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Instructions for the Enumerator Census of Population and Housing Israel 1983

[p. 1-3 are omitted, including Chapters 1 and 2.]

[p. 4]

Chapter Three: Whom to Fill a Questionnaire for?

When receiving the questionnaire from the family, you should check for which of the people living in the apartment, a questionnaire should be filled. This should be done before you proceed to check the answers in the questionnaire, and before you fill it yourself.

For this check you can use the instructions for the family included in the questionnaire (on the second page) and the table "for whom to fill a questionnaire" -- on the inner side of this guide's cover. In this chapter you will learn in detail, for which people a questionnaire should be filled.

1. For whom to fill a questionnaire

In the address you enumerate, a questionnaire should be filled for a person, when three conditions are met: (a) the person is included in the census population, (b) the person is to be enumerated in this address and not another, and (c) there is a household in this address. These conditions should be met in the "critical day" (see explanation later in the chapter).

Meaning, if a person is not included in the census population (as detailed hereinafter) details should not be filled for him in the questionnaire. If the person is included in the census population, you should check whether he/she should be enumerated in this address. This check should be performed since many people have more than one address, but should be enumerated only once -- in their permanent and main address.

Our efforts are intended to prevent a situation, in which you enumerate a person in the apartment, when as a matter of fact they should be enumerated in a different address.
Whenever you are not sure whether to fill a questionnaire for a specific person, fill one, and report this to the chief enumerator. When in doubt, it is better to fill a questionnaire since not filling will harm the census more than filling two questionnaires for the same person. In addition, if two questionnaires have been filled for the same person, this will be revealed in the data processing stage and the extra questionnaire will be cancelled.

2. The critical day

The critical day for the census is the day ending at midnight of June 4, 1983. The enumeration stage starts the following day. The census should refer to a specific day, since the size of the population changes each day. Filling all the questionnaires in reference to the same day will give us a picture of the whole population on that day.

The critical day is very important when deciding if a person is included in the census population and if they should be enumerated in the address you are enumerating.
Now we turn to the detailed instructions according to which you should decide whether to fill details for a person or not.

[p. 5]

Who is included and who isn't included in the census population?

3. The critical day

The decision whether to enumerate the people mentioned in this clause will be made according to their status on the critical day.
3.1 Infants

A baby born before midnight on 6/4/83 should be enumerated.
A baby born after this time should not be enumerated.
3.2 Deceased
A person who passed away after midnight on 6/4/83 should be enumerated.
A person who passed away before midnight on 6/4/83 should not be enumerated.
3.3 Immigrants
Immigrants who arrived in the country before midnight 6/4/83 should be enumerated.
Those who arrived after midnight should not be enumerated.
4. Staying in the country more than a year

The decision whether to enumerate the people mentioned in this clause will be made according to their length of stay in the country or abroad.

4.1 Temporary residents, tourists and residents of the occupied territories

Temporary residents, tourists and non-Jewish residents in Judea, Samaria and the Gaza region, present in the country a year and more will be enumerated.
Temporary residents, tourists and non-Jewish residents in Judea, Samaria and the Gaza region, present in the country less than a year will not be enumerated.

Notice!
"In the country" means the area of the state of Israel before June 1967 (inside the green line), east Jerusalem, and the Golan heights.
4.2 Israeli residents staying abroad
Israelis staying abroad less than a year will be enumerated, even if other residents, who should be enumerated, are living in their apartment.
Israelis staying abroad more than a year will not be enumerated.
5. Diplomats

Holders of a foreign diplomatic passport, UN personnel and holders of a foreign service-passport will not be enumerated in any case, no matter their length of stay in the country. Notice the difference between holders of a foreign diplomatic passport and temporary residents holding a foreign passport.

Who is to be enumerated in this address?

[p. 6]

6. The critical day

Generally, every person that this was his/her only or permanent address on the critical day should be enumerated at this address. Therefore, a person who left the apartment and moved elsewhere before that day or a person who moved into the apartment after that day -- will not be enumerated in this apartment but rather in the address where he/she lived on the critical day. Also, a person who lived in the apartment on the critical day and left it after that day will be enumerated in this apartment, despite not living in the apartment at the time of your visit, during the enumeration stage.

7. Additional address

Hereinafter are the different possibilities, in which a person can have an additional address, and instructions regarding the address in which to enumerate him/her. (The answer to question 2 in the questionnaire refers to the additional address and will assist you in deciding whether to enumerate a person or not).

7.1 Married persons

A married person living in this apartment and has an additional address for the purpose of a job or study will be enumerated in this apartment -- together with his/her spouse. Therefore, a married person living in a certain address only for the purpose of a job or study will not be enumerated in that address, but rather in his/her permanent address, where he/she lives with his/her spouse.
7.2 Unmarried family member
An unmarried family member living also in a different address for the purpose of study or a job -- will be enumerated in the address where he/she slept most nights in the past month. Meaning, if the person slept most of the nights (in the past month) in the address used by him/her for the job/study, he/she will be enumerated there, and vice versa, if slept most nights at the address not used for the job/study, he/she will be enumerated there.

Notice!
An unmarried family member, who has an additional address for study/job and slept there most nights in the past month, will be enumerated at that address -- even if returning to his parents' home for weekends and holidays.
7.3 Family member temporarily staying away from home
A family member staying on vacation/military reserve service/general hospital, and this is his/her permanent address -- will be enumerated in this address together with his/her family, even if absent on the critical day.
7.4 Family member staying in an institute for a long stay
A family member/spouse staying in an institute for a long stay will be enumerated in that institute and not in his/her family's/spouse's address.

For example:
A. A family member studying in a boarding school and sleeping there will be enumerated in the boarding school and not in his/her parents' home.

B. A spouse/family member staying in an elderly citizens' home/hospital for the chronically ill/hospital for the mentally ill/prison and so forth, will be enumerated in the institute where staying and not in the address you are enumerating.
[p. 7]

7.5 National service

A young lady serving on national service instead of joining the army, living in an additional address for the purpose of her service, and who slept there most nights in the past month will be enumerated in that address and not in her parents' home.

Occasionally there are cases of a young man who postponed his enlistment date and is volunteering for a year of service to community. In this case, when living in an additional address for the purpose of his service and when slept there most nights in the past month, he will be enumerated in that address and not in his parents' home.
7.6 Soldier
A soldier serving in compulsory/regular army service and that this is his/her permanent civilian address -- will be enumerated in it.
Notice, the soldier will be enumerated in his/her civilian address even though staying and sleeping most of the time in the army. The reason for this is that his/her military address is not considered an "additional address" for the purpose of the census.
7.7 Pilot and Air-crew personnel
Seamen or air crew personnel staying and sleeping away from their permanent address for a long period of time, will also be enumerated in their permanent civilian address, since the vessel or plane are not considered an "additional address" for the purpose of the census.
7.8 Guests
Guests with a permanent address in another country will not be enumerated in the address where staying, even if slept in the apartment on 6/4/83.
8. Non-family members

Persons who are not family members but this is their permanent address, such as sub-tenants, will be enumerated in this address.

Full coverage of the population is a necessary condition for the census' success

[p. 8]

Chapter Four: What is a Household?

1. What is a household?

When a person lives alone in an apartment he/she will be considered a household.
When a number of persons permanently live together in an apartment, there are two possibilities in which they can be seen as one household:

A. When having family relations between them, such as: husband and wife, parents and children, grandmother residing with her son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren, son residing in his parents' home together with his wife, etc (usually a household consists of family members).

B. When having no family relations between them, they will be considered a household if preparing most of their meals together.
For example: university students living together and one of them cooks for his/her friends, or a sub-tenant the landlady cooks for.
B.1 When there are no family relations between the residents of an apartment and they do not prepare their meals together, each resident will be considered a separate household.

For example: Three persons live in an apartment: Two of them prepare their meals together and the third prepares his/her own meals separately. In this case, there are two households in the apartment. If each of the three prepares his/her own meals separately, they will be considered three households.
If the residents oppose this definition of a household, accept their division into households.

Notice!

This definition of a household refers only to the residents of a regular apartment. For residents of an irregular apartment, there is a different definition (see chapter twelve, clause 7).

For simplicity we sometimes use the term family instead of household. For example: head of family, instead of head of household.
2. Handing questionnaire to household

A questionnaire is intended for a household. For each household, a separate questionnaire should be filled. Therefore, in apartments with more than one household, the number of questionnaires handed should equal the number of households.
Each household in the apartment will receive the same type of questionnaire (short or extended) and the same "number of apartment in cell".

[p. 9]

Few examples of households:

Residing in the apartment:

1. Family (parents and children, and the husband's mother). All prepare most of their meals together. [The instructions refer to a picture of this example.]

2. Family (parents and children) and a sub-tenant. The sub-tenant prepares her meals separately. [The instructions refer to a picture of this example.]

3. Three students. They prepare their meals together. [The instructions refer to a picture of this example.]

4. Three students. They prepare their meals separately. [The instructions refer to a picture of this example.]

5. Three students. Two prepare most of their meals together. The third prepares her meals separately. [The instructions refer to a picture of this example.]

[p. 10-12 are omitted.]

Chapter Six: Detailed Instructions for Filling the Short Questionnaire or Part A of the Extended Questionnaire

[p. 13]

[Instructions for questions 1-10 in the short questionnaire]

1. Question 1: Relationship to head of family

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 1.]

According to the answer we will be able to define the types of relations between persons. Also, we will receive data regarding the household's structure and composition. Meaning, we will know the number of households including parents and children/one parent/couples with no children, etc.

The answer will assist you in determining the persons belonging to the household: all who have family relations to the head of family or his spouse belong to the household. If you found in the apartment a person who is not related to the head of family, and for whom answer 8 was marked -- "not a relative", you should check whether they and the family prepare most of their meals together. If they prepare most of their meals together they will be considered one household. If not, the person will be registered as a separate household. Therefore, if details have been filled for this person in the household's questionnaire, they should be erased and a separate questionnaire should be filled for him (for the complete definition of household -- see chapter four).

Remember!
This check is very important, since it will determine the number of households in the apartment and therefore also the number of questionnaires to be filled in the apartment.

1.1 Who is head of the family?

Head of the family is that person whom members of the family see as their head. Only when members of the family find it difficult to define this -- set the oldest person as head of family.

In case a person has two wives:

If the wives live in the same apartment and conduct one household, meaning they prepare most of their meals together, then the husband will be registered as head of family, and each wife will be registered as his wife -- in the same questionnaire.

If the wives constitute two households in the same apartment or in different apartments, meaning they do not prepare most of their meals together, then each wife will receive a separate questionnaire and the husband will be included in one questionnaire only -- in which he will be registered as head of family.
1.2 Additional explanations
Other relations (answers 3-7)
Notice: answers 3-7 refer to type of relation to head of family or their spouse. Meaning: A wife's parent will be registered in answer 6 -- "parent", since they are the parent of the head of family's spouse.

[p. 14]

Notice!
Stepson/adopted son should be registered as sons of the head of family.

2. Question 2 -- objective: Additional address

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 2.]

The question's objective is to determine whether the person should be enumerated in this address. Through this question you will determine the person's permanent address, when he/she has an additional address. Meaning: if a person has more than one address, you should make sure (according to clauses B-C hereinafter) that he/she should indeed be enumerated in this apartment and not in another address.

2.1 Explanations

Check according to the following instructions whether to enumerate a person in this address only if he/she is part of the census' population (see chapter three in this guide and table "for whom to fill a questionnaire" on the inner side of the cover page).
A. If a person does not have an additional address, for the purpose of job/study, you should enumerate him/her and register details for him/her in the questionnaire.

B. If a person has an additional address, and has slept there most nights in the past month, do not enumerate him/her and do not fill details for him/her in the questionnaire, unless the following:
1. The person is married and his/her spouse lives permanently in this address. In this case the person should be enumerated here, even if slept most nights of the past month at a different address.
2. The person is a soldier, the additional address is a military address and he/she has no other civilian address in the country. In this case the person should be enumerated in this address.
3. The person is a seaman/air-crew person and does not have any other address in the country. In this case the person should be enumerated in this address.
4. The person is an Israeli resident, staying abroad for less than a year. In this case the person should be enumerated in this address.
C. A person with another address in which slept most nights in the past month and is not included in one of the above clauses will not be enumerated in this address. If registered in the questionnaire and you have determined that he/she should not be enumerated in this address, erase all details filled for him/her by drawing a line across the columns regarding him/her.
[p. 15]

If you have filled an extended questionnaire in the apartment, remember to erase the details for this person also in part B of the questionnaire.

In case a person has an additional address, check thoroughly, so you do not omit a person supposed to be enumerated in this address. If in doubt, it is better to err by adding a person than by omitting him/her since it will be revealed and fixed in the data processing stage. But in case a person is omitted from the census -- there is no means of supervision and no way to correct the mistake. Therefore, when not sure whether to enumerate a person, include him/her in the questionnaire and write the reasons for your doubt at the top of the page. Also, report this to the chef enumerator.

Remember!
You should make sure what the address was on the "critical day"

3. Question 3 - explanations: Year of birth

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 3.]

Write the person's year of birth and not his/her age.

A. If the age and month of birth are known, use table I -- converting number of years into date. The table is found on the back cover of the enumerator notepad. Look in the table for the person's age and determine the year of birth according to the month born in.
For example: if the person is aged forty-seven and was born on May, look in the table for the corresponding year of birth. You will find that the year is 1937. If born in January -- the year of birth is 1936.

B. If only the Hebrew year and month of birth are known, use table G to convert Hebrew year into calendar year.

If only the age or Hebrew year of birth are known, but not the month of birth, write the earlier of the two possible calendar years, according to the table. For example: if a woman is 35 and her month of birth is unknown, write year 1947 (the years appearing in the table are 1947 or 1948).
4. Question 4 -- explanations: Month of birth

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 4.]

It is important to know a person's month of birth, in order to determine his/her exact age. This is especially important for persons born in 1968, due to the need to check if they have turned 15, in order to decide whether to fill details for them in part B of the extended questionnaire.

For persons born between January and May, mark answer 1.

For persons born between June and December, mark answer 2.
[p. 16]
If only the Hebrew month is known, use table H, on the back cover of the enumerator notepad, to convert Hebrew month into calendar month.

If month of birth is unknown (either Hebrew or calendar) -- the question should not be answered. Meaning: do not circle any of the possible answers.

5. Question 5 -- explanations: Sex

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 5.]
Circle the appropriate number

6. Question 6 -- explanations: Family status

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 6.]

Ask the person about his/her family status and accept the answer -- do not ask for any document for verification. Also, do not determine the family status according to your impression. For instance, if a couple lives in the apartment, do not register them as married without receiving this answer from them, since they might be living together without being married.

7. Question 7: Are you... [ethnicity or religion]?

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 7.]

The purpose of the question is to distinguish between the main groups constituting the population.

Ask the person and mark his/her answer in the questionnaire. Do not determine the answer according to impression. Meaning, do not rely on his/her name, accent etc.

A. If the person is a Christian, belonging to a sect different than the ones mentioned in the questionnaire, circle no. 6 and write the name of the sect above the line next to it.
[p. 17]
B. If the person does not belong to any of the groups mentioned in the answer, or you receive answers such as Atheist, Canaanite, Israeli, etc. -- circle no. 8 and write the answer above the line.

C. If a person answered he/she is Greek, inquire whether he/she is Orthodox or Catholic and mark the full answer: for a Greek Orthodox, mark answer 3 and for a Catholic, mark answer 4.

D. If a person answered that he/she is Armenian, Syrian or Coptic, inquire whether a Catholic or Orthodox, mark no.6 and write the appropriate answer.

Notice!
If a person answered in Arabic that he/she is "Rom Catholic" -- mark answer 4, Greek-Catholic. If a person answered that he/she is Roman-Catholic, mark answer 5, Latin (Catholic).

8. Question 8 -- explanations: Country of birth

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 8.]

If a person was born abroad, circle no. 2 and write the name of the country above the line.
Write the name of the country according to present boundaries and borders. The borders of many countries have changed due to wars and we are interested in the name of the present country in which the locality the person was born in is found, not the country it was in at the time of birth.
For persons born in Israel, circle answer no. 1 and skip to question 10.

Notice!
Persons born in Israel are persons who were born in Israel according to British mandate borders and persons born in the territories occupied, or that were occupied by the IDF.

9. Question 9 -- explanations: (For the born abroad) year of immigration to Israel

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 9.]

A. When a person does not remember the year of his/her immigration to Israel, but remembers how many years he/she is in Israel, use the table for converting number of years into date.

B. For a person who immigrated to Israel more than once and stayed abroad for less than ten years, write the year in which first immigrated.
For a person absent from Israel more than ten years, write the latter year of immigration (do not take into consideration visits in Israel, only the year of immigration).

[p. 18]

C. For a person who stayed in Israel as a "temporary resident" or tourist, left the country and then came back as an "immigrant" -- write the year in which came as an immigrant.

D. For a person who arrived in Israel as a "temporary resident" or tourist and after a while received the status of immigrant, write the year in which received "immigrant" status as the year of immigration.

E. A "potential new-immigrant" will be considered "immigrant" for the purpose of this question, meaning: the year in which arrived as a "potential new-immigrant" or the year in which turned from tourist/temporary resident into potential new-immigrant will be registered as year of immigration.

F. For a person who stayed in a detention camp in Cyprus and arrived in Israel after independence, write the year of arrival as year of immigration.

G. For tourists and temporary residents, staying in the country for more than a year, write the year of entrance into Israel as year of immigration.

Notice!
For the born abroad the questionnaire ends in this question -- move on to next person.

10. Question 10 -- explanations: (For Israeli natives) father's country of birth.

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 10.]

In this question, too, the country should be registered according to present borders.
For Israeli natives, whose father was born in Israel, mark number 1.
For Israeli natives whose father was born abroad, mark number 2 and write the country's name above the line.

[p. 19]

Chapter Seven: Detailed Instructions for Filling Parts B and C in the Extended Questionnaire

Part B -- questions for aged 15 and over

The questions in this part relate to seven subjects:

A. residence, questions 1,2
B. marriage and births, questions 3-7
C. education, questions 8-12
D. spoken languages, question 13
E. work, questions 14-23
F. work five years ago, questions 24-26
G. income, questions 27-28
1. Purpose of questions regarding residence -- questions 1-2

The purpose is to receive information about the seniority of the population in different localities and about the characteristics of persons who came to live in the localities at different periods of time. Along with that, information will be received regarding the inner-immigration between localities, meaning: information regarding the number of people moving from place to place in the country. For instance: it is possible to know how many moved from a rural locality to an urban locality or vice versa, where do the ones moving from the city-center to the suburbs work, etc.

2. Question 1 -- explanations: Seniority in locality

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 1.]

A. If the person has not lived in the same locality since birth, write the last two digits of the calendar year in which moved into this locality.

B. If the person knows only the Hebrew year -- convert it to a calendar year, according to "table for converting Hebrew into calendar year" found in the enumerator notepad.

C. If a person can not remember the year -- try and help him/her through questions relating to historic events, like: did you enter this locality before or after the Yom-Kippur war? In this case, write the approximated year.

D. If the person left the locality for a period of less than 10 years and returned to it, write the year in which he/she first started living in the locality.

E. If a person left the locality for more than 10 years and returned to it -- write the year in which he/she returned to the locality.

[p. 20]

3. Question 2 -- explanations: Address five years ago

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 2.]

Write the exact address at which the person lived five years ago, meaning: name of locality and street (or neighborhood) and house number.

A. Lived permanently -- the place where he/she regularly lived five years ago, meaning June 1978, even if he/she was absent from it temporarily, due to study, job, etc.
Whoever was in compulsory service in the army will write his/her civilian address at the time.

B. Abroad -- when his/her permanent address five years ago was abroad. This does not mean a temporary stay abroad. (No need to specify name of country, just circle number 2).

C. Other address in Israel -- different house than the one living in today, either in the same locality or not.

In Israel -- meaning also people who lived in Judea, Samaria, Gaza region, Golan Heights and Sinai.

You should write the exact address in which he/she lived five years ago, including: name of locality, street and house number

4. Purpose of questions about marriage and births -- questions 3-7

From the data received in the answers to these questions, and in consideration of the details regarding each spouse separately, and both of them together, we will be able to learn about the "marriage habits" and fertility of the population and the different groups composing it.

The intention in "marriage habits" is the age at which people get married and the differences between spouses in age, education, origin etc.

5. Question 3: Marriage

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 3.]
This question is intended for the whole population.

[p. 21]

6. Question 4: Year of marriage -- for persons who married once

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 4.]
This question is intended for those who marked answer 2 in the previous question, meaning: persons who married only once.

7. Questions 5-6: Years of marriages -- for persons who married more than once

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including questions 5 and 6 .]
Questions 5-6 are intended for those who marked answer 3 for question no. 3.
In question 5 mention the year in which the person last married.
In question 6 mention the year in which the person first married.

8. Question 7: Number of births

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 7.]

The question is not intended for single women or men, but for married women/ divorced women/widows.

Write the number of children the woman gave birth to throughout her whole life (also in previous marriages) -- even if deceased.

Do no include abortions and children born dead.

9. Purpose of questions regarding education -- questions 8-12

The purpose of the questions is to receive information about the level of education and kind of education of the population.

Each person (aged 15 and over) is asked whether ever studied in school, how many total years studied in school, what kind of school did he/she last study in, what is the highest degree/certificate he/she ever received and what was his/her major field of study (if studied in a vocational or agricultural school).

From the data received it will be possible to learn, for instance: what is the number of people whose last school was a vocational or a general high-school, what part of them received a matriculation certificate and how many years the ones not receiving a matriculation degree studied. It is also possible to inquire the number of academics in the country and how many of them have a Bachelor's, Master's or PhD degree.

[p. 22]

The data received from these questions also enables us to notice the relations between education and occupation, income, level of housing and more. For instance: it is possible to check the percentage of teachers from among the persons studied in post-secondary teacher-training colleges -- as their last school, or how many of them are occupied in different jobs or not working at all at the time of the census.

10. Question 8 -- explanations: Have you ever attended school?

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 8.]

The question divides the population into three groups: persons who never attended school, persons who attended school in the past, persons attending school now.

School also includes evening-school, a course of over than a year, yeshiva, a school preparing for external matriculation exams, school for apprentices, university, Technion, teacher-training college etc.

School does not include kindergarten, study in a course shorter than a year, study by correspondence (e.g. Open University), language or music course even when longer than a year, private lessons, self-tutoring etc.

Notice!
The term school, as explained above, is valid for the following questions regarding education as well.

11. Question 9 -- explanations: Total years of schooling

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 9.]

A. Write the total number of years, including all kinds of school the person attended.
For example: if a person studied in elementary school abroad for 8 years, then studied high school in Israel and then studied in university for 2 years, the total years studied is 14.

B. For persons studying at the time of the census, count the current year as well -- do not count the current year when stopped studying this year.
For example: a person who studied 8 years in elementary school and is about to complete his/her third year of study in a vocational school will write 11 years.

C. The following should not be included in the total of years studied:
[p. 23]
Additional year of study in the same grade (for persons who repeated a year of school).

Unfinished year of study in the past.

Years of study in programs not regarded as school (see explanations for question 8).

12. Question 10 -- explanations: Type of school last attended

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 10.]

In this question, specify the type of the last school the person attended, even if he/she hasn't completed his/her study in it.
If a person is still attending school, specify the type of school he/she is attending.

Types of schools (as appearing in the questionnaire)

A. Elementary school, Heder, Kutab: also including special-education school and Talmud torah (Torah studies for elementary school ages).
Kutab: religious school in Muslim countries.

B. Junior high-school: school grades between elementary and high school.

C. Yeshiva: including all kinds of Yeshivas, except for yeshiva high-school.

D. Vocational/Agricultural high school: including vocational yeshiva-high school, vocational trend in comprehensive school, industrial school, school for apprentices, pre-military vocational courses and military boarding schools next to vocational schools.

E. General high school: including yeshiva-general high school, general trend in comprehensive school, school preparing for external matriculation exams, kibbutz high school, and military boarding school next to a general high school.

F. Post secondary teacher training college: including colleges for the training of art teachers. Does not include academic-teacher training in university.

G. Other post-secondary school: post high-school schools issuing certificates such as authorized nurse, practical engineer etc. These schools do not issue academic degrees. Also included in this category are nurse authorization schools, practical engineer and technician schools, art academy, social-workers school (not through university) etc.
[p. 24]
H. University/Technion: including other institutes issuing academic degrees.

Notice!
If a person answers that he/she attended college, post secondary school or Academy -- inquire whether his/her studies were towards an academic degree or a post-secondary certificate. In case of academic degree mark answer 8. In the case of post secondary certificate, mark answer 7.

I. Other school: in this answer include any other kind of school according to the definition in question 8, which is not included in any of the previous answers. For example: pre-academic preparatory program, pre-practical engineering preparatory program, school for the elderly.
If a person attended school abroad and can not classify the type of school, he/she is entitled to write the type of school in foreign language, under this answer.

Notice!
If a person is attending evening school, mark the most suitable type of school. For example, if attending an evening school preparing for external exams, mark number 5 (general high-school).

13. Question 11 -- explanations: Major field-of-study at vocational/agricultural school

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 11.]

The question is intended only for those whom the last school they attended/attend is a vocational/agricultural school (meaning: persons who answered number 4 in question 10). Mark one answer only -- the most suitable.

List of fields-of-study (as appear in the questionnaire):

1. Agriculture -- including fishing

2. Electricity -- including car-electricity, ship-electricity etc.

3. Electronics

4. Metalworking, Mechanics -- including etching, welding, tinsmithing, exact mechanics, pipe and building locksmithing, plumbing etc.

5. Motor mechanics -- including car mechanics, ship mechanics, aeromechanics etc.

6. Clerical/Secretarial work, Accounting

7. Sewing, Fashion -- including knitting, weaving etc.
[p. 25]
8. Hotel trades, Home economics, Nursing -- including cooking, waiting, accommodation and housekeeping, nannies and practical nurses.

9. Other -- in this answer, include any field-of-study not classified under the previous answers, e.g. carpentry, print, lab technicians, etc.
Notice!
Maintain exact registering, for instance write "dental technician" instead of "technician".

14. Question 12 -- explanations: Highest certificate (degree)

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 12.]

In this question the intention is to the highest degree the person received for studies in a school (see definition in explanations for question 8). This does not mean excellence/participation/appreciation certificates.

Notice!
A certificate the person is entitled to should also be specified, even if he/she doesn't have it yet. For example: a person who completed the matriculation exams successfully, but still has not received the certificate or a student who completed his/her studies in the university and is entitled for a degree, but the ceremony hasn't been held yet.

List of types of certificate (as appear in the questionnaire)

1. Certificate of graduation from elementary school/junior high

2. Certificate of graduation from high school -- this category will include persons who graduated from high school and do not have a matriculation certificate.

For a person who studied in high school and passed only part of the matriculation exams, and therefore is not entitled for the matriculation certificate, mark this answer (2).

3. Matriculation certificate -- including external matriculation certificate.

4. Non-academic certificate of graduation from a post-secondary school, e.g. teaching authorization certificate, practical engineer certificate, authorized nurse certificate, etc.
[p. 26]
5. Academic Bachelor's degree -- if a person received an academic degree and another certificate, register the academic degree and not the other certificate (answer no. 5).

6. Academic degree - master's or above

7. Other certificate -- a certificate which can not be classified as fitting one of the previous answers should be specified in this answer.

If the person studied abroad and can not classify the certificate, he/she is entitled to write the type of certificate, in foreign language, under this answer.

15. Question 13 - languages spoken

Since Israel is an immigration country, many different languages are spoken in it. The purpose of the question is to evaluate the extent of use in each language.

Explanations: Languages spoken
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 13.]

In answer to this question, specify the main language spoken by the person in everyday life.

If a person speaks more than one language in everyday life, register first -- as "only or main language" the language which he/she speaks more than any other language. As "second language" -- register the second language he/she speaks in everyday life.
Do not register more than two languages.

Notice!
Register only languages spoken in everyday life. Do not register languages the person speaks but does not use as an everyday spoken language.

16. Purpose of questions regarding work and employment -- questions 14-21

The purpose -- to receive information regarding the "work force" in Israel: number of employed, job scope of the employed, their status on the job, their division into economic branches and their occupation.

"The work force" includes the employed workers, the workers temporarily absent from their jobs and the ones searching for a job.

The data received will enable us to apprehend the characteristics of workers in the different branches: age, sex, family status, education, income and more.

Processing of the data will be done by geographical division and this data is necessary for the planning and development of employment sources around the country.

[p. 27]

17. Definition of "work"

"Work" means any work, full or partial in exchange for salary, profit or any other return. Including also:

A person's work in his/her own business.

The work of a family member in a family business or farm, even without pay

Considered as worker is a person that worked (according to the definition in this clause) even one hour in the past week.

Also considered as work:

Work of an apprentice/trainee -- even if worked without pay

Work of a pupil in agricultural school

Yeshiva student aged 18 and over, engaged in teaching in the yeshiva.

Work of apprentices, for pay as part of vocational course.

Work of a pupil in a kibbutz -- not as part of school/national service.

Work in hospital of a student in nurse school.

Work as part of "service year" by religious girls (instead of military service).

Work of students or pupils giving private lessons or working as babysitters for pay.

Notice!
Work of students serving as tutors will also be considered as work.

A nanny/housekeeper receiving wage or sleeping arrangements, support and allowance for her work.

A woman taking care of children as part of a foster family. If both spouses are taking care of the children and have no other job -- refer only to the wife as working and the husband should be registered as "not working".

Civilian working for the IDF.

The work of air crews on civilian aircraft and seamen aboard civilian ships.

Work abroad of Israelis staying outside the country for less than a year, whether they are salaried employees of a governmental/public institute or factory in Israel, or self-employed, staying abroad (less than a year) for the purpose of their business in Israel.

Persons sent for general training/study -- not occupational by their workplace, for a period of up to one week. If the study lasts more than a week -- the employees will be considered absent from their job.

Persons sent on occupational training by their workplace-- even for a period of more than a week.
[p. 28]

Activities not considered as "work" for the purpose of these questions:

Work of a housekeeper in her home.

Regular/reserve army service.

Notice!
Regular service in the border-guard is considered work in the police, not the army.

Volunteer work -- without receiving pay

Work of pupils in vocational school (except agricultural school).

Work abroad of Israelis staying outside the country for less than a year, but more than 30 days, which is not for a governmental/public institute or factory in Israel, or: the work of a self-employed for a business abroad. For example: an Israeli working abroad as a salesman for a Japanese company or an Israeli running a night-club abroad.

Inactive partnership in a foreign business/factory -- abroad.

18. Question 14 -- explanations: Work in the last week

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 14.]

1. Whoever was in regular military service will mark answer 1 and will not answer the work and employment questions, but rather turn to question 24 -- work five years ago.

2. Whoever was in compulsory (not reserve) service will mark answer no. 2 and turn to question 17.

3. Whoever worked will mark answer 3 and turn to question 17.

4. Whoever did not work and was not in compulsory/regular army service will turn to question 15 -- job search.

19. Question 15 -- explanations: Job search

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 15.]

[p. 29]

considered as "searching for job" is

A person who actively searched for a job, for instance by turning to the employment bureau, applying for ads on newspapers, investigating among friends, trying to open a private business etc.

If the person is waiting for an answer from the workplace he/she has applied to or the results of a tender applied for -- he/she will be considered as searching for a job in the two weeks following the application. If more than two weeks have passed, without the person searching for another job -- he/she will not be considered as searching for a job.

Notice!
Self-employed professionals not working in pre-defined hours, such as a taxi driver waiting for passengers, a doctor waiting for patients, or a carpenter waiting for costumer orders will be considered working and not searching for a job.

Not considered "searching for a job" is:

A person not actively searching for a job.

A person who searched for a volunteer-job (job with no returns).

A person whose details are at the hands of an employer who turns to him/her at time of need, like a nurse not regularly working but being called for special duties or a substitute teacher.

20. Question 16 -- explanations: Absence from job

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 16.]

Considered absent from his/her job is:

A. If a person has a job, business or farm but he/she were absent from it last week due to a paid leave, sickness, reserve army service etc.

B. A woman on maternity leave for up to 12 weeks (the period of absence from job paid for by social-security). A woman continuing her maternity leave beyond this period is not considered absent from job.

C. A person on an unpaid leave of up to 30 days.

D. When there is a temporary recess in work (for a period no longer than 30 days), due to completion of work in the branch (industrial or agricultural), due to unsuitable weather or because of a labor dispute. Workers in seasonal jobs (such as life guarding, fruit-picking) are not considered absent at the end of working season.

E. A person promised a job in a month's time.

F. When a person is in an occupational training program on behalf of his/her workplace for less than a year.
[p. 30]
Notice!
When a person does not work regularly, but rather is sometimes called to carry out a job -- he/she should not be considered as absent from the job and answer number 2 should be marked for him/her.

21. Question 17 -- explanations: Number of work weeks in the past year

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 17.]

The purpose of the question -- to check the scope of work in a period of one year: the last 12 months.

A. For whoever did not work at all in the past 12 months or whoever worked abroad -- but not in Israel -- circle "00".

B. For whoever worked during all of the last 12 months, circle "52" -- for work during the 52 weeks in a year.

If a person did not work several weeks, due to army reserve service, holiday, etc -- mark he/she worked during all months of the year.

C. For whoever worked less than 12 months (in Israel), write in the squares the number of weeks worked (in Israel) during this period.

To simplify the calculation of weeks, subtract the number of weeks not worked from the 52 weeks of a year.

For example: if a person specified he/she did not work for 9 weeks: subtract this number from the total weeks in a year (52-9=43) and write 43 in the squares.

Notice!
For a soldier in compulsory service who worked - during the past year - prior to his/her enlistment, write the number of weeks worked during that period. Also, he/she must answer the following questions regarding the work place.

22. Question 18 -- explanations: Number of working hours in a week

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 18.]

[p. 31]

A. In the answer, write the number of working hours the person usually works during a week: if a person worked regularly in a number of working places, write in the answer the total sum of all (weekly) working hours in all workplaces in which the person worked.

B. The sum of working hours should also include:
Overtime hours (usually worked)

Waiting hours (such as by doctor, driver, porter etc.). Include all hours of stay in the workplace but not alertness hours.

Working hours of a person who worked without pay in a farm or business owned by the family.

Preparation hours related to work, even when were not carried out at the workplace.
For example: lesson preparation by teachers or rehearsals by artists.

23. Question 19 -- explanations: Workplace

In this question, details regarding the person's workplace and not the work carried out (he/she will be questioned regarding this in the next question), should be filled.

The question refers to the last 12 months, meaning even if the person did not work in the last week, but did work some other time during the last year -- refer to his/her workplace during that period.

If the person worked in several workplaces in the last year, register the details regarding hi/her last workplace.

If the person worked in several jobs in the last week, refer to his/her main work -- the one in which worked most hours in the last week.

[p. 32]

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 19.]
Details necessary for the question:

A. Name of workplace

B. Exact address of workplace

C. Main activity of workplace (not of person)

D. Name of department/division in which the person works
A. Name of workplace
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 19A.]

Write the name of the factory/business/employer in full detail. For instance: if a person works in a government ministry, public bureau, or other place.
[p. 33]
[Examples of how to write the name of workplace correctly]

Write "Ministry of Trade and Industry" rather than "government ministry".

Write "Tax chamber of the "Histadrut Haclalit" labor federation" rather than "labor union".

Write "'Aharoni' law firm" rather than "law firm".

Write "'Etz Ha'zait' factory" rather than "factory".

Write "Kiryat-Gat municipality" rather than "municipality".

Write "Africa-Israel investment company" rather than "investment company".


For a civilian working for the IDF or the ministry of defense write - "IDF" or "ministry of defense" -- with no further detail, but first inquire whether he/she is working in the security system or in a factory belonging to it.

If a person is working in his/her own business and that business does not have its own name, but the name of the person -- write only the occupation. There is no need to write the name.
For example: a private music teacher, an independent insurance agent, the owner of a carpentry, etc.

For workers in a kibbutz, write the name of the kibbutz. If a person works in a certain factory in the kibbutz, specify its name. The same for moshav (co-operative settlement). Specify the type of farm if there is one.
B. Workplace address
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 19B.]

Write the address of the workplace specified in clause A. the address should be written in maximal detail: if the address is unknown, write general location, closeness to a well-known place etc.

Notice!
Be sure to mention the name of locality in which the workplace is found -- even when the same as person's locality of residence.

If a person works in different places during the day, write the main workplace.
For example: for a person working in transport and distribution of products: write the place in which he/she receives the products for distribution, the place of concentration or the meeting place with costumers. For instance, for a bread-distributor, write the address of the bakery from which he leaves for the job. For a bus driver arriving at the garage and leaving it for different places, write the garage's address.

When there is no permanent address for the workplace
1. Inside a locality or specific region: For whomever his/her job is not carried out in a permanent address, write the name of the locality/region and specify "no permanent address". For example: porters, gardeners etc.
2. Outside a locality: For a person working in road construction or another job outside a locality and who when leaving home for work, does not arrive at a permanent place, write "no permanent address".
[p. 34]

C. Workplace's main activity
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 19C.]

Notice!
Describe the workplace's activity and not the person's activity. Meaning: if a person works as an accountant in a candy factory, he/she should describe the activity as "candy manufacturing" -- even if he/she is not engaged in the production itself. Similarly, a typist working in a school will register the main activity as "teaching children aged 6 to 12", even though her job is not directly related to teaching.

Describe the activity/products and services the workplace manufactures in detail -- a general description is not enough.
For example: when a person works in a parent company with many different subsidiary companies, refer to the subsidiary company he/she works in.

Notice the following examples:
Write "Special education school" rather than "School".

Write "Sub-contracting and electricity works in buildings" rather than "Electricity works".

Write "Manufacture of children's clothes" rather than "Clothing"
For persons working in government ministries and municipalities there is no need to fill this clause -- their activity is well known.

For persons working in a factory/institute/farm manufacturing several products/engaged in several areas of activity -- write the organization's main activity.
The "main activity" can be determined according to various principles/standards.
Accept the interviewee's answer as it is.
Examples:
A. for a person working in a factory manufacturing meat conserves and vegetable conserves: if the factory manufactures more meat conserves -- write "meat conserves manufacture"

B. If a person works in a transport company, transporting passengers and cargo and most of the revenue is generated by passenger transportation -- write "passenger transportation".

C. If a person works in a workshop repairing and manufacturing shoes and most of the workers' time is dedicated to manufacture -- write "shoe manufacture".
If it is impossible to determine the main activity -- write all activities.
[p. 35]

D. Department/division in which the person works
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 19D.]

Many workplaces consist of different departments and divisions. You should inquire in which unit the person works and write the unit's name.
Examples for the manner in which to fill clauses A,D of this question:
Example 1: in the questionnaire of a person working in the "Histadrut" labor federation's tax chamber --write:
Clause A -- "name of workplace" -- "Histadrut" labor federation.
Clause D - "department or division" -- tax chamber
Example 2: in the questionnaire of a person working in the sanitation department of Kiryat-Gat municipality -- write:
Clause A -- "name of workplace" -- Kiryat-Gat municipality
Clause D - "department or division" -- sanitation department.
If the person works in several departments/divisions/units write the unit in which he/she worked most of the time last week.

If the workplace is not divided into units or the person does not know the unit he/she belongs to' do not fill this clause.

24. Question 20 -- explanations: Worker's main occupation

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 20.]

A. Main occupation

In this question, describe the worker's occupation and specify its title -- if any.

Notice!
While the previous question referred to the main activity of the workplace, this question refers to the worker's occupation.

If a person has several occupations in the same workplace -- refer in the question to the occupation he/she dedicates most of his/her time to.
For instance: In case of a woman working as a typist and an operator and dedicates most of her time to typing, write "typist".
[p. 36]
Write a detailed description of the occupation. In any case, do not write a general definition, such as: laborer, clerk, and technician. Inquire what kind of laborer/clerk/technician and specify in detail.
For example:
Write "Repair of radio and TV sets" rather than "Radio technician".

Write "Planning and supervision of tax clerks" rather than "Unit director".

Write "Math teacher for 11th grade" rather than "Teacher".
B. Job title -- if any
Clause B of the question is intended for salaried employees only
The intention is to the official/accepted title of the job or the name of the occupation in the plant where working.

If there is no title for the job, do not fill clause B

Notice!
In this question the intent is not to a person's occupation, once he/she does work in his profession any more. For instance: an electronics engineer working as a sales manager of electrical appliances will not write "electronics engineer" in his/her answer. Similarly, a lawyer working as a tax clerk will not write "lawyer" in his/her answer.

25. Question 21 -- explanations: Status on the Job

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 20.]

"Status on the job", means salaried employee, self-employed, etc. and not "temporary"/"permanent".

Salaried employee -- is a person working for someone in return for a daily/monthly/per job wage or for some other return. Also regarded as salaried employees are:
A person working in a cooperative and receiving a salary only (meaning, he/she is not a member of the cooperative).

An apprentice receiving wage

A yeshiva student aged 18 and over, occupied as a teacher in the yeshiva.

A pupil in an agricultural school, or a vocational school, receiving wage.

A citizen working for the army

A housekeeper, nanny etc.
[p. 37]
Self-employed not employing salaried employees includes also:
A person working in a business/farm of his/her own and not employing others for wage or any other returns.

An active partner in a business not employing others.

A person employing workers without pay or return (such as: a person employing family members in his/her business/farm without pay).

A private teacher.
Self-employed employing salaried employees:
Considered as self-employed employing salaried employees is a person employing others for wage or any other return. Including:
An active partner in a business employing salaried employees.

The owner of a farm employing a worker for wage

A craftsman employing an apprentice
Member of cooperative: Considered as member of cooperative is an employee sharing the cooperative profits on top of his/her salary. A member of a communal Moshav will also be considered as member of a cooperative.

Member of kibbutz
Including:
Kibbutz members and their sons/daughters; parents and relatives of kibbutz members, living in the kibbutz and working in it; candidates for membership in the kibbutz; members of groups planning to establish or join a kibbutz and teenagers living in the kibbutz and working in it; kibbutz members working outside their kibbutz without receiving pay from their workplace.

Not including:
1. Kibbutz members working outside the kibbutz for wage.

2. Persons who are not kibbutz members but live in the kibbutz and work in it for wage

3. persons studying Hebrew in a kibbutz
4. Volunteers in the kibbutz.
Family member working without pay in the family business/farm: A son working for his father or a woman working for her husband, in a farm or business, without receiving payment.
For example: a woman helping her husband in a grocery store or a son helping his father in his workshop -- without receiving pay.

[p. 38]

26. Question 22 -- explanations: Manner of arrival to work

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 22.]

In the answer refer to the workplace registered in question 19.

If the workplace is the person's home, circle "0" and skip to question 24.

If a person arrives at a gathering place in one vehicle and leaves it for work in a different vehicle -- mark the vehicle in which he/she travels to the gathering place.

If a person travels to work in different vehicles on different days of the week, mark the vehicle in which he/she travels most days.

If a person is part of a car-pooling group of people, in which every day a different member of the group is the driver - mark answer 7, since most of the week he/she arrives in private car as a passenger (and not as a driver).

If a person uses several types of vehicles on his way to work (while alternating between them) -- specify the vehicle in which travels the longest distance.

27. Question 23 -- explanations: Time of departure for work

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 23.]

In this question also refer to the workplace registered in question 19.

"Time of departure" means the time in which the person leaves home and not the time he/she arrives at work.

For a person working a split day, meaning: works until noon, goes back home and leaves for the same workplace again in the evening, write the time of first departure.

If a person works shifts, write time of departure for the shift worked most days last week.
For example: for a nurse who worked morning and night shifts in the last week and most of her shifts that week were night shifts -- mark time of departure for the night shift.

Notice!
You should make sure the person marks "1" -- if leaves before noon and "2" if leaves after noon.

[p. 39]

28. Questions 24-26 -- work five years ago

Questions' Purpose - Receiving details regarding the mobility of workers between workplaces. Comparison of the current job with the job a person had 5 years ago will enable us to know the extent to which persons changed occupations or workplaces in the past 5 years. These data will give us a general picture of trends and changes in the "job market".

29. Question 24 -- explanations: Work five years ago

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 24.]

For whoever served in compulsory/regular army service (answer 1) or did not work (answer 5) -- mark the appropriate answer and skip to question 27.

For whoever does not work today, but worked 3 years ago -- mark answer 2 and continue to question 25.

For whoever worked in the same workplace -- mark answer 4 and skip to question 26.

For whoever worked in a different workplace -- mark answer 2 and continue to question 25.

For whoever worked abroad -- mark answer 5 and skip to question 26.

For whoever did not work five years ago -- mark answer 6 and skip to question 27.

30. Question 25: Workplace 5 years ago

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 25.]
Answer this question according to instructions for question 19.

[p. 40]

31. Question 26: Main occupation of worker 5 years ago

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 26.]
Answer this question according to instructions for question 20.

32. Questions 27-28 -- Income from work

Purpose of questions -- Receiving data regarding the income level of families and persons, the sources of income from work as a salaried employee/self-employed, the type of providers (family head, wife, other providers) and the number of providers in the family.
From the data we can learn about the relations between income and: sex, education, occupation, geographical region and other data.

For example: It is possible to check the average income of a salaried employee in the hotel business in Eilat in comparison to workers in this business in Haifa, or what is the average income of a garage-owner in Tel-Aviv in comparison to a garage-owner in Beit-Shean.

33. Question 27 -- explanations: Income from work as salaried employee

A. In this answer include incomes from salaried-work, including: incomes of cooperative members from salaried work and from cooperative profits, incomes of a soldier in compulsory/regular service.
If a person works in several jobs, include the gross income from all workplaces.
If a person has income from salaried-work as well as self-employed work, specify his/her income from salaried work in question 27 and income from self-employed work in question 28.

B. Whoever received salary for his/her work in at least one of the three months mentioned in the question, is asked to examine his/her paycheck and copy the gross wage -- for each month separately.
We are interested in the gross income, since it is not affected by random deductions in one month or another or deductions to the worker's personal status.

Notice!
In order to avoid mistakes, encourage the person to copy the sum from his/her paycheck.

[p. 41]

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 27.]

C. "Gross income" includes all payments received by the worker (such as: overtime pay, premiums, 13th salary, refund of expenses, etc.), payments for car allowance, board and lodging and other additions. The gross income should also include payments received from the employer/other sources for periods of absence from work due to sickness, holiday, reserve army service, accident, birth, etc.

"Gross income" is the income before the following deductions: income tax, uniform tax, social security, insurance payments, pension payments, labor union taxes, etc.

"Net income" is the sum left after deducting income tax and social security payments from the gross income and before deducting all other payments.

"Sum for payment" is the sum left in the workers hands after all other deductions (uniform tax, repayment of loans, etc.).

[p. 42]

D. If a person does not know his/her gross income, he/she should write his/her net income. If a person does not receive a paycheck, but receives his salary each month in cash -- with no deductions whatsoever, he/she should register the sum received as net salary.
For example: A nanny receiving a sum of 6000 shekels a month, and the sum is not taxed -- should register her income as following:
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 27D.]

E. If a 13th salary has been received in one of the three months, it should be divided in 12 and the quotient added to the monthly gross amount.

F. The sum of the monthly income should be rounded to the nearest shekel and written in the squares, from right to left.
For example: if the gross income in April was 10,340.35 shekels, write--

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 27F.]

In any case, mark whether the amount specified is net or gross income (circle the appropriate number).

Notice!
If the family has not written the sum properly, you should correct it and write the sum from right to left, rounded to the nearest shekel.

34. Question 28: Incomes from work as self-employed or partner in a business

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 28.]

[p. 43]

A. "Work as self-employed" -- means the work of a person in his/her own business (such as: grocery store, private clinic the work of a farmer in his farm) and any other self-employed job (such as: private teacher, whitewasher).

Partners in a limited company -- will be registered as self-employed or salary-employees, according to their choice.

In the answer, refer to tax-year 1982/83 -- in the period between 4/1/82 and 3/31/83.

If income in the tax year 1982/83 is unknown, refer to the previous tax year 1981/82 and write the answer in the bottom square.

B. "Gross income from work as self-employed" means business revenue after deducting current expenditures for maintenance of the business (such as: materials, wage, rent) but before deducting private taxes (such as income tax, social security).

"Revenue" -- means the sum the business receives for the product/service it sells.

In the gross income of a self-employed should be included payments received from social security, insurance funds (payments for army reserve service or accidents etc.) and also withdrawals for private uses.

Notice!
Do not include in income from work as self-employed, income from an inactive partnership in a business, income from interest and dividends etc. (these types of income will be included in question 14 in part C of the questionnaire).

C. If a person had incomes from work as self-employed in only part of the year, specify these incomes.

D. In a business belonging to several partners, register only the questioned person's share as income from the business.

E. If in addition to being self-employed the person was a salaried-employee in one of the three months, register his/her income as a salaried employee in question 27 -- in addition to specifying his/her income as self-employed in this question.

F. If a self-employed lost money in his business, write the sum and next to it the word "losses".

G. If the person knows only his/her net income, write the sum and mark "net" under it.

Part C -- Questions for the family

Part C consists of 11 questions regarding the apartment and home equipment, 2 questions regarding a car and one question regarding incomes from sources other than work.

[p. 44]

1. purpose of questions regarding apartment -- questions 1-11

The purpose -- receiving information about the population's housing conditions.

Each family is asked how many rooms it lives in, when did the family's head start living in the apartment, in what year was the apartment built, arrangements for heating in winter, existence of bathrooms, shower and bath, arrangements for water-heating in the bath/shower, existence of different types of equipment in the apartment and type of ownership of apartment.

From the above data we can learn about the population's housing conditions and the relations between housing conditions and other characteristics of the population, such as: education, income, seniority in the country etc.

For example: it is possible to learn about the relations between the density level in an apartment and number of schooling years of the family's head, or between the equipment found in the apartment and the number of years a couple is married, or between the type of ownership of the apartment (ownership/rent) and the family's head seniority in the country.

2. Question 1 -- explanations: Number of rooms the family lives in

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 1.]

A. Include in the answer all rooms and half-rooms used by the family for living: a room used for living as well as for business will be considered as a living room.
For example: The room of a seamstress, used also for living after work hours, will be considered as one of the living rooms.
If a family considers a hall/dining room as a room/half room -- include it in the total number of rooms.

B. Do not include in the total number of rooms: kitchen, bathroom and room used for business purposes only.

C. In an apartment in which two or more households are living:
Include only the rooms used by the household for which the questionnaire is filled
If two households living in the same apartment share some of the rooms -- add half a room to each household for each shared room.
For example:
Two students living in a 3-room apartment. Each student lives in a room of her own and the guest room is used by both of them (the students prepare their meals separately and therefore are considered two different households). In this case, write each student lives in a 1.5-room apartment (the room in which living and half the shared room).
[p. 45]
Three households live in three separate rooms in a 4-room apartment. The dining room is shared by all three households. In this case, write 1.5 rooms for each household -- the room in which living and half the shared room (notice, do not write 1/3 room for each household).

Notice!
If the family finds it difficult to determine what a room is and what half a room is, decide according to the following: an area of 2x3 sq. meters will be considered a room. A smaller area will be considered half a room.

3. Question 2 -- explanations: Year of family head's entrance into apartment

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 2.]

A. If the family head lives in the apartment since birth, circle "00".

B. If the family head does not live in the apartment since birth, write the last two digits of the year in which entered the apartment.

For example:
If the family's head started living in the apartment in 1973, write in the square: year of entrance to apartment 19 [7] [3].

C. If a person left the apartment for a period of less than 10 years and returned to it, write the year in which first started living in the apartment.

If a person left the apartment for a period of 10 years or more and returned to it, write the year in which returned to the apartment.

4. Question 3 -- explanations: Year apartment's construction ended

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 3.]

In each answer to this question, a range of years is mentioned. The person should match the completion year of the apartment's construction to the fitting range of years.
For example: if the apartment's construction was completed in 1970, circle number "3".

[p. 46]

Notice!
In the answer refer to the completion of the whole apartment. If renovation has been carried out in the apartment in a certain year and new rooms have been built -- do not refer to the renovation year as the construction completion year.

5. Question 4 -- explanations: Main arrangement for heating in winter

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 4.]
A. Specify only the main arrangement for heating the apartment in winter.

B. If there is more than one means of heating and the family finds it difficult to determine the main arrangement, mark the arrangement usually used more hours in a day.

6. Question 5 -- explanations: Main type of fuel used for heating the apartment in winter

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 5.]
A. Mark one answer only

B. If there is more than one type of fuel used for heating and the family finds it difficult to determine the main type of fuel - mark the type of fuel used more hours in a day.

[p. 47]

7. Question 6 -- explanations: Bath and/or shower

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 6.]

A. If the bath and/or shower are located outside the apartment -- mark the apartment has a bath and/or shower.

B. Mark the apartment has a bath and/or shower even when the bath/shower is shared by several apartments.

8. Question 7 -- explanations: Main device for heating water in bath or shower

Device for water-heating -- is a fixed device, connected to the water pipe, and which heats the water for the shower/bath (not a pot/water tank heated on the stove).
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 7.]

A. If several methods of water-heating are used throughout the year, mark the arrangement used most months.
For example: If water-heating is done via central heating in Dec.- Feb. and by an electric boiler the rest of the year -- mark answer 2.

B. If several methods of heating are used during the day, mark the arrangement used more hours.

Notice!
If the apartment has a solar water heater in which the water can also be heated using electricity -- mark solar water heater as the main water-heating arrangement.

9. Question 8 -- explanations: Bathroom

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 8.]
If the bathroom is located outside the apartment -- mark the apartment has a bathroom.
Mark the apartment has a bathroom even when it is shared by several apartments.

[p. 48]

10. Question 9 -- explanations: Home equipment

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 9.]
In this question, the family is asked about the home equipment found in the apartment. An answer should be marked regarding each item. If a certain item is not found in the apartment, circle number "2".

Notice!
Specify the existence of every item, even when not belonging to the person living in the apartment.
For example: A person renting an apartment in which there are an oven and TV belonging to the landlord -- will mark the existence of the oven and TV even though not belonging to him/her.

11. Question 10 -- explanations: Apartment ownership or rent

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 10.]

A. In answer 2 -- "rented with right to receive key money" the meaning is that the family pays rent for living in the apartment and is entitled for some payment, depending on the apartment's worth, when it wishes to leave.

B. When the apartment is not owned by the family and not rented by it - circle number 4 and specify the owner of the apartment.
For example: when the apartment belongs to a factory in which the family's head works, and he/she is not paying rent.

12. Question 11 -- explanations: From whom did you rent the apartment?

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 11.]

[p. 49]

Notice!
The question is intended only for families who replied they live in a rented apartment. Meaning - those who answered "2" or "3" in question 10.

13. Question 12 -- explanations: Car

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 12.]

A. If no car is in use by the family members mark answer "1".

B. If there is one car in use by the family members living in the apartment, mark answer "2" (even when the car is not owned by the family).

C. If more than one car re used by the family members, mark answer "3".

14. Question 13: Ownership of car

[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 13.]
Mark the owner of the car used by the family members.

15. Question 14: Income from sources other than work

The purpose of the question -- Receiving data regarding the family's total income family, in addition to the data regarding income from work (received in part B). The total income indicates the standard of living of different populations.
This information is of high importance when displayed in the context of the family's size, the level of education, occupation, dwelling place and other data received in the census.
[Instructions refer to a graphic of the census form including question 14.]

[p. 50]

A. The answer should include all incomes regularly received -- every month, whether received from Israel or from abroad. Do not include one-time incomes such as: compensations, inheritance, lottery winning, etc.

B. Register the family incomes, meaning if more than one family member has incomes not from work -- write the total sum of incomes of all household members.

C. If a family has regular incomes from several sources other than work -- make sure to write all kinds of income in the answer. For example: a family receiving payments from abroad, pension payments from the ministry of defense and income from rent.

D. If the family does not have any income in one of the clauses in the question, write "0" in the appropriate square. For example: if the family receives a social security children's allowance, but has no other not-from-work incomes -- write "0" in all other clauses of the question.

E. If the family has not registered the income correctly, correct accordingly: round the sum to the nearest shekel and write it from right to left.

F.
1. Social security children's allowance -- meaning the allowance received by each household for children under the age of 18 (in accordance with the number of children).

2. Social security old-age pension -- meaning the pension received in each household for persons aged 60 or 65 and over, in accordance with their family status.

3. Incomes from pension from workplace in Israel or a pension fund -- meaning the payments received for persons who worked for a continuous period prior to his/her retirement. The pension's sum depends upon the salary and time worked.
[p. 51]
4. Income from pension or reparations from abroad -- Immigrants from Germany and other countries, harmed by the Nazis are usually entitled for a monthly payment by the German government.

5. Other incomes from sources other than work -- meaning incomes from sources other than work received from various institutions.

[p. 52-117 are omitted.]