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Israel 2008 Census of Population and Housing
Enumerator's Manual
2008 Census of Population and Housing
State of Israel -- Central Bureau of Statistics


[Chapters 1-3 of the original document are not presented here.]
Chapter 4: Questionnaire

Questionnaire Introduction

Introduction
[Text omitted, it states the purpose of the data collection and some relevant questions that could be answered using the data]
1. Structure of the questionnaire
[Text omitted, list of the chapters of the questionnaire]

2. Key terms
a. The determining date
As mentioned in the introduction chapter of the Pre-collection Stage Enumerator Guidebook, the determining date is the date according to which the questionnaire should be filled, in order to get a picture of the population's state of affairs at a certain point in time. In the population census survey the determining date is the end of Saturday, 27 December 2008, Hebrew date: 30 Kislev 5769. The determining date is especially important for questions concerning place of residence, and in these questions, the date is presented in the body of the question. When the question refers to a period of time which is not the determining date, the relevant period of time is presented in the body of the question.
b. Household
By definition, a household is a group people who live in the same apartment and have a shared expense budget for food. In most apartments the residents are families and in these cases the term 'household' is identical to the term 'family'. The questions in parts A-H are asked for each person living in the apartment, and the questions in parts I-J are asked for the entire household as a single unit.

3. The computerized questionnaire
[Text omitted, describes how the computerized questionnaire works and lists some advantages such as: questions which will appear in the questionnaire will be worded according to the interviewee's sex or translation into different languages]

[Text omitted, summary of the introductory chapter]
Part A: List of People Living in Apartment and Relation

Introduction
In the first series of questions in the questionnaire, you will be asked to type the names of all the people living in the apartment, and ask about relations. Relations can be family or non-family relations.
In this part you will become familiar with the guidelines for including individuals in the list of people living in the apartment, and learn the order in which you are asked to type their names.

1. The question list
1. Who are the people living in the apartment?
2. Who are the people who lived in the apartment on 12/27/2008 (Hebrew Date: 30 Kislev 5769) and are not living in it today?
3. First name
4. Family name
5. What is the relation of ________ to (the name of the person which appears first on the list)?

2. Instructions for answering questions
a. List of people living in apartment
The reason for creating a list of the people living in the apartment is to gather the names of all the people and thus, make sure you have not forgotten anyone or, alternatively, that no one was included more than once.
In the census we aim to get an accurate status report on all of the country's residents and so it is important to include everybody who lives in the apartment.

Question 1.10 - Who are the people living in the apartment?
Include babies, soldiers, residents of institutions and boarding schools, and persons who have been abroad for less than a year
The order of listing people is important: If a couple lives in the apartment, type their two names in the first two places on the list. If a couple does not live in the apartment, register first on the list a person who is 15 years old, or older. The first on the list is the person whose name you type at the top of the list of people living in the apartment.
Also include in the list people who live somewhere else some of the time. For example, people living in an institution - retirement home, hostel for the disabled, etc., students who live in boarding schools and soldiers living on base.
Also include in the list persons who are abroad and have been there for less than a year, and were living in the apartment prior to going away.
Anytime you have doubts whether a person lives in the apartment, include them in the list.
Most people were also living in the apartment where you are visiting them on the determining date, and therefore we ask who is living in the apartment right now. To learn about the few who have left the apartment between the determining date and the interview date, we also ask about those who lived in the apartment on the determining date and do not live in it today.

Question 1.40 - Who are the people who lived in the apartment on 12/27/2008 (Hebrew date: 30 Kislev 5769)?
Include people who traveled abroad and past residents
People who lived in the apartment on the determining date and do not live in it anymore can be one of two types:

- Family members, who moved to another apartment because of a wedding, school, work, etc. Collect data on these people as you would on any other person living in the apartment.
- Previous residents of the apartment. It is possible that the people living in the apartment moved into it after the determining date and have replaced previous residents. In these cases, type the names of the previous residents. You are not asked to collect additional information on the previous residents.

b. First name and family name
A name is the central tool which allows us to identify people. To identify each and every person we require the first names and family names of all the persons included in the questionnaire. The names are kept in complete confidentiality and are not published.

- In the answer field for the first name, type the full name - no abbreviations or nicknames. If the respondent gives you a shortened name (for example, Miki, Alex, Abed), check with him what his full name is, and type the full name (for example, Michal or Michaela, Alexander, Abdullah).
- If a person has a second name, note it in the answer. It is important to note this name since sometimes it may distinct between two people living in the same apartment who have the same first name.

c. Relation to the first on the list
Relation is the tie between one person and another. The tie can be a family or non-family relation. For example: mother, son, sister, room mate.
Answers on relations allow us to learn about the compositions of households, as well as characterize and investigate households of different types, such as: families with many children, single-parent families, young or old people living with their families, etc.
The relations we ask about are relations to the first on the list. Since you made sure to register first one of the spouses or another adult, the relations will usually be family relations (such as spouse or daughter). For example: if a couple with children lives in the apartment, and the mother was typed as first on the list, her spouse's relation to her will be 'Spouse' (answer 2) and her children's relation to her will be 'Son/ daughter' (answer 3).

Question 1.16, 1.44 - What is the relation of [the respondent] to (the name of the person which appears first on the list)?
[] 1 [Myself]
[] 2 Spouse
[] 3 Son/daughter
[] 4 Father/mother
[] 5 Brother/sister
[] 6 Grandchild
[] 7 Spouse of son/daughter
[] 8 Other relative
[] 9 Not a relative

- The answer 'Spouse' (answer 2) refers to married couples, as well as unmarried couples.
- For a child of one of the spouses from a previous marriage (stepson or stepdaughter), or an adopted child, choose 'Son/daughter' (answer 3).
- The answer 'Spouse of son/daughter' (answer 7) refers to married couples, as well as unmarried couples.
- After choosing 'Other relative' (answer 8) you must choose from an additional list of family relations: nephew/niece, cousin, brother-in-law/sister-in-law, uncle/aunt, father-in-law/mother-in-law, great grandchild, grandfather/grandmother, great grandfather/grandmother, other relative.
- After choosing 'Not a relative' (answer 9) you must choose from an additional list of non-family relations: roommate, social worker/caretaker/domestic worker, child in foster home, subtenant, previous tenant, other non-relative.

3. Special cases
a. Indicating spouses and parents
In a few cases where the required data on couples in the household or on parent-children relations was not obtained, one or more of the following questions will be presented:

Question 11.10 - Is the spouse of (the relevant person's name) in the household?
Question 11.20 - Is the mother of (the relevant person's name) in the household?
Question 11.30 - Is the father of (the relevant person's name) in the household?

- If the answer to one or more of the questions is 'yes', you will be asked to indicate the name of the person in the household who is the spouse/mother/father.

Part B: Additional Residence Address

Introduction
One of the central goals of the population census survey is to receive data on the size of the population in each and every locality. In large localities the survey also aims to obtain data on the size of the population and its distribution inside the localities. To succeed in this goal it is extremely important to identify the permanent address of each person on the determining date.
Most people live in a single address and that is their permanent address, but there are people who live in more than one residential address due to work, military service, schooling or other reasons. The questions in this part are meant to identify these people, in order to determine what their permanent address is.
Identifying the address on the determining date is important because the census data is used to plan services for small areas. The public receives education, health, transportation and other services from the authorities, based on the characteristics of the population that lives in each place.

1. The question list

1. Did you have an additional address where you spent most of the nights in the month of December?

2. Where was your additional address, in Israel or abroad?

3. On 12/27/2008 (Hebrew date: 30 Kislev 5769), have you been living abroad for a year or more, or for less than a year?

4. Was your additional address in a boarding school, student dorms or a long-term stay institution?

5. What is the name of the place (the boarding school or institution)?

6. What is the additional address? Locality, street, neighborhood, house number.

2. Instructions for answering questions

a. Additional address
This question is meant to identify people with more than one residential address, in order to determine what their permanent address was on the determining date.

Question 1.50 - Did you have an additional address where you spent most of the nights in the month of December?
Enumerator, please note: additional address does not include a military base or vacation spot.

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

This question includes several parts which are important to note:

An additional address is only a residential address.
The time frame this question refers to is the month before the determining date (12/27/2008). That is to say, the person slept in another address on most of the nights of the month preceding the determining date.

The following addresses are defined as additional addresses since the stay in them is long-term:

- A person who divides his time between an apartment near his workplace and his family's home, or a student who lives part-time in an apartment near his place of studies and part-time in his parents' home- the additional place of residence is an additional address.
- Long-term stay institutions - retirement homes, prisons, immigrant absorption centers, psychiatric hospitals, hospitals for chronic patients, etc.
- Boarding schools, yeshivas (with boarding school), student dorms.
- An apartment of girls in national service, an apartment of soldier teachers (which is off the military base), an apartment of young people in their 'service year' before enlisting into the army.
- A foster home where one of the family members' lived.

The following are examples of places which are not additional addresses:

[] A military base is not an additional address (soldiers in mandatory or career service), except for permanent residences of families or singles in IDF bases.
[] A place where people stay during vacation is never considered an additional address.
[] Places where people usually stay for short periods are not considered residential addresses. For example, a general hospital, jail, drug rehabilitation center, reserve duty.

b. Location of additional address
A person who has been abroad for more than a year on the determining date is not a part of the census population. The following questions are one of the means to identify whether a person belongs to the census population, in order to decide whether to automatically remove him out of the questionnaire. A person who said his additional address was abroad will be asked how long he stays there

Question 1.70 - Where was your additional address, in Israel or abroad?
[] 1 Israel
[] 2 Abroad

Question 1.70.1 - On 12/27/2008 (Hebrew date: 30 Kislev 5769), have you been living abroad for a year or more, or for less than a year?
[] 1 A year, or more
[] 2 Less than a year

c. Additional address in an institution
The type of additional address holds special significance in the data processing and the follow-up surveys the Central Bureau of Statistics conducts on the population of institutions. This data will assist in the identification of institutions where people live. It is important to distinguish between a regular residential address and a boarding school, student dorms or a long-term stay institution, and to ask for the name of the place (the boarding school, dorms or institution).
Question 1.80 - Was your additional address in a boarding school, student dorms or long-term stay institution?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

d. Additional address
Additional questions regarding the additional address will be presented to people who have an additional address, as detailed in the next paragraph.

e. Address details
In general, the address details are: locality name, street name, neighborhood name and house number.
The locality's characteristics will determine what questions regarding the address details will appear. For example, not all localities have streets (such as: Kibbutzes and Moshavs). The question regarding street name will only appear in localities where it is relevant.
The question regarding house number will only appear when the question on street name appears.
The question regarding neighborhood name will only appear in some of the Arab localities, instead of the questions on street name and house number.

Part C: Division into Households

Introduction
A single family lives in most apartments and in these cases the term 'household' is identical to the term 'family'. In some rare cases there is more than one household in the apartment. In this part you will learn what a household is and how to divide the people in an apartment into households.
The division into households is important because some of the data concerning Israel's population is published with regards to the household level: the average size of a household, the average number of children in a household, the average number of rooms a household lives in, etc.
In most apartments you visit, you will not be directed to the questions which appear in this part.

1. The question list

1. Do all of the people living in the apartment have a shared expense budget for food?

2. Who of the following has a shared expense budget for food with you?

3. Hence, there are (number) households (groups of people with a shared expense budget for food)?

2. Key terms

a. Household
The questionnaire should be filled for those people who live in the apartment. In the population census survey we are interested in dividing the people living in the same apartment into groups who buy their food together. Each such group is called a household.

A household is a group of people living in the same apartment who have a shared expense budget for food.

b. Shared expense budget for food
One of the most prominent characteristics of a group of people who make up a family is a shared expense budget, and especially a shared expense budget for food. In most cases, family members depend on their family financially. We mostly meet 'simple' families (a couple or parents and their children) and then the term household is identical with the term family, but sometimes we find people with no family ties between them living in the apartment. That is why we do not ask about the 'family', but rather about the 'household'.
A shared expense budget for food is the purchase of food, using the same budget or the same cash box or the same income sources.

3. Instructions for answering questions
Using the following question we check whether there is more than one household in the apartment. If the answer is 'yes', there is one household in the apartment. If the answer is 'no', there is more than one household in the apartment.

Question 2.10 - Do all of the people living in the apartment have a shared expense budget for food?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

The next question allows us to divide the people into separate households. The question will only be asked if their answer to the question on a shared expense budget for food (question 2.10) was 'no'. The answer list should include the names of all the people living in the apartment.

Question 2.20 - Who of the following has a shared expense budget for food with you?

____ 1 First name, last name
____ 2 First name, last name
____ 3 First name, last name

The division into households affects the way you continue to fill the questionnaire. Using the following question you will verify the accuracy of the division and make corrections if needed.

Question 2.30 - Hence, there are (number) households (groups of people with a shared expense budget for food)?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

4. Detailed definitions
In order to divide the people living in the apartment into households, we must check if they all share an expense budget for food.
Examples indicating the existence of a shared expense budget for food:

- A family and other relatives (for example, a couple with children and a grandmother who lives with them) live in the apartment, and the food in the house is purchased using the same budget, or same cash box, or same income sources.
- A family and non-relatives live in the apartment, and the food in the house is purchased using the same budget, or same cash box, or same income sources. For example, an older couple and a Philippine caretaker. If the couple pays for the food in the apartment and the caretaker eats the food purchased by the couple, then the three of them have a shared expense budget for food.
- Roommates live in the apartment and each roommate allocates a sum of money to a joint cash box which is used for purchasing food for all the roommates.

Examples indicating the existence of a separate expense budget for food:

- Roommates live in the apartment and each roommate purchases his own food (or at least one roommate purchases food separately from the rest of the roommates).

5. Special cases
In apartments with one household, we ask questions about the household members' relations to the first person in the apartment. In apartments with more than one household, we ask questions about the relations to the first person in the household. The questions and possible answers are identical to the questions described in part A, but the person (whose name appears in the question) is different.

Part D: Identification Details and Demographic Details

Introduction
A person's demographic details allow us to divide the country's population into meaningful groups. For example: men and women, children and adults, Israeli born and those born abroad. The demographic details allow us to explain many issues. For example, men and women are very different when it comes to their rate of participation in the workforce, their incomes, marriage age, etc. Information on ages also allows us to understand important phenomena concerning human resources, such as the number of young and old job seekers, the number of working elderly persons, etc.
A person's identification details allow us to positively identify each person, even in cases of identical first names and last names.

1. The question list

Personal details
1. Are you a male or a female?
2. What is your ID card number?
3. What is your date of birth?

Country of origin
4. What country were you born in?
5. What country was your father born in?
6. What country was your mother born in?
7. In what year did you enter/immigrate to Israel?

Marriage
8. What is your marital status?
9. How many times did you get married?
10. In what year did you get married (the last time)?
11. In what year did you get married for the first time?

Births (for women only)
12. Did you ever give birth to children?
13. How many children did you give birth to?

Religion (only for persons missing an ID card)
14. Are you Jewish, Moslem, Christian, Druze or other?

Identification details
15. What is your father's name?
16. What is your mother's name?
17. What is your paternal grandfather's name?
18. What is your tribe's name? (for Bedouin localities only)

2. Instructions for answering questions :

a. Sex
The information on a person's sex is needed for social analysis that allows us to identify gaps between the sexes, and trace changes that occur in these gaps.
Question 3.20 - This person is ____:
[] 1 Male
[] 2 Female

- There is no need to ask this question about the person you are interviewing.
- When asking about the rest of the household's members, you must explicitly ask about sex and not conclude what the person's sex is, solely based on their name. With many names it is impossible to tell whether they belong to a male or a female. For example: Rotem, Noam, Islam, Manar, etc.

b. ID card number and passport number
A person's ID number is the most important tool for the computerized data processing. It allows us to verify that all persons were registered, and that other persons were not registered twice, in two different apartments.
Question 3.30 - What is your ID card number? (Including control digit)

Enumerator, please note: if a person does not have an Israeli ID card type 9999

- We recommend that you copy the number from the ID card or another form of ID (HMO card, driver's license, student card), in order to prevent errors in the number.
- You must copy all of the digits, including the control digit.
- There are people with no ID card number- persons missing an ID card. These are usually people who are not permanent residents of Israel. If a person is missing an ID card type 9999 and you will be directed to the question on passport number.
Do not copy the ID card number from an ID card that is not blue. If a person has an orange/green ID card, type 9999 in this question and you will be directed to the question on passport number. If the person does not have a passport (Jordanian/Egyptian), type 9999 in the passport number question as well.
Question 3.30.1 - What is your passport number?

Enumerator, please note: if a person does not have a passport type 9999

- We recommend that you copy the passport number from the passport or another form of ID where the passport number appears, in order to prevent errors in the number. It is also possible to type letters.
- If a person does not have a passport, type 9999.

c. Age
Age is one of the population's features and allows us to understand the population's characteristics in many fields, such as: education, employment, income, family composition and size, etc.
Information on the population's age structure is an important element in planning local-level services for the residents, such as: schools, kindergartens, youth clubs and community centers, health services, retirement homes and many other services.
Question 3.40-3.60 - What is your date of birth? Day, month and year
- Sometimes the full date of birth is unknown. In these cases, empty values will appear in the ID card instead of the day and month. For example, 00/00/1946. In this case you must type 'unknown' (Ctrl+K) in the day of birth and month of birth questions.
- If the date of birth is unknown, you will be directed to the question about age.

Question 3.60.4 - How old are you?
- Type 0 for a baby whose age is less than a year.
- You must type whole years, rounded downwards. For example, if a person is aged 24 and a half, type 24.
- If the exact age is unknown, ask about the person's approximate age. If the interviewee does not know whether a person is 42 or 43, choose one of his answers.

d. Country of origin - country of birth, parents' country of birth
The information received from the data on country of origin, combined with the answers to questions on various issues, is of great value for understanding the social and economic status of each population group, and the changes that occur in it, based on the countries of origin and seniority in Israel.
Question 3.100-3.100.1 - What country were you born in, according to current borders?
- Type the country of birth according to current borders. Current borders are the borders existing today between countries (and not the borders that existed between countries when the person was born).
Examples:

- If a person was born in a city that belonged to Germany when he was born, but today belongs to Poland, type 'Poland' in the questionnaire.
- If a person was born in a place that was part of the former Soviet Union, type the name of the independent country where this place is today. For example: if a person was born in Kishinev, type 'Moldova'.
- The former Soviet Union included various states which are independent countries today. Russia is one of these countries. Do not use the answer 'Russia' as a substitute for the Soviet Union. You must find out what country the respondent was born in.

e. Year of immigration
The data on year of immigration allows us to analyze the absorption of immigrants from different countries and to describe their situation, based on the immigration wave in which they came to Israel.
Question 3.130 - In what year did you immigrate to Israel?
- People who have an ID card and were not born in Israel will be asked about their year of immigration to Israel. Persons missing an ID card will be asked about their year of entering Israel.
- If children were born abroad to Israeli parents and they now live in Israel, type the year of entry into Israel.
- If persons missing an ID card entered Israel more than once (for example, foreign workers), type the year of their last entry into Israel.
- If a person decided to immigrate to Israel after staying in the country under a different status (tourist or temporary resident) type their date of immigration- i.e. the date when they officially received an immigrant status. For example: if a student came for a year of studies in a university, and then decided to change his status to that of an immigrant, type the date when he received his immigrant status.
- If a person immigrated (or entered) Israel in 2008, ask about the month (and day) of immigration in order to clarify whether he immigrated to Israel before or after the determining date.

f. Marital status
Data on marital status is needed for completing the information on family structures in the population, and for understanding the changes that occur over time in the composition of families. The data is used for planning education and housing services, which are affected by the changes to families' composition.
Only persons aged 15, or older, are asked about their marital status.
Question 3.180 - What is your marital status?
[] 1 Married
[] 2 Separated
[] 3 Divorced
[] 4 Widow
[] 5 Single
[] 6 Other

- Only read out loud answers 1-5.
- If the answer you receive is not the person's marital status, but a description of another aspect of his life, ask him again about his marital status. For example, if the answer you received is 'single mother', ask again what the marital status is (since her marital status can be any of the suggested answers).
- The answer 'other' is for cases where the respondent is not willing to choose any of the other answers, and has a unique definition for his marital status.

g. Marriage
The data on marriage will provide information on the marriage customs in different groups of the population. For example, at what age do men get married, in comparison with women, and what are the age gaps between spouses.
Only people who said their marital status is different than 'single' are asked about marriage.
If a person was married once, he is asked for the year in which he got married.
Question 3.200 - In what year did you get married?

- In the Arab population, if you are asked whether the question refers to the engagement (which is registered with the Moslem Religious Judge and the Ministry of Interior) or the actual marriage, ask the respondent to refer to the actual marriage.
- If a person got married more than once - ask about the year of the last marriage, and the year of the first marriage. This information is critical for studying fertility trends in the population.

Question 3.200 - In what year did you get married, last time?
Question 3.210 - In what year did you get married for the first time?


h. Births
Data on births will allow us to calculate fertility rates and understand fertility differences between different groups in the population. Furthermore, this data will provide a foundation for studying changes in fertility over time.
Only women aged 15, or older, are asked about births.
Question 3.220 - Did you ever give birth to children?
Question 3.220.1 - How many children did you give birth to? Include all children who were born alive, even if they are not alive today.

-Include: live births only, children from previous marriages, and children who are not alive today.
- Do not include: miscarriages and abortions, children born dead.

i. Religion
Only persons missing ID cards are asked about religion.
Religion is one of the most prominent characteristics of the population in Israel, and there are differences between different religious groups in terms of place of residence, occupation fields and other characteristics.
Question 3.240 - Are you?
[] 1 Jewish
[] 2 Moslem
[] 3 Christian
[] 4 Druze
[] 5 Other

j. Father's name, mother's name, paternal grandfather's name, tribe name
The names of the parents and grandfather allow us to distinguish between people with the same name, especially among populations where there are very common names. All population types are asked about father's name. To the questions about 'mother's name' and 'grandfather's name', however, you will only be directed by the computerized flowchart if needed. You will only ask about the tribe's name in Bedouin localities.

Part E: Place of Residence

Introduction
This part contains questions about the residence address 5 year ago, and the date of entering the apartment and locality.
The data on the place of residence will provide information on the population's seniority in the different localities, and on the movement between localities. For example: we will be able to know how many people have moved (in the five years before the survey) from a rural locality to an urban locality, and vice versa, or, how many people changed addresses within the same city. The information on transition between localities and within localities also allows us to examine the places which are sources of 'attraction' and other places, which residents have been leaving. In addition, it will be possible to examine who the moving population is, and what their characteristics are.
For example, are all the people who move to Tel Aviv young? What is the education level of people moving from the center of Israel to the north or the south? Are the people moving from one apartment to the other single persons or families?
In addition, the questions on date of entry into the apartment, combined with the questions on additional residence address (see part B), are used to identify the permanent residence address on the determining date.
All questions in this part are only addressed at persons aged 15, or over.

1. The question list

1. In what year did you begin living in the apartment?

2. Did you begin living in the apartment prior to the determining date, or after it?

3. What was your previous residence address?

4. What was your residence address 5 years ago (i.e. at the end of 2003)?

5. In what year did you begin living in the locality where you live today?

2. Instructions for answering questions

a. Place of residence on the determining date
As you learned in part B of this chapter (additional residence address), some of the questions in this questionnaire are aimed at identifying the permanent address of a person on the determining date. Since you are visiting the residents' homes anywhere between several days and several weeks after the determining date, it is possible that changes have occurred in the place of residence, since the determining date. Therefore, there is a series of questions intended to clarify where the person lived on the determining date. The year each person entered his apartment will determine what questions he will be asked.
Question 4.10 - In what year did you begin living in the apartment?

[] 1 2008-2009 (the past year)
[] 2 2004-2007 (the past five years, but not the past year)
[] 3 2003 or earlier (more than 5 years ago)

- If a person lived in this apartment in the past, left it, and returned to live in it - type the latter year of entrance into the apartment.
- If a person began living in the apartment prior to the determining date, then the address where you are visiting was also his address on the determining date. If a person began living in the apartment after the determining date, then the address where you are visiting was not his address on the determining date. Therefore, he is asked about his previous address - the address where he lived on the determining date. Additional details on the address details can be found in part B, paragraph 2.e.
Question 4.10.1 - Did you begin living in the apartment prior to 12/27/2008 (Hebrew date: 30 Kislev 5769), or after 12/27/2008?
Prior to 12/27/2008 (including)
After 12/27/2008
Question 4.20-4.40 - What was your residence address before moving into this apartment? Locality, street, neighborhood, house number

b. Place of residence 5 years ago
The answers on place of residence 5 years ago, allow us to study and analyze the trends and causes of changes in the population's concentration and distribution in the country's regions.
Combining the information on place of residence 5 years ago with other details from the questionnaire, allows us to characterize groups of people who tend to change their place of residence, to estimate the scope of the phenomenon, and to understand its causes.
The data on changes in the place of residence over the years is an important foundation for local planning of services for the residents.
Question 4.60-4.80 - What was your residence address 5 years ago (i.e. the end of 2003)? Locality, street, neighborhood, house number
Additional details on the address details can be found in part B, paragraph 2.e.

c. Year of entry into locality
The answers to this question will allow us to process data on the population composition in the locality. This is basic information for analyzing the characteristics of the residents living in the locality over different periods of time.
Question 4.100 - In what year did you begin living in the locality where you live today?
A person who lived in this locality in the past, left it, and returned to live in it:

- If a person lived outside of the locality for less than 10 straight years - register the earlier year of entry.
- If a person lived outside the locality for more than 10 straight years - register the latter year of entry.

Part F: Daily Functioning

Introduction
A person's ability to perform daily activities can influence his ability to work, study, and make a living. Using the information received from questions on this subject, we can identify the percentage of people in the population who experience difficulties in their daily functioning, and characterize this group. Based on this data, the various authorities can plan appropriate services for supporting those persons who experience difficulties.
This is the first time that data on daily functioning is collected during the population census. The data on the national and local levels can provide unique information on this subject to all those who work in this field: ministries, local authorities, public bodies, research institutions and different types of organizations.
The daily activities studied in the questionnaire are: hearing, walking inside the house and going up and down stairs, memory and concentration, and the ability get dresses and bathe.
The questions are presented according to age. All persons, regardless of age, are asked about difficulties in hearing. Persons aged 5 and up are asked about difficulties in walking inside house, memory and concentration, and ability to get dressed and bathe.

1. The question list
1. Do you experience any difficulty in hearing (even when using a hearing aid)?
2. Do you experience any difficulty in walking inside house, or going up and down stairs?
3. Do you experience any difficulty in remembering things or concentrating?
4. Do you experience any difficulty in getting dressed or bathing?

2. Instructions for answering questions
A wide variety of questions can help us learn about the country's residents' level of functioning and ability to cope in their daily life. In the population census survey we examine these issues through questions about the level of difficulty a person experiences when performing different activities.
Each question in this part is separate from the others and does not depend on the other questions. Therefore, each question is asked regardless of the answer received for the previous question.
a. The introduction
An introduction sentence appears before the questions, explaining the framework within which the questions are asked. The introduction presents the subject of the questions and explains the type of difficulties that should be addressed. The introduction is read out once and refers to the series of questions that follows.
In the questions, you should refer to difficulties which are the result of a health, physical or mental problem, lasting six months or more. This time frame was determined in order to focus on long-term and permanent difficulties and avoid collecting data on temporary difficulties, such as a person who broke his leg but will fully recover within a short time.

Introduction:
Now I will ask about difficulties in performing certain activities due to a health, physical or mental problem, lasting six month or more.
The questions only refer to difficulties resulting from a physical, neurological or mental problem, lasting six months or more. If the problem lasted less than six months, treat it as if the person has no difficulty and answer 'No- no difficulty' (answer 1).
The questions only refer to difficulties which are the result of a physical, neurological or mental problem. If the source of the difficulties is different, treat it as if the person has no difficulty and answer 'No- no difficulty' (answer 1).
The difficulties the questions refer to are difficulties, as perceived by the respondent. There is no 'right' or 'wrong' answer for these questions. Refer to the difficulty and level of difficulty according to the way the respondent feels them.

b. The questions
Question 5.10 - Do you experience any difficulty in hearing (even when using a hearing aid)?
[] 1 No - no difficulty
[] 2 Yes - little trouble
[] 3Yes - it is very hard
[] 4 Cannot hear at all (deaf)
[] 5 Irrelevant

- If the hearing aid completely fixes the hearing difficulties, choose 'No - no difficulty' (answer 1).
- The answer 'irrelevant' will only appear for children under the age of 5. Only use this answer after it was explicitly chosen by the respondent.

Question 5.20 - Do you experience any difficulty in walking inside house, or going up and down stairs?

[] 1. No - no difficulty
[] 2 Yes - little trouble
[] 3 Yes - it is very hard
[] 4 Cannot at all

Question 5.30 - Do you experience any difficulty in remembering things or concentrating?
[] 1 No - no difficulty
[] 2 Yes - little trouble
[] 3 Yes - it is very hard
[] 4 Cannot at all

Question 5.40 - Do you experience any difficulty in getting dressed or bathing?
[] 1 No - no difficulty
[] 2 Yes - little trouble
[] 3 Yes - it is very hard
[] 4 Cannot at all

- If the person only experiences difficulties performing one of the actions that appear in the question, respond according to the difficulty in performing that action. For example, if a person experiences little trouble bathing, but does not have any trouble getting dressed, mark 'Yes - little trouble' (answer 2).

Part G: Education

Introduction
This part of the questionnaire deals with the subject of education. The goal of the questions is to receive information on the population's education level and type of education.
The data received will allow us to study, among other things, the distribution of different population groups according to people's number of schooling years in different types of schools (high school, post-secondary school or higher education), how many of them received matriculation certificates, how many received other diplomas, and the number of academics in Israel. The data allows us to analyze the relations between education and people's occupations, or between education and housing conditions, etc.
In addition, the data is used for assessing the population's education resources and for planning education services, such as frameworks for professional studies, adult education, etc.
All questions in this part are addressed at persons aged 15 or more.

1. The question list
1. Have you ever studied in the past, or currently studying, in a school (academic institution)?
2. How many years did you study in all schools (academic institutions)?
3. In which of the following schools did you study?
4. What is the highest diploma or degree you received in your studies?

2. Instructions for answering questions

a. Studies in school (academic institution)
The question distinguishes between three groups of people:
People who are studying today, people who studied in the past and are not studying today, and people who never studied. This distinction allows us to learn about each group and analyze its characteristics. For example: the number of people who are studying during the period of the population census.
People who studied in the past or are studying today will be asked about the types of schools they attended, number of schooling years, and their highest diploma. People who never studies will not be asked additional questions concerning education.

Question 6.10 - Have you ever studied in the past, or currently studying, in a school (academic institution)?
The following are also considered as schools: university, night school, course lasting at least one school year, yeshiva or kollel.

[] 1 Only studied in the past
[] 2 Currently studying
[] 3 Never studied

- Studies in school include: studies in elementary school, junior high school, high school, post-secondary school, university and college. In addition, studies in school include studies in academic institutions where studies are conducted on a regular basis, and last at least one school year. Therefore, you should include:

people who studies in a Cheder or Talmud Torah school (religious studies for children in elementary school age), a Qutab (religious elementary school in Islamic countries), special education schools, different yeshivas, courses in various frameworks lasting at least one school year, and external schools for matriculation test preparation.

- This question does not refer to self-education or visits to irregular courses lasting last than one school year. Therefore, do not include:

kindergartens, classes with private teacher, hobby courses, Hebrew Ulpan, literacy schools, training or vocational in-service training lasting less than one school year, internships of doctors, lawyers, etc.

- Studies in the Open University will be considered as studies in a school (academic institution) as long as they are toward an academic degree or a practical engineer certification.

b. Number of schooling years
The information on the number of schooling years assists in the study of the population's education level.

Question 6.20 - How many years did you study in all schools (academic institutions)?
Enumerator, please note: if currently studying, include current school year.

- If the respondent is currently in school, include the current school year in the count - even if it is the beginning of the school year.
- Concerning past studies - only include schooling years that the respondent actually completed. For example: You are told that the respondent studied in the past for a year and 7 months in a vocational training course. You need to find out whether the course's length was a year and 7 months (and then count it as two years of schooling), or if the course was longer and the respondent terminated his studies before their end and then count it as one year only).
- Only refer to the actual years of studies and not to the planned years of studies.
Include all schooling years in any type of school, even if there were intervals between them. For example: The respondent studied toward a bachelor's degree at the Hebrew University for one year. At the end of the first year he stopped his studies in order to work. At the end of the year of working he returned and completed another two years toward the degree. In this case, type the entire sum of his years of study - 3.
- Include any schooling year, regardless of whether the studies were conducted during the day or the evening, in Israel or abroad.
- A 'schooling year' does not include: years of studies in frameworks which are not schools (academic institutions), schooling years which were not completed in the past, additional schooling years in the same grade in an elementary or high school.

c. School type
Information on school types allows us to examine different study tracks, according to characteristics of different groups. Therefore, this data allows us to follow the integration of graduates of certain tracks in various economic branches.

Question 6.30 - In which of the following schools did you study?
You can choose more than one answer
1. Elementary school or junior high school
2. High school - academic, vocational, technological or agricultural track (including external school which prepares for matriculation exams, yeshiva high school, junior yeshiva)
3. Higher education yeshiva, Kollel
4. Post-secondary school, not in a track leading to an academic degree (e.g. school for technicians and practical engineers, teacher and kindergarten training institutions, nursing schools)
5. Academic institution, toward an academic degree
6. Other educational institution, elaborate

- In this question you must choose all of the school types where the person has studied.
- Before choosing the answer 'Other' - check if the type of school falls under one of the answers. If the school does not fall under one of the answers, choose the answer 'Other' and indicate the name of the school and the subject of studies.
- Examples of the different types of schools can be found in paragraph 3.a of this chapter.
- A lexicon of religious schooling institutions can be found in paragraph 3.a.1 of this chapter.

d. The highest diploma/degree
The goal of this question is to receive data on the population's level of formal education. This information allows us to study the distribution of the population's education level. For example: the number of people with academic degrees, the number of people with matriculation diplomas, etc.
Question 6.40 - What was the highest diploma or degree you received in your studies?

Enumerator, please note: if received an academic degree and an academic diploma, only mention the academic degree
1. Elementary school or junior high school graduation diploma
2. High school graduation diploma (which is not a matriculation certificate)
3. Matriculation certificate
4. Non-academic post-secondary school diploma (such as a teaching certificate, practical engineer certificate, technician certificate, nurse certificate)
5. Bachelor's degree, B.A. or equivalent
6. Master's degree, M.A. or equivalent (including M.D.)
7. PhD, or equivalent degree
8. Never received a diploma or certificate
9. Other, elaborate

- This question refers to the highest diploma a person has received after completing his studies in a framework that is considered a school (an academic institution). This does not refer to honors certificates, certificates for participating in competitions, certificates of appreciation, etc.
- Also indicate a diploma or degree that a person is entitled to receive since he completed all of his study requirements, even if he still doesn't have the certificate. For example, if a person successfully passed all of his matriculation exams, but still hasn't received the matriculation certificate, write that he has received a matriculation certificate (answer 3).
- If a person has an academic certificate and an academic degree, treat his academic degree as the highest diploma. For example, if a person has an academic teaching certificate and a bachelor's degree in sociology, his bachelor's degree is the highest diploma.
- Examples of different types of diplomas and certificates can be found in paragraph 3.b of this chapter.

3. Detailed definitions
In this part you will find a list of different school types and different certificate and diploma types, as well as what is included in each category. Furthermore, you will find here a lexicon with definitions of religious education institutions.

a. School type
Type of school

Elementary school or junior high school (answer 1)
Elementary school: Cheder, Qutab, Talmud Torah school, elementary night school for working teenagers;
Special education school: for disabled children, children with learning disabilities, mentally retarded children, blind children, orphans, children living in hostels, etc.;
Junior high school in Israel or similar school abroad, which is between elementary school and high school;
Please note,
If the answer is 'post-primary school', you must clarify with the respondent whether he attended this school in the framework of a junior high school or a high school (academic or vocational)
Some people call elementary schools 'popular schools' (Amami)

High school - academic, vocational, agricultural track (answer 2)
High school, including all tracks, whether the studies are conducted during the day or the evening; high schools for apprentices, clerks, trade, home economics, practical nurses or caretakers and industrial schools;
'Bezeq' high school (high school which trains communication technicians);
External school which prepares for matriculation exams;
Military boarding schools, Air Force technical school, naval high school;
Continuation classes (post-primary classes in Kibbutzes)
yeshivas (junior yeshiva, vocational high school yeshiva, academic high school yeshiva), see explanation in paragraph a.1;
Also includes: P.T.U - vocational high school in the Soviet Union


yeshiva (higher education) (answer 3)
Post-secondary yeshiva - for adults studying with no time restriction (entire life);
Higher education yeshiva
Hesder yeshiva - See explanation in paragraph a.1
Kollel
Does not include: torah studies in synagogue.

Post-secondary school, not in a track leading to an academic degree (answer 4)
People are usually admitted into a post-secondary school after completing their high school studies (vocational or academic). Upon completing a post-secondary school, graduates receive a graduation diploma, such as a technician certificate.
A list of post-secondary schools (not in an academic track):
Technicians and practical engineers:
School for technicians and practical engineers: any technical vocational school where people study after high school, 13th and 14th grades in a technicians and practical engineers track, studies in the Open University toward a practical engineer certificate (does not include preparatory programs for schools for technicians and practical engineers (see other school);
Teachers and kindergarten teachers:
A post-secondary school for training teachers and kindergarten teachers, not in a track leading to an academic degree, including teachers' seminars, craft teachers' college, nutrition teachers' college, post-secondary school for physical education, agricultural college for agriculture teachers or instructors (does not include: Academic tracks in teachers' seminars);
Medical professions:
Post-secondary school for registered nurses (not in a track leading to an academic degree), school for paramedical professions (such as laboratory workers), school for medical technology, school for medical secretaries;
Also includes:
School for senior secretaries, post-secondary school for clerks, management school, banking school, non-academic school for business management, non-academic school for bookkeeping;
Music academy, post-secondary school for plastic art, such as: drawing, sculpting, design and graphics, post-secondary school for fashion, Bezalel academy (non-academic track), school for cinema and acting;
Non-academic school for training social workers;
School for tour guides and travel agents;
School for librarians;
Course lasting at least one school year, at the IDF Command and Staff College.
Please note:
Post-secondary schools abroad: college, academy (not in a track leading to an academic degree), 'Technickum', 'Uchilishcha' - post-secondary schools in the former Soviet Union

Academic institution, toward an academic degree (including an academic certificate) (answer 5)
Any university and college which award academic degrees, such as: B.A. B.Sc., M.A., M.Sc., PhD
For example: the Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, Haifa University, the Negev University, Beer Sheva University, Bar-Ilan University, the Technion, Weitzman Institute of Science, the Open University (studies toward a bachelor's or master's degree); private or public college (studies toward a bachelor's or master's degree);
Also includes schools within universities, such as:
school of engineering, school of medicine, school of physiotherapy, school of occupational therapy (which awards an academic degree), school of social work, school of technology, Bezalel - Academy of Arts and Design Jerusalem, academic school of management, the Rubin Academy for Music, Shenkar College of Engineering and Fashion, the Jerusalem College for Women, David Yellin college of Education, Beit Berl.

Other educational institution (answer 6)
Refers to any other school that does not fall under the above types.
Also includes vocational courses that lasted at least one school year. Pre-academic preparatory program, preparatory program for practical engineering programs, school for studying Islam with no academic track, 'Tehila' (Hebrew studies and basic education for women), school in Israel or abroad that does not fall under the above types.

a1. Religious education institutions

Elementary school or junior high school (answer 1)
Cheder, Talmud Torah school -
Religious studies for students in elementary school age.
Metivta junior high school-
Religious studies institution (ultra-orthodox). Students' age matches that of students in the upper class and in junior high schools in Israel's state-religious school system (ages 12-14).
yeshiva track (Nativ yeshivati), academic/technological-
Special study track, for boys in junior high and post-primary ages only (7th-9th grades)

High school (answer 2)
Junior yeshiva
a. Religious studies institution. Students' age matches that of students in post-primary schools in Israel's state-religious school system.
b. Boarding school where religious studies begin in the morning and end at the evening.
High school yeshiva (academic or vocational)
a. Education institutions for grades 7-12, and in the case of technological education, also: 13th and 14th grades at the same institution.
b. Boarding schools which combine religious studies in their curriculum (at least half of the class hours are devoted to religious studies), and award their graduates a matriculation certificate or graduation diploma in academic/technological subjects.
Ulpana for girls
Religious studies institution for girls. Students' age matches that of students in junior high and post-primary schools (grades 7-12) in Israel's state-religious school system.

Higher education yeshiva (answer 3)
Higher education yeshiva
a. Institution which operates a full religious studies schedule during all hours of the day, for high school graduates and junior yeshiva graduates.
b. Boarding school where religious studies begin in the morning and end in the evening.
Hesder yeshiva
Higher education yeshiva which operates a full yeshiva program and combines in it regular army service, according to a program recognized by the Ministry of Defense.
Kollel
a. College for yeshiva students- religious studies institution for married graduates of higher education yeshiva.
b. Kollel for training rabbis or religious judges - these institutions prepare students for the exams toward receiving a rabbi certificate or a religious judge certificate or a teacher's certificate for teaching Judaism; or train them to provide spiritual leadership to immigrants or Jewish communities in Israel or abroad.
Yeshiva for Baalei Teshuva (non-orthodox Jews who become orthodox)-
Yeshiva institution which provides religious studies for non-orthodox Jews who have chosen to become orthodox (single and married).

b. Certificate and diploma types
Certificate/ diploma type

Elementary school or junior high school graduation diploma (answer 1)
Studied in high school but did not complete their studies there.
Completed elementary school or junior high school and did not study in a high school at all.
Studied 5 years or more in an elementary school.
Matriculation certificate (answer 3)
External matriculation certificate.
Certificate from abroad, parallel to a matriculation certificate - allows students to be admitted to academic degree studies.
Non-academic post-secondary school diploma (answer 4)
Teacher's certificate, kindergarten teacher's certificate, graduation diploma from teachers' or kindergarten teachers' seminar, registered nurse certificate, practical engineer certificate, diploma from a Hesder yeshiva, rabbi certificate.
Pay attention,
In the former Soviet Union: graduation diploma from a 'Technikum' - Diplom Ob Okonchanii Technikuma or graduation diploma from an Uchilishcha - Diplom Ob Okonchanii Uchilishcha.
Bachelor's degree (answer 5)
Bachelor's degree - B.A., L.Lb, B.Ed., B.Sc.T.E., B.Sc., B.Ed. Tech.
Master's degree (answer 6)
M.A., L.L.M., M.Sc., M.B.A., M.S.W., M.D., D.D.S., D.M.D.
Pay attention,
In the former Soviet Union: Diplom ob Okonchanii VUZA
Medical doctors are considered to have a degree equivalent to a master's degree, unless they have a Ph.D. (or equivalent degree) in another field.
Ph.D. (answer 7)
Ph.D., or equivalent degrees: Dr.Sc, L.L.D., or Professor
Pay attention,
In the former Soviet Union: Candidat Nauk, Doctor Nauk

Part H: Work

Introduction
In this part of the questionnaire we present a series of questions concerning work. The goal of the questions in this chapter is to divide the working-age population into people who worked and people who did not work in 2008, and receive information about them based on their place of residence, age, education, marital status, etc.
The questions provide important information about the scope of employment, type of work, the different workplaces (in industry, agriculture and services) and means of transportation to work. Based on this information we can plan and develop employment sources, transportation networks, vocational training programs, etc, according to the needs of the area and the locality.
All questions in this part are only addressed at persons aged 15, or over.

1. The question list

Questions for examining work in 2008:
1. Did you work at least one hour during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?
2. Do you have a job or business from which you were absent for the entire week that ended on 12/27/2008, due to illness, vacation or reserve duty?
3. Did you actively seek work in December?
4. If you had been offered an appropriate job, would you have been able to start working during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?
5. Did you work in Israel in 2008?

Questions for examining the scope of employment:
6. In 2008, how many months did you work in Israel?
7. Did you work during December 2008?
8. Did you work for the entire month, in December 2008?
9. How many days did you work this month? (Did you work more than 15 days in December 2008?)
10. How many hours do you usually work during a week, in all workplaces? (Do you usually work 35 hours or more in a week?)

Questions on the workplace:
11. Your workplace address (locality, street, neighborhood, house number).
12. What is close to your workplace?
13. What is the name of the workplace?
14. What is the main activity of the workplace?
15. What is the name of the division or department where you work?
16. What is the main activity of the division or department where you work?

Questions on the type of work a person does:
17. What is the main job you perform at this workplace?
18. List the main activities you do at this workplace.
19. What is your status at this workplace?
20. Do you receive your salary from a manpower agency?

Questions on means of transportation to work:
21. How did you get to work on most days, during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?
22. At what time did you leave your home for your workplace on most days, during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?

2. Key terms:
Work - Any full-time or part-time work in exchange for pay, profit or other compensation, as well as unpaid work of a family member in a family-owned business or farm. Only persons working as civilians (not soldiers) in the civilian or military sectors are asked to provide details on their work.
A list of the activities that are considered as work and the activities that should not be included in this definition can be found further on in this chapter, in paragraph 4.a.

3. Instructions for answering questions :
Questions for examining work in 2008:
The first group of questions about 'work' helps determine whether a person worked in 2008 and allows us to estimate the amount of labor force at the household's disposal.

a. Work during the week that ended on the determining date
The goal of this question is to sort people into three groups: those who worked during the week that ended on 12/27/2008, those who did not work that week, and those who were in (mandatory or career) military service in the IDF.
Question 7.10 Did you work at least one hour during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?
Enumerator, please note: do not include a housewife's work at her house and volunteer work.

[] 1 Worked
[] 2 Was in mandatory military service in the IDF (not including reserve duty)
[] 3 Was in career military service in the IDF
[] 4 Did not work

- It is enough for a person to have worked one hour during the week that ended on 12/27/2008, in order to be considered as if he had worked.
- The term 'week that ended on 12/27/2008' refers to a whole week, i.e. from Sunday to the end of Saturday 12/27/2008.
- Do not include a housewife's work in her home and volunteer work.

b. Absent from workplace
Absent from workplace are persons who had a workplace in the week that ended on 12/27/2008, but for various reasons did not work that week.
The information from this question is meant to distinguish between people who did not work during the week that ended in 12/27/2008 because they were temporarily away from their workplace for various reasons, e.g. illness, vacation, reserve duty (and are considered 'absent'), and people who did not work during the week that ended on 12/27/2008 because they don't have a workplace and do not work at all.
Question 7.20 - Do you have a job or business from which you were absent for the entire week that ended on 12/27/2008 due to illness, vacation, reserve duty?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

-Examples of people who are considered as 'absent from workplace' can be found further on in this chapter, in paragraph 4.b.

c. Job seeking
A 'job seeker' is a person who did not work during the week that ended on 12/27/2008, and was actively seeking work during December.
The information received from this question can be used, among other things, to plan employment services in areas where the job seekers' population is large.
Question 7.30 - Did you actively seek work in December?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

- Examples for actively searching for work: registering in the employment bureau (even if the person only visited there once during December), sending resumes in response to ads in newspapers, contacting a recruitment agency, asking friends, attempting to establish a private business, etc.
- Examples of 'job seeking' can be found further on in this chapter, in paragraph 4.c.

d. Availability for work
This question clarifies whether a person (who did not work and who sought work) would have been available to start working during the week that ended on 12/27/2008, if work had been offered to him, or was he occupied in a way that would have prevented him from beginning to work.
Question 7.40 - If you had been offered an appropriate job, would you have been able to start working during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

e. Work in 2008
The goal of this question is to examine whether people who did not work in the week that ended on 12/27/2008, and were not absent from their workplace, were working in Israel in 2008. The questions asked so far referred to one week and working/not working in a certain week can be affected by many temporary factors. In order to receive a broader picture of the labor force, we ask about work over a longer period.
Question 7.50 - Did you work in Israel in 2008? (Excluding mandatory and career military service)
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

Questions for examining the scope of employment
This group of questions allows us to estimate the scope of de facto work performed by those who did work in 2008. The information is received from the questions: number of work months in 2008, work in December and number of weekly work hours.

f. Number of work months in 2008
This question examines how many months a person worked in all workplaces.
Question 7.60 - In 2008, how many months did you work in Israel?
- In the work months total, also include months in which a person was absent from work due to vacation, maternity leave, reserve duty, illness, or any other reason.
- It is enough for a person to have worked one day to be considered as if he had worked one month.

g. Work in December
This question examines whether a person worked in December 2008. A person who did work shall be asked about the number of days he worked.
Question 7.60.1 - Did you work during December 2008?
- Paid absence from work due to vacation, maternity leave or reserve duty shall be considered as work.

h. Weekly work hours
This question provides information on the number of hours a person works during a week, in all workplaces. If a person cannot estimate how many hours he usually works, ask him if he works more or less than 35 hours a week.
Question 7.70 - How many hours do you usually work during a week, in all workplaces?
- Type the number of weekly hours a person usually works, and not necessarily the number of hours he worked during the week that ended on 12/27/2008.
- If a person regularly worked in several workplaces, type the total number of weekly hours the person worked in all workplaces.
- Work hours of teachers and artists also include preparation hours.
- If the person worked an irregular number of weekly hours, type '99'.
- If a person did not work in the week that ended on 12/27/2008, refer to the last main workplace in Israel where he worked in 2008.
- A list of the hours that are included and the hours that are not included under 'work hours' can be found further on in this chapter, in paragraph 4.d.

Questions on workplace
The goal of the questions about the workplace is to fully and precisely classify a person's workplace. Therefore, it is extremely important that the answer is as detailed and accurate as possible.
The information is received from the questions on: workplace address, workplace name, main activity of the workplace, name of division and main activity of division. The answers to these questions (except for the question on the address of the workplace) and the questions on type of work (detailed later on) are in the respondent's own words and require him to describe in great detail the workplace's activities and his activities in the workplace. The questions may seem as repeating themselves to some people, but it is important to understand that a great degree of detail is required in order to accurately discern between different workplaces and different types of work.
The questions on workplace description and the person's job description (detailed later on) refer to one workplace:

- Anyone who worked during the week that ended on 12/27/2008 - shall provide answers concerning his main workplace during that week. A main workplace is the place where a person is employed most of his weekly work hours.
- Anyone who was absent from work on the week that ended on 12/27/2008 - shall provide answers concerning the job from which he was absent.
- Anyone who did not work during the week that ended on 12/27/2008, but worked in Israel in 2008 - shall provide answers concerning his last job.
- Anyone who was in mandatory or career military service on the week that ended on 12/27/2008, but worked in Israel in 2008 - shall provide answers concerning his last job as a civilian.

i. Workplace address
The information on the workplace's address teaches us about the mobility of the labor force and about the distance between the place of residence and the workplace. The questions provide very important information on the geographic dispersion of workplaces and allow us to make the connection between workplaces and places of residence. The data allows us to compare the sizes of the 'day population' (the number of people who work in the area) and the 'night population' (the number of people who live in the area), in every place in Israel. This data is of great importance for physical planning in many areas, such as: transportation, housing, development of services for residents, etc.
The questions on the workplace address include: locality name, street name, house number. In cases where there is no full information on the address, a person is asked close to what his workplace is located (for example: HMO clinic, shopping mall, hospital). Additional details on workplace address can be found in part B, paragraph 2.e.
Question 7.80 - In what locality is your workplace located?
Enumerator, please note: If the person worked abroad, type - abroad.
If worked from home, type - home.
If there is no permanent address, type - no permanent address.

Question 7.84.1 - What is close to your workplace?
- Most people work in a workplace which has a permanent address. This address can be an office building, a factory or a home address. It can be in Israel or abroad, inside a locality or outside a locality, in an urban industrial zone or an industrial zone outside the city.
- There are workplaces where the person arrives at the main workplace and from there he leaves for different places. In these cases, the workplace address is the main workplace's address. For example: The workplace address of a bread delivery man who arrives every day at the bakery and from there goes out to deliver bread to stores, is the bakery's address. The workplace address of an Egged bus driver who arrives every day at a bus parking lot and from there goes out on his bus route, is the parking lot's address.
- If a person's workplace does not have a permanent address, and he works in a different place every day, his workplace address is the locality where he worked most days last week. If he worked in different localities and there is no majority, choose 'no permanent address'.
- In cases where the person does not know the full address of the workplace, ask him 'What is close to your workplace?' In this question, choose from a list the name of a familiar place which is located close to the workplace. For example: the name of shopping mall, the municipality building in the locality, the name of a public park in the locality, an HMO clinic. In this question, you can choose the name of the building where a person works or a place located near it.

j. Workplace name
Question 7.90 - What is the name of the workplace (factory, business, institution or employer)?
- Write the full and detailed name of the workplace where a person works. Examples: 'Beilinson' Hospital, 'Elit' factory, the Ministry of Finance.
- If a person is employed through a manpower agency, write the workplace where he actually worked on the agency's behalf. A manpower agency is a company that provides temporary workers to various employers for a limited time (that can sometimes last several years), and receives pay for their work (such as: Manpower, Tigbur).
- If the respondent is employed by a company that provides security and cleaning services, and is sent by it to various places, type the name of the security or cleaning company and not the name of the workplace where he actually worked (unlike the guideline for manpower agencies).
- A person who works as a sales agent for a company that stations sales agents in different places for sales promotion (such as: a cosmetics company with stations in shopping malls) - the name of his workplace is the cosmetics company and not the place where he was stationed.
- If the factory or business does not have a name, describe it briefly and type the name of the employer. Examples: Yitzhaki law firm, Aloni building subcontractor, falafel stand.
- A citizen working for the IDF or the Ministry of Defense - type IDF or 'Ministry of Defense' with no additional details. If a person works in the Military Industries, Rafael Advanced Defense Systems, or any other factory belonging to the Israeli Security Forces, type the full name of the factory.
- If a person works on a Kibbutz or Moshav, type the name of the Kibbutz or the name of the Moshav, and the branch or factory where he works. For example: Kibbutz Nofim, kindergarten.

k. Main activity of the workplace
The description of the main activity of the workplace is an important variable for correctly classifying the workplace. There are many cases in which the 'workplace name' does not provide us any information on the activity performed at the workplace, and therefore the person is asked to describe the main activity performed there. For example, 'A.A. Moshe and sons' - we cannot conclude what this company does just from its name: industry, agriculture, etc. Therefore, the person is asked to accurately describe the activity performed at the workplace.
Question 7.100 - What is the main activity of the workplace?
- Write the activities of the workplace, not the activities of the person at the workplace.
- Write an accurate and detailed description of the activities, the products or services produced or provided by the factory, business, company or employer mentioned in the previous question. It is not enough to provide a general description such as: 'factory' or 'contractor'. It is important to verify what the activity is - production, services, fixing, wholesale or retail, growing plants or raising animals, etc.
- In cases of people who work in a factory which produces various types of products, or works in different areas - type the main activity of the factory, institution or farm. If it is impossible to determine what the main activity of the workplace is - write all of them.
- If a person works in a subsidiary company which focuses on a different activity than that of the parent company (the main company) - write the activity of the subsidiary company.
[Text omitted, examples of correct and incorrect descriptions]

l. Division name
The information on the division's name, and on the main activity performed in it, is extremely important in workplaces where each division performs a different activity (such as: municipalities, large corporations).
Question 7.110 - What is the name of the division or department where you work?
- If the person works at several divisions or departments, type the division where he worked most of the time last week.
- There are workplaces where there is no division into divisions or departments. In these cases, you can leave this question unanswered. Pressing the Enter button will pass you to the next question.

m. Main activity of the division
The main activity of the division is sometimes different from the main activity of the workplace and therefore a person is required to describe it as well.
Question 7.120 - What is the main activity of the division or department where you work?
The method of answering this question is similar to that of answering question 7.100 (main activity of workplace).

Questions on the type of work the person does
The goal of the questions on the type of work is to fully and accurately classify the type of work a person actively does. Therefore, answering as accurately and in as much detail as possible is extremely important.
The information is received from two questions: description of the person's main job and description of the main activities the person performs at his job. The information from these questions focuses the data on the work the person himself does at the workplace, unlike the previous questions where the information received refers to the workplace where the person works. The answers to these questions are in the respondent's own words. Additional information on work is received from the questions: status at work and source of salary.

n. A person's main job
This question refers to the work a person actively does in his workplace.
Question 7.130 - What is the main job you perform at this workplace?
- The description you write should be as accurate as possible.
- Write a detailed description and not a general definition.
- If a person performs different jobs at the same workplace - refer to the job he dedicates most of his time to.
- Do not write an occupation the person studied but does not work at. For example: a person studied electrical engineering and works as an electrical appliances sales manager - write: 'Electrical appliances sales manager'.

[Text omitted, examples of correct and incorrect descriptions]

o. List of activities at work
The list of activities a person does as part of his job allows us to obtain accurate information on his job. The job description (obtained in the previous question) is not sufficient since people may be working in jobs which are defined in a similar way even though their activities are different.
Question 7.140 - List the main activities you do in this workplace.
- Ask for the main activities the person performs.
Examples of the required list of activities:

- Museum manager - conduct management meetings, responsible for balancing the budget, in touch with museum's executive committee.
- Museum manager -guides visiting groups, tries to market the museum to the workers' committee, responsible for the regular maintenance of the museum.
- Construction worker - installs drywalls.
- Construction worker - plasterer.
- Teacher - high school teacher
- Teacher - special education teacher.
- Caretaker - geriatric care of elders.

p. Status at workplace
The goal of the question is to receive information on the employment status of the people who worked in 2008. For example: the number of salaried employees and self-employed, number of Kibbutz members.
Question 7.150 - What is your status at this workplace?
[] 1 Salaried employee
[] 2 Self-employed, does not employ workers
[] 3 Self-employed, employs 1-2 workers
[] 4 Self-employed, employs 3-9 workers
[] 5 Self-employed, employs 10+ workers
[] 6 Member of a cooperative
[] 7 Kibbutz member (who is not a salaried employee)
[] 8 Unpaid family member who works in a family business or farm

Definitions of types of status at work:
Salaried employee: a person who works for someone else in return for a daily, monthly or contract salary, or in return for some other compensation.
Self-employed, does not employ workers: a person who owns a business, which is not a limited (Ltd) company, or a farm, and works in it, but does not employ others for pay or in exchange for any other compensation.
Self-employed, employs workers: a person who owns or partly owns a business, which is not a limited (Ltd) company, or a farm, works in it, and employs other workers for pay or in exchange for some other compensation (excluding unpaid family members).
Member of a cooperative: a person who is a member of a cooperative, who in addition to his salary also has a share in the cooperative's profits.
Kibbutz member: Any person who lives on a Kibbutz and works on it without receiving pay. A personal budget is not considered as pay.

Kibbutz members who work outside the Kibbutz shall be considered as salaried workers, even if their pay is transferred to the Kibbutz .
Unpaid family member: A family member or relative who works in the family's business or farm without pay, as long as this is not a limited (Ltd) company. If the compensation is not in a salary form - this person will be considered as an 'unpaid family member'.
In cases where workers' status (employee or self-employed) is not clear, such as: a seamstress who does sewing jobs at her home for a certain factory, a translator who works for a certain publisher and his pay is per book, etc. - find out whether the workplace pays his social security dues:

If they pay his social security - he is a salaried employee.
If he pays social security himself - he is self-employed.

A list of cases that fall under the different categories of status at work can be found in paragraph 4.e.

q. Source of income
The question allows us to distinguish between people who receive their salary directly from their workplace and people who received it from a manpower agency. This information helps in classifying a person's workplace.
Question 7.151 - Do you receive your salary from a manpower agency?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

- This refers to workers who are employed in different places but receive their salary from a manpower agency.
- Do not include here workers who work for subcontractors. Their workplace is the subcontractor.

Questions on means of transportation to work and hour of leaving house
The information on means of transportation to work and hour of leaving for workplace teaches us about the traffic created in the transportation routes during rush hour, and allows us to plan public transportation and roads in the appropriate times and places.
In most cases the questions refer to 'most days during the week that ended on 12/27/2008'. In the few cases where people were absent from work last week, the questions will refer to 'most days on the last week you worked'.

r. Means of transportation to work
Question 7.160 - How did you get to work on most days during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?
You may choose more than one answers
Enumerator, please note: only choose the answer 'By foot' in addition to another answer if the walk lasts longer than 15 minutes

[] 1 Private or commercial vehicle - as driver
[] 2 Private or commercial vehicle - as passenger
[] 3 Public bus
[] 4 Organized transportation provided by workplace
[] 5 Train
[] 6 Share cub
[] 7 Taxi cab
[] 8 Motorized two-wheel vehicle (such as: motorcycle)
[] 9 Bicycle
[] 10 By foot
[] 11 Other vehicle

- You may choose more than one answer.
- You must list all of the means of transportation used by the person to get to his workplace.
- If the person arrives at the main workplace and from there continues to different places, list the means of transportation he uses to get to the main workplace.
- If the person has a carpool arrangement with a group of people for getting to work and each day they ride in a different person's car, mark 'Private or commercial vehicle - as passenger' (answer 3).
- 'By foot' (answer 10) -only choose this answer in addition to another answer if the walk lasts more than 15 minutes.
- If a person rode in a truck weighing over 3.5 tons, mark 'Other vehicle' (answer 11) and when asked to elaborate, write 'Truck, over 3.5 tons'. A truck weighing less than 3.5 tons is classified as a commercial vehicle.
- If a person rode a public bus (answer 4), he will be asked to elaborate whether he rode one bus line or more than one bus lines.

s. Hour of leaving house
Question 7.170 - At what time did you leave your home for your workplace on most days, during the week that ended on 12/27/2008?

Enumerator, please note: use four digits to indicate the time of leaving. For example, 16:30, 07:15, 00:20.
If the time of leaving is irregular, press CTRL+K
- The time of leaving for work is the time the person leaves his house, even if he does not go directly to work or if he is delayed on the way. For example, a person who takes his children to school and then goes to work.
- If a person works a split day, i.e. works in the morning, returns home, and then leaves for the same workplace again, write the initial time of leaving for work.
- If a person works different shifts during the week, write the time of leaving for the shift the person worked most days of the week. If there is no majority of days, write the time of leaving for the earliest shift the person worked.
- Use four digits and a 24-hour clock to indicate the time of leaving. If a person left for work at 7am, write 07:00. If he left at 7pm, write 19:00.
- If the time of leaving is irregular, press CTRL+K.

4. Detailed definitions

a. List of activities which are considered as work and activities which are not considered as work:
Activities considered as work:

Students, apprentices:
Apprentice or intern work, even if unpaid (for example: an apprentice in an auto repair shop, an intern, etc.)
Practical work of students in agricultural or nursing schools, within the framework of their studies.
Paid work of students in a vocational course.
Work of high school students from cities in a work camp on a Kibbutz , outside the framework of their studies.
Work of a yeshiva student, aged 18 or over, who teaches in the yeshiva.
Work of students who serve as tutors.
Military, air a naval crews:
Work of religious girls performing 'national service', in lieu of military service.
Career army service in the Border Police, or work as a policeman in the police.
Paid work of civilians employed by the army (IDF civilian employees).
Work of aircrews on civilian planes and of naval crews on civilian ships.
Civilian work of a soldier in mandatory military service, who works in a civilian job, in addition to his military service.
Private lessons, babysitting, foster care:
Providing private lessons in exchange for pay.
Babysitting in exchange for pay.
Caretakers or domestic workers who work in exchange for room, board and allowance.
Childcare within the framework of a foster family. If both spouses care for the children within this framework, and do not have any other job -treat only one of them as working. His spouse shall be registered as 'Not working'.
Continuing education programs:
Persons who were sent by their workplace (salaried employees or self-employed) to a continuing education program for a week, or less.
Persons who were sent by their workplace (salaried employees or self-employed) to a continuing education program, for a period longer than a week, and the program took place during work and not at a school.
Work abroad or work in Israel for a foreign body:
Work of a person who has been abroad for less than a year, and works there as a salaried employee of an institution, factory or company which operates in Israel. For example: work in the embassy, employee of the Jewish National Fund, employee of a construction company who was sent abroad to execute a construction project abroad.
Work of a self-employed business owner who has been abroad for less than a year, for the purpose of his operations in Israel. For example: boutique owner who went abroad to bring merchandise.
Work of a person who works in Israel, but his employer is a foreign body (for example: foreign reporter, worker in embassy of a foreign country).
Other types of work:
Civilian work of a soldier in mandatory military service, who works in a civilian job, in addition to his military service.
Work of a self-employed professional, who does not have regular work hours, such as a cab driver who waits for passengers.
Work of 'volunteers' from abroad, who are staying in Israel and work 15+ hours a week.

Activities which are not considered as work:

Work of a homemaker in his or her household.
Volunteer work, without pay or other compensation. For example: women who volunteer in hospitals with Yael organization, women who volunteer to work in military bases, unpaid volunteer on Kibbutz .
Work of a vocational school student within the framework of his studies (excluding agricultural school).
Work of an Israeli abroad, who works there as a salaried employee of an institution, factory or company which are not Israeli.
Inactive partnership in business.
Regular army service (mandatory or career) or reserve duty, including work of soldiers who are sent to civilian workplaces (such as: a soldier teacher).
Work within the framework of the Nahal (Fighting Pioneer Youth) or Shalat (Unpaid Military Service) programs.
People who were sent by their workplace to continuing education programs, but the frameworks of the programs are external.
Students in vocational courses and career change courses who study all day (even if they get paid by their workplace).

b. Examples of absence from work
Considered as absent:

Woman on a maternity leave of up to 14 weeks (which is the period for which the Social Security pays maternity allowance), as well as a woman who following her maternity leave takes advantage of the annual vacation days she is entitled to.
A woman on unpaid leave following her maternity leave, up to 30 days since the beginning of the unpaid leave.
A person who has a job, business or farm, but was absent from it during the week that ended on 12/27/2008 because of a paid vacation, illness, reserve duty, etc.
Person on unpaid leave of up to 30 days.
A person who has been in a continuing education program, on behalf of his workplace, for less than a year (this refers to cases where the program is outside the framework of the job).
A person who has been absent from work, without receiving pay, for a period of no longer than 30 days, due to a strike at the workplace, or a temporary halt of work in a certain agricultural branch.
A person who has been on a paid sabbatical from a certain institution, for a period of a year or less. For example: university, school.

Not considered as absent:

A person who has been absent for more than 12 months.
A woman who is on an unpaid leave following a maternity leave, if more than 30 days have passes since the beginning of the unpaid leave.
A person who works in a seasonal job (lifeguard, picker, etc.), if the season he worked during has ended.
A person who has been on a sabbatical from work, or in a continuing education program on behalf of his workplace, for a period longer than 12 months.
A person who does not work regularly, but is occasionally invited to perform a job, and on the week that ended on 12/27/2008, did not work all week.
A person who was promised work.
A person who has been absent from work, without being paid, for a period longer than 30 days, due to a strike at the workplace, or a temporary halt of work in a certain agricultural branch.

c. Examples of job seeking
Considered as seeking work:

A person who was promised a job within four weeks.
A person waiting for an answer from a certain workplace shall be considered as searching for a job for four weeks from the time he applied.

Not considered as seeking work:

A person who did not actively seek work.
A person who searched for volunteer work, unpaid and not in exchange for any other compensation.
A self-employed professional (whitewasher, seamstress) who does not have regular work hours or work days.
A person who is occasionally approached by an employer to perform a certain job, such as: a nurse who does not work regularly but is willing to do 'private guard duty' when needed, substitute teachers.

d. Examples of work hours that should be included in the question 'How many hours do you work in a week'
Include in work hours:

All work hours in all workplaces.
Overtime hours which a person usually worked.
Waiting hours of a doctor, driver, porter, etc. for their clients. Include all waiting hours in workplace, but not standby hours.
Preparation hours related to work, even if not done at the workplace. For example: teachers checking homework and preparing classes, actor rehearsing and trainings.
Work hours of a person who worked without pay in a family business or farm.
A person who is in fact working all day, such as: a woman who cares for children as a 'foster parent' or a live-in domestic worker. Do not write more than 8 work hours a day for these people, even if they say they work more than that.

Do not include in work hours:

Standby hours outside the workplace. For example: the hours a doctor is outside the hospital but is available for work.
Commuting hours, if the commute itself is not part of the job, even if the worker gets paid for these hours (for example, a worker who drives from his home to the office and back).

e. Status at work - cases included under the different status types
Type of status

Salaried employee (answer 1)
A person who works for someone else in exchange for a daily, monthly or contract salary, or some kind of other compensation.
A manager of a limited (Ltd) company who receives a salary from the company, even if he is a shareholder.
A person who works in a cooperative but is not a member of the cooperative, and only receives a salary.
Work of a salaried employee on a Kibbutz (including students from city schools and 'volunteers').
An agent who receives a salary in addition to his commission (For example: lottery agents).
Housekeeper - whether she works in one place or several places.
Babysitter - whether she works in one place or several places.
Seamstress, hairdresser, etc. who works at other people's houses.
Kibbutz members who work outside Kibbutz for pay (even if their salary is transferred to the Kibbutz ).
Self-employed, does not employ workers (answer 2)
Partner in a business that does not employ other workers.
A person who employs workers without pay or other compensation, such as: a person who employs family members in a family business or farm without pay.
A man or woman who cares for children within the framework of a foster family.
A woman who takes care of a child at her home.
Tutor, whether he works at his home or at the student's home.
An agent who does not receive a salary, only commission.
Seamstress, hairdresser, etc. who works at her home.
If a couple has a joint business (and they do not employ others) - if they are not defined as salaried workers, one of them shall be registered as self-employed and the other as an unpaid family member.
Self-employed, employs workers (answers 3-5)
Partner in a business that employs salaried workers.
Artisan who employs an apprentice.
Member of a cooperative (answer 6)
Includes:
'Egged' and 'Dan' bus drivers, who are members of these bus cooperatives.
Member of a collective Moshav (Mosahv Shitufi).
Does not include:
Salaried drivers of 'Egged' and 'Dan' who are not members of the bus cooperative, and do not have a share in the cooperative's profits.
Kibbutz member (answer 7)
Includes:
Kibbutz members and their children.
Candidate for Kibbutz membership.
Member of a Hakhshara (agricultural training program), member of a Gar'in (a group training for establishing a new settlement), youth living and working on the Kibbutz .
Kibbutz members who do public work outside the Kibbutz (for example: a person who works at the United Kibbutz Movement's offices in the city).
Does not include
Kibbutz members who work outside the Kibbutz for a salary.
Volunteers.
Unpaid family member (answer 8)
A woman who works with her sister at the grocery store, without pay.
A son who helps his father at his workshop or farm, without pay.
A couple who have a joint business - if they are not defined as salaried workers, one of them shall be registered as self-employed, and the other as an unpaid family member.

Part I: Incomes

Introduction
The questions in this part refer to incomes from sources other than work. The data collected is on incomes from pensions or provident funds from workplaces in Israel, incomes from pensions from abroad, and other regular incomes from sources other than work.
The questions on incomes are asked once per household.

1. The question list
1. Did you have any income from pensions or provident funds from a workplace in Israel, in the month of December?
2. How high was the income from the pension or provident fund?
3. Did you have any income from pensions or benefits from abroad, in the month of December?
4. How high was the income from the pension or benefit from abroad?
5. The currency in which the pension or benefit was received.
6. Did you have any other regular incomes from sources other than work, in the month of December?
7. How high was the income?
8. The currency in which the income was received.

2. Key terms

a. A pension - is an income a person receives upon reaching the age of retirement. A pension can be received from a workplace, or from a certain provident fund which was opened through the workplace, such as Mivtachim or Makefet provident funds. Also include a pension received by a widow from his or her deceased spouse's workplace.
b. Provident fund - a private insurance fund from which a person receives a pension after retiring from work, or an income in case of loss of ability to work. For example: Otzma, Gadish, Tamar, Sion, etc.
c. Monthly benefits from Germany - are received every month from the German government. They are given to people who came from Germany and Austria, who owned property or worked in the public sector prior to the war, and whose property was stolen from them, and jobs were terminated, when the Nazis came to power.

3. Instructions for answering questions

a. Income from pensions or provident funds from a workplace in Israel
The question examines whether the household had any income from a pension or a provident fund from a workplace in Israel. If so, ask which household member received the pension and what the sum of the pension was. If the respondent does not know which household member received the pension, ask for the sum of the total amount of pensions received by the household.
Question 9.90 - Did you have any income from pensions or provident funds from a workplace in Israel, in the month of December?
Question 9.100 - Which of you received the pension or the provident fund money?
Question 9.110 - How high was the income from the pension or provident fund?
Question 9.110.1 - What was the total sum of your income from pensions or provident funds?
- In this question, only refer to pensions received from a workplace in Israel.
- Write the sum received in December 2008. If there usually is a pension, but for various reasons, this month only, it was not received, write the sum received in the previous month.
- Also include pension-track executives' insurance.
In all questions concerning the sum of the income in this part (pension from Israel, pension from abroad and other incomes), refer to the gross income.

b. Income from pensions or benefits from abroad
The series of question on this topic is similar to the questions in paragraph a, but refers to incomes from pensions or benefits from abroad.
Question 9.120 - Did you have any income from pensions or benefits from abroad, in the month of December?
Question 9.140.1 - Enumerator, please note: indicate the currency in which the pension or benefit was received.
- A pension from abroad is paid to people who worked abroad, but currently live in Israel and receive a pension from their workplace abroad.
- A person who received a pension outside Israel shall be asked what currency he received his pension in.

c. Other regular incomes from sources other than work
- Other regular incomes - regular incomes from sources other than work, which are not from Social Security and were not included in the other questions (incomes from pensions, provident funds and German benefits).
- There may be cases where a person says that the additional income which is not from work is a joint income. In this case, write it under one person only. For example: income from rent which is received as a joint income of the couple - only write it under one person.
- The series of questions on this topic is similar to the questions in paragraph b.
Question 9.160 - Did you have any other regular incomes from sources other than work, in the month of December? (Excluding Social Security benefits)
- Examples of regular incomes from sources other than work: income from renting out an apartment, benefit from the Ministry of Defense, financial assistance to new immigrants, scholarships, income of a soldier in mandatory service, payments from an education fund for sabbaticals of teachers, professors and researchers, dividends of shareholders in a public company (paid once a year).
- 'Regular incomes' do not include one-time incomes such as: compensations, inheritance, lottery win, a savings account or fund that was redeemed (such as an education fund which is redeemed every six years), any other sum which is received on a one-time basis.

Part J: Housing Conditions

Introduction
This part includes questions about the apartment, the appliances at the household's disposal, and the vehicles used by the household.
From the questions on housing we can learn about the population's standard of living, as well as the connection between housing conditions and other characteristics of people, such as: education, income, seniority in Israel.
Up-to-date data on housing conditions can assist in identifying areas which require aid, such as: areas with high population density and areas where the apartments were built many years ago.
The information received from the questions about the vehicles at the disposal of the household also serve organizations in the field of transportation who examine, for example, the rate of vehicle ownership, and the number of vehicles per household.
The questions on housing conditions are asked once per household.

1. The question list
1. In how many rooms (including half rooms) do you live?
2. What is the number of toilet rooms at your disposal?
3. In what year did the construction of this apartment conclude?
4. Is this apartment owned by you, or rented by you?
5. Who did you rent the apartment from?
6. Do you own an apartment?
7. Do you have at your disposal the following items: television, VCR/DVD, clothes dryer, dishwasher, microwave, air conditioner, solar water heater, personal computer or laptop, internet connection, telephone line (such as: Bezeq, Hot), cellular phone, vehicle.
8. How many phone lines do you have?
9. How many cellular phones do you have?
10. How many vehicles do you have?
11. Who owns the vehicles?
12. What type of vehicles are they?

2. Instructions for answering questions

a. Number of rooms in apartment
The ratio between the number of persons living in the apartment and the number of rooms in the apartment ('housing density') is the basic and most important measure of the housing conditions.
The data on the housing density is essential for determining the standard of living. This data can help government authorities determine regions where it is worthwhile to invest in projects such as 'Neighborhood Rehabilitation', etc.
Question 10.10 - In how many rooms do you live (including half rooms)?
Includes living room. Does not include kitchen, bathroom and a room used solely for business.

- Include in the answer all rooms and half rooms which are used for living by the household. If the family considers an entry hall or a dining area as a room or half room for living, include them in the total number of rooms.
- If the household has trouble determining what is a room and what is half a room, use the following guideline: An area of 6 or more square meters shall be considered as a room (for example, 2*3 square meters). A smaller area shall be considered as half a room.
- Include the living room in the room total.
- Do not include in the room total: kitchen, bathroom, or a room used solely for business.
- A room used for both business and living shall be considered as a room where the household lives.
- If the household lives in a housing unit with over 10 rooms, write 10.
- Later on in this chapter, in paragraph 3.a, you will find a detailed explanation of how to act if two or more households live in the apartment.

b. Number of toilet rooms in apartment
This question provides additional information on the person's standard of living.
Question 10.20 - What is the number of toilet rooms at your disposal?
- If a bathroom includes a toilet, include it as well in the total number of toilets.
- If there are over 10 toilet rooms at the household's disposal, write 10 rooms.
- Later on in this chapter, in paragraph 3.b, you will find a detailed explanation of how to act if two or more households live in the apartment.

c. Year apartment's construction was concluded
The data received from the question allows us to assess the state of the residential buildings in each place in the country, as well as issues concerning the buildings' maintenance (such as: ability to survive an earthquake). Another example of the way the information is used, together with building laws, is the ability to know how many buildings have shelters or protected spaces (Mamad) prior to the year of concluding the apartment's construction.
Question 10.30 - In what year did the construction of this apartment conclude?
[] 1 1947, or earlier
[] 2 1948-1954
[] 3 1955-1964
[] 4 1965-1974
[] 5 1975-1984
[] 6 1985-1994
[] 7 1995-1999
[] 8 2000, or later, indicate the exact year

- Refer to the year when the construction of the entire apartment came to an end. If renovations were done in the apartment on a certain year - additional rooms were built or a porch was closed, do not refer to the renovations' year as the year construction ended.
- People who do not know the year when construction ended shall be asked to estimate the apartment's age.

d. Type of ownership of apartment
The household's type of ownership of apartment is the arrangement according to which the household lives in the apartment (does it own the apartment, rent it, or lives there according to a different arrangement).
From this question we can learn what percentage of people live in an apartment they own, compared to the percentage of people who rent their apartment or live in an apartment without paying.
Question 10.40 - Is this apartment owned by you, or rented by you?

[] 1 Own it
[] 2 Key-money apartment
[] 3 Rent it (no key-money)
[] 4 Apartment owned by relatives and respondents do not pay rent for it
[] 5 Other, elaborate

- Apartment is considered as owned as soon as there is a purchase contract with a contractor, private body or any other body.
- 'Key-money apartment' (answer 2): This is a type of a rented apartment. The person living in the apartment paid a one-time deposit, 'key-money', when entering the apartment. During the lease he will pay a monthly rent, and when he leaves he will get the key-money back from the owner, or from the new tenant which will replace him in the apartment.
- 'Other' (answer 5): this is an apartment where people live without paying, and is not owned by relatives. For example: an apartment owned by the workplace, or an apartment that belongs to a religious institutions.

e. Renting body
Persons living in a rented apartment are asked about the body who rents out the apartment.
From this question we can learn what part of rented apartments belongs to private bodies, as opposed to those belonging to public bodies.
Question 10.50 - Who did you rent the apartment from?

[] 1 Private landlord (including relative)
[] 2 Public company (such as: Amidar, Prazot, Amigur, Halamish)
[] 3 Other, elaborate

f. Ownership of a different/ additional apartment
A household living in an apartment it owns is asked whether there is another apartment it owns. A household living in an apartment it does not own is asked whether it owns an apartment.
Question 10.60.1 - Do you own an additional apartment?
[] 1Yes
[] 2 No
Question 10.60.2 - Do you own an apartment?
[] 1Yes
[] 2 No

g. Appliances at the household's disposal
The importance of the data on appliances which are at the disposal of the household lies in the information obtained on the standard of living of families from different localities and different types of places. This information, together with other data, is used by the Central Bureau of Statistics to determine the standard of living grades of localities or areas in the localities. This information is an important factor in the distribution of government budgets and other budgets (such as: Mifal HaPayis - the National Lottery) to the local authorities.
Question 10.70-10.210 - Now I will ask you if you have the following items:
Television, VCR/DVD, clothes dryer, dishwasher, microwave, air conditioner, solar water heater, personal computer or laptop, internet subscription, phone line (such as: Bezeq, Hot), number of phone lines, cellular phone, number of cellular phones, vehicle, number of vehicles.

- These questions examine the existence of these items and not necessarily their ownership. In other words, an item can be considered as available for the person's use even if he does not own it. For example: a person lives in a rented apartment where there is a washing machine that belongs to the landlord, or a person who got a cellular phone from his workplace.
- Write the respondent's answer even if he says a certain item is not at his disposal and you see the item in the apartment.
- If there are two or more households in the apartment and the appliances in the apartment are used by all the people living in it - each household should state that these items are at its disposal.
- VCR/DVD - VCR does not refer to a video camera, but to a device for recording and screening video tapes.
- Personal computer or laptop - does not refer to palm computers, but to desktop computers (PC) or laptops.
- Internet connection - only refers to internet connection from the apartment (and not general use of internet. For example: a person who has internet connection at work).
- Number of phone lines - if a household has more than nine phone lines, write 9.
- Number of cellular phones - if a household has over ten phones, write 10.
- Number of vehicles - if a household has over nine vehicles, write 9.

h. Ownership of vehicles
One of the household items we ask about is vehicles. A household which has a vehicle at its disposal is asked who owns the vehicle and what type of vehicle it is. Through these answers we obtain data on the mobility level of Israel's residents in general, and in each area in particular. This data is very important for studying the standard of living of households in Israel, and allows, among other things, to examine various trends in society. For example: the percentage of people who have a company car at their disposal or the percentage of people who lease their car.
Question 10.220 - Who owns the vehicles?

[] 1 Owned by household
[] 2 Owned by relatives who do not live in the household
[] 3 Operating lease
[] 4 Owned by employer or company
[] 5 Other ownership

- 'Vehicles' only include vehicles which are allowed to travel on highways, such as: private car, commercial vehicle, off-road vehicle (4X4), motorcycle. They do not include vehicles which are not allowed to travel on highways, such as: tractors and all-terrain vehicles.
- 'Owned by household' (answer 1) - owned by one of the household's members.
- 'Operating lease' - owned by a company which provides vehicles to companies or private people. Includes car rental companies.
- 'Owned by employer or company' (answer 4) - owned by the workplace of one of the household's members.
- 'Other ownership' (answer 5) - for example, owned by a friend who is abroad.
i. Type of vehicle
Question 10.230 - What types of vehicles are they?

[] 1 Private
[] 2 Commercial (van, pickup truck - even if only used for private purposes)
[] 3Motorized two-wheeled vehicle (such as: motorcycle)
[] 4 Other, elaborate
a. Commercial vehicle - vehicle which is defined in its license as a 'composite body' and its total weight does not exceed 3.5 tons. For example: a truck weighing less than 3.5 tons.
b. For a truck weighing over 3.5 tons, choose answer 4 (other) and add in writing: 'truck weighing over 3.5 tons'.
c. Off-road vehicle is included under answer 1 - 'private'.

3. Special cases

a. Calculating the number of rooms in apartments where two or more households reside
Only count the rooms used for living by the household for which you are filling the questionnaire.
If the households living in the same apartment have a joint room - add half a room to each household. For example: Two students, each of them constitutes as a separate household, live in a two bedrooms and one living room apartment. Each student lives in her own room and the living room is used by both. For each student, write one and a half rooms (the room where she lives, and half of the joint living room).
Even if you divide a joint room between three or more people, write half a room for each of them, and not a third of a room, a quarter of a room, etc. For example: Three people, each one of them defined as a separate household, live in a four room apartment. Each one lives in his own room, but the living room is used by all three. In each one's questionnaire write ‘One and a half rooms’.
If a number of people live in a single room, and each one of them constitutes as a separate household, write one room for each one of them.

b. Calculating the number of toilet rooms in apartments where two or more households reside
Write the number of toilet rooms at the disposal of the investigated household, and not the number of toilet rooms in the entire apartment