system, single-cycle level II degree under the new system, level II two-year specialized degree under the new system), and requires a personalized program of research and study that lasts no less than 3 years and focuses on in-depth scientific investigation and research methods specific to the sector in question. In international terms, the research doctorate is a post-graduate educational qualification that is equivalent to completion of the second cycle of university education (e.g. Ph.D.).

Question 6.1
Work refers to any activity performed in exchange for payment, salary, wages, profit, etc. It does not include the time dedicated to housework, minor household maintenance and repairs, hobbies and similar.

Check box 1 ("Yes") if you:

- performed (during the week from October 02nd-08th) one or more hours of paid work (whether permanent, temporary or seasonal), as an employee or on a self-employed basis, regardless of whether a formal employment contract exists. Any and all forms of income should be considered: salary, wages, profits, payments in kind, food, lodging or other forms, including income not yet received or paid during a different week from when the work was actually performed; box 1 should also be checked by apprentices and trainees who receive payment or other forms of non-monetary compensation, as long as it is ongoing (meal vouchers, cell phone credit, petrol coupons, etc.);
- performed (during the week from October 02nd-08th) one or more hours of work helping a family member or relative with their self-employed activity, business or company, including unpaid work (family workers).

Family workers refers to individuals who help another family member who is self-employed, without the work relationship being regulated by a contract (e.g. a wife helping her shopkeeper husband, or a son helping his farmer father).

Check box 2 ("No") if you:

- performed (during the week from October 02nd-08th) hours of unpaid voluntary work for any organizations, institutions, associations or similar;
- are a seasonal worker who did not work during the week of reference.

Question 6.2
Check Box 1 ("Yes") if you have a job you were absent from for one of the following reasons during the week from October 02nd-08th: holiday, leave of absence, maternity/paternity leave, reduction in business activity, illness, holiday, CIG (cassa integrazione guadagni, temporary state layoff fund), etc. This question gathers information about job continuity and the degree of formal attachment to the job in terms of absences and salaries earned.

Employees on leave are considered to be employed if they are absent for less than three months or if they continue to receive at least 50% of their salary during their absence. Exceptions include employees on (mandatory) maternity leave or (optional) parental leave. Self-employed individuals who are absent from work (except for family workers) are considered to be employed if their business activity continues during their absence. Family workers are considered to be employed if their absence lasts less than three months.

Question 6.3
Check box 1 ("Yes") if, in the last 4 weeks (11th September to 08th October) you have inquired about job offers in the newspaper, applied for competition-based positions, submitted your resume/CV to a company, etc.

You should also answer "Yes" if you will start work within 3 months of the date of the Census (09th October 2011).

Question 6.5
Only respond if you checked box 1 ("Yes") in questions 6.3 and 6.4. Otherwise skip to question 6.13 to continue the questionnaire.

Check box 1 ("Yes") if you are looking for work but are not actually working at present, having performed paid work in the past or unpaid work, as long as the unpaid work was in the capacity of family worker.

In your answers to questions 6.6-6.12:

- Individuals with more than one job should answer in reference to their primary work activity only. Primary work activity is the job with the most work hours or the one (if you work an equal number of hours for different jobs) that provides the most income.
- Employed individuals who did not work during the week prior to the survey date (October 02nd-08th) because of a holiday, illness, CIG, leave of absence, etc., should refer to the job that usually represents their primary work activity.
- If you are not working at present, refer to the last job you had.


Question 6.6
Employment: work performed for a public or private employer (with or without a contract) in exchange for compensation in the form of wages, salary, reimbursement of expenses, payment in kind, food, lodging, etc.

This also includes:

-paid apprentices and trainees (paid work placements, fellowships, research grants), in other words, individuals whose work is a combination of training, practice and work;
- workers hired by a temporary employment agency;
- home workers who work on commission for one or more businesses.

Continuative and coordinated collaborative work (project-based or otherwise): work relating to one or several specific projects, programs or phases thereof. This contract type is characterized by the independence of the collaborator and mutual coordination with the contractor for provision of services. The worker may provide their services to multiple contractors (unless otherwise specified in the individual contract).

Occasional work: in this type of contract, the worker commits to providing the contractor with a job or service while retaining full organizational and operational autonomy without any administrative subordination. While this type of service is classified as occasional because of the fact that the relationship terminates after the agreed result has been achieved, the relationship is not necessarily a short-term one. Registration with INPS (the social security institute) is unnecessary due to the occasional nature of the relationship. Social security payments are not required, therefore, and the taxation involved is income tax, or IRPEF (20% withholding of the due amounts). This work category does not require a written contract, and there is no obligation to apply workplace safety regulations or any other legislation applying to other workers.

Business owner: self-employed manager of a business (agriculture, industry, commercial, services, etc.) which employs staff. With at least one employee working for them, the business owner's main work is the organization and management of business activities. If direct involvement in the productive process is their primary work (in addition to organizing and managing the activity), then it is more appropriate to check box 6 ("Self-employed worker"). For example, a metalsmith who has his own workshop where he employs an assistant to help him, the primary activity is more about the metalwork itself than management of the workshop.

Freelance professional: works for him/herself in a professional capacity or in the liberal arts (notary, lawyer, dentist, construction engineer, etc.) in which intellectual work or effort is predominant. Freelance professionals may or may not be registered in an official roster of practicing professionals.

Self-employed worker: manager of a farm, small industrial or retail business, craftwork studio, shop or public service who contributes his/her own manual labor. This category also includes farmers, tenant farmers and similar who work directly from their own home on behalf of consumers, and not on commission for businesses. Self-employed workers may or may not have their own employees. What distinguishes them from business owners is how their direct involvement in the productive process predominates over their management-related tasks and responsibilities. If the worker has employees and the organization and management represents their primary activity, then it is more appropriate to check box 4 ("Business owner").

Member of a cooperative: an active member of any cooperative that produces goods and/or provides services, regardless of the specific type of activity involved, and whose compensation is proportional to services and/or share of business profits as opposed to contract-regulated payments.

Family worker: an individual who helps another family member who is self-employed without any contract-regulated work relationship (e.g. a wife helping her shopkeeper husband or a son helping his farmer father).

Question 6.7
Do not answer unless you checked box 1 ("Yes") in question 6.6 ("Dependent employment").

Permanent work relationship: refers to a work relationship for which no expiration date or predefined time limit has been defined;

Fixed-term work relationship: refers to a work relationship that ends when certain objective, predetermined conditions have been satisfied (e.g. expiration of a specific time period, completion of a task, achievement of an objective, return of an employee who had been temporarily replaced).

Question 6.9
Part time: a work relationship (with or without a contract) that involves fewer than the normal number of work hours for other workers in the same category. It can be:

a) horizontal: work is performed every day, but for fewer hours;
b) vertical: work is concentrated in a few days of the week, a few weeks of the month, or a few months of the year;
c) mixed: work that includes both horizontal and vertical elements.

For employees, part-time work is based on a formal agreement between employer and employee.
Self-employed workers may also working part-time (e.g. a shopkeeper who only works in the morning or afternoon works
part-time).

Question 6.10
Use the following definitions to answer the question properly:
-Category 01: These occupations involve simple, repetitive activities that require no special training, and which may involve the use of manual tools, physical strength and limited decision-making and initiative in carrying out tasks.

-Category 02: These occupations oversee and supervise the proper functioning of industrial machinery and automated or robotic manufacturing systems, supply product assembly lines and manufacturing systems or operate mobile machinery and lifts. This type of work requires basic knowledge equivalent to the completion of compulsory schooling, a vocational qualification or work experience;

-Category 03: These occupations use experience and technical/practical knowledge of materials, tools and processes required for extracting and processing minerals, for building, repairing or maintaining equipment, objects and machines, for working and processing foodstuffs and farm products destined for consumption. This type of work requires basic knowledge equivalent to the completion of compulsory schooling, a short cycle of upper secondary education or, once again, vocational qualifications or work experience;

-Category 04: These occupations grow crops and raise animals, plan and perform the work required to make fields, gardens, greenhouses and livestock productive, caring, maintaining and making woodlands and forests productive, fishing in the open sea, coastal zones and inland waterways, fish farming and hunting. This type of work requires basic knowledge equivalent to the completion of compulsory schooling, a short cycle of upper secondary education or, once again, a vocational qualification or work experience;

-Category 05: These occupations deal with customers in commercial enterprises, provide reception and restaurant services, recreational and family support services and personal care; maintaining public order, protecting people and property. This type of work requires basic knowledge equivalent to the completion of compulsory schooling, a short cycle of upper secondary education or, once again, a vocational qualification or work experience;

-Category 06: These occupations involve non-managerial office work. They generally require basic knowledge equivalent to compulsory schooling, a short cycle of upper secondary education or, once again, vocational qualification or work experience;

-Category 07: These occupations involve the operational selection and application of protocols and (defined, predetermined) procedures in the context of production or services. The necessary knowledge is acquired through the completion of secondary, post-secondary or level I university programs or apprenticeships (including unofficial apprenticeships) of comparable complexity;

-Category 08: These occupations require high levels of theoretical knowledge for analyzing and representing complex discipline-specific (mathematics, physics-engineering, socio-economic, intellectual, artistic, etc.) situations and problems, setting out possible solutions and making the related decisions. The level of knowledge required in such professions is acquired through the completion of level II university programs, post-university programs or apprenticeships (including unofficial apprenticeships) of comparable complexity;

-Category 09: These occupations draw up and implement executive and regulatory strategies in political, institutional and economic contexts, drawing on expert counsel as needed. The level of knowledge required by this large group of professions cannot always be associated with a specific level of formal education;

-Category 10: These occupations are practiced in the context of the armed forces (the Army, Navy, Air Force or Military Police).

For clarification, call the toll-free number 800-069701.

Question 6.11
Check the box corresponding to the sole or primary economic activity sector of the factory, farm, shop, office or institution where you work or that you own.

Specifically:
-Category 01: includes cultivation of permanent and non-permanent agricultural crops, plant reproduction and livestock raising, including the forms associated with agricultural cultivation, hunting and capture of wild animals, forestry and the use of forest areas, fishing and aquaculture;

-Category 02: includes extraction of natural minerals found in solid, liquid or gaseous state (e.g. mining and/or extraction of coal, crude oil, natural gas, stones, sand, torba clay, salt, mining of ferrous and non-ferrous minerals such as uranium and thorium). Extraction may involve a variety of different methods, such as underground or open-air mining, well-drilling, ocean mining, etc. This category also includes specialized mining support services (exploration services involving sample gathering, boring, petroleum and gas platform construction, washing, blow-down, mine pumping and drainage, etc.);

-Category 03: includes processing, production and preservation of all types of foodstuffs, the tobacco and textile industries, production and packaging of clothing and leather goods, manufacturing of furniture, straw-based and woven goods, paper, cardboard and related goods, coke and petroleum derivatives, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, paints, varnishes and enamels, rubber items and plastics, glass, porcelain and ceramic products, construction materials, metal goods, computers and electronics, optical and electrical products, vehicles of transport, jewelry, musical instruments, sporting goods, toys, and medical tools and supplies. This category also includes the publication of newspapers, books, periodicals, commercial printing and other materials as well as correlated support activities such as bookbinding, the preparation of printing plates and the electronic processing of texts and images and the repair, maintenance and installation of related machinery and equipment;

-Category 04: includes production, transmission and distribution of electricity, natural gas, steam, hot water and air conditioning through permanent infrastructures (networks or grids) through power lines, pipes or conduits. This grouping does not include the separate management of pipelines, which falls under category 08 because they tend to extend across long distances in order to connect gas producers to gas distributors or urban centers;

-Category 05: includes waterworks (collection, treatment and distribution), sewer system management, waste water collection and treatment, solid and non-solid (hazardous and non-hazardous) waste disposal and treatment, recovery and recycling preparation of metal waste, plastic materials, solid urban, industrial and biomass waste, decontamination services for sites and buildings, ground soil, surface water and underground water;

Category 06: includes construction of buildings, roads, railway lines, subways and airport runways, bridges and tunnels, waterworks and public utilities for electricity and telecommunications, demolition and preparation of construction sites, installation of electricity and plumbing systems and installation of materials for casings, fixtures, flooring, etc.;

-Category 07: includes wholesale and retail commerce of all types of goods. This category also covers the repair and sales of automobiles and motorcycles. It does not include the serving of food or drink for immediate consumption or the sale of take-away food (restaurants, bars, pizzerias, pubs, etc.), which fall under category 09;

-Category 08: includes freight or passenger transport (regularly scheduled or otherwise) by rail, pipelines, roads, waterways or by air, plus related support activities including terminal services, parking area and vehicle storage management, logistics centers (interports) and storage of goods, etc., in addition to vehicle rentals with drivers. It also includes postal and courier services;

-Category 09: includes hotel and short-term accommodation activities for visitors and travelers (hotels, tourist villages, hostels, campsites, etc.), restaurant activities that provide full meals and/or drinks for immediate consumption, whether in the form of traditional restaurants, self-service or take-away establishments or in permanent or temporary kiosks, with or without seating (ice cream parlors, pastry shops, dining halls and catering facilities, bars, pubs, brewpubs, etc.). The deciding factor is the serving of meals for immediate consumption, regardless of the specific type of facility involved;

-Category 10: includes all types of publishing activity, including software, production of films, videos, television programs, radio broadcasts, musical and audio recordings, telecommunications (fixed, mobile and satellite), computer consulting and all IT-related services (internet-based search engines, data processing and hosting, database management, etc.) and publishing agencies and information agencies that supply information, images, and special communication-related services;

-Category 11: includes financial intermediation, including insurance, reinsurance and retirement funds (excluding compulsory social insurance), as well as support activities (promoters, agents, mediators and procurers of financial products, postal banking activities, money transfer services, etc.);

-Category 12: includes the activities of landlords, agents and/or mediators in one or more of the following sectors: real estate sales and purchase, real estate rentals, provision of other real estate services, such as property assessment and estate agent activity on behalf of third parties. Activities in this category can apply to personally-owned or rented properties as well as third parties;

-Category 13: includes specialized professional, scientific and technical services. These types of activities require extensive training and preparation to provide clients with specialized knowledge and capacities. They include the activities of law firms as well as commercial, tax and account auditing firms, corporate management and management consulting, technical studios (architecture, engineering, project development, site inspections, surveying and mapping and activities related to physical, chemical and other types of inspections), research and development in the fields of natural sciences, engineering, human and humanistic sciences, advertising (conceptualization of advertising campaigns), market research and opinion surveys, specialized design activities (graphic designers, technicians, etc.), photographic activities (production of photographic services, photojournalists, aerial photography), translation and interpreting and agricultural consulting. This category also includes the activities of veterinarians in veterinary clinics or on farms, at kennels and animal hospitals, and at outpatient clinics and others (including animal ambulance services);

-Category 14: includes the renting and leasing of intangible, non-financial goods plus a wide range of material goods, such as vehicles without drivers or operators, air or sea transport vehicles, office equipment (furniture, computers, photocopiers, etc.), sports and recreational equipment, videocassettes and DVDs, equipment for farming, construction work and civil engineering. This category also includes the search, selection and placement of personnel, travel agencies and tour operators, detective agencies, private surveillance and surveillance systems (e.g. satellite radio-control of means of transport), cleaning and disinfestation services (for buildings, industrial machinery, cisterns for transport by road or sea), landscaping care and maintenance (including parks, gardens and planters in buildings and public and private residences), incoming and outgoing call center activities, telephone-based help centers, the organization of conventions and trade fairs and a variety of business support activities (e.g. credit recovery agencies, requests for certifications and dispatch of applications, etc.);

-Category 15: includes government activities typically performed by public administrations. This includes general public administration activities (e.g. executive, legislative, financial, etc., at all levels of government), foreign affairs, defense, public law and order, justice department, fire departments and civil defense, compulsory social insurance (INPS, INAIL, etc.);

-Category 16: includes education (both public and private) at all levels for all professions and occupations. The activity can take place through oral or written lessons via radio, television, and internet or by correspondence. It includes all of the different levels of education offered by the different institutions within the national school system as well as adult education, literacy campaigns, etc. It also includes military schools and academies and schools within the prison system. This category also includes education intended primarily for sports or recreational purposes (teaching tennis, swimming, acting lessons, dance, etc.) and driving schools (driving schools, airplane pilot schools and nautical schools);

-Category 17: includes the provision of health services and social assistance (residential or non-residential for senior citizens and the disabled and assistance structures for mental disturbances and drug abuse). This category includes medical checkups and treatments by general physicians, specialists, dentists, etc. The activities may take place in private offices, out-clinics involving groups of physicians and hospital clinics that provide outpatient treatment at businesses, schools, rest homes and union organizations as well as house-calls for the sick;

-Category 18: includes a wide range of activities addressing a variety of different cultural interests, public entertainment and recreation, including live shows, museum management, libraries, historical monuments, nature reserves, zoos, gambling and betting facilities (casinos, bingo halls, game rooms, etc.), sports and recreational activities (sports facilities, sports clubs, gyms, hunting and fishing reserves, board-game clubs and toy libraries, dance halls, swimming centers, etc.). The activities of individual artists are included here;

-Category 19: includes the activities of employers and economic trade associations, employee unions, political parties and religious organizations, repair services for personal and domestic goods, personal services (laundry, dry-cleaning, hairdressers and aesthetic treatments, etc.). This includes computer repair and industrial laundry services;

-Category 20: includes family and cohabitation activities (including condominiums), such as work providers for domestic workers such as domestic assistants, cooks, valets, butlers, launderers, gardeners, doormen, drivers, custodians, baby- sitters, etc.;

-Category 21: includes the activities of international organizations, such as the United Nations and their specialized agencies, the EU, the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, etc.
For clarification, call the toll-free number 800-069701.

Question 6.12
Overtime (paid or unpaid) should be included as part of your regular weekly hours as long as those hours are worked regularly in addition to the normal number of contracted hours.

Teachers should count the number of hours dedicated to teaching plus the number of hours regularly dedicated to related activities (preparing lessons, correcting homework, parent-teacher meetings, etc.).

This should also include overtime hours, whether paid or unpaid.

The time required for commuting to the workplace and the hours allotted to meal times during work breaks, however, should be excluded.

Question 6.13
Use the following definitions to answer the question appropriately:
Recipient of one or more pensions for previous work activity or recipient of unearned income

Recipients of one or more pensions for previous work activity: individuals who are receiving one or more old-age or invalidity pensions. These distributions are paid out for work activities performed by the covered individual after reaching a specified age limit, achieving creditable service or suffering diminished work capacity. This category also includes workers' compensation for workplace accidents and/or occupational illnesses. These pensions are designed to compensate individuals for disabilities (in proportion to the severity) and deaths (for which payments go to the survivors) resulting from events that took place during their work. A minimum period of regular contributions is required before becoming eligible for worker's compensation.

Recipient of unearned income: individuals who receive income, rent or profits derived from property ownership, investments, interest, rents, royalties, etc.

Student: an individual whose main occupation is studying.

Homemaker: an individual whose main occupation is caring for their own family and home.

Other condition: an individual with a status not listed above (e.g. retired for other reasons, social aid or civil disability pension recipients, etc.).

Question 7.1
Box 1 ("Yes, I go to a place of study") should also be checked for children who attend nursery school, kindergarten, etc.

Student-workers should check box 2 ("Yes, I go to a place of work").

Farmhands who have no single fixed workplace because they work for multiple farms should check box 5 ("No, because I do not have a single fixed workplace").

Individuals who take their children to school on a daily basis but who do not subsequently go to a place of work or study should check box 6 ("No, because I am not working, studying or taking any vocational training courses").

Question 7.2
There need not necessarily be any direct relationship between the place of work and the response to question 6.11. This would be the case, for example, of an employee of a maintenance contractor for a metalwork factory who, in his/her response, has to tell the address of the place where he/she actually goes to work (the metalwork factory), instead of the address of the contractor itself.

For cases in which, for example, consulting activities were being performed onsite in an external business or office on the date of the Census, the answer should refer to the address of the consulting business itself.

Student-workers should use the address of their work place.

Individuals who work on vehicles (drivers, railway engineers, tram drivers, pilots, ship workers, etc.) should use the address where the service is based (garage, station, depot, airport, port, etc.).

Individuals with two usual places of work or study should use the location of their primary work or study activity.

Question 7.3
Individuals who work in the municipality where they currently live or in another municipality in Italy also need to indicate the address of their usual place of work or study.

Question 7.4
This question should only be answered by individuals who go to a place of work or study on a daily basis, or who checked box 1 ("Yes, I go to a place of study") or box 2 ("Yes, I go to a place of work") in question 7.1.

Question 7.5
This question should only be answered by individuals who go from their place of usual residence to a place of work or study on a daily basis, or who checked box 1 ("From this dwelling") in question 7.4.

Questions 7.6, 7.7 and 7.8
Use last Wednesday as the point of reference for answering the questions. If you did not commute to your regular place of work or study on that particular day (for various reasons - strike, illness, holiday, etc.), refer instead to a typical day.

If the individual went to a different place of work or study last Wednesday from the usual one indicated in question 7.5, refer instead to the address of the usual place of work or study.

If the individual went to the usual place of work or study two times last Wednesday, refer to the first of the two commutes that occurred on that day.
As prescribed by law, please be advised that responding to questions 8.1 through 8.4 is not compulsory.

Question 8.1
The purpose of this question is to learn more about any visual difficulties or problems that people might have even while wearing glasses or contact lenses. These can involve, for instance, not being able to see up close or far away, a lack of peripheral vision or not being able to see from one or both eyes. Your response should account for any kind of visual difficulty you consider to be a problem.

Question 8.2
The purpose of this question is to learn more about any hearing difficulties or problems that people might have even while using hearing aids. These can involve, for instance, hearing difficulties (even if only in the context of a noisy environment), and the inability to distinguish the sources of different sounds or deafness in one or both ears. Your response should account for any kind of hearing difficulty you consider to be a problem.

Question 8.3
The purpose of this question is to learn more about any difficulties or problems with mobility that people might have without using auxiliary devices (canes, crutches, wheelchairs, etc.) or personal assistance. The types of limitations may involve, for instance, difficulties with walking short or long distances, climbing up or down stairs or standing for more than 1 or 2 minutes.

Question 8.4
The purpose of this question is to learn more about any problems that people might have with their memory or concentration. This includes the following issues: forgetting important things, losing one's way, forgetting what they were just told, and inability to concentrate on what they are doing. The difficulties must be serious enough to create problems with the execution of daily activities. It does not include memory or concentration difficulties that can be attributed to stress, overwork or the use of recreational drugs.