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[Israel]
Central Bureau of Statistics
1972 Census of Population and Housing

Enumerator's Manual: Stage A. (201)
[Translation of selected parts]

Chapter 4: Enumerator's Report Book

[p. 15]

2. What is a 'household'?

A household is a group of people living together regularly, in one apartment, and prepares most of the meals together. Usually, a household coincides with members of a family living together in one apartment, but not always.

2a. A single person is a separate household.
2b. There are cases in which a household is comprised of a family and people who are not members of the family; or only of people who are not members of one family.
Examples:

In the apartment, live-

(1) A family (parents and children) and a sub-lessee. The housewife prepares the meals to all of them. [The original form includes a picture with a title 'One household']

[p. 16]

(2) A family (parents and children) and a sub-lessee. The sub-lessee prepares her meals separately. [The original form includes a picture with a title 'Two households']
(3) Three students prepare their meals together. [The original form includes a picture with a title 'One household']
(4) Three students prepare their meals separately [The original form includes a picture with a title 'Three households']

2c. Contrary to the above, there are cases in which family members do not belong to the household.

Examples:
(1) A son who got married and moved to another address.
(2) A family member who stays in old-age home.

Remember: A family member who has additional address for schooling, working, healing etc. -- does belong to the household.

[p. 25]

15. Who is the head of the household?

The head of the household is a person that the household members perceive as their leader.

[p. 26]

If the household members cannot decide who is the head of the household, use the following rules to determine it yourself:
15a. If the household is comprised of husband, wife and children: The husband is the head of the household.
15b. If the household is comprised of woman and children and the husband is missing: The woman is the head of the household.
15c. In other cases: Assign the main breadwinner as the head of the household, according to the decision of the household members.
15d. If a man has two wives and both are living in the same apartment: It is considered as one household, and the husband is the head of the household. If each wife lives in a separate apartment, each one of them constitutes a separate household, and the husband will be enumerated as the head of the household in both households.
(In this case you have to write down the address of the other apartment in question 15 of each questionnaire).

16. Total number of persons in the household

After ending the Stage A questionnaire for the household members, copy the total number of persons you have written in question 26, to column 10 in the enumerator's report book (See explanation below).

[p. 33]

Chapter 5: Stage A Questionnaire

I Types of questionnaires

You will have two types of questionnaires for your work:
(1) Questionnaires filed in a binder with preprinted data from the population register on its upper part, including:
In the first row -- last name, first name, father's name, address and year of birth.
In the second row -- cell number, personal identification number (PIN) and auxiliary number.
These questionnaires will be called here: Questionnaires with register data.
These are questionnaires of people registered in the population register who have an address in the cell area.
(2) Questionnaires in the envelope with a preprinted cell number only.
These questionnaires will be called: Empty questionnaires.
You will fill-in empty questionnaires for people living in the cell who have no questionnaires with register data, and for empty apartments.
If you will run out of empty questionnaires (questionnaires with a preprinted cell number only) ask your supervisor to bring you blank questionnaires, and you will have to write down the cell number in the appropriate boxes.

[p. 36]

IV How to fill-in the questionnaire

First line in the questionnaire:
The first line in the questionnaire is assigned for the following data: last name, first name, father's name, address and year of birth.
These personal data are preprinted. Do not alter or correct them, except for name changes (like conversion to Hebrew name or a change of name because of marriage).
(Tell the residents that this correction of name does not replace the formal updating of the population register, required by law to be done by the resident himself).
In the empty questionnaires -- you have to fill-in this line. There is no need to fill-in the year of birth.

Question 1: Enumeration-cell number

The enumeration-cell number will be preprinted on the questionnaires. If you will run out of questionnaires with preprinted cell number, you will have to fill-in the cell number in each questionnaire that you will use.
The cell number is preprinted -- it is forbidden to alter or correct it. [Illustration of the question].

Question 2: Personal Identification Number (PIN)

One of the most important details to be collected in the population census is the PIN.
2a. The importance of the PIN
Each resident in the country has a PIN (even babies who are just born). Each resident has only one PIN that only he has received. It means that it is impossible that one resident will have two PINs or several residents will have the same PIN.
The PIN is used to match (the collected data) with the (data of the same person in the) population register, and to prevent duplications when counting the residents in the census, in cases where the same people are enumerated in several places.
An example: A student who has moved to another town for his studies might be enumerated in his parents' house and in his schooling address.

2b. Who should you write the PIN for?
The PIN is already preprinted for people who have questionnaires in the binder.
You have to fill-in an empty questionnaire and to write down the PIN, for people with no questionnaire in the binder.
The PIN is preprinted in the questionnaire. It is forbidden to alter or correct it.

2c. How to write down the PIN?
Write the PIN from right to left hand side. Start writing in the right box, each digit in a separate box.
- When the PIN has less than 7 characters and has no serial letter, the boxes on the left-hand side will remain empty.

[p. 37]

Example: [The original form has an illustration of a PIN with blank boxes on the left-hand side]
- When the PIN has less than 7 characters and has a serial letter, convert the letter to a number and write it in the most left-hand side box (If the letter is A change it to 1, B to 2 etc.).
Example: The number E/18473 will be written like that: 5018473.

2d. How to get the PIN?
You have to copy the PIN from the early questionnaire. If there is no early questionnaire, copy the number under the picture from the identification card (ID card).
- PINs of children are written in their father's ID card or their mother's (or in both) on page 6.
- In new ID cards, issued during the last year, the spouse's PIN is written on page 14.
- If the ID card is not in the apartment at the time of the enumeration, you can find the PIN in each of the following documents: (See photocopy of documents at the end of the enumerator's manual, pp. 86-92).
1. Membership card of Histadrut HaOvdim (trade union) (Kupat Holim card (medical insurance card)) -- photocopy a.
2. Membership card of another medical insurance (Kupat Holim Amamit or others) -- photocopy b.
3. A pay slip (from the government or other big institutions) -- photocopy c.
4. Military reserve card or a veteran's card -- photocopy d.
5. Birth card.
6. Driver license or vehicle license -- photocopy e.
7. 'Ole card' (immigrant to Israel) or a card of a temporary resident.
8. A student card of the universities or the Technion (tech university) -- photocopy f.
9. A card of being supported, from the welfare ministry -- photocopy g.
10. Any document from the Social Security institution, property tax or revenue tax institution -- photocopy h.
11. Confirmation letter of registration to school- photocopy i.
12. Registration note of a baby or a new emigrant -- photocopy j.
13. Any personal invoice given by the government (and the attached slip).
14. An Israeli passport.

[p. 38]

If the person does not have any of these documents, but he remembers his PIN, write it as he says it.
If no document is available in the apartment and the person is not at home or does not remember his PIN, leave a card in the apartment for filling in the PIN (See chapter 6, pp. 64-65).

Question 3: Auxiliary number

3a. The questionnaires that carry register data are filed in a binder according to addresses, and in each address according to alphabetical order of the last name. Each questionnaire has a preprinted sequential number in the cell, given according to the order in the binder. The first questionnaire in the binder carries the sequential number 1001, the second 1002, 1003 etc.
This number is called an auxiliary number.

This number is also printed in the alphabetical index, on the right hand side of the last name.
(See explanation about the alphabetical index in the sixth chapter, p. 61)

3b. For a person listed in the alphabetical index, with no questionnaire with register data in the binder -- copy the auxiliary number from column 1 in the index to the Stage A questionnaire.
This number will help you identify the people who live in the cell according to the population register, even if no preprinted questionnaire has been prepared for them.

3c. For a person with no questionnaire with register data in the binder, and who is not listed in the alphabetical index, and therefore has no auxiliary number -- leave these boxes empty.

Question 4: Household number in the cell

You have to copy from column 7 in the visitation record page in the enumerator's report book, the number of the household in the cell.
[Skipped over the examples]
[p. 39]

Question 5: Person number

Write here the sequential number of each person within each household.
The order of the people will be determined by the reference to the head of the household:

5a. The sequential person number of the head of the household will always be 1.

5b. The person number of his wife will be 2.

5c. The person numbers of the sons and daughters will follow the numbers of the head of the household and his wife, according to their age from the first born to the youngest.

5d. After them, will come the sons and daughters-in-laws of the head of the household, from the oldest to the youngest.

5e. After them, their children, i.e. the grandchildren of the head of the household, who will get a person number according to the age order, from the oldest to the youngest.

[p. 40]

5f. Following the above, list the person numbers of other relatives belonging to the same household (like the parents of the head of the household, his wife's parents, brother-in-law, brother, cousin) according to their age.

5g. Finally, list the other people who are not family relatives (like friends, sub-lessees, a house cleaner, a care taker, who live and eat with the family members).

Remember: Write the person number and the household number in the cell accurately. Any error will deteriorate the findings (and have the impact) as if you have never filled-in the questionnaire.

Question 6: Relation to the head of the household

Circle the appropriate number.
6a. Stepson and an adopted son are registered as sons.

6b. When a man has two wives and both are living in the same apartment -- they comprise one household, where the husband is the head of the household. For each wife circle the number near the category 'his wife', in the column 'relation to the head of the household'.

[p. 41]

Question 7: Year of birth/age

You have to ask this question although the answer is printed on the questionnaires with the population register data. We ask this question in the census since occasionally, the register data is not accurate. The pre-printed number is supporting information only.

7a. Write the year of birth in four boxes.

7b. If only the age is known, write it in the two right-hand side boxes, and in the remaining two boxes write zeros.

7c. If only the Hebrew year is known, you have to use the conversion table from Hebrew to civilian (Gregorian) year, that you can find on the last page of the enumerator's report book.

7d. If the year of birth or the age are unknown, and the questionnaire has the register's data, copy the preprinted data from the upper part of the questionnaire, after finding out if the printed year (of birth) matches approximately the age of the member of the household.

7e. In a rare case, where year of birth and age are unknown, and there is no questionnaire with register data for that person, or the preprinted register data does not match with the person's real age, try to estimate the age with the help of the family members.

Question 8: Month of birth

8a. Write down the civilian (Gregorian) month number, as in the following example:
[The original form includes an illustration of: October as 10; February as 2; January as1]
The months' numbers are written in parentheses in the conversion table from Hebrew to civilian (Gregorian) month on the back cover of the enumerator's report book.

8b. If only the Hebrew month is known, use the conversion table from Hebrew to civilian (Gregorian) month in the enumerator's report book.

8c. If the month of birth is unknown, leave these boxes empty.

[p. 42]

Question 9: Sex

Circle the appropriate number.

Question 10: Marital status

Circle the appropriate number.
When the household members have difficulties defining their status, act according to the following guidelines:
(1) A separated couple, not legally divorced, is considered married.
(2) A couple living in the same household, not legally married, is also considered married unless otherwise declared.

Question 11: Is he/she: Jewish, Moslem etc.?

Circle the appropriate number.
11a. If a person is Christian, belonging to a different congregation from the main three mentioned in the questionnaire, like Baptist, you have to write it on the dotted line without marking a circle,
Attention: there is no number near it (Other Christian category).
[The original form includes an illustration of the question's categories including: Jewish, Moslem, Catholic Greek, Orthodox Greek, Latino (Catholic), Other Christian]
Examples of Christian congregations: Armenian-Catholic, Armenian Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Coptic Catholic, Anglican, Baptist (See supplementary list on page 96).

11b. If the person is not Jewish, Moslem, Christian or Druze -- write down the group that he belongs to, on the dotted line at the end of question 11 -- "other" (like: Samaritan, Bahaman).
Here too, do not circle any number. (Attention, there is no number near the 'other' category).

11c. If you encounter answers like Atheist, Canaanite, Israeli etc., write the answer given by the person, under 'other'.

Question 12: Place of birth

In this question circle the number of the category 'Israel' for all Israeli born, for Israelis born in Eretz Israel (Country of Israel, before the State of Israel) within the borders of the British Mandate, and also for people born in the territories occupied by the Israeli Defense Forces.

[p. 43]

Question 13: Country of birth (The explanation refers to country of origin)

In this question you have to refer to the country of birth according to its present borders (except for Israel, whose borders definition is in question 12).

13a. Foreign born: Write down their country of birth.

13b. Israeli born: write down their father's country of birth.

13c. You have to circle the number of the category Israel only for Israeli born whose father was also born in Israel.

13d. Countries of birth are written in alphabetical order except for Israel, which is written first.

13e. If the country of birth is not printed on the questionnaire, write that on the dotted line near the category 'other country -- namely' (Attention, do not circle any number).
Example: Belgium will be written as follows: [The original form includes an illustration of the question with Belgium written under 'other']

Question 14: To people born abroad -- Year of Aliya (migration to Israel)

14a. For foreign born: write here the last two digits of the year of Aliya.
Example: Year of Aliya 1936, write like that [The original form includes an illustration with 36 written].
For Israeli born, leave these boxes empty.

14b. A person immigrated before 1900
For a person immigrated (to Israel) before 1900, write the number 8 on the printed number 9.
Example: A person migrated in the year 1885, it is printed [An illustration of 19_ _]
You have to write as follows [An illustration of 1885]

[p. 44]

14c. Year of Aliya is unknown

(1) When the household member remembers how many years ago he immigrated to Israel, use the table on the back cover of the enumerator's report book to change the number of years to year of Aliya.
(2) When the household member does not remember how many years ago he immigrated to Israel, leave these boxes empty.

14d. A person who immigrated more than once to Israel:
For a person who immigrated to Israel more than once -- you have to write down the year of the first migration, unless he was abroad for more than 10 years.
For a person who stayed in Israel as a temporary resident, or as a tourist, who left abroad and returned as a new immigrant, you have to write down the year of immigration.

14e. A person who migrated from Cyprus during the establishment of the State:
For people who arrived from Cyprus during the establishment of the State, write the year of arrival from Cyprus (There were WWII refugees' camps in Cyprus).

14f. A person who 'entered' the country
Temporary residents and tourist who stay in Israel over a year -- for them the year of entrance will be the year of migration. If these people have changed their status to 'potential immigrants' or to immigrants -- their year of Aliya will be the year in which they have changed status.
(Potential immigrant is a person who immigrated to Israel, and has part of the rights given to a new immigrant for a duration of three years, yet he is not a resident. As long as he in a status of potential immigrant, he can regret it).

Question 15: Does he have an address in addition to this one?

15a. Ask the question as it is printed on the questionnaire: "Does he have an address additional to this one (for schooling, work, therapy etc.)?"
Do not determine if there is an additional address. Allow the people of the household to determine it themselves.
If the person answers that he does not have additional address, circle the number 1 'no' and skip questions 16-19.
If the person answers that he has additional addresses, circle the number 2 'yes' and write the address on the dotted line on the left-hand side. Continue to the next question.
There are cases in which you will enumerate a person in his studying or working address, and he will give you his family's address as a second address.
Examples: A student living in another town for studying; A married man living out of his family's address, for work.
Do not write a military address as an additional address.

[p. 45]

15b. When the family has difficulties deciding if there is an additional address, follow these rules:

(1) If the person stays in another residential address for a month or more (for schooling, work, therapy etc.) -- mark the option that he does have an additional address, and write it down on the dotted line.
If a person stays less than a month in another residential address, circle the number near the option 'No'.
(2) If a person is in jail, hospital for chronic patients, hospital for mentally ill, institution for retarded people, institution for juvenile delinquents -- write it as an additional address even if he has stayed there less than a month.
'A month' is the last month till the arrival of the enumerator.

Question 16: Did he sleep in the additional address four nights a week, in the last month?

- If the answer is no: circle the number 1
- If the answer is yes: circle the number 2.

Question 17: To a married man/woman only -- 'Does your spouse live in the additional address?'

- If the answer is no: circle the number 1
- If the answer is yes: circle the number 2.

Question 18: Does not live in the cell -- write down the reason

During the enumeration process, you will find in the binder questionnaires with register data of people who do not live in the cell, and therefore you do not have to enumerate them.
By encircling the appropriate number, you supply the reason for not enumerating the person.
Possible reasons are:

18a. Deceased -- if died before midnight of census-day.

18b. Emigrated abroad -- meaning a person who left the country for good.

18c. Stays abroad for over a year. For example: Stays abroad for schooling or works abroad for over a year continuously.

18d. Lives outside the enumeration-cell -- for a person who does not live in your cell. You have to write his present address: locality, street, house number.

Remember: Do not circle the answer for people who live in your cell in a different address than the preprinted one or for people with two addresses when one of them is in your cell. Fill-in the questionnaires with the preprinted register data.
When the reason given is not certain, do not circle the number, but write a question mark '?' on the left hand side of the reason.

[p. 46]

18e. Other reason -- When there is some other reason for not enumerating a person, you have to circle the number 5 -- 'other reason' and write down the answer on the dotted line.
If you'll find our that one person has two questionnaires with the same register data on them, fill-in one questionnaire, and on the other circle the number 5 and write 'double questionnaire' on the dotted line.
If the person is unknown, do not write anything on the questionnaire at this stage.
Do not fill-in the rest of the details required in the questionnaire for people with an answer on question 18.

Question 19: The PIN is not identical - There are rare cases where the PIN on the top of the questionnaire, which has been preprinted with other register data, is not identical to the PIN in the person's ID card, although the name, address and other data do match.
In this case, circle the number '6'.
Do not fill-in any other information in the questionnaire that carries the preprinted register data.
You have to fill-in an empty questionnaire for this person (except for question 19); and to copy the correct PIN as written in the ID card.

Questions 20-26
These questions refer to the address, apartment and number of persons in the household. You have to fill-in these questions in each questionnaire of the head of the household only.

Attention:
- If there are two or more households living in the apartment, fill-in these questions in the questionnaire of each head of a household.
- In a case of a household living in two apartments -- you have to fill-in questions 20-25 for each apartment in two separate questionnaires, and question 26 (total number of persons in the household) -- in the questionnaire of the head of the household only.
Questions 20-25 for the second apartment are to be filled-in in the questionnaire of the oldest person who live in the apartment.

Question 20: Street number

Copy the street number from column 3 in the enumerator's report book.
Each street number is of four digits, including zeros (example: 0532).

Question 21: House number

Copy the house number from column 4 in the enumerator's report book. When the house number is of one digit -- leave the two left boxes empty.

Question 22: Sub-number

Copy the sub-number from column 5 in the enumerator's report book, if there is any. If there is no sub-number, leave this box empty.

[p. 47]

23. Question 23: Apartment number

Copy the apartment number from column 6 in the enumerator's report book.
Example: Street number, house number (including sub-number), apartment number as written in the enumerator's report book.
The same data as copied to the Stage A questionnaire.

Question 24: Number of rooms in the apartment

Ask how many rooms there are in the whole apartment, and write it down in the questionnaire.

24a. When asking for the number of rooms in the apartment, the intention is not to count only those used by the household, but all the rooms in the apartment; including rooms used for businesses only, or for both businesses and residence.

24b. If there are two or more households in one apartment -- you have to write down the number of rooms in the whole apartment in the questionnaire of each household.

24c. Half a room is counted as a room.

24d. The dining room is counted as a room.

24e. If the family considers the entrance room or the dining room as a room or as a half-room, include them in the count.

24f. A kitchen, a bath tab room, or a shower and a bathroom are not considered as rooms.

24g. When there are more than 9 rooms in the apartment, write down 9.
Examples:

1. If you are told that there are 3.5 rooms in the apartment, write down 4 rooms.

[p. 48]

2. A family has a 5- room apartment and it rents two rooms to sub-lessees, who eat separately from the family. The apartment owners live in 3 rooms. You have to write down in the questionnaire of the apartment owner and also in the questionnaires of the sub-lessees -- 5 rooms.
3. There are 4 rooms in the apartment. One of the rooms is used as a sewing workshop only, and no one lives in it. Include it in the rooms count and write -- 4 rooms.

Question 25: Type of apartment

1 Usual-apartment
2 Unusual-apartment
Circle the appropriate number according to the following definitions:

25a. Usual-apartment -- A place, used for residence, that includes living and service- room or rooms (at least a kitchen or a cooking corner, and a bathroom), and that each room is reachable without passing through an open area (an area without a roof), or a closed area shared with other people, who do not live in the same place (shared corridor, shared entrance room, shared balcony etc.).
Most apartments built in the last twenty years are usual-apartments (like in apartment houses, housing blocks etc.).
If there is a sub-lessee in a usual-apartment, write in both questionnaires, of the family and of the sub-lessee, that it is a usual-apartment.

25b. Any other apartment will be unusual-apartment.

Examples:
1. A room or rooms without a kitchen or a cooking corner, or without a bathroom.
2. An apartment where in order to get to (at least) one of its living or service rooms, one has to pass through a shared area, used also by others.

In a case of a doubt, write: unusual-apartment.

[p. 49]

Examples of unusual-apartments:
a. The bathroom is out of the apartment [The original form includes an illustration].

b. Two unusual-apartments -- In order to get to each one of them, one has to go through a shared corridor. [The original form includes an illustration].

c. In order to get into each room, one has to go through an open balcony [The original form includes an illustration].

Question 26: Total number of persons in the household

Write the total number of persons in the household in question 26. This number has to be identical to the number of questionnaires that you have filled-in in the household.

Question 27: The apartment:

1- is empty 2- accommodates people not included in the census population
If you encounter an empty apartment (See definition on page 23, item 12f), circle the
number 1.When there are people in the apartment who do not belong to the census population (An apartment with residents not belonging to the census population -- see definition on page 23, item 12f) circle the number 2.

[p. 50]

In addition, you have to fill-in the following details in the questionnaire:
- On the upper part of the questionnaire, write 'Empty apartment' in the 'Last name' field or 'Apartment with people not to be enumerated'.
- Enumeration-cell (question 1) -- if it is not preprinted.
- Address details (questions 20-23).
- Number of rooms (question 24). Ask neighbors or estimate it according to the other apartments in the building.
- Usual- or unusual-apartment (question 25). Ask neighbors or estimate it according to the other apartments in the building.

Questions 28-31

Questions regarding the building:
Answer these questions in the questionnaire of the head of the household in the first open apartment in the address (even if there are two buildings with the same address).

Question 28: Year of completion of the construction of the apartment

28a. For buildings whose construction ended in 1948 or before -- write 48 including abandoned property (abandoned during the Independence War).

28b. For houses whose construction ended after 1948 -- write the last two digits of the year.

28c. If the exact year is unknown but the building has existed before 1948 -- you can accept this answer and write 48.

28d. In a building whose construction has been completed after 1948, but the family members do not know the exact year -- try to ask the long-time tenants of the building about this detail. At least try to get an assumed year of completion. If you are unsuccessful, leave these boxes empty.

28e. As for buildings built in a specific year, and more rooms added to it in a latter year- you have to refer to the year in which most of the building has been constructed. Meaning that if the addition to the building is small, write the year of completion of the old building. However, if most of it has been built in a latter stage, refer to the latter date.

[p. 51]

Question 29: Number of floors

You can answer this question by looking at the building without asking the tenants. Write the number of floors in the appropriate box.
A floor is a space between two parallel floors, whose height is over 2.5 meter.

29a. Count all the floors in an apartment or a business, including a basement. If the basement is used by the building residents as a warehouse or as a (bomb) shelter, and there is no apartment or a business in it -- do not count it as a floor.

29b. In an address with several entrances or several buildings (with no separate address mark), that have different number of floors in each one of them -- count the number of floors in the highest entrance or in the highest building.

30. Question 30: (Bomb) Shelter

Circle the appropriate number.
Shelter -- A room built with cement, under or over ground level, in- or outside the building and adjacent to it, that, according to the residents, can be used as a shelter during a war.

30a. Public shelter or a shelter in a separate building not used for dwelling is not considered as a shelter (of the building). The reason is that we are interested in the information about the number of buildings used for dwelling, that have their own private shelter, and who do not need public shelter.

30b. If the tenants have difficulties deciding if they have a shelter, circle in any case the answer '1-There is'. (Later on people from the Civil Defense Forces will visit each shelter, where a 'there is' answer has been given, and check its quality).

Question 31: The building material of the outer walls

You can answer this question by looking at the building without asking the tenants. Circle the appropriate number.

31a. If the walls of the building are made of several materials (like stone and cement), mark the material most of the walls are made of, in the questionnaire.
Example: For a house with three cement walls and one of stone, mark 'cement' (see example at the bottom of the page).

31b. If two walls are made of one material and two of another, or each wall is made of a different material, the outer walls material will be determined by the material of the front wall.
Front wall is the side looking to the street, by which the address is determined.

31c. 'Stone and blocks' means natural or artificial stone, or silicate blocks (white or red).

31d. Plastered building-wall, that you can't determine what material it is made of, will be considered as 'blocks, cement, plaster'.

31e. For a tent, circle the number 3.

[p. 59]

Chapter 6: Additional Forms

1. Early questionnaire

1a. Who should get an early questionnaire and when?

Early questionnaires will be distributed to all residents of the country, by mail, few days prior to the beginning of the census. The questionnaires will be with no name or address and will be put in the post boxes.

1b. The questionnaire's format

The questionnaire is formatted as a table with columns and rows; the title of each column is the variable required.
For each person there is a separate row.

1c. What are the residents asked to do in the questionnaire?

There are explanations and writing instructions in the questionnaire, as well as a request from the Government Statistician to fill-in the questionnaire within two days and hand it out to the enumerator.
The residents will be asked to fill-in all the personal details needed for the census, also for family members who may not be at home during the enumerator's visit.

1d. The aim of the early questionnaire

Filling-in the early questionnaire by the household members will facilitate the data collection during the enumeration; save you time and avoid repeated visits to the same household, in order to get missing details.
The questionnaire has another use:
When the household members do not fill-in the early questionnaire, and they do not have the PIN and other data item/s, you use the early questionnaire as a means to collect the missing data in a revisit.
When you come to an apartment, ask for the early questionnaire and present an example.

1e. What do you have to do with the questionnaire?

(1) When the early questionnaire is filled-in -- copy the data written by the members of the household on the early questionnaire to the Stage A questionnaire, while reading the data aloud, in the presence of the household members. This is to make sure that the details written on the early questionnaire are correct.
Pay attention when assigning a person number according to the relation to the head of the household (as in pages 39-40, item 5) and not according to the order in the early questionnaire.
You do not have to collect the early questionnaire once you have copied the data.
(2) When the early questionnaire is not filled-in -- there are several options:
a. The household members give you all the data required -- write them down in Stage A questionnaire. Leave the early questionnaire empty. You do not have to collect it.

[p. 60]

b. The PIN and other data item/s are missing when you fill-in the Stage A questionnaire -- take the early questionnaire from the family. If they do not have it, pull out an empty early questionnaire, write down the names of the people whose data are missing, circle the row in the relevant column, ask them to fill it in and to hand you the questionnaire in the revisit.

c. If only the PIN is missing -- leave a PIN card (as will be explained in item 3, pp. 64-65).