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[p. 1]

Census of Population of Ireland

Sunday, April 24 2016


Enumerator's Manual

Confidential
If found return to: Central Statistics Office PO Box 2016 FREEPOST F4726
Swords
Co. Dublin. K67 D2X4

LoCall 1850 2016 04

[Table of contents, pages 3-5, has been omitted]

[p. 6]

Chapter 1 Introduction

1.1 Introduction
The Census of Population is carried out every five years and counts all dwellings, households and persons in the country. The Census is the largest statistical operation carried out in Ireland, involving around 4,700 enumerators. The next census will be taken on Sunday 24 April 2016 (hereafter referred to as Census Night). Each enumerator will be assigned an Enumeration Area (hereafter referred to as EA) and will be required to identify all dwellings and deliver a census form(s) to each household in the EA before Census Night and to collect and check each form for completeness commencing Monday 25 April. In order to ensure a full and accurate census it is vital that the procedures documented in this manual and in training videos are carefully applied

1.2 Enumerator's manual
This manual provides instructions on how to carry out the enumeration. Because of the detail involved, you should read it through once to initially familiarize yourself with the structure, timing and main tasks involved in enumeration. Then, as each phase of the enumeration arises, study the relevant chapters in detail before beginning that phase. Your field supervisor will train you thoroughly in all aspects of your duties. As your work proceeds, use your manual to ensure that you are carrying out the enumeration accurately and effectively. To complement the manual, short videos have been produced which document the four enumeration stages of delivery, collection, summarization and packing. These can be accessed by googling "enumerator training videos" or via the following link http://www.census.ie/How-we-do-it/enumerator-training

If you are unsure of any procedure, ask your field supervisor before implementing it.

1.3 Role of the enumerator
As a census enumerator you are personally responsible for the enumeration of all dwellings, households and persons in your EA. Your work is key to the success of the Census.

As an enumerator your job is:

1. To locate and identify every dwelling - house, flat, apartment, mobile home etc. - in your EA
2. To write the dwelling's geography codes, including address and eircode, onto the census form
3. To deliver a census form to every occupied dwelling before Census Night
4. To collect completed census forms after Census Night
5. To check that all householders have filled out their census form correctly
6. To count the number of people on each census form and to summarize this information
7. To complete a reconciliation form for every dwelling from which no census form was returned such as vacant or derelict dwellings and commercial only buildings
8. To document and summarize the enumeration process in your EA using your map etc.

To do this you have been given:

1. A map of your area with all dwellings marked clearly, and identified with a unique number
2. An enumerator record book (ERB) which lists the address of every dwelling on your map
3. Enough census forms for your area
4. A set of various administrative forms used to handle absent households etc.
5. A mobile phone.
[p. 7]

The enumeration must be done exactly as instructed in this manual and any other supplementary instructions/field circulars which may be issued by the Central Statistics Office (CSO). You must not delegate or sub-contract any enumeration tasks to any other person.

1.4 Main tasks and timetable for enumerators

Monday 21 March to Tuesday 22 March: First enumerator training session

- Introduction to the Census
- Visual enumeration and form delivery
- Enumerator assessment worksheet

Wednesday 23: Route planning/start of field work

- Visual enumeration and form distribution.

Thursday 24 March: Enumerator training session post kick off

Friday 25 March to Wednesday 20 April: Continued visual enumeration and form distribution

Thursday 21 April: Second enumerator training session

- Form collection and summarization
- Field supervisor quality checking of work, enumerator assessment worksheet

Friday 22 April to Sunday 24 April: Visit communal establishments and tie up loose ends

Sunday 24 April: Census Day

Monday 25 April: Collect forms from communal establishments and transient populations

Tuesday 26 April to Sunday 22 May: Form collection and checking

Monday 23 May to Thursday 26 May: Wrap-up and summarization and post back Form C

Friday 27 May

- Return all materials to field supervisor
- End of enumerator contract

Daily SMS feedback on the daily total of form deliveries and collections.

[p. 8]

1.5 Confidentiality

All information obtained by an enumerator relating to individuals or households in the course of the Census must be treated as strictly confidential.

An Identity Card (ID) and lanyard is issued to each enumerator. It must be worn so that it is clearly visible at all times and produced whenever you are introducing yourself to the householder or any other person.

On appointment, each enumerator is appointed as an Officer of Statistics as defined in the Statistics Act, 1993. The Enumerator is bound by the conditions of this Act. The relevant sections of the Act are 32, 33, 38 and 44.

Statistics Act, 1993

32. All information furnished by a person, undertaking or public authority under this Act shall be used only for statistical compilation and analysis purposes.

33. No information obtained in any way under this Act or the repealed enactments which can be related to an identifiable person or undertaking shall, except with the written consent of that person or undertaking or the personal representative or next-of-kin of a deceased person, be disseminated, shown or communicated to any person or body except as follows:

- For the purposes of a prosecution for an offence under this Act;
- To officers of statistics in the course of their duties under this Act;
- For the purposes of recording such information solely for the use of the Office in such form and manner as is provided for by a contract in writing made by the Director General which protects its confidentiality to his satisfaction.

38. Any person who uses information furnished under this Act or the repealed enactments in contravention of section 32 of this Act or willfully discloses information relating to any identifiable person or undertaking in contravention of section 33 of this Act shall be guilty of an offence.

44. A person guilty of an offence under any provision of this Act shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding €1,374, or on conviction on indictment, to a fine not exceeding €44,440.

You must bear in mind the following in relation to confidentiality:

- Information relating to any individual must not be passed on to any other person or body. If necessary, the information may be passed on to another Officer of Statistics.

- No attempt must be made to obtain information other than that required by the census.

- No remarks, even of a casual nature, regarding your enumeration work in one household should be made to another household.

- In line with the strong emphasis on confidentiality in the census, all field staff are prohibited from discussing the census in private emails, internet forums, social media or radio programs.

- Any person guilty of an offence under the Statistics Act, 1993 may be liable to a fine of up to €1,374 on summary conviction or up to €44,440 on conviction on indictment.

Two crates (one red, one black) are provided for the safe storage of all census forms and materials:

- Completed returns must be kept in these cases at all times except when you have them in the field or are actually working on them.

- Both crates must be kept closed at all times.

- You must ensure that nobody, including members of your own household, has access to census materials.

- Only you, your field supervisor or an official of the CSO is entitled to see the returns.

- You must also ensure that census documents are never left unattended in cars.

- You must carry your map, ERB, forms and other materials in the satchel provided during the course of the fieldwork. Satchels should never be used for any other purpose.

[p. 9]

1.6 Glossary of important census terms

This section contains a list of census terms which are used throughout this manual. You will need to be familiar with these terms to fully understand this manual.

Eircode: An identifiable postcode for every individual address - rural or urban.

Geo-directory: A national database of addresses compiled by an post and ordnance survey Ireland. This is the source of information on households and communal establishments in your ERB.

Enumeration area (EA): The area in which you must deliver and collect census forms as defined on your census maps.

Small area (SA): Your enumeration area is divided into a number of small areas, each of which will be assigned an alphabetic code. Small areas are the finest level of geography for which census results are published.

D number (D.No.): A unique number assigned to every dwelling, household and communal establishment (hotels, hospitals, prisons etc.) in your enumeration area.

Enumerator map: A map of your enumeration area. The map shows the exact location and D Number of all known dwellings and communal establishments in your EA.

Enumerator record book (ERB): A book containing a listing of all D numbers in your enumeration area along with the address, eircode and enumeration alerts. You will use it to record details of your visits to each dwelling in your enumeration area.

Unlisted dwellings: Dwellings which are in your enumeration area but are not listed in your ERB. Where the enumerator finds an unlisted dwelling or additional household they will assign it a unique D number beginning with 9001. The new D number should also be marked on your map and in your ERB.

Delivery grid: A numbered grid, used to record which households you have delivered census forms to. They are used to help you send daily text messages to CSO on your progress.

Collection grid:Like the delivery grid, but used to record form collection.

[p. 10]

1.7 Definition of a dwelling

Before you begin to deliver forms you must understand the concepts of a dwelling and a household. The Census collects information about all persons individually and also about their living arrangements, so that they can be grouped into households even if a household comprises of only one person.

A dwelling is a self-contained unit of living accommodation that is occupied or, if vacant, is intended for occupation by one or more households. A dwelling should have a separate access to the street (direct or via a garden or grounds) or to a common space within a building (staircase, passage gallery, etc.).

Examples include: a family home, a family home on a farm, a separate flat, apartment or bed-sit, a caravan, a caretaker's accommodation located in an office building, living accommodation over a shop.

1.8 Definition of a private household

A private household comprises either one person living alone or a group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address with common housekeeping arrangements - that is, sharing at least one meal a day or sharing a living room or sitting room.

In the rare case where a dwelling houses more than one private household, each individual household within the dwelling should be assigned a separate unique identifying dwelling number, or D.No. See section 2.13 for more details.

Examples of private households

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Private household example
(B) No. of separate households
(C) Notes

Private household example: A person living alone.
No. of separate households: One household.
Notes: If the person is absent from the dwelling on Census Night, a form E must be completed (see section 4.2).

Private household example: A single parent living together with his/her children. All present on Census Night.
No. of separate households: One household.
Notes: All household members present on Census Night should be entered on list 1, page 3 of the household form.

Private household example: A single parent living together with his/her children. All present on Census Night.
No. of separate households: One household.
Notes: All household members present on Census Night should be entered on list 1, page 3 of the household form.

Private household example: A husband and wife (or couple) living together with their children.
No. of separate households: One household.
Notes: All household members present on Census Night should be entered on list 1, page 3 of the household form.

[p. 11]

Private household example: A husband and wife (or couple) living together with their children. The household has an Italian student on an exchange program staying with them on Census Night. Their daughter is on an exchange in Cortina staying with the Italian student's family on Census Night.
No. of separate households: One household.
Notes: Only household members actually present on Census Night should be listed on List 1, page 3 of the household form. The Italian student should also be entered on List 1 as she is present in the household on Census Night. The daughter away in Cortina should be entered on list 2, page 3 of the household form as she is absent from the household on Census Night.

Private household example: A husband and wife (or couple) living with their married daughter and her husband and child.
No. of separate households: One household.
Notes: All household members present on Census Night should be entered on list 1, page 3 of the household form.

Private household example: Four nurses who are unrelated. All share a living room, but only three of the nurses usually take at least one meal a day together.
No. of separate households: One household. They all share a living room.
Notes: All the nurses are included on the same household form.

Private household example: D.No. 10 is a 3 story house converted into flats. Your ERB and map has only one address and D.No. listed. Each flat has its own hall door off the ground floor and first and second floor landings. Each flat is occupied by students. Each flat has its own common housekeeping arrangements.
No. of separate households: Three dwellings. Three households.
Notes: The ground floor flat should be assigned D.No. 10. The first floor flat is unlisted. It should be assigned the next available unique D.No. starting at 9001. The second floor flat is also unlisted. It should be assigned the next available D.No. e.g. 9002. The newly assigned D.Nos should be marked on the map beside D.No. 10 and an entry created in your ERB for each of the unique D.Nos generated. Try to clarify, where possible, if the three households have unique eircodes or whether they share the eircode of the originally listed dwelling.

Private household example: At D.No. 12 (a 3 bedroom apartment with one entrance) there are three students. The accommodation does not contain a living room. Two of the students usually take at least one meal a day together. The other student eats his/her meals separately.
No. of separate households: Two households sharing one dwelling. The two students who take at least one meal together would count as one household. The other student constitutes a separate household.
Notes: The two students who usually share a meal each day should be issued with one Household Form assigned D.No. 12. The other student gets his/her own Household Form. There are 2 households. The second household is unlisted. It will be assigned a new D.No. (assigned the next available D.No. in the 9001+ range). See section 2.13. The second household should have the same eircode as the first household in this instance.

[p. 12]

Private household example: A separated couple is living at D.No. 415 (a three bedroom semi). The separated husband lives upstairs and has separate housekeeping arrangements i.e. he cooks for himself and does not use the living room down stairs.
No. of separate households: Two households within one dwelling.
Notes: The husband and wife should both get separate Household Forms. One form should be assigned D.No. 415 and the other should be assigned the next available D.No. in the 9001+ range. Both households should have the same eircode as originally listed in the ERB.

1.9 Communal establishments (CEs) or non-private households

A communal establishment is defined as an establishment providing managed residential accommodation. Managed means full-time or part-time supervision of the accommodation.

In most cases (for example, prisons, large hospitals, hotels) communal establishments can be easily identified. However boarding houses1 with less than five boarders on Census Night should be treated as private households. Boarding houses with less than five borders should complete a household form and should include the manager and his/her family if they are on the premises that night. Larger boarding houses should be enumerated as communal establishments.

The following are examples of communal establishments or non-private households.

Hotel
Educational establishment
Prison
Boarding house
Religious community
Defense establishment (including ships)
Guest house
Children's home
Civilian ships, boats and barges
Bed and breakfast
Nursing home
Garda station
Hostel hospital / Nurses' home
Holiday campsite

Footnote: A boarding house is an establishment run for profit, which provides board (full or partial) and lodging for permanent or semi-permanent residents e.g. persons working away from home or university students during term time. Guest houses / B and Bs on the other hand cater for transient persons.

In the case of student residences where the accommodation is split into self-contained units accommodating 2-6 students, each self-contained unit should receive a household form.

1.10 Enumeration of communal establishments

- A listing form(s) listing all persons present on Census Night should be completed by the manager or person in charge. An individual form should be completed by each person present in the establishment on Census Night.

[p. 13]

- A proprietor, manager, head of the establishment or any member of staff who resides on the premises with his/her family must be regarded as a distinct private household. The household should be allocated a separate D.No. on the map and ERB, it should receive a separate Household Form and should be listed separately in the ERB.

- Any member of staff who resides on the premises alone (i.e. without a family) should be included on the listing form and should complete an individual form.

- Any member of staff who resides on the premises with a group of unrelated persons should be included on the listing form and should complete an individual form.

- Staff of an institution (e.g. hospital) who are working on a night shift on Census Night and who return to their own homes the following morning should not be enumerated in the institution. They should be enumerated at their homes.

- Each family in homeless accommodation or homeless families in hotels should receive a household form and a separate D.No. In such incidences, ensure that the eircode is filled in on the form ID on the front panel of the form. See appendix C for more detail on procedure. The same applies to families in direct provision centers for asylum seekers - see appendix D.

1.11 Present and absent persons

The census counts persons where they are on Census Night. Situations will arise where some or all persons in a household are absent from their home on Census Night.

Who is to be counted as present on Census Night? - list 1

- Include every person who spent Census Night in the dwelling or who arrived the following morning not having been enumerated elsewhere but had been in the country before midnight; even visitors who are only staying temporarily in the household should be included.

- Include all persons alive at midnight on April 24. Experience indicates that babies and very young children are sometimes omitted by the householder so care should be taken to ensure that all persons, regardless of age, are declared on the form.

- Do not include anyone who is temporarily away from home on April 24. They should be declared as absent (see list 2, page 3 of household form) and complete the questions at the back of the form.

- Do not include students who are away from home living in other accommodation on the night of April 24 (see list 2, page 3 of household form).

- Do not include babies born after midnight on Census Night.

Remember only persons who are actually in the country at midnight on Census Night should be enumerated in the census. Anyone who arrives from outside the country after midnight should not be counted as being present.

Who should be counted as absent on Census Night? - list 2

Persons who usually reside in a private household but who are temporarily away from home on Census Night should be entered on list 2, page 3 of the household form by the householder. The householder should also complete the questions relating to absent persons on pages 22-23 of the form in respect of each absent person.

[p. 14]

The following persons or classes of persons should be counted as absent persons:

- Household members who usually live at the address but are away from home on Census Night;

- Household members who usually live at the address but who are out of the country on Census Night;

- Primary, secondary and third level students who are absent on Census Night and are living away from home during term time.

Absent persons only applies to private households. Persons absent from communal establishments on Census Night are not covered as absent persons in the census.

If the entire household is temporarily absent on Census Night, a form E must be completed for the household. The form E procedure ensures that members of the household who spend Census Night elsewhere in Ireland are confirmed as enumerated at the location where they spend the night. See section 4.2.

1.12 Census geography

There are three key levels of geography which the enumerator needs to be aware of.

County: For census purposes the country is divided into 34 administrative counties. Each county is identified by a unique two digit code, e.g. 01 identifies County Carlow.

Enumeration area: An enumeration area (EA) is the area assigned to an enumerator.

Small area: Each EA is sub divided into a number of divisions called small areas indicated by an upper case letter, usually beginning with A. Small area boundaries are marked in blue on your map. Most EAs will contain a number of small areas assigned the small area codes A, B, C...

The small area code for each dwelling is pre-printed in the enumerator record book. The small area code for dwellings / households added to the ERB should be assigned by reference to the small area boundary on the map.

Summary of main forms

Forms to be completed by the public

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Form
(B) Function

Form: Household form.
Function: The main census form to be completed by private households. If there are more than 6 persons present in a household on Census Night, individual forms should be provided for the additional persons. Under no circumstances should more than one household form be delivered to a household unless it is a replacement for a lost or soiled form.

Form: Listing form.
Function: To be used for communal establishments (CEs). This form should be completed by the manager or person in charge of the establishment on Census Night.

Form: Individual form.
Function: Individual forms are completed: (1) by persons enumerated in CEs, (2) by individuals in private households who specifically request a separate form for privacy reasons or (3) where there are more than 6 persons present in the household on Census Night.

[p. 15]

For use by the enumerator in the field operation

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Form
(B) Function

Form: Enumerator record book (ERB).
Function: The ERB is used by the Enumerator to record the progress of enumeration from delivery to collection. It is pre-printed with the D.Nos, address and eircode details of dwellings in your EA. There are blank panels at the back of the ERB to record the D.Nos of unlisted addresses of habitable dwellings. The ERB is a very important and confidential document and cannot be reprinted. Do not lose it. Blank ERBs are available from your Field Supervisor should you run out of blank panels in your first ERB.

Form: Enumerator D. No. delivery and collection grids.
Function: These two grids are printed on A4 card, one for delivery and the other for collection. The grids are used to keep a daily record of form delivery / collection. You will need to refer to these grids when you send daily SMS message updates to CSO during the delivery and collection phases of enumeration.

Form: Calling card.
Function: This is a card which can be left at a dwelling if you are unable to make contact. You should complete all the information on the calling card including the date and time you called, when you will call back, your CSO mobile number, your name, the county, EA, and D. No. before delivering.

Form: Cen 1.
Function: when you have called 3 times to deliver a household form and failed to make contact with the householder it is permissible to deliver the household form without making contact if the dwelling is likely to be occupied on Census Night. Cen 1 is a covering note used to accompany the household form. You should not deliver a census form with a cen 1 before Friday April 8th.

Form: Rem 1.
Function: A reminder used if you fail to make contact with the householder on your fourth visit to collect the completed census form(s).

Form: Rem 2.
Function: A second reminder used if contact cannot be made with the householder after several visits to collect the completed census form(s).

Form: Ref 1.
Function: The Ref 1 form is issued when the rem 1 and rem 2 forms have been delivered but you still cannot make contact with the householder to collect the completed census form(s) or if the householder refuses to complete a delivered census form. The ref 1 is a formal request and will be issued by registered post by the regional office and will only be sent once your field supervisor has been notified.

Form: Form H.
Function: A form completed by the field supervisor when the householder posts their census form(s) directly to the regional office or CSO for privacy reasons. The regional office will send the census form(s) to the field supervisor. The completed census form(s) are retained by the field supervisor who issues the enumerator with a form H. The form H acts as a proxy form providing the enumerator with the information needed to complete the EA summary and is counted for payment purposes. Census forms received by CSO will be retained unless they are incomplete. You will receive an SMS from CSO indicating that the form has been received. Your field supervisor will complete a form H and give it to you for summarization.

Form: Form E.
Function: You should complete a form E when the entire household in a dwelling is away on Census Night. If the household spent Census Night elsewhere in the republic of Ireland, your field supervisor will initiate absent persons tracking to verify the absent persons were enumerated where they spent the night.

Form: Form EF.
Function: You use this form to fill in the names of absent household members and the address and eircode at which they spent Census Night on receiving a form E request from the field supervisor. You use the information on the form EF to check that the absent household members were in fact enumerated on the census form at the address where they claimed to have spent census night.

[p. 16]

Form: Reconciliation form.
Function: A reconciliation form must be completed for every dwelling / CE listed in your ERB for which you do not collect completed census forms.

Form: Form B.
Function: The form B is used by the enumerator to summarize the number of households and persons enumerated in each small area in their EA based on the census forms collected and any proxy forms H received from your supervisor.

Form: Form BR.
Function: The form BR is used by the enumerator to summarize the reconciliation forms completed for each small area in their EA.

Form: Form C.
Function: Form C is used to record the results of the summarization of your EA and to note the cause of any significant changes in the number of persons or households since the 2011 census in each small area. Form C provides you with a summary listing of the small areas contained in your EA along with summary data recorded in the 2011 census. The forms C for every EA in the country will be combined to produce the preliminary population count after the census. You will use the form C to indicate significant changes in the number of occupied dwellings and the number of people resident in the small areas in your EA compared to census 2011. If the number of occupied dwellings in a small area has changed by more than 10% since 2011, you are required to provide a reason as to why this occurred, e.g. buildings demolished, hotel closed, new housing estates etc. For more detailed information on how to complete a form C, please see section 7.9 and the summarization video.

Form: Form LS.
Function: This form provides a final count of the number of boxes of forms, the number of forms within each box and the total number of households for the EA. Form LS should be the last item to go into the plastic red crate being surrendered by you to your field supervisor at the end of the field operation. Please see chapter 8.

Form: Form L.
Function: This form is an invoice of items and census material (including completed census forms), being surrendered (in the red and black crates) by you to your field supervisor at the end of the field operation. Three copies of form L are to be given with the materials listed above to the field supervisor who will sign them. One copy will be inserted in the red crate, one copy will be returned to you and one copy will be retained by your field supervisor. Please see chapter 8.

Examine all these forms thoroughly and become fully familiar with their purpose and contents.

1.13 Confidential census return envelopes

You are provided with confidential census return Envelopes and a supply of address labels for your regional office. The labels can be affixed to the confidential envelopes which can be sent Freepost. The envelopes are marked 'confidential' with boxes to enter county and EA codes.

Confidential census envelopes are used in the following instances:

- When a householder, an individual in a household or a resident in a Communal Establishment indicates that they do not want the enumerator to see their completed census form, the form H procedure is used. You should put a label with the address of the regional office on the front of the envelope and 'form H' should be written onto the envelope before it is handed over. To avoid operational complexity, the number of forms H should be kept to an absolute minimum while bearing in mind that there may be no alternative but to use this procedure in a small number of cases. You will be provided with sheets of free post address sticky labels addressed to the regional office. They should be attached to the census privacy envelope to facilitate posting to the regional office. There will be one Irish address label on each sheet which should be used in cases where the householder has requested an Irish language form and for the confidential facility. If you run out of Irish labels the address can be hand written on the envelope.

[p. 17]

- A blank confidential envelope is used when an individual within a household requests an individual form for privacy reasons.

- To store soiled/damaged forms (envelopes should be marked 'soiled forms').

- In communal establishments when distributing the individual forms.

- With a cen1 form when delivering a census questionnaire to a household which could not be contacted prior to Census Night.

- Delivered with a rem 2 (or ref 1) form during collection to allow the householder to post the completed census form back to the regional office.

[p. 18]

Chapter 2 Visual enumeration and form delivery

The purpose of visual enumeration/form delivery is to identify every habitable dwelling, household and communal establishment within your EA and deliver census forms to them.

2.1 Ensuring 100% coverage

The enumerator is responsible for ensuring a successful Census. To ensure 100% coverage you must complete a full visual enumeration of your area as you deliver your census forms.

A full visual enumeration involves a comprehensive check of all buildings in your EA as well as checking that the information and details in your ERB and on your map are correct.

Visit every building in your EA. Some buildings are not easily visible. To ensure that no dwelling or possible place of human habitation has been overlooked you must traverse every length of public thoroughfare in your EA. You must see all buildings for yourself. Do not take anyone else's word that there is no dwelling in a secluded area or in an area which is difficult to reach.

There will be dwellings in many EAs across the country which have not been marked on the map or listed in the ERB. Dwellings in your area which are not on your map or in your ERB will be referred to as unlisted dwellings throughout this manual and require special treatment.

Examples of buildings and dwellings which require extra vigilance and which may not be listed on your map and ERB include:

- New housing developments;
- One-off houses in rural areas;
- Buildings which have been converted into flats or bedsits;
- Flats over shops;
- Houses in alleyways or down narrow lanes;
- Granny flats, caravans or mobile homes in back gardens;
- Outhouses converted into living accommodation;
- Isolated houses not visible from the roadway, etc.;
- Multi-story car parks with apartments on top.

During the census in 2011, the enumerators found around 40,000 dwellings not listed in their ERB, and close to 87,000 people were enumerated in these dwellings. This is equivalent to the population of Westmeath!

It is absolutely crucial that every habitable dwelling is covered in the Census, whether it has been listed on the map/ERB or not. All unlisted dwellings must be recorded on your map and in your ERB and, if they are occupied on Census Night, census forms must be delivered to them. Before concluding a dwelling is unlisted check your position on the map by referencing landmarks as you may not be where you think you are on the map. This happened in over 10,000 cases in the 2011 census.

[p. 19]

2.2 Enumerator maps

Each enumerator will be supplied with map(s) or a map book of his / her EA. Significant map features are detailed below.

[The original document includes a map below.]

EA boundary. Consult with your supervisor and adjoining enumerator if you are unsure whether a new unlisted dwelling is inside your EA.

Small area boundary (in blue).

Small area code.

Multi dwelling buildings. This apartment block has 12 apartments with D.Nos 124- 135. Note if the footprint of a multi dwelling building spans 2 Small Areas or EAs, all dwellings within the building are assigned the same small area code and are covered in the one EA, it being the one where the main entrance to the building is located.

Single dwelling buildings. Each assigned a D.No. and listed in your ERB.

Grids for recording details of 'added', 'amended' and 'do not exist' D.Nos. These should be highlighted on the map using the pink highlighter provided.

Map key. Make sure you have been given the correct map.

Listed dwellings in your EA have been assigned a D.No. These will be pre-printed on your map, marking the location of the dwelling. They will also be listed in your enumerator record book (ERB) along with the dwelling address and eircode.

You are expected to use the map to arrive at a building and check that the address of the assigned dwelling number is the same as what is written in the ERB.

Cluster maps are provided in areas where D numbers are not easily read.

[p. 20]

Marking maps

If you wish to record which dwellings you've delivered forms to and collected forms from on the map, you should mark your map as follows.

Form delivered: Draw a circle around the D.No.

Form collected: Place a / through the circle.

[The original document includes two images below.]

The only other times you should write on your map are:

- When adding in new D.Nos. for unlisted dwellings;
- Including new apartments/flats. See section 2.13 on assigning new D.Nos;
- When amending the location of a D.No. (see section 2.15);
- When writing numbers in the 'added', 'amended' and 'does not exist' grids.

The map is an important document that you will need at all stages of your work as an enumerator. It contains information which is vital to you in your role as an enumerator and is highly confidential. It must be returned to CSO. For these reasons, you must take great care of your map at all times.

In urban areas an A1 sized map will be supplied.

In large rural EAs an enumerator may be supplied with an A3 sized map book of their EA. The map book will contain an overview map showing the location of the EA and a key to the pages within the book.

[p. 21]

2.3 Enumerator record book

Each enumerator is supplied with an enumerator record book (ERB). This book is used to record details of each visit you make to the dwellings in your EA. You should also use it to record details of any unlisted dwellings in your EA. A typical ERB entry for a listed dwelling is detailed below:

[The original document includes a map below.]

D.No. of the dwelling. This is pre-printed for all listed dwellings.

Small area code. This is the small area in which the dwelling is located. It is pre- printed for listed dwellings.

Name of householder. You will write this in when you have contacted the householder for this dwelling.

Dwelling address and eircode. This is pre-printed for all listed dwellings.

Notes. Record your notes on the dwelling here, including the contact telephone number.

Enumeration alert- about 1 in 10 dwellings. This field will be populated to emphasis certain procedures.

Dwelling status. You will mark the correct dwelling status for each dwelling here when you call to deliver census forms. Confirm first!

Address change. If the address in the ERB is incorrect, you should mark this box and write 'address change' followed by the correct address in the notes section.

Census calendar. You will use this to record the days you called to this dwelling.

Field forms. You will mark one of these boxes when you are required to use a field form.

Persons expected. Use these boxes to record the number of males and females expected to spend Census Night in the dwelling.

Forms issued and collected. Use these boxes to record the number of each census form type you have delivered and collected for this dwelling.

Doorstep check / reconciliation form check. Mark doorstep check when you have done the doorstep check on collected census forms. Mark RF when a dwelling requires a Reconciliation Form.

2.4 Basic visual enumeration

The EA map is your definitive guide. It should be used to determine your route. You should always work from your map to the ERB to ensure that you are delivering forms to the correct addresses. Working from your map first will also ensure you enter details under the correct D.No. and write the correct D.No. on the census forms.

- Study the map(s) and the dwellings indicated on them with D.Nos. Study your ERB. Make sure you know all the streets/roads/townlands within your EA. Where addresses in the ERB appear to be commercial there may be someone operating their own small business from their dwelling.

- Identify the small areas within your EA on your map (the small area code is also indicated on the ERB for each dwelling).

- Familiarize yourself with the codes to be used for completing the front panel Form ID on the census forms, especially the small area C odes on the map.

[p. 22]

- Get to know your enumerator record book (ERB), enumerator D.No. delivery grid and the census forms.

- Agree the best route for covering your EA with your field supervisor.

- Traverse all roads, paths, laneways and thoroughfares in your EA and visit every building and other places of possible habitation in your EA. As mentioned in Section 2.1 some dwellings may not have a D.No. listed on the map.

- If you discover a habitable dwelling which has not been marked on your map, you must allocate a new D.No. to that unlisted dwelling. See section 2.13 for details.

- Where contact is made with the householder, follow the delivery routine in section 2.17.

It has not been possible to automatically assign the D.Nos. in perfect order along roads, streets and thoroughfares. Some D.Nos may be out of sequence on the map. For example, if a house was built later than the other houses on a road then the D.No. may be out of sequence. For this reason you should always locate the D.No. for a dwelling on your map first and then locate it in your ERB. The ERB is in D.No. order and the D.Nos. are shown on the page margin to assist you.

Note that you can enumerate households in any order you wish. You should not try to follow the numerical listing of addresses as they appear in your ERB. The best route should be worked out by studying the map and should be discussed with your field supervisor. The only rule is that you must enumerate every household and habitable dwelling in your EA, whether they have been pre-listed on your map and in your ERB or not.

2.5 Form delivery in action

On the doorstep
There is no need to go into anyone's home.

Adopt a non-threatening stance. If a householder becomes aggressive or you feel threatened, walk away from the situation, make a note in your ERB and report the incident to your field supervisor.

Health and safety

1. Make sure that someone knows where you are going and when you expect to return.
2. Plan for the weather - wear comfortable shoes and clothes.
3. If you think someone is following you, cross the street, keep moving and head for the nearest place where there will be other people, such as a shop or pub.
4. If someone grabs your satchel, let it go rather than risk injury.
5. Where possible walk on the side of the road that faces on-coming traffic.
6. If you use a car, try to park it facing out in a well-lit, preferably busy area and remember to lock it. Do not leave forms unattended in your car.

Remember, your field supervisor is your first line of support. You should keep in regular contact and discuss progress and potential problems.

[p. 23]

Beware of dogs

When approaching a property, look for signs on gates or fences that indicate dogs may be present; try rattling the gate to see if a dog appears.

Remember, it is a dog's instinct to defend their territory; try to behave in such a way that the dog does not see you as a threat.

Incident report form (Acc 1)

If you have any kind of accident or experience an incident which you feel has compromised your health or safety, you should complete an Incident report form (Acc 1) and forward it to your field supervisor. Your field supervisor will have a supply of these forms.

Appendix G and I contains detailed notes on health and safety and child protection. Make sure you read them thoroughly before beginning your field work.

Dealing with the public

You may encounter people who need help with their census form for a variety of reasons. Some may find the forms difficult to understand, may have literacy problems, or may not have English or Irish as their first language. The following points may help you bridge the communication gap.

- Be polite and patient.

- Listen to what people are saying and be prepared to adapt your approach to suit the circumstances.

- Show consideration to householders by not calling after 9.30 p.m unless previously arranged.

- If a householder objects to you calling, ask when it would be suitable to call back and make a note in your ERB.

Explanatory notes on the nationality, ethnicity and religion questions

As part of the training on the content of the census form, particular emphasis should be put on the following questions.

Nationality (Q10): What is your nationality?

Nationality is now a key demographic variable on the census and is analyzed in conjunction with a range of other census variables to provide invaluable information on the profile of the population. The information is used by a broad spectrum of local, community and government based organizations.

A member of the public may seek clarification on how to complete this question if he/she has more than one nationality / citizenship. In such instances the person(s) should be directed to declare both. If he/she has dual Irish citizenship (e.g. through participation in a citizenship ceremony), they should mark both the 'Irish' tick box and the 'other' tick box and write in the second nationality. If the person has two dual non-Irish nationalities, he/she should mark the 'other' tick box and write in both in the text box.

Example:
What is your nationality?

[] 1 Indian [checked]
[] 2 Other nationality, write in:
Indian

[p. 24]

Ethnicity (Q11): What is your ethnic or cultural background?

The information on ethnicity gathered in this question enables an analysis of the population by social living conditions, employment, occupation, education and a whole range of other social and demographic variables. Ethnicity is listed as one of the nine grounds for discrimination under equality legislation in Ireland.

If a member of the public advises that he/she feels the options in sections A to C do not adequately describe his/her ethnic or cultural background, advice to mark box 8 and write in the ethnicity in the boxes provided.

Example:
D Other, including mixed background

[] 8 Other, write in description
Roma

Religion (Q12): What is your religion?

The religion question is an important demographic question. It is regularly analyzed along with other demographic variables in the context of diversity. If clarification is sought on how to answer the question explain that it does not refer to frequency of attendance at church. Rather people should respond to this question according to how they feel now about their religious beliefs or lack thereof (for instance how they might describe their religious belief to a friend).

Be aware of peoples' religious customs. Be prepared and offer to call back at a more suitable time. Make a record in your ERB.

Muslims may be at worship on Friday evening.

The Jewish Sabbath is the 24-hour period from sunset Friday to sunset Saturday with worship on Saturday morning.

2.6 Irish language forms

Under the Official Languages Act 2003, every householder must be offered the option of an Irish language census form as part of your delivery routine. There are Irish language versions of the household, individual and listing forms. Make sure you always have a sufficient supply of Irish forms available.

Where an Irish language census form is delivered, the address should be written onto the form ID in Irish. You should therefore ensure that prior to delivering an Irish version of the form you have an Irish version of the address ready, or alternatively do not write any address in the form ID and inform the householder that he / she can complete the address himself / herself. The geography coding should be completed in the usual manner by you.

There were around 6,000 Irish language census forms used in 2011.

[p. 25]

2.7 Foreign languages

Householders must complete either the English or Irish language version of the various census forms.

However, translations are available in 21 languages on www.census.ie/translations and also in your foreign language pack.

Languages:

Polish
Lithuanian
Russian
French
Latvian
Romanian
Chinese
Portuguese
Slovak
Hungarian
German
Spanish
Arabic
Czech
Urdu
Italian
Ukrainian
Traditional Chinese
Vietnamese
Bengali
Thai

Note that responses must be completed on an English or Irish language household form, not on the foreign language translation form itself. Therefore if you issue a foreign language translation form, you must issue an accompanying household form.

2.8 Visually impaired persons - large print forms and Braille forms

Where a visually impaired person (VIP) lives alone, the Enumerator may have to provide assistance with completion of the census form using the large print version as an aid. In the majority of cases the VIP will be happy for the enumerator to go through the form and complete it for them. A single copy of this large print form is supplied to each enumerator, with additional copies available from the field supervisor. The large print form contains enlarged versions of the household and personal questions. In all cases the enumerator will have to transcribe the answers provided to a standard household form.

If the VIP is comfortable with reading Braille, a Braille version of the household form is available. Contact your field supervisor (it will take a few days to get it posted from CSO). A DVD of the census form can also be arranged through your field supervisor. The VIP or a representative can access or request all aids available for VIPs via the accessibility link on www.census.ie.

2.9 www.census.ie

The public can view translations and large print versions of the form, listen to an audio transcript of the form and access a wealth of information on the census at www.census.ie.

2.10 Basic form delivery

A short training video is available online showing form delivery routine. http://www.census.ie/How- we-do-it/enumerator-training/deliveryforhouseholds

There are a number of key steps you must follow to correctly deliver the appropriate census form(s):

1. Before you make contact with the householder, make sure you are at the correct address by reference to the location of the D.No. on your map and the address listed in your ERB.

2. When you make contact with a householder introduce yourself using the Cue Card below, ask for his/her name and write it into the ERB.

3. Confirm with the householder that the address and eircode are correct.

4. Ask whether there is more than one household living in the dwelling. Use the household definition on the household form if you are unsure. You will need to deliver additional census forms and assign new D.Nos if there are two or more households in the dwelling.

[p. 26]

5. Ask the householder whether he/she wants to complete an English or Irish version of the household form. The enumeration alert flag in the ERB will indicate if the household used an Irish form in 2011 so you can be prepared.

6. Transcribe the address, eircode, county code, enumeration area code, small area code and D. No. from the ERB onto the front of the household form. Ask the householder how many males and females are expected to be in the dwelling on Census Night. If there are more than 6 persons, you will need to issue an individual form for each additional person (remember to complete the Form ID on each).

7. Record the number of males and females expected in the ERB.

8. Record the number of forms delivered in the ERB.

9. Mark the dwelling status as 'occupied' and record your visit in the ERB.

10. Ask the householder for a contact telephone number (mobile number is best). Write this into the ERB. If the householder is reluctant, explain that it will be useful to arrange collection of the form after Census Night but not obligatory.

11. Point out the household questions on page 2, explain the present and absent persons on page 3, point out that there are 3 pages of questions for each person present and that details for absent persons should be entered at the back of the form. Tell the person to complete the form on and in respect of the night of Sunday 24th April.

12. Deliver the census form(s).

13. Tell the householder you will collect the form after the 24th of April and arrange a suitable time to call back. Record these details in your ERB.

14. When you have left the doorstep, circle this delivery on the delivery grid.

Census enumerator cue card

"Good evening / morning. My name is [enumerators' name] from the Census Office."

"Perhaps you have heard the census is on Sunday 24 April. The census is taken every 5 years and counts all the households and persons in Ireland. All information provided is kept confidential. To ensure a secure service, we provide a personal form delivery and collection service. I have been appointed as the census enumerator for this area."

"I need to ask you a few simple questions to know which forms I need to leave with you."

[p. 27]

2.11 Common delivery situations

You will come across a number of situations during your visual enumeration / form delivery. The following describes what to do in particular circumstances which will arise:

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Situation
(B) Procedure

Situation: You come across a dwelling that is not listed in your ERB and is not marked on the map, is a private dwelling and is habitable. See Section. 2.13 below.
Procedure: This may happen if it is a new building or if it is missing from the geo-directory. If the dwelling is private and is habitable (i.e. it has a roof, walls, hall door and windows) and does not appear abandoned or derelict then:

Verify your position on the map by using map features such as field boundaries, road junctions, lane ways, streams or adjacent buildings to guide you. In Census 2011 enumerators found 48,000 new dwellings about 25% of which were in fact there but the Enumerator was looking in the wrong place for the dwelling on the map.

[The original document includes an image below.]

What to do:

1. Using the panels at the back of your ERB make an entry for the dwelling. Write in the address and eircode.
2. Assign a D.No. as follows - Assign 9001 to the first unlisted dwelling/household you come across, 9002 to the next unlisted dwelling and so on.
3. On your map mark the location of the dwelling accurately and write in the D.No. (9001 etc.) beside the location and in the New Dwellings grid on the map.
4. Write the Small Area Code into the ERB.
5. Enter the D.No. into both the ERB Delivery and Collection grid.
6. Deliver the census forms as normal and/or treat the dwelling in the same way as all other dwellings in the area.

All census geography will be derived from the position of the D.No. on the map. Where new D.Nos. are created it is essential that the position of the new dwelling is marked accurately on the map and highlighted using a pink highlighter. Use field borders, location of adjacent dwellings etc. to assist you to do this.

Situation: An apartment block or a block of flats contains more apartments / flats than are listed in the ERB and indicated on the map. See section 4.5 for more information on multi-dwelling buildings.
Procedure: Follow the exact same procedure described above for unlisted dwellings.

[The original document includes an image below.]

On the map, mark the new D.Nos assigned beside the apartment block/block of flats. If there is more than 1 new D.No. assigned, write the first D.No. assigned, followed by # and the number of new D.Nos assigned.

In this example, the enumerator finds 10 apartments in the complex. Only 8 D.Nos have been allocated, so two new D.Nos, 9013 and 9014, are assigned by the enumerator.

Write the new D.Nos in the New Dwellings grid at the bottom of the map.

[p. 28]

Situation: An apartment block or block of flats not listed on the map/ERB is found by the enumerator.
Procedure: Draw a triangle on the map at the location of the apartment block. Beside the triangle, write in the first new D.No. assigned to the apartment block followed by a # and the number of new D.Nos being assigned to the apartment block. Highlight this in pink. Write the list of D.Nos into the 'Added' grid on the bottom of your map.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Make a separate ERB entry for each new D.No.

Add the D.Nos to your delivery and collection grid.
In this example, the Enumerator adds a new apartment block containing 4 apartments D.Nos 9022, 9023, 9024 and 9025.

Situation: A dwelling that is not on the map and is not listed in your ERB and is under construction, abandoned, derelict or commercial only.
Procedure: Do nothing. We are only interested in identifying unlisted dwellings that are private (or communal) and habitable. Under construction is defined as having one of the following 4 things missing - roof, walls, hall door, windows. Commercial only dwellings could be a doctor's surgery, crèche or other small businesses. Verify that the dwelling is in fact commercial only by talking to someone.

Situation: A dwelling is marked in the wrong place on the map.
Procedure: This may happen if the geo-directory has the wrong coordinates for the dwelling.

[The original document includes an image below.]

What to do:

1. Verify your position by reference to your map.
2. On your map mark the correct location of the dwelling.
3. Draw an arrow from the original position to the new correct position.
4. Write the original D.No. beside the new dot.
5. Enter the D.No. into the 'amended' grid at the bottom of the map (this is to alert CSO that it has to re-position this dwelling).
6. Remember to use the pink highlighter to highlight the correct location when you return home.

Wrong small area
If the dwelling marked in the wrong place on the map is in an adjacent small area, the following additional steps should be taken:

1. Make sure the correct small area code is written onto the form ID before form delivery.
2. In the ERB, blot out the pre-printed small area code and write the correct code above it. In this example, the dwelling is actually located in small area C, but was listed as small area B in the map / ERB.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 29]

Wrong enumeration area
If a dwelling which appears on the map/ERB is in fact located in a neighboring enumeration area, the following steps should be taken:

1. Inform your field supervisor immediately, indicating the location of the dwelling and where in the adjacent enumeration area it is located.
2. Classify the dwelling as 'does not exist' and complete a reconciliation form for it.
3. The field supervisor should contact the enumerator in whose EA the dwelling is located and inform her that a new dwelling should be created on the map at the location indicated. A new 9001+ D number should be added and the procedure outlined in section 2.13 of the manual followed.

Situation: You can't find a dwelling that is clearly marked on your map or listed in your ERB.
(Non-existent dwellings). See section 3.3.
Procedure: First verify your position by reference to your map.

You should thoroughly examine the area around the location as the dwelling may just be hidden from view. Alternatively it may be located nearby and if so follow the instruction in the section above this. If the dwelling clearly does not exist it may be demolished.

What to do:

1. Write the D.No. into the 'does not exist' grid on your map.
2. In your ERB mark the dwelling status as 'does not exist'.
3. Mark your calendar with the date you visited the area.
4. Mark the RF box to indicate that you will have to fill out a reconciliation form for this dwelling.

If there is no dwelling at the location indicated on the map, but there is a post box, the address may be used as a livestock herd address. In this case, you should mark the D.No. as 'does not exist' and follow the steps above.

If there is a dwelling on the map, but the address details in the ERB are wrong, you should not mark it as 'does not exist'. Instead, you should change the address details in the ERB. See section 2.15 for details.

Situation: An apartment block or a block of flats has fewer apartments / flats than are listed in the ERB and indicated on the map.
Procedure:

1. On the map, correct the number of apartment/flats allocated to the building.
2. Write the D.Nos of the apartments which do not exist into the 'does not exist' grid on the map.
3. Mark the dwelling status of the ERB entry as 'Does not exist'. Mark the RF box.
4. Complete a reconciliation form for each apartment which does not exist and mark box 8 under dwelling status.

In this example, the enumerator only finds 5 apartments in the complex, but 7 are indicated on the map.

Situation: The listed dwelling is still under construction.
Procedure: A dwelling is considered habitable if it has a roof, walls, hall door and windows installed. If any one of these things are missing then the dwelling is to be classified as under construction.

What to do:

1. In your ERB mark the dwelling status as 'under construction'.
2. Mark your calendar with the date you visited the area.
3. Mark the RF box to indicate that you will have to fill out a reconciliation form for this dwelling.
4. Complete a reconciliation form and mark box 5 under dwelling status.

[p. 30]

Situation: The listed dwelling is used for commercial purposes only.
Procedure: This can happen if the dwelling is in a residential area but is used solely for a small business such as a crèche, doctor's surgery, dog grooming, health and beauty business etc.

What to do:

1. In your ERB mark the dwelling status as 'commercial only'.
2. Mark your calendar with the date you visited the area.
3. Mark the RF box to indicate that you will have to fill out a reconciliation form for this dwelling. Mark box 7 'commercial only' on the reconciliation form under dwelling status.

Situation: You cannot gain access to a gated community.
Procedure: Wait around for approximately 10 minutes for someone to pass through the gates. Speak with them and ask them for contact details of the management company. You must gain access, so try again later. Your field supervisor should provide you with assistance to enter difficult to access gated communities.

Situation: Caravans and mobile homes. See section 4.7.
Procedure: Occupied mobile homes must be treated like all other dwellings. If occupied assign a new D.No. (9001+) if not already listed.
If unoccupied do not assign a new D.No.

For unlisted mobile home parks:

1. If the entire park is empty on Census Night, treat as a single private holiday home.
2. Note in your ERB the total number of mobile homes.
3. Mark 'holiday home' as the dwelling status.
4. Mark RF in your ERB.
5. Complete a reconciliation form completing the dwelling status and dwelling type.

If each unit has been listed in your ERB you should complete the ERB panel and a reconciliation form for each indicating the dwelling status and dwelling type.

Any mobile homes occupied on Census Night should be enumerated as normal private dwellings.

1. Treat each one as a single private household.
2. Assign a new D.No. if none on map/ERB.
3. Mark 'occupied' in the dwelling status.
4. Deliver a household form with front panel completed.

For forecourts selling mobile homes or caravans:
If not assigned a D.No. on the map and ERB, do not mark on the map or create an entry in the ERB.
If assigned a D.No. on the map and ERB, for each D.No. mark 'commercial only' in the dwelling status.
Mark RF in your ERB and complete a reconciliation form.

CSO has made contact with Pavee Point and the Irish traveler movement, both of which will be publicizing the need to be counted amongst the Irish traveler community.

Situation: Other temporary or mobile structures.
Procedure: Visit all houseboats, camper vans, tents, railway carriages etc. to determine if they will be occupied on Census Night. Only if they will be occupied:

Assign a D.No. if not already listed.

Note in your ERB that it is a mobile structure. Mark 'occupied' in the dwelling status.

Deliver a census form and make arrangements for collection of the form. Put a note in your ERB to revisit on Monday 25 April.

[p. 31]

Situation: Structures that are not dwellings but are marked on the map/ERB.
Procedure: Satisfy yourself that there is no possibility that there will be anyone there on Census Night.

In your ERB mark the dwelling status as 'commercial only'. Mark your calendar with the date you visited the area.

Mark the RF box to indicate that you will have to fill out a reconciliation form for this dwelling.
Mark box 7 'commercial only' on the reconciliation form under dwelling status. Examples of such structures which should not be allocated a D.No. are: shops / restaurants / pubs, theatres / cinemas, garages / filling stations, factories/warehouses, street traders' stalls, barns/milking parlors, green-houses/ outhouses, hay-sheds / stables, domestic outhouses / garden sheds, domestic garages unless converted to separate living accommodation, telephone kiosks, bus shelters / rain shelters, public toilets, television masts/water towers/ESB sub-stations, sport stadia/dressing rooms / club-houses, religious grottoes / religious shrines, ancient monuments.

See chapter 3 for a full description of the ERB and examples on completion of the ERB in various situations.

2.12 Completing the form ID

The Form ID is the panel on the front page of the census forms. It is marked for office use only and should only be completed by the Enumerator. The address, eircode and geography information must be completed prior to the form being delivered. The number of persons present and absent information should only be completed after the form has been collected.

The following is an example of an ERB entry and Form ID made for an occupied dwelling. The Household Form was delivered on the fourth delivery call on April 15. A calling card had been issued on April 11. The enumerator spoke to a neighbor who gave the enumerator the householder's name and information that the householder was usually at home after 8pm. The enumerator arranged to call again to the house after 8pm on April 15 and succeeded in delivering the household form on this date.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Golden rule: Never deliver any census form without first entering the county code, enumeration area code, small area code and D.No. on the form.

If you do not correctly complete all of these codes, the form cannot be identified or classified geographically and will be treated as an uncollected form for payment purposes.

[p. 32]

2.13 Assigning new D.Nos - dwellings and households not marked on your map or ERB (9001+ numbers)

During your visual enumeration, you may come across instances where a habitable dwelling is not listed on the map or in your ERB. You may also come across instances where there is more than one household living in a single dwelling, but only one D.No. has been listed for that dwelling on your map and in your ERB. In both of these instances you will be required to add a new D.No. to your map and ERB.

This section is of vital importance so make sure you understand it completely before you begin your enumeration. If you are unsure of any part of the procedure, you should raise it with your field supervisor immediately.

Allocating new D.Nos - unlisted dwellings

A dwelling is unlisted when there is NO D.No. allocated for the dwelling on the map or in your ERB. Your map is crucial in deciding whether a D.No. has been listed for a dwelling. Before deciding a D.No. is unlisted for a dwelling you must be sure that there is no D.No. on your map at the location where the dwelling is situated.

9001+ D.Nos may only be allocated to habitable dwellings which do not appear on your map or in your ERB.

When you are sure no D.No. has been allocated to a habitable dwelling, you should proceed as follows:

1. For the first dwelling you find which has not been allocated a D.No. you should allocate D.No. 9001, for the second one allocate 9002 and so on.

2. On your map, you should mark the exact position of the dwelling with a dot and the new D.No. you have allocated. You should then write this D.No. into the grid section for added D.Nos at the bottom of your map. Highlight the new D.No. on the map with a pink highlighter pen when you get back home.

3. You should make a new entry for the dwelling in a blank panel in your ERB and write in the D.No. and the small area code from the location of the dwelling on your map.

4. You should write the dwelling's address in the 'Address' box along with the relative eircode. The householder should be able to advice on the eircode.

5. You should then proceed with the delivery process as outlined in section 2.10, making sure to add the new D.No. to the delivery and collection grids (see section 2.17).

You should only allocate 9001+ D. Nos. to dwellings which are habitable. If a building is under construction, derelict or commercial only and is not listed on your map or in your ERB, you should not allocate a new D.No.

[p. 33]

Before you allocate a new D.No. for a dwelling it is vital that you make sure the dwelling is not already marked on the map and does not appear out of sequence in your ERB.

It is possible that a dwelling such as a granny flat was built later than an adjacent dwelling and does not appear in the numerical D.No. sequence in your ERB. The dwelling may appear later on in your ERB.

If a dwelling is vacant or if it is a holiday home but it is habitable, you should allocate a new D.No.

Allocating new D.Nos. - multi household dwellings

The geo-directory lists address points, the census enumerates households. Where there is more than one household (applying the UN definitions in section 1.7 and 1.8) sharing the same dwelling/hall door, subsequent households should be allocated their own D.Nos.

It is likely that if you discover a situation where there is more than one household sharing an address, it will occur when you make contact with the occupants of the dwelling at the doorstep. When this occurs:

1. Deliver the relevant forms for the first household as usual (see section 2.11 for the routine).

2. For the second household at the address, you should allocate a new D.No. This D.No. should be the next available D.No. in the 9001+ range.

3. In the unlikely event that there are additional households sharing the address, you should allocate new D.Nos for each. If there is a third household at a single dwelling, for the third household the D.No. you allocate should be the next available D.No. in the 9001+ range and so on. For example, you may call at a dwelling with a D.No. of 125 and discover that there are three households at the address but only D.No.125 appears on your map and in your ERB, and the first free D.No. in the 9001+ range in your ERB is 9023. You should allocate the D.No. 9023 and 9024 to the second and third household respectively.

4. Mark the new D.No(s). on your map adjacent to the D.No. of the first household. Run a highlighter pen over the new D.No(s) you have written on the map.

5. You should write the new D.No(s) code into the 'added' D.Nos grid on your map.

6. Make a new entry in the next blank panels in your ERB for the new D.No(s).

7. The eircode for the new household(s) may not be the same as the original listed address so seek clarification from the householder(s).

8. You should write the small area code of the new household in the box provided. it will be the same small area code as for the first household.

9. Add any newly added D.Nos to the form delivery and collection grids.

10. You should proceed to deliver the relevant form(s) as usual, (see section 2.11 for the routine).

When you allocate a new D.No. do not forget to complete a blank ERB panel, mark and highlight the new D.No. on the map and list it on the map grid. Blank ERB panels should only contain new D. Nos.

If you encounter several households in one dwelling, it may be useful to note the new D.No(s) you have allocated in the notes section of your ERB for the original household. If you do this, when you go to collect forms from the address, you will know that there are additional households resident in the dwelling and you have to collect forms from them.

[p. 34]

Finally, in the very rare cases where you discover a dwelling not on the map/ERB and subsequently discover that there is more than one household in this dwelling, you should create a 9001+ number for the dwelling and add the next available 9001+ number for the second household in the dwelling. For example, you create D.No. 9003 for a dwelling which is not on the map/ERB. On calling to the dwelling you find there are two households residing there. You therefore add D.No. 9004 for the second household.

2.14 Non unique addresses in your ERB

About thirty-five percent of rural addresses in Ireland are not unique because they contain only the townland with the householder's name completing the address for the postman. The geo-directory does not contain names.

This should not be a problem. As instructed, you should first identify the dwelling by its position on the map and then note the D.No. and then find that entry in your ERB which is in D.No. order.

2.15 Wrong addresses

If you locate a dwelling on the map but find that the address in the ERB is incorrect, you should mark the relevant address change 'AC' box in your ERB, to the right of the 'does not exist' dwelling status. You should then write 'address change', followed by the correct address and eircode in the notes section of your ERB and enumerate the dwelling in the usual way. If there is a dwelling at the location indicated on the map but the address is wrong in the ERB, you cannot mark the dwelling as does not exist.

[The original document includes an image below.]

You should only do this if the address printed in the ERB is substantially different from the actual address. Examples of a wrong address are the wrong house number, the wrong street name, the wrong townland name etc. If there is only a minor difference between the address in the ERB and the actual address (e.g. a misspelling), it should not be considered a wrong address.

[p. 35]

2.16 Householder disagrees with address / eircode details on Form ID

Some households may query the address details you have written on the census form ID prior to delivery. This may be occurring because you are transcribing the geo-directory address and eircode from the ERB and the details provided in the ERB are different from the householder's version of his / her address details.

If disputes of this nature arise, you should allow the householders to cross out the address and eircode you have written and write in the householder's version of the address and eircode. Under no circumstances should the householder be allowed alter the geography coding on the form ID. If a householder is concerned about their eircode, the eircode website has a facility for a householder to check/confirm their eircode.

If you agree with the changes made to the address details by the householder, you should change the address details in the ERB, following the procedure in Section 2.15. If you do not agree with the changes made to the address details by the householder, you should make no alteration to the ERB but should leave the address details in the form ID as completed by the householder.

Under no circumstances should you create a new D number based on a householder changing the address details on the Form ID.

2.17 Delivery and collection grids

The delivery and collection grids are used to help you monitor your progress in delivering and collecting census forms. You will use the information on the grids to send daily SMS messages to report on your progress to the CSO (see section 5.4).

Form delivery grid
Once you have delivered a form to a household, you should proceed as follows:

- Circle the corresponding D.No. on the delivery grid. If you have had to create a new D.No. in your ERB for an unlisted dwelling, you should write it into one of the blank cells on the grid. There is space for 180 new D.Nos. on the grid. When you do this, you should also write the same D.No. into a blank space on the collection grid so you can mark it when you have collected the forms.

- At the end of delivery day 1, you should make a note of the total number of household deliveries you have made by counting the number of circled boxes in the delivery grid. You should then write this total beside 'delivery day/date' for day 1 in the record of daily form delivery table on the reverse side of the delivery grid. Finally, for each circled D. No. you counted, you should place a line through it to indicate it has been included in the daily total, thereby ensuring these D.Nos. are not included in subsequent daily totals.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 36]

- At the end of delivery day 2, you should make a note of the daily total number of household deliveries you have made for delivery day 2 only by counting the total number of circled boxes in the delivery grid through which no line has yet been placed. Once assured of the total for delivery day 2 you should write the daily total number of forms delivered beside 'delivery day/date' for day 2 on the reverse side of the delivery grid and then place a line through every circled D.No. included in the delivery day 2 total - this will ensure these D. Nos. are not included in subsequent daily totals.

You should follow this procedure throughout the form delivery phase, always remembering that it is the daily number of households to which forms were delivered that you should be recording. Count an occupied communal establishment as one household.

New D.No. count

You must also return the daily number of NEW D. Nos. generated in your EA on a daily basis. This can be got by simply counting the number of 9001+ D.Nos. on your delivery grid at the end of each day.

You will send the daily number of households to which you have delivered forms to the CSO by SMS message. See section 2.17 below for details.

A similar process should be used for form collection (see section 5.4)

If you wish, you can use your own notation system to keep track of the status of dwellings in your EA to which a form cannot be delivered. For example, you may wish to write a 'V' on a number in the grid to indicate that you believe the relevant dwelling is vacant. You can also use colored pens if you find it makes the grid easier to read.

2.18 Your mobile phone - delivery phase

You will receive a CSO mobile phone exclusively for use in your enumeration work. See appendix F use of mobile phones for details on how to use your phone.

When you first switch on the phone you will receive a welcome SMS (text) message listing the county code and EA code of your EA and it will ask you to confirm that both codes are correct. If they are, you should immediately reply 'yes'. However, if the county and EA code in the SMS message are not correct for your EA, you should reply 'no' and immediately contact your field supervisor.

Your mobile phone has two purposes. It is used to aid you in contacting householders and to allow householders to contact you during delivery and collection. It is also used to send CSO daily updates on your progress in delivering, collecting forms and recording hours worked.

You should ensure that you have downloaded the SMS application to enable you to send SMS updates to CSO on your progress. Instructions on how to initially download this system will be provided separately.

[The original document includes an image below.]

You must send SMS messages using the application on the phone indicating:

1. The daily number of D.Nos./households to which you have delivered forms to and collected forms from.
2. The daily number of new D.Nos/ERB entries created
3. The daily number of hours worked.

[p. 37]

4. If you are retrospectively recording forms delivered and hours worked, please select the relevant date from the date field.

This will keep the CSO and your field and regional supervisors up to date on your progress.

Before you begin your fieldwork each day, you should make sure that your phone is fully charged. At the end of each day in the form delivery phase, you will have the total number of households to which you have delivered forms in the record of daily form delivery section of your delivery grid.

If you do not send a text message, it will be assumed you have not delivered any forms or worked any hours for that day.

SMS messages from the CSO
You will receive text messages from the CSO during your enumeration work. These will be of two kinds.

General messages

These are messages which will be sent to groups of field staff (e.g. all field staff, all enumerators, all field staff in a certain region). They will contain census related news or updates on field procedures.

Specific messages

These are messages which will be directed specifically to you or to you and your Field Supervisor. These messages will generally be sent after a member of the public living in your EA has contacted the CSO directly with a query. The message will contain the D.No. of the dwelling where the household lives. The most common messages you will receive are as follows:

- Form not received by a specific household. When you get this message you should arrange to deliver a census form to the household at your earliest convenience.

- Request for an Irish language version of the form from a householder in your EA. You should arrange to deliver an Irish version of the form to the household.

- Request for assistance in completing a form from a householder in your EA. You should offer assistance to the householder in completing the census form the next time you make contact.

- Forms mislaid by household. You should arrange to deliver a replacement form to the household.

- Individual form required by household. You should contact the householder to find out why they require an Individual Form, and deliver one if appropriate.

- Foreign translation form required by householder. You will be informed what language is required and you should deliver it as soon as possible.

- Request for a freepost envelope. You should arrange to deliver the envelope to the household.

- Automated error reports from the SMS delivery/collection system indicating a problem with the data you have transmitted.

- Notification that a form has been returned directly to CSO by the householder. Your field supervisor will give you a completed form H in respect of the form retained by CSO.

[p. 38]

Chapter 3 The enumerator record book (ERB)

The ERB is a vital document that you will need at all stages of your work as an enumerator. It contains information which is important to you in your role as an enumerator and is highly confidential. For these reasons, you must take great care of your ERB at all times, don't lose it. It is not possible for CSO to reprint a lost ERB in the scannable format. All the prefilled information in a lost ERB will have to be transcribed by the enumerator to a blank ERB from a printout provided by your field supervisor.

The details of the dwellings in your EA which have been identified on the geo-directory will be listed sequentially in your ERB along with a D. No. and small area code. There are a number of blank panels at the back of your ERB. These are for details of new or unlisted dwellings which you may locate. If you use all of these blank panels, you can obtain a second blank ERB from your field supervisor.

It is very important that you familiarize yourself with your ERB and the link between your ERB and EA map before you begin your field work. Of particular importance is the list of addresses in the ERB. You should study it carefully, making sure you know the streets, roads and areas where dwellings are located within your EA with reference to the map. Addresses which appear to be commercial addresses are listed because the geo-directory indicates that the householder is operating a business from their residence.

3.1 ERB cover page

The following will be printed on the cover page of your ERB

Field district: A number representing the field district in which your EA is located.

County name: The county in which your EA is located.

County code: The code which represents the county in which your EA is located.

EA code: The code which represents your enumerator area that you will be covering.

[The original document includes an image below.]

You should fill in the enumerator record book number box. This records whether the ERB is the first or second ERB you have used. If you only use one ERB, you should fill in '1 of 1'. If you used a second ERB, you should fill in '1 of 2' on the front page of the first ERB and '2 of 2' on the front page of the second ERB.

[p. 39]

3.2 Inside front page

The inside front page of the ERB contains basic information on the visual enumeration/form delivery process and notes on how you should decide the status of a dwelling.

[The original document includes an image below.]

You should mark every visit to the dwelling with an X on the calendar in the ERB and make appropriate notes. If you drop a calling card then mark the visit with a C.

3.3 ERB dwelling panels

All the dwellings on the geo-directory for your EA will be listed in your ERB. At the end of this listing, a number of panels have been left blank for you to detail dwellings you find during visual enumeration which have not been marked on your map or in your ERB. See section 2.13 on assigning new D.Nos.

At the top left of each ERB panel is the D.No. and small area (SA) Code. D.Nos. are unique numbers assigned by CSO to each dwelling or household in your EA and are related to a position on your map. The D.No. in your ERB corresponds to the D.No. printed on your map.

The small area code indicates in which of the small areas in your EA the dwelling is located. Small area boundaries are indicated on your map. The D.No. and small area code will be pre-printed for dwellings which have been identified on the geo-directory for your EA.

Name of householder

This is the person responsible for making the return. It should normally be the householder but can be any adult member in the household. You must fill the name in on the ERB.

Address and eircode

The postal address and eircode for every household listed in the geo-directory will be printed in the box beside the householder's name. When you allocate a new D.No. to an unlisted dwelling or multi household dwelling to a blank panel in the ERB, you will be required to complete the address and eircode. The householder should be able to advise you on the eircode.

If the text such as "additional dwelling 2 @" has been inserted before the address this has been done because the postman has indicated that there are more dwellings in a building than there are unique addresses. In such cases CSO has generated additional dwellings to agree with the postman's determination of the number of dwellings in a building. Where these additional dwellings cannot be found, treat them as 'does not exist', see below.

Dwelling status

The dwelling status box is underneath the D.No. There are eight categories in the dwelling status box. You should mark the relevant one for each dwelling during the visual enumeration / delivery phase. It is important that you know the definition of each dwelling status.

Occupied - For all dwellings where persons are expected to be present on Census Night. A form must be delivered to and collected from all dwellings marked as occupied.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 40]

When you make contact with the householder, you should note the householder's name and mark 'occupied' as the dwelling status in the ERB. You should record the number of forms issued, and the number of males and females expected to spend Census Night in the dwelling. You should also request a contact telephone number from the householder to facilitate form collection.

If you mark a dwelling as occupied but find out after Census Night that it was not occupied on Census Night, you should put an X through the mark beside 'occupied' and mark the correct dwelling status. If the entire household was unexpectedly absent, you should complete a form E.

Temporarily absent - For dwellings where the entire household is away on Census Night. This information will usually come from the householder. You will need to complete a form E and get the householder to sign it (see section 4.2). If the household will be away in the republic of Ireland, you will be required to complete a reconciliation form once the form E procedure has been confirmed by your field supervisor. If the household will be away outside the republic of Ireland, you should complete the form E, ask the householder to sign it and give it to your field supervisor before completing a reconciliation form.

[The original document includes an image below.]

It is important that in cases where the householder indicates that the household will be abroad, they must sign a declaration on the form E to that effect. A check should be made after Census Night to ensure that there was no change of plans.

You should note the name of the householder in the ERB, mark 'temporarily absent' as the dwelling status, and mark 'E' to indicate you have initiated a form E tracking procedure. When the form E procedure has been verified by your field supervisor or if you have verified that the household was outside the republic of Ireland on Census Night, you should mark the 'RF' box at the bottom right of the ERB panel, which indicates you will need to complete a reconciliation form for this dwelling.

Vacant - You may come across vacant accommodation in your EA. Types of vacant accommodation include:

[The original document includes an image below.]

- New accommodation, ready for occupation but not yet occupied.
- Accommodation in the course of conversion, improvement, renovation or decoration and not occupied at the time of the Census.
- Existing accommodation clearly without furniture or which you have been reliably informed is not occupied; for example awaiting new occupants.

To confirm whether a habitable dwelling is vacant, you should call to it several times prior to Census Night. You should vary the times you call in case the householder is working a set pattern of hours.

You should look for signs that the house is not occupied, e.g. no furniture, no cars outside, junk mail accumulating, overgrown garden etc. It is important that you try verify with neighbors whether the house is vacant or not as they are likely to have the best information about the house.

[p. 41]

Unoccupied dwellings with doors and windows which look to have been recently boarded up should be classified as vacant. A dwelling should only be classified as derelict if it is dilapidated and looks to have been boarded up for a long time.

It is not sufficient to classify a house as vacant after one or two visits. Householders may be attempting to avoid you or the house may be occupied by an elderly / disabled person who has difficulty answering the door. You must visit several times before Census Night until you are fully satisfied that it is not occupied. If possible verify with a neighbor.

You should mark the calendar on the ERB panel each time you visit the dwelling and make appropriate notes. When you decide that the dwelling is vacant, mark the dwelling status 'vacant'. You should mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a completed reconciliation form will be required for the dwelling.

A house / flat or apartment can only be marked as vacant if it is fit For habitation i.e. It has a roof, walls, hall door and windows Installed and you call after census night to confirm vacancy. Note that you must fully complete the reconciliation form Including the dwelling status (R1) and dwelling type (R2) on the reconciliation form.

Note: Vacant communal establishments should be marked 'vacant' in your ERB.

Holiday home - This category covers all dwellings that are only occasionally occupied. Holiday homes are mainly found in rural and coastal areas, however the description also covers all dwellings that are only occasionally occupied, including city apartments used for week-end breaks etc.

[The original document includes an image below.]

As with vacant dwellings, if you do not make contact with a householder you should call to the dwelling several times prior to Census Night and vary call times. Information that the dwelling is used as a holiday home is likely to come from neighbors, so it is vital that you speak with neighbors if you think the dwelling may be used as a holiday home.

You should mark every visit to the dwelling on the ERB calendar and make appropriate notes. When you have clear information that the dwelling will be unoccupied on Census Night and is used as a holiday home, you should mark 'holiday home' as the dwelling status. You should mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a completed reconciliation form will be required for the dwelling. When completing the reconciliation form complete dwelling status (R1) and dwelling type (R2).

When you decide a dwelling is a holiday home, you must revisit it again after Census Night to verify that nobody spent Census Night in the dwelling.

Under construction - You should always exercise caution around buildings which are under construction and never attempt to enter them.

You do not need to visit a dwelling several times to decide that it is under construction. You should mark the dwelling status as 'under construction' and mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a Reconciliation Form must be completed for the dwelling and make appropriate
notes.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 42]

For census purposes, a dwelling is to be considered 'under construction' if it is not yet fit for habitation because the roof, doors, windows or walls have not yet been built or installed.

Under no circumstances should you add a new D.No. to your ERB for a dwelling that is under construction but is not pre-printed in your ERB. New D.Nos (9001, 9002 etc.) may only be allocated for habitable dwellings.

Derelict - You should always exercise caution around derelict buildings and never attempt to enter them.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Note that a dwelling which has windows and doors recently boarded up (typically by the local authority to prevent vandalism) but does not appear dilapidated and run down should be classified as a vacant house. Derelict dwellings which are boarded up are likely to have been abandoned some time ago and show other signs of exterior deterioration.

Mark the ERB calendar each time you visit the dwelling and make appropriate notes. Once you are sure that the dwelling is derelict, you should mark 'derelict' as the dwelling status and mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a reconciliation form must be completed for the dwelling.

You are not required to revisit dwellings which are derelict after Census Night.

Derelict buildings are those which have been abandoned, look dilapidated and the windows and/or doors are boarded up. The grounds may be overgrown and they are likely to be older buildings or in ghost estates.

Under no circumstances should you add a new D. No. to your ERB for a dwelling that is derelict but is not pre-printed in your ERB. New D. Nos. (9001, 9002 etc.) should only be allocated for habitable dwellings.

Commercial only - Entries in your ERB may include buildings classified by the geo-directory as both commercial and residential. You may find that some do not have a dwelling attached. You should confirm with the person in charge that no one lives at the building before marking it as 'commercial only'. This should be backed up with appropriate notes and a record of visits on the calendar. Mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a reconciliation form must be completed for the dwelling.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Buildings are to be marked as commercial only if the premises are used solely for commercial purposes and no part of the building will be used as a dwelling on census night.

[p. 43]

Under no circumstances should you add a new D.No. to your ERB for a building that is commercial only but is not pre-printed in your ERB. New D.Nos. may only be allocated for habitable dwellings.

Does not exist - If you cannot find a dwelling corresponding to a point on the map, you should perform a thorough check of the area to make sure that you have not missed the dwelling. This should involve checking behind trees, around nearby buildings and other structures that may be obscuring the dwelling from view. It is possible that the dwelling has been marked in the wrong place on the map and is located close by. If this is the case, you should follow the procedure indicated in section 2.11. You should consult with someone in the locality to see if they are aware of a dwelling at that position on the map. Only when you are sure that the address does not exist at or near the indicated location should you mark the 'does not exist' box in your ERB. Mark the RF box and complete a reconciliation form.

[The original document includes an image below.]

You should also note the D.No. in the 'does not exist' box at the bottom of your EA map.

Note: You can only use the 'does not exist' category if there is no dwelling at the location indicated on the map. If there is a dwelling at the location, but the address details in the ERB are incorrect, you should follow the procedure in section 2.15.

Visit calendars
The left panel is used to record enumeration calls during visual enumeration / delivery beginning on the 21 March through to Census Night on the April 24. The other panel is used to record visits during the collection period.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Record the date of each attempt at delivering / collecting form(s) by marking an X through the date on the calendar, or with a C if you deliver a calling card. You can record the time of the visit in the notes section. By varying the times on subsequent visits you may be more likely to find someone at home.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Cen 1: Mark the 'cen 1' box if you have called 3 times to the household, have been unable to make contact with the householder, but suspect that the dwelling will be occupied on Census Night.

You should deliver the appropriate census form(s) with a Cen 1 form and mark the 'cen 1' box in your ERB. You should record the form types issued in your ERB (see forms issued section below) and mark the appropriate D.No. on your delivery grid. Because it is better to make contact and explain the Census Form, a cen 1 cannot be issued until Friday April 8th at the earliest.

More details on the cen 1 procedure can be found in section 4.1.

[p. 44]

Form H: Mark the 'H' box if a household or member of a household insists on sending their completed form(s) directly to the regional office for confidentiality reasons. The regional office will send the form to your field supervisor who will ensure you receive a form H in respect of the form(s) that they have received. Remember to record any forms collected in this manner on the collection grid see section 4.8.

Form E: Mark the 'E' box if an entire household at a dwelling will be temporarily away on Census Night to indicate form E tracking has been initiated. See section 4.2 for full detail.

Rem 1: Record if you have delivered a form rem 1 on your fourth attempt to collect the completed form(s).

Rem 2: Record if you have delivered a form rem 2 after repeated unsuccessful attempts to collect the completed form(s).

Ref 1: Record if you have arranged for a form ref 1 to be sent to the household after repeated unsuccessful attempts to collect the completed forms. A regional or field supervisor will be required to sign the ref 1 which will be sent by registered post from the regional office. More detail on the rem 1, rem 2 and ref 1 procedures can be found in section 5.5.

Forms issued, forms collected

Forms issued: Record the number of each type of form delivered to the household / communal establishment.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Forms collected: Record the number of completed forms of each type collected from each household / communal establishment. This should tally with the number of forms issued. If forms issued and collected don't tally, recover the missing forms and record the reason why all forms delivered to the household were not completed in the notes section.

Persons expected

When you make contact with the householder / CE manager, you should verify how many males and females they expect will be present on Census Night. If they are not sure, ask them for their best guess. You should write this information into the relevant boxes in this section.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Notes section

The notes section should be used to record:

[The original document includes an image below.]

- An identifiable feature of the dwelling that you may record in the absence of a full postal address or that may assist you in finding it when you return to collect the completed forms;

- If the householder states that they are usually at home only at certain times;

- Anything out of the ordinary e.g. a threat from a householder or the presence of a dog;

[p. 45]

- Reasons why forms issued and completed forms collected do not tally; Reason why a dwelling is vacant and the source of this information;

- If the householder has requested an Irish form;

- If a second household exists at a pre-printed address to remind you to collect the form(s) from the second household;

- Anything that assists you in your enumeration.

Should you need more room for notes, there are a number of pink notes pages at the back of the ERB.

Telephone icon: Used to record the householder's contact / mobile number. The householder is not obliged to give you their telephone number but if they do it will be easier for you to contact them if necessary.

Doorstep check, RF box

Doorstep check: This is a check you will need to make during form collection and is described in more detail in section 5.3. It is a check to ensure the household returns all the forms delivered and that the forms have been completed correctly, no questions have been missed and no persons have been omitted.

RF: Mark this box if you need to complete a reconciliation form for a dwelling. See chapter 6 for more information on when and how you should complete a reconciliation form. You must complete the dwelling status (R1) and the dwelling type (R2) for statuses 1-4, don't forget to either complete the reconciliation form on the spot or record R2 in the ERB for use when completing the reconciliation form.

Enumeration alert:
For about 10% of dwellings the enumeration alert in your ERB will be populated by text to emphasis a particular procedure which needs to be adhered to for the dwelling.

The populated text, when present, will be one of following four:

- 'Gen' or 'mix' denotes that dwelling has been enumerated as either a homeless shelter or a PEA (private emergency accommodation). The latter consists of a small number of hotels, B and Bs and private landlords, see Appendix C.
- Priority check
- Gaelic form
- Direct provision

[p. 46]

Gen and mix
If the enumeration alert contains the words 'gen' or 'mix' it means the dwelling has been identified as accommodating homeless persons. 'Gen' for accommodation traditionally associated with the homeless and 'mix' for private emergency accommodation (hotels, B+B's and private landlords) and so the procedure outlined in appendix C, should be followed.

Priority check
If the enumeration alert contains the term 'priority check' it requires that priority attention should be given to checking the collected census form for this dwelling regarding its completeness as part of the doorstep check. Based on an analysis of the previous census, the 2011 census return for this dwelling included a lot of questions that were left blank. However, the current occupants may not be the same as those present in the last census and so the 'priority check' flag is only to assist the enumerator in the collection of forms and should not be relayed back to the householder.

Gaelic form
If the enumeration alert contains the term 'gaelic form' it indicates that this dwelling requested an Irish language census form in the last census. As the current occupants may not be the same as those present in Census 2011 it cannot be automatically assumed that an Irish language form will be sought this time but the flag emphasizes that you need to have a Gaelic form in the bag to cover this household.

Direct provision
If the enumeration alert contains the term 'direct provision' it indicates that this dwelling has been identified as a dwelling that accommodates persons currently applying for refugee status. The standard enumeration procedure should be followed but sensitivity and awareness should be particularly exercised in such instances. The key difference is that family units / rooms / hall doors which spend Census Night together in the direct provision accommodation should be allocated a separate D.No. / ERB entry point on the map and should be issued with a household form rather than individual forms. See appendix D.

Blank ERB panels
There are a number of blank dwelling panels at the back of your ERB. These should be used to note the details of any unlisted D.Nos. you find during visual enumeration. For unlisted dwellings to which you have allocated a new D.No., you will be required to write in the new D.No., small area code, dwelling address and eircode.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 47]

Blank ERBs
In the unlikely event you fill all the blank dwelling panels at the back of your ERB, you should request a blank ERB from your Field Supervisor. The additional ERB contains blank panels only and these should be completed in the same way as the blank dwelling panels in your original ERB. Don't forget to fill in the front cover of the blank ERB.

[p. 48]

Chapter 4 Adapting delivery to particular situations

Section 2.10 described the standard delivery routine which applies in most cases. You will come across situations, however, where the procedure to follow is somewhat different.

The following is a list of situations and how you should adapt the basic delivery in specific circumstances.

1. No contact at a dwelling
2. Absent households
3. Households with more than 6 persons present
4. Households with more than 4 persons absent
5. Apartment complexes and gated communities
6. Communal establishments
7. Caravans and other mobile or temporary structures
8. Confidential returns
9. Multiple households at an address
10. Visitors
11. Refusals
12. Deliveries made after Census Night
13. Public enquiries at the doorstep
14. Media enquiries

4.1 Situation 1 - no contact at a dwelling

Previous experience has shown that where enumerators deliver a census form in person and clearly explain when and how to complete the form, the quality of the census return will be better.

Inevitably, however, there may be households where you will be unable to make contact when delivering the form.

No contact on first call

When you are unable to make contact with the householder on your first call:

1. If there is already a D.No. allocated for the dwelling on your map and ERB, record the date that you called in your ERB with an X on the calendar.

2. For unlisted, habitable dwellings, follow the procedure in section 2.13 Assigning new D.Nos. Mark an X on the delivery calendar in your ERB.

3. Write your CSO mobile telephone number on a calling card and put it through the letterbox. If you do this, write a C on the calendar date to remind yourself that you have delivered a calling card. Do not leave a calling card without first completing it and writing in your CSO mobile number.

4. Visit again within the next few days.
[p. 49]

No contact on second call

When you call a second time, you should vary the time of the day you call if possible.

1. Record in your ERB the date that you called with an X on the calendar or a C if you deliver another calling card. You should not issue more than 2 calling cards to any one household.

2. Look for signs that the dwelling is occupied. Try to establish how many households / persons live at the address and when they are likely to be at home. A neighbor may be able to indicate if someone is living at the address. Make a note in your ERB.

3. Call again when you expect the household might be at home.
No contact on third call - cen 1 procedure

If you are unable to make contact on your third call:

1. Record in your ERB the date that you called with an X on the calendar.

2. If you are confident that the dwelling contains only one household and will be occupied on Census Night, complete form cen 1 and deliver a household form. Make sure that you complete the form ID on the front of the census form.

3. To complete a form cen 1, write the county code, EA code and D.No. and complete the address and eircode of the dwelling at the top of the form. You should mark the date you are completing the cen 1, along with a time and date when you will call to collect the form. You should complete your mobile phone number and the D.No. in the space provided and sign the form.

4. Deliver the census form with the completed cen 1 in a confidential envelope. Mark 'cen 1' in your ERB and mark the dwelling as occupied on the dwelling status list.

5. If you have found out that there are more than 6 persons in the household you should also include the appropriate number of individual forms for each additional person. Make sure that you complete the form ID on the front panel of each individual form that you enclose in the envelope.

6. You should not deliver a census form with a cen 1 before Friday April 8th.

7. When you deliver a census form(s) with a cen1, you should treat it as a delivery. This means you should circle the appropriate D.No. on the delivery grid and include the household in your tally when you are sending your daily deliveries SMS return.

8. If you decide the dwelling is vacant you will need to revisit it after Census Night to verify.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Remember, it is always preferable to make contact with a householder when delivering forms. The quality of the completed census form will generally be better when you have met the householder and explained to him/her how to properly complete the form. Making contact will also make it easier for you to collect the form.

[p. 50]

4.2 Situation 2 - absent households - form E procedure

You may come across some private households where the entire household will be away on Census Night. This is an 'absent household'.

If you make contact with the householder in advance of Census Night and he/she informs you the entire household will be away on Census Night, you will need to complete a form E. You will also need to complete a form E if a householder tells you after Census Night that the entire household was unexpectedly away on Census Night.

When you learn that an entire household will be or was absent on Census Night, you should follow the form E procedure.

Form E procedure

If a D.No. has already been listed for the dwelling on your map and your ERB, mark 'temporarily absent' in your ERB. If the household has not been listed in your ERB and on your map, assign a new D.No. Follow the procedure below.

Mark the box 'form E' in your ERB.

If the household will spend Census Night elsewhere in the republic of Ireland:

- Write the name of the householder, the home address, eircode and the county, EA, small area code and D.No. at the top of the Form E.

- Write the number of males and females and total number of persons usually in the household (note: you do not need to write this information into your ERB).

- For every household member who is spending/who spent Census Night at another address in the republic of Ireland, write their name in section A (within the state) as well as the address and eircode of the place they spend Census Night.

- If household members are spending / spent Census Night at more than one address in the republic of Ireland, you will need to complete a separate form E for each additional address.

- If more than five household members are spending / spent Census Night at one address in the republic of Ireland, you will need to complete an additional form E with the details of these household members.

- Ask the householder to sign the front page of the form E. This is a statutory declaration.

- You should now give the form E to your field supervisor. He / she will proceed to track whether the household members were enumerated at the address/addresses given to you. If they were enumerated at this address / addresses, your field supervisor will inform you.

- Only then should you complete a reconciliation form for the home address, marking 'temporarily absent' as the dwelling status (R1) and mark dwelling type (R2).

[p. 51]

- If your field supervisor informs you that the household did not spend Census Night at the address / addresses given, you will have to go back to the household and ask them where they spent Census Night and deliver a census form in the usual manner if you find out the household spent Census Night at home.

If the household will spend Census Night outside of the republic of Ireland (including Northern Ireland):

- Complete the form ID as described above.

- Write the name and surname of each household member into section B (outside the state), mark whether the person is male or female and complete the full address at which they will spend/spent Census Night.

- Writing in a country name is not sufficient. The full address (or hotel and city) of where the person is spending / spent Census Night is required.

- If more than five persons are usually resident in the household, complete an additional form E.

- Ask the householder to sign the form. This is a statutory declaration by them.

- You should ask the householder for evidence that the household will spend/did spend Census Night abroad, e.g. plane tickets, booking details, receipts, etc. You should not however demand this information in an aggressive manner. You are, however, entitled to take reasonable steps to satisfy yourself that the household was outside the state on Census Night.

- Give the completed form E to your field supervisor who will sign and keep it and record it on the form E tracking system.

- After Census Night, you should call to the household and check to ensure that the household was in fact outside the state on Census Night, (if you doubt a householder's claim that the entire household will be temporarily outside the state on Census Night you should call to the dwelling on the morning of Monday April 25th). If you find that the household did spend Census Night at home, request that the householder completes a census form.

- You should complete a reconciliation form for the D.No. of the home address, marking 'temporarily absent' as the dwelling status (R1) and mark dwelling type (R2).

Checking a form E request received from another EA

An enumerator in another EA may complete a form E in respect of a household which intends to spend Census Night at an address in your EA. If this occurs, your field supervisor will contact you and ask you to verify that the household members were captured on the census form for that address. You will be provided with the address and eircode, plus a list of the names of the persons to check. You should write these details onto a Form EF.

When you collect the completed form/s for the address, you should check to make sure the persons are included on it. You should prioritize these households for collection. Once you have done this, you should inform your field supervisor immediately.

Individuals absent from a household

Persons should be enumerated at the address at which they spend Census Night.

[p. 52]

Where one or more usually resident members of the household, but not all of the household members are away on Census Night, they should be included on list 2 on page 3 of the household form with their details supplied on pages 22-23.

In particular note that primary, secondary, and third level students who are living away from home during term time and who are not present on Census Night should be included on the household form as absent persons.

Individuals absent from a communal establishment

Persons normally resident in a communal establishment but who are not there on Census Night should not be enumerated as persons absent from the establishment. Absent persons only applies to private households.

4.3 Situation 3 - households with more than 6 persons present

You should issue a household form and one individual form for each additional person over 6 persons e.g. if there were 8 persons then you should issue one household form and two individual forms. Make sure you complete the front panel on each individual form you deliver.

Note in your ERB that you have issued one household form and the number of individual forms issued. This will help you remember how many forms to collect after Census Night.

Explain to the householder the procedure for completing the individual form(s). Stress that question 4 (relationship) on the individual form relates to persons 1-4 on the household form.

You should never deliver two household forms to any household. If you do not have sufficient individual forms with you, call back later.

4.4 Situation 4 - households with more than 4 persons absent

In the unlikely situation where there are more than 4 persons absent from the household on Census Night issue an individual form for each additional absent person and ask the householder to record the additional absent person's details on the individual form(s). Write the word 'absent ' on the front page of the individual form in the eircode text box.

4.5 Situation 5 - apartment complexes and gated communities

Apartment complexes with multiple dwelling units will be marked on your map with a blue triangle. The D.No. of the first apartment will appear beside the triangle followed by the number of apartments in the complex. For example, if the first apartment in the complex has been allocated D.No. 373 and there are 10 apartments in the complex, 373#10 will appear on your map.

[The original document includes an image below.]

In your ERB, all the D.Nos. for each apartment in the complex will be printed.

You may come across situations where there are fewer D.Nos. allocated to an apartment complex than there are apartment units. In this case, you should allocate new 9001+ D. Nos. in the usual manner and mark them on your map, map grid, in your ERB and on the delivery and collection grids.

[p. 53]

You may also come across situations where there are more D.Nos. allocated to an apartment complex than there are apartment units. In this case, you should:

1. Correct the number of apartment / flats allocated to the building on the map.

2. Write the D.Nos. of the apartments which do not exist into the 'does not exist' box and into the 'does not exist' grid on the map.

3. Mark the dwelling status of the ERB entry as 'does not exist'. Mark the RF box.

4. Complete a reconciliation form for each apartment which does not exist, marking box 8 in R1.

Apartment buildings spanning enumeration area or small area boundaries

In some EAs, there are apartment buildings which straddle a boundary into an adjacent EA or small area. This has resulted in apartments in the one building being physically located in two EAs or small areas.

In these instances, a decision has been made by CSO to allocate the whole building to one particular EA or small area and the blue triangle on the map indicating the apartment building will appear in only one of the small areas or EAs. All apartments will be listed in one EA or small area. Notify the enumerator in the adjoining EA that you will be covering the EA to avoid confusion.

Apartment buildings not marked on your map / ERB

In the course of visiting dwellings in your EA you may discover an apartment building which is not listed on the map / ERB. The location of these buildings must be marked on the map with a triangle and the D.No. you have allocated to it (in the same format as for other apartment buildings) with a black biro and pink highlighter. All the D.Nos. should be entered into your ERB and you must also write all the newly allocated D.Nos. into the 'added' D.Nos. grid on the map.

If this new building spans EA / small area boundaries you should contact your field supervisor for guidance as to which enumerator should enumerate it.

Gaining access to gated communities and apartment complexes with security gates / doors

Gated housing developments and apartment complexes requiring security fobs or access codes can be difficult to access. When you are performing your visual enumeration, you should take note of any such developments which you encounter. If there is a security guard present, he / she may grant you access to the development.

Your field supervisor will provide you with assistance in accessing gated communities which are difficult to enter.

4.6 Situation 6 - communal establishments

Hotels, hospitals, residential homes, boarding schools, prisons, religious establishments and other managed residential accommodation where specific groups of people such as guests, patients, inmates and students live communally are called communal establishments (CEs).

[The original document includes an image below.]

Your field supervisor will have contacted the managers of the larger CEs (more than 10 persons) in advance to inform them that the Census is taking place and to ask them for their co-operation. Enumeration of smaller CEs, such as B and Bs, is normally carried out by a manager or person in charge. You are responsible for contacting this person and issuing the appropriate forms and envelopes. It is important, therefore, that you have read and understood the completion instructions for the listing form and the individual form, so you can advise the manager. The manager completes a listing form. Each person present on Census Night completes an individual form.

[p. 54]

Boarding houses

A boarding house is an establishment run for profit, which provides board (full or partial) and lodging for permanent or semi-permanent residents e.g. persons working away from home or university students during term time. Guest houses / B and Bs on the other hand cater for transient persons.

Boarding Houses with less than five boarders on Census Night should be treated as a private household. This household should include the manager and his / her family.

Boarding houses with five boarders or more on Census Night should be treated as communal establishments. In communal establishments, the manager and his/her family are treated as a separate private household so you will have to generate D.No. (9001+), create an ERB entry and mark the D.No. added onto your map and Collection/Delivery grids.

CEs providing shelter for homeless persons or persons in direct provision centres

There are slightly different procedures to be followed in CEs which provide shelter for homeless persons. The procedures to be followed are detailed in Appendix C + D.

Standard procedures for enumeration in communal establishments

Small communal establishments (with 10 or less persons)

[The original document includes an image below.]

1. Contact the manager or person in charge on or before Tuesday 19 April.

2. Introduce yourself and explain that you have come to deliver forms for the Census.

3. Ask the manager whether he / she wishes to complete an Irish or English version of the listing form.

4. Go through the listing form and the individual form with the manager to be sure that he / she knows what is required.

5. Complete the name, address, eircode and the form ID (county, EA, small area and D. No.) on the listing form. As with the household form, the D. No. for the establishment should be on your map with a corresponding entry in your ERB. If not, generate the next unused 9001+ D. No. and enter on your map / ERB see section 2.13.

[p. 55]

6. Mark the dwelling status as 'occupied' in the ERB. Write in the manager's name, get a contact number and write it in your ERB.

7. Ask the manager how many males and females are expected to be in the CE on Census Night. If the manager is unsure, ask for an estimate. Record this in your ERB.

8. Complete the name, address and eircode of the establishment and the Form ID on each Individual Form before handing it over to the manager. The D.No. on each individual form should be the same as the D.No. on the listing form. Leave the 'person number' blank on the individual forms as it should only be completed after collection.

9. Leave enough individual forms with accompanying confidential envelopes for everyone who will be present on census night. Only leave extra forms if there will be a real need for them.

10. Ask the manager to write each person's name on the front of the privacy envelope before distributing them on the evening of Sunday April 24. This will allow the manager to check that he/she has collected forms from every person who spends Census Night in the establishment.

11. Ask the manager or person in charge to complete the listing form on Census Night and deliver the individual forms. He/she should write the names of each person staying in the CE on pages 2-4 of the listing form and mark the appropriate response to question E1 on page 2.

12. On issuing an individual form to a person staying in the CE, the manager should mark the corresponding 'issued' box on the listing form.

13. If the manager or person in charge refuses to distribute and collect the forms, offer to do so yourself (see below for the procedure for CEs with more than 10 persons present on Census Night).

14. Update the ERB with the number of listing forms and individual forms issued.

15. Ask the manager to collect the completed individual forms on the morning of April 25. On receipt of each individual form, he / she should mark the 'collected box' in the appropriate space on the listing form.

16. Once you have finished this procedure, you should circle the appropriate D.No. on your Delivery grid.

Treatment of the manager and other staff members spending the night in the CE

Living with family
If the manager or other staff members live on the premises of the CE with their family, they should be regarded as a private household separate to the CE. This means they should receive a separate household form with a 9001+ D. No. unless the manager's dwelling is listed separately in the ERB.

Living alone or with unrelated persons
If the manager or other staff members live on the premises of the CE alone or with unrelated persons, they should be enumerated in the same manner as other residents of the CE, i.e. they should be listed on the listing form and should complete an individual form.

Not living in the CE
If the manager or other staff members spend Census Night at work in the CE, but do not live in the CE and return home in the morning, they should be included on the census form in their usual address. They should not be enumerated in the CE.

The general rule to follow in situations like these is when the additional buildings are used for the same function as the main building, you should not create new D.Nos. for them.

[p. 56]

Communal establishments based in multiple buildings

You may encounter a communal establishment that is based in more than one building at the address listed in your ERB, for which only one D.No. has been listed.

For example, a hotel that has several smaller buildings on the grounds which can be booked by guests or a convent and a nursing home run by the same religious order.

If a building is used for a different function to the main buildings, a new 9001+ D.No. should be created on your map and in your ERB. In cases such as these, the manager of the communal establishment should fill out a separate listing form for the building with the different function. Each will be treated as separate CEs.

Example
A nursing home is indicated on your map and in your ERB with D.No. 129.

You make contact with the manager of the home who informs you that there is a convent on the grounds which is also part of the communal establishment and several nuns live there.

Because the convent is a different type of establishment, you decide to allocate D.No. 9001 to it. You mark it on your map and fill a blank panel in your ERB. You hand the manager a listing form filled in with the county, ea and small area code and D.No. 129 and ask her to list details of the persons in the nursing home on Census Night. You also hand her a second listing form for D.No. 9001 and ask her to list details of the persons in the convent on Census Night.

The ERB entries for this example are as follows:

For the nursing home:

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 57]

For the convent:

[The original document includes an image below.]

In the above example both dwellings have the same eircode, but you should seek clarification from the manager whether the original eircode listed in the ERB applies to all the separate dwellings you have identified as part of the original CE.

For a hotel with separate buildings used by guests on its grounds, you should only use one D.No. You should not assign new D.Nos. for each of the separate buildings on the grounds as they are being used for the same purpose as the main hotel building, i.e. guest accommodation.

Vacant communal establishments
If no one is staying in a communal establishment on Census Night you should mark 'vacant house / CE' in your ERB and complete a reconciliation form, marking the dwelling status 'vacant' and 'communal establishment'.

If a CE is vacant on Census Night but the manager is staying on the premises, you should use the D.No. allocated to the CE in your map / ERB to enumerate the manager.

Large communal establishments (with more than 10 persons)
Your field supervisor will make contact with the administrator or manager to explain the timing and procedures used to enumerate the establishment. In most cases, form delivery should take place on Friday 22 April - two days before the Census. If an EA has a number of large communal establishments, form delivery can take place before this, but should be done in the week before Census Night.

For large hospitals you may also deliver forms before Friday 22 April. The hospital manager may know who will be in the hospital on Census Night and may be able to complete the list of patients on the listing form in advance. If necessary patients can be removed from or added to the listing form after Census Night (e.g. due to subsequent births, deaths, unexpected admissions etc.).

You should follow the same procedure as for smaller CEs except that:

1. You should arrange a suitable time to meet the manager in order to explain the procedures you will be following. Be sure to inform the manager that he/she will be responsible for completing the listing form and for distributing the individual forms.

2. Inform the manager that he/she will need to complete the list of persons staying in the CE on Census Night on pages 2-4 of the listing form. The guest or patient register can be used as a source for the names if available.

3. Ask the manager to mark the appropriate response to question E1 on page 2 of the listing form.

[p. 58]

4. Should there be more than 60 persons in the CE, you should use a second listing form.

5. Ask the manager to distribute the Individual Forms and envelopes to the persons staying in the CE on the evening of Census Night. Once an individual form has been distributed to a person staying in the CE, the manager should mark the appropriate 'issued' box on the listing form on pages 2-4.

6. You should leave extra individual forms if there will be a real need for them. Do not estimate the extra forms required based on empty beds, for example. Ask the manager the likely number of extra forms needed.

7. Ask the manager to ensure that anyone not listed on the listing form who arrives later and spends Census Night in the CE is entered on the listing form and completes an individual form.

8. Inform the manager that you will return to collect the forms on the day after the Census (Monday 25 April).

9. Where an individual is likely to have difficulties completing a form, ask the manager to provide help or to arrange for the form to be completed on the person's behalf.

10. Where the manager will have difficulty carrying out the task, you should assume the role of the manager and follow the enumeration procedure as instructed on the listing form.

In a large establishment such as a hospital you may have to arrange a short information session for staff such as ward managers to explain the procedures. Your field supervisor may assist with this.

Note that when you successfully deliver forms to a communal establishment, you should circle the D. No. on the delivery grid as you would for a normal household.

Private residences in the grounds of a communal establishment

Examples of this are a doctor's house, caretaker's cottage or porter's lodge.

These dwellings are separate private households and require a separate entry in your ERB. The details should be pre-printed in your ERB and on your map. If the dwelling is unlisted, assign a new D No. and follow the procedure in section 2.13 and apply the usual delivery routine.

Note that if you have a number of large CEs in your EA, your field supervisor may decide to ask an enumerator from a nearby EA to help you with collecting the CE forms on the morning of April 25.

4.7 Situation 7 - caravans and other mobile or temporary structures

Caravans and mobile homes should be listed separately in your ERB and assigned a 9001+ D. No. if not already listed, except where:

[The original document includes an image below.]

- A single caravan/mobile home is parked in the grounds of a private house and is not occupied by a separate household. You should not allocate a new D. No. or list in your ERB.

- One or more unoccupied caravans are being displayed for sale or hire. These should not be assigned D. Nos. in your ERB or marked on your map.

- There are one or more unoccupied caravans in a caravan park. If not already listed with a D.No. on your map and in your ERB, these should be assigned one new 9001+ D. No. You should note in your ERB the total number of caravans unoccupied. Mark 'holiday home' if the caravans are vacant holiday homes. Remember to fill out one reconciliation form for all holiday homes (see section 6.1).

[p. 59]

- Two or more caravans/mobile homes are occupied by a single family. A D.No. may already exist on your map and in your ERB. If this is not the case, you should assign only one 9001+ D.No. and carry out the delivery procedure.

Enumerating caravans on a managed site

Speak to the manager of the site to determine which caravans will be occupied on Census Night. Visit each caravan.

Treat each occupied caravan as a separate dwelling unless two caravans are occupied by the one family (see bullet point 4 above). Each caravan containing a separate household may have a D.No. listed on your map and in your ERB. If not, assign a 9001+ D.No. and follow the delivery procedure. When completing the address details on the form, use the D.No. as the caravan number if no caravan numbers are assigned on the site.

Caravans not on a caravan site (including unofficial halting sites)

If the caravan is not pre-printed on your map and in your ERB, you should assign a new 9001+ D. No. and follow the procedure in Section 2.12.

Each separate household should have one D.No. each. If you need to complete the address in your ERB, use 'Caravan at ____'.

Put a reminder in the notes section to remind you that form(s) must be collected early on the Monday morning after the Census.

Temporary or mobile structures or truck cabs

You should enumerate all temporary or mobile structures such as camper vans, houseboats, parked trucks that are habitable or look like they may be inhabited with new D.Nos. and follow the delivery procedure. When completing the address use 'Truck parked at ____', or an appropriate introduction to the address. Put a reminder in the notes section to remind you that form(s) must be collected early on the Monday morning after the Census.

The eircode in such instances is not applicable.

4.8 Situation 8 - Confidential returns

Households seeking to make confidential returns

If you encounter a household which does not want you to see their completed census form, you should explain that all information collected is confidential and is protected by the Statistics Act 1993. If this does not reassure the householder:

1. Give the householder a confidential envelope with a regional office address label affixed and ask him/her to return the form(s) in the post. Write 'form H' on the back of the envelope.

2. Make a note in your ERB and mark the 'H' box.

3. On receiving the census form(s), the regional office will send them to your field supervisor. Your field supervisor will send you a completed form H which will allow you to complete your summarization and will ensure you receive full payment for a collected form.

[p. 60]

4. You should treat a completed Form H for an entire household received from your field supervisor as a collected form.

Try to keep the number of such confidential returns to a minimum.

Request from an individual for confidentiality

If a member of a household has objections to you or other members of the household seeing his/her information:

1. Give the person an Individual Form (remember to complete the form ID before giving it to them) and a blank census envelope to enclose the form after completion.

2. Record on your ERB that an individual form(s) was issued.

3. Ask the person to enclose his / her completed individual form in the envelope and return it with the household form when you come to collect the forms.

If the person is not happy with this arrangement:

1. Provide an envelope addressed to the regional office and ask him / her to return the form by post (write form H on the back of the envelope). When this is received, the regional office will send it to your field supervisor.

2. Make a note in your ERB and mark the 'H' box.

3. Make sure you receive a form H from your field supervisor to confirm that the person has posted back the form.

4. Ask the householder to ensure that the person requesting the individual form is entered on list 1, page 3 of the household form.

5. Remember that you have issued additional forms when completing the form ID and note in your ERB that more than one form has been issued.

Try to keep the number of such confidential returns to an absolute minimum.

4.9 Situation 9 - Multiple households at an address

It is important that you identify all the households at every dwelling and deliver a separate household form to each. It is part of the delivery routine to establish the number of households at each dwelling. Signs such as several doorbells or dustbins will often indicate a shared entrance and multiple households.

Examples of the type of dwelling where you may find more than one household include:

- Tenements
- A dwelling which includes accommodation occupied by a lodger or live-in relative who does not share a living room or meals with the remainder of the household.

Although grouping people into households is important it is not as important as ensuring everyone is included on a form. Bear this in mind if you are struggling to group people into households at a dwelling.

Often the first person you talk to will be able to tell you how many other households live there.

If you discover additional households at a dwelling you should follow the procedure in section 2.13.

[p. 61]

Remember:

If there is a second household sharing the same hall door in a dwelling unit (e.g. a lodger living separately in a house), the new D.No. you allocate should be the next available 9001+. If there is a third household at the single dwelling the third D.No. you allocate should again be the next available D.No. in the 9001+ range and so on.

Similarly, if there is more than one household in one building but the households live in separate dwelling units (e.g. flats with separate dining areas in a large house), the new D.No. you should allocate should be 9001+ as described in section 2.13.

If you encounter more than one household at one address for which you need to allocate new D.Nos., it may be useful to note the new D.Nos. in the notes section of your ERB for the original printed address. If you do this, when you go to collect forms from the address, you will know that there are other households resident in the dwelling and you have to collect forms from them. See below for an illustration.

[The original document includes two images below.]

On your map, you should write any new D.Nos. you have allocated beside the D. No. of the first household and highlight it in pink. You should also write this D.No. into the 'added' D.Nos. box at the bottom of your map and onto your delivery and collection grids. Note in the example above, the two households have the same eircode. Where multiple households reside at the one address you should try and confirm if different eircodes are applicable or whether the originally listed eircode applies to all the households present.

4.10 Situation 10 - visitors

We want to enumerate everyone where they are in the country on Census Night.

Visitors staying with a household should be included on the household form irrespective of whether they are residents of the republic of Ireland or not.

Visiting households on Census Night

Visiting households staying in holiday accommodation or in someone else's home while the usual residents are away on Census Night should complete a household form irrespective of whether they are residents of the republic of Ireland or not.

Visiting households may move on soon after the Census, so for these households put a reminder in the notes section that forms must be collected soon after the Census.

4.11 Situation 11 - Refusals

We look to you to gain the public's confidence and encourage their participation. If someone refuses to accept a form, be courteous and explain that:

[p. 62]

- The information is vital for planning the needs of their local area and the Census provides the only source of information for many areas. For example, it provides information on the number of people over 65 or under 5 in their area;

- The form is easy to fill out and should only take several minutes to complete. Although it is a 24 page form, most households will have to complete less than half the form as it covers up to six persons;

- Most of the questions just require a mark;

- All information is confidential and is used for statistical purposes only;

- The Census is compulsory and that the householder is obliged by law to ensure that the form is completed and may be fined up to €44,440 for refusing to do so;

- Do not cause any antagonism. Suggest that the householder looks through the form if they are reluctant to complete it;

- Make sure you listen to the householder. Very often a person will be co-operative after having had his/her say. Under no circumstances should you threaten a householder or engage in any activity which could be considered harassment.

If the householder still refuses:

1. Record the date and time of the call in your ERB.
2. Summarize your interaction with the householder in the notes section.
3. Notify your field supervisor of the refusal. He / she will call on the householder to encourage participation.

4.12 Situation 12 - deliveries made after Census Night

There may be rare situations where you have to deliver a form after Census Night. Examples of this may be:

- When you re-visit a dwelling which you believed was vacant after Census Night but find it is occupied;
- When you missed a dwelling during your visual enumeration and did not deliver a form to the household;
- Where a member of the public has contacted the census regional office or CSO to say that they did not receive a census form. You will receive a text message with the address details requesting you to deliver a census form.

Should you need to deliver a form after Census Night, you should follow the usual delivery routine but you should ask the householder to complete the form as soon as possible and arrange a time to collect the form. You may need to make alterations to your ERB (e.g. if you had indicated a dwelling was vacant).

4.13 Situation 13 - Public enquiries at the doorstep

Familiarity with this manual and the census forms will help you answer most questions you are likely to get from the public. Below are the answers to some of the more usual questions which may be put to you.

[p. 63]

Why do you need names on the form?

Names enable the householder and the enumerator to distinguish different people on the form to help check that everyone has been included. They also assist in the verification of family relationships.

Why do you need my address?

We need to ensure that a form has been delivered to every address in the country and we need to record where a form has been received from and where we need to call back to collect the form.

Will my answers be confidential?

Yes. Confidentiality is guaranteed by law. Everyone working on the Census has to sign an undertaking guaranteeing that they will not disclose any information collected in the course of their work.

Is participation in the census voluntary?

No. There is a legal requirement on householders and individuals present in the country on Census Night to be enumerated in the Census.

How much does the census cost?

The Census is the largest and most complex statistical operation in the State and costs around €50 million spread over 5 years.

Once I have completed and returned the census form will I be contacted again?

No, not for the Census. See also appendix J

More detailed questions regarding the census form?
Read the Explanatory Notes on the back page of the census form. Also, see appendix H.

4.14 Situation 14 - media enquiries

It is important to note that enumerators do not conduct media interviews or provide information or comments to the media. Nothing is ever 'off the record' and even the most casual of comments can result in a news story quoting 'an official spokesperson'.

You should not get involved in discussing politics, religion or debating issues in the media. Remember, the enumerator's job is to deliver and collect completed census forms.

Should you receive media enquiries, you should immediately alert your field supervisor and pass them to him / her. Where it may be appropriate for an enumerator to publicize the Census, this will have to be cleared in advance with your field supervisor.

[p. 64]

Chapter 5 Form collection

Collection will begin on Monday 25 April, the day after the Census and must be completed by Monday 23 May. You must collect a completed census form from all households who spent Census Night in your EA. A short training video is available online showing form collection routine: http://www.census.ie/How-we-do-it/enumerator- training/collectionforhouseholds

In order of priority, collection on the first day, Monday 25 April should concentrate on:

1. Ships in port, lorries, etc.
2. Caravans and other mobile or temporary structures (including traveler halting sites).
3. Communal establishments.
4. Visiting households which you suspect may move on soon after the Census.

If your EA contains a number of these categories you should advise your field supervisor as they may need to draft in the assistance of surrounding enumerators.

5.1 Preparation at home

Thorough preparation will help to ensure that your collection will go smoothly. Before you set out, you should plan your route. The best route will most likely be that used to deliver the forms. You will need to visit every address where forms have been delivered including those marked as vacant or holiday homes during form delivery. Familiarize yourself with the content of the census forms because often people will need assistance in completing them. See form delivery and collection - item checklist in appendix A for items you need to bring with you.

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5.2 Basic collection routine for households

Begin the collection of forms in your EA by visiting each dwelling or household listed in your ERB. If you have phone numbers for householders in your ERB, you can ring them in advance to arrange a time to collect the form(s) if you have not already done so. In the unlikely event that you notice a dwelling was missed during delivery or that a caravan, etc. has arrived since you delivered forms, deliver the forms immediately, make an entry in your ERB and map, follow the delivery procedure and arrange to call back in a couple of days to collect the forms.

The following procedure applies to the collection of all forms:

1. If you make contact show your ID card and introduce yourself.

2. Explain that you are calling to collect the census form(s).

3. Ask the householder how many persons spent the night of Sunday April 24 in the household. This is the number of persons present.

4. Ask the householder if anyone who is usually resident in the household was temporarily away on the night of Sunday April 24. If so, they should be categorized as absent persons.

5. Tell the householder that you must check all forms collected to ensure that nothing has been omitted, this is to avoid having to call back.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 65]

5.3 The doorstep check

When the householder returns the form(s) to you, you must carry out the following checks on the doorstep:

1. Check that the householder returns all the forms that you delivered. The number of forms you delivered should be in your ERB.

2. Check that all forms have been filled out in black or blue pen. If the forms have been filled out in pencil you will have to transcribe the answers onto a new form later.

3. Check that the householder has completed the household questions on page 2.

4. Check that no person has been listed twice on the form. Check in particular with the householder that any absent persons are not also listed as present.

5. Cross check that persons present indicated verbally by the householder agrees with both the number of persons listed on list 1, page 3 of the household form and the number of persons present for which questions were answered on the household form (pages 4-21) and any individual form(s) issued. If they do not tally you should check with the householder and ask him / her to carry out any necessary amendments. Amendments may be made by any adult member of the household.

6. Note that if there were more than 6 persons present on Census Night, you should collect an individual form for each additional person after person 6.

7. If any individual forms were delivered, check that the relationship to persons 1 to 4 on the household forms has been correctly entered.

8. Cross check that absent persons indicated verbally by the householder agrees with both the number of persons listed on list 2, page 3 of the household form and the number of absent persons for whom questions were answered on the household form (pages 22-23). If they do not tally you should check with the householder and ask him / her to carry out any necessary amendments. Amendments may be made by any adult member of the household.

9. You cannot have a household form with absent persons but no persons present listed. If the whole household was absent, you should follow the form E procedure outlined in section 4.2. Any forms completed with absent persons only listed should be treated as spoiled forms.

10. If any individual forms were collected, check that the person has not been double counted on the household form and complete the person number on the front panel of the individual form. The person number assigned to the individual form should be the number of the person on list 1, page 3 of the household form or the next available blank person number on the household form. Note that an individual form may have been sent directly to the regional office for confidentiality reasons. You should have marked the form H box in your ERB if this is the case.

11. Having completed the above checks, scan all the remaining questions looking for instances where questions that should have been answered were left blank. You should request the householder to carry out the necessary amendments to questions left blank or correct any inconsistencies you see.

12. Check that the householder has signed the declaration on page 23 of the household form and that any individual form(s) are signed by the person who completed them.

13. Note in your ERB the number of form(s) collected and the date of collection.

[p. 66]

14. Confirm that you have completed the doorstep check on the forms collected and mark the 'doorstep check' box in your ERB.

15. Circle the relevant D.No. of the household on the collection grid to indicate a successful collection.

16. Thank the householder for completing the form(s) and for their participation in the Census.

The best possible check of the accuracy and completeness of the information provided is a check carried out by you, the enumerator, on the doorstep. Under no circumstances should the enumerator amend any information provided on a form once they have left the doorstep.

5.4 Form collection summary and SMS (text) messaging to the CSO

As with the form delivery stage, you must keep a daily record of households from which you have collected completed forms on the form collection grid.

[The original document includes an image below.]

When you collect the forms you have delivered to a household, you should circle the household's D.No. on the collection grid.

Each day you collect forms, you should send the daily total number of households from which you have collected completed forms and the number of hours worked on that date using the application on your CSO mobile phone. If you are retrospectively recording forms collected and hours worked, please select the relevant date from the date field.

Example of using the collection grid and SMS messaging

Collection day 1

1. At the end of your first day's collection, you collect and check completed forms from 40 households.

2. You should circle the D. Nos. of the 40 households from which you have collected the completed forms on the form collection grid.

3. On the record of daily form collection table, on the reserve side of the grid, you should write 40 beside 'collection day / date' for day 1.

4. You should then mark a line through each of these 40 circles, indicating you have included the D. Nos. in your daily total.

5. SMS 40 Forms Collected using the application on your CSO mobile and hours worked for day 1.
[p. 67]

Collection day 2

1. On the second day of collection, you collect and check completed forms from 37 households.

2. You should circle the D. Nos. of the 37 households from which you have collected the completed forms on the form collection grid.

3. To get your daily total, you should count the total number of circled boxes in the collection grid through which no line has yet been placed.

4. On the record of daily form collection table, on the reserve side of the grid, you should write 37 beside 'collection day / date' for day 2.

5. You should mark a line through each of the 37 circles you drew for collection day 2 to indicate you have included the D. Nos. in your daily total.

6. SMS 37 forms collected using the application on your CSO mobile and hours worked for day 2.

If you did not collect any forms on a day, you should not send an SMS message. If you do not send an SMS message, it will be assumed by your field supervisor and the CSO that you did not collect any forms or work any hours on that particular day.

[The original document includes an image below.]

5.5 Issues which may arise during form collection

1. The form is not ready for collection
2. Lost forms
3. Householder requires assistance completing the form
4. Householder refuses to return a completed form
5. Householder does not want you to see the completed form
6. Householder has posted the form to the CSO
7. Entire household was away on Census Night
8. You do not make contact on your first collection call
9. You do not make contact on your second collection call
10. You do not make contact on your third collection call
11. You do not make contact on your fourth collection call
12. You do not make contact on your fifth collection call

Situation 1 - The householder tells you the form is not ready for collection

1. Record the date of your collection call with an X on the calendar in your ERB.

2. Try to get the form(s) completed there and then. If this cannot be done, arrange a time to collect the form (record this in your ERB).

3. If on your third visit to collect the form it is still not ready, inform the householder of the importance of the census and offer to assist them to complete the form. Be aware that some householders may have a literacy problem and will be afraid to let it be known.
[p. 68]

Tell the householder that:

1. The form will only take a few minutes to complete and that although it is a 24 page form, most households will only have to complete less than half the form as it covers up to six persons;

2. Most questions just require a mark to answer them;

3. It is vital that the information is complete and that they are included;

4. All information collected is confidential and is used for statistical purposes only;

5. There is a legal obligation to complete the Census.

Situation 2 - If the householder has lost the form(s)

1. Complete the Form ID (County, EA, Small Area and D.No. and eircode) information on replacement form(s).

2. Give the householder the replacement form(s) to complete.

3. Write 'original forms mislaid, replacements provided' in your ERB.

4. Wait until the householder completes the form. If that is inconvenient for the householder, make an appointment to return in order to collect the completed form.

If the householder finds the original copy before you make your subsequent visit to the household, ensure both copies of the household forms are returned to you. The uncompleted copy should be included with any other spoiled forms you may have when you complete your enumeration.

Situation 3 - If the householder asks for your assistance

You may be asked to help with a particular question or to help complete the form. You may also encounter language difficulties. If there are children in the house they will often have some understanding of English and may be able to help complete the form. You can use the translated questions sheet if help is required in one of the 21 languages for which foreign translations are available. Arrange to call back with a translation form or tell the householder that translations are available at www.census.ie if you have no copies of the translation forms immediately available.

Situation 4 - If the householder refuses to fill out a form

Do not act in an aggressive manner towards the householder. Tell the householder that:

- The information is vital for planning the needs of their local area and is the only source of information such as the number of people over 65 or under 5 in their area;

- The census form is a permanent record of their household and will become available for study by their descendants in 100 years;

- The form should not take more than several minutes to complete and that although it is a 24 page form, most households will only have to complete less than half the form as it covers up to six persons;

- Most questions just require a mark to answer them;

- It is vital that the information is complete and that they are included;

- All information collected is confidential and is used for statistical purposes only; you can assist them in completing the form.
[p. 69]

If this approach fails, inform the householder that:

- The Census is compulsory;

- Under the Statistics Act 1993 they may be fined up to €44,440 for refusing to complete the form;

- They can post the form back if they are concerned about confidentiality. Offer to give him/her a confidential census envelope with a regional office address label attached in which to return the form. Write 'form H' on the back of the envelope and enter the county and EA code in the relevant boxes on the envelope. See situation 5 below for how to deal with confidential returns.

- Offer to assist the householder to complete the form there and then. If they do not take up this offer you should tell the householder that you will be reporting the situation to your field supervisor who will be in contact.

- Make a full record of what transpired including any reasons that the householder gives for not wanting to complete the form. Inform your field supervisor who will advise you on how to proceed and may initiate the ref 1 procedure.

- In the very rare event that you cannot collect a census form from an occupied dwelling after involving your field supervisor, you may need to complete a reconciliation form. This is a serious issue and will require authorization from your regional supervisor. You will need to contact your field supervisor who will apply to the regional office for authorization. Regional office authorization will only be given where all other avenues have been exhausted.

Situation 5 - the householder does not want you to see the completed census form - form H procedure

[The original document includes an image below.]

If you encounter a householder who is uncomfortable about giving you their completed return because they know you, explain that all information collected is confidential and is protected by the Statistics Act 1993. If this does not reassure the householder:

1. Give the householder a confidential envelope with a regional office address label affixed. Write 'form H' on the back of the envelope.

2. Ask the householder to return the form freepost to the regional office within 3 days. Make sure that the form ID is accurate and completed on the form. The regional office will return the census forms to your field supervisor when they are received.

3. Write 'confidential request' in the notes section in your ERB.

4. Mark 'form H' in your ERB.

Make sure you receive a form H from your field supervisor confirming that the householder has in fact returned the form by post to the regional office. You will not be able to complete summarization or receive payment for collecting the form unless you receive the form H.

By patient explanation and persuasion you should aim to keep the number of such cases to a minimum. Remember form H gives rise to additional work for you and your field supervisor.

[p. 70]

Situation 6 - householder has posted the form to CSO

Householders should not be encouraged to post the form to CSO. However, if CSO receives a census form which has been properly completed, both you and your field supervisor will receive an SMS message informing you that the form has been received. When you receive the SMS message, make sure you make a note of it in your ERB so you do not revisit the dwelling in question.

Your field supervisor will complete a form H with the information from the SMS message and give it to you. You should sign the completed form H and use it for your EA summary.

This procedure will also apply if the householder posts a completed form to CSO in advance of Census Night.

If a householder posts a form which has not been fully completed to CSO, CSO will return the form to you. You must return to the householder and request that he / she completes the form.

Situation 7 - The entire household was away on Census Night - form E procedure

You may come across some dwellings where the entire household was unexpectedly away on Census Night:

In these situations, you should:

1. Amend the dwelling status from 'occupied' to 'temporarily absent' in your ERB. Cross out the mark you have made on the 'occupied' box in your ERB. Mark the 'form E' box.
2. You will now need to complete a form E in respect of the household. The form E procedure is outlined in section 4.2.

Remember you should complete a reconciliation form for each household for which the form E procedure is confirmed.

Situation 8 - If you do not make contact on your first collection call

Arrange to call again at a different time. Record the date of your call in your ERB with an X on the calendar. If you have a contact telephone number for the householder in your ERB, you should use it to arrange to collect the form.

Situation 9 - If you do not make contact on your second collection call

Leave your calling card stating the time you called, your phone number, the day and time that you will be calling back (try to vary the time you call next time) and the EA and D.No. Record the date of your call in your ERB with a C on the calendar.

Call again at your proposed time unless you hear from the householder in the meantime and have arranged a more suitable time for you to call.

Situation 10 - If you do not make contact on your third collection call

Leave your calling card stating the time you called, your phone number, the day and time that you will be calling back (try to vary the time once again) and the EA and D.No. Record the date of your call in your ERB with a C on the calendar.

Call again at your proposed time unless you hear from the householder in the meantime and have arranged a more suitable time for you to call.

Under no circumstances should you leave more than 2 calling cards at the collection stage before your fourth call.

[p. 71]

Situation 11 - If you do not make contact on your fourth collection call

1. Record the date of the call in your ERB.

2. Complete a form rem 1. Write in the reference (county code / EA code / small area code /D No.), name, address and eircode of the householder, the date and your phone number on the form rem 1 and sign it.

3. Deliver the completed form rem 1 to the household.

4. Mark 'rem 1' on your ERB.

5. Wait for 4 days. If you still have not heard from the householder and your field supervisor has not informed you that a completed return has been received in the post, you should call again.

Situation 12 - If you do not make contact on your fifth collection call

1. Record the date and time of the call in your ERB. Use the notes pages at the back of the ERB if you don't have enough space. It is important to record the time of the call as it may be needed should your field supervisor become involved.

2. Complete a form rem 2. Write in the reference, regional office address, household address and eircode, the date and the householder's name on the form rem 2 and sign it.

3. Deliver the completed form rem 2 to the household along with an envelope with a regional office address label attached (write 'rem 2' on the back of the envelope and fill in the county and EA boxes on the front of the envelope) and a household form (and any individual form(s) if relevant).

4. Remember to complete the Form ID (county, EA, small area and D.No.) on every form supplied to the household.

5. Mark 'rem 2' on your ERB.

6. If the rem 2 procedure results in the completed census form being posted back to the regional office, the form will be forwarded to you as soon as it is received in the regional office.

7. If you still cannot collect the form after following these procedures, you should refer the matter to your field supervisor. He / she may decide to issue a Ref 1 or to intervene to see if he / she can get the householder to co-operate.

8. If the ref 1 procedure results in the completed census form being posted back to the regional office, the form will be forwarded to you as soon as possible.

5.6 Collecting forms from communal establishments

Collection from communal establishments should take place very early on Monday 25 April. If there are several communal establishments in your EA, you should prioritize collection from CEs from which persons are likely to depart on Monday 25 April (e.g. hotels, B and Bs). If there are a number of large CEs in your EA, your field supervisor may decide to ask an enumerator from a neighboring EA to help you out with some of the establishments.

- When you arrive at the CE, ask the manager / administrator for permission to view the register for Census Night.

- Check that every person on the register is named on the listing form. If someone listed on the register is missing, ask the manager to confirm that the person spent Census Night in the establishment. Enter any persons on the register confirmed as missing on the listing form and ask them to complete an individual form.

[p. 72]

- If someone listed on the listing form is missing from the register for 24 April, ask the manager to clarify the situation. If the manager confirms that the person did not spend Census Night in the establishment, strike through the person's name on the listing form. If the person has completed an Individual Form, write 'completed in error' across the individual form and include this form with any other spoiled forms to be returned by you to CSO. Amend the number of individual forms issued and collected on pages 2-4 of the listing form.

- Check the listing form to ensure that everyone who received an individual form in the CE returned it. If an individual form for a person listed on the listing form is missing or was not returned, ask the manager to account for the missing form. If the person involved has refused to return the completed form, as a last resort ask them if they are willing to return the form by post. If so, give the person an envelope addressed to the regional office (write 'form H' on the back). Ask the person to post back the form and mark 'H' in your ERB. The regional office will send the census forms to your field supervisor when they are received. Make sure you receive a form H from your field supervisor confirming that the person has returned the form.

- If the person declines the offer to post back their individual form, you will need to 'construct' a form for that person. See the section on constructing an individual form for CEs below.

- Remember that staff members who live in the CE alone or live in the CE with unrelated persons should appear on the listing form and should have completed an individual form.

- Remember that staff members living in the CE with their family or staff members who return home after working in the CE on Census Night should not appear on the listing form.

- Staff who live in the CE with their families should be enumerated on a household form. Check that the manager has completed question E1 on the type of establishment.

- Record the number of listing forms and individual forms collected in your ERB.

- Record the number of Individual Forms issued and collected on the back page of the listing form.

- You should ask the manager/person in charge to sign the declaration on the back page of the listing form. You should then sign the listing form.

- You should then complete the 'person number' in the form ID section on each individual form by reference to the name list on the listing form. Ensure that no two persons bear the same 'person number'.

- Once you have completed this process, you should circle the D.No. of the CE on the collection grid to indicate you have successfully collected forms from the CE.

If the manager refuses to co-operate with collection

Inform the manager that:

- It is his/her responsibility to ensure that the establishment is enumerated;

- All data collected is confidential to CSO under the Statistics Act 1993, and cannot be passed to any third party including government departments;

- The Census is compulsory;

- Under the Statistics Act 1993, he / she may be fined up to €44,440 for refusing to co-operate.
[p. 73]

Offer to assist the manager in completing the enumeration of the establishment. If the manager does not take up this offer you should tell him/her that you will be reporting the situation to your field supervisor who will be in contact. Make a full record of what transpired, including any reasons the manager gives for not co-operating and notify your field supervisor immediately of the situation.

Uncollected or incomplete individual forms - constructing individual forms for CEs

If you discover that persons who stayed the night in a communal establishment have either not returned an individual form or have returned a blank individual form, you should try to make contact with the persons concerned and request that they complete the form. If the persons refuse to complete the individual form or you cannot make contact with the persons, you will be required to complete an individual form for that person.

To do this, you should complete the basic demographic information for the person concerned, i.e. name, sex, date of birth and nationality (questions 1, 2, 3 and 10 on the individual form).

Ask the manager of the CE to provide you with as much of this information as possible. He / she should know at least the name, sex and nationality of each resident.

When you have the information, transcribe it onto a blank Individual Form, making sure to complete the correct census geography on the form ID. The form should then be included with the remaining individual forms for the CE. Write constructed after the address in the address panel.

Example of completing the person number on the Form ID for an Individual Form issued to Nora Pearson in a communal establishment.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Because no person No. can be duplicated, persons listed on a second listing form should be assigned person number 61, 62, 63 etc. on the individual form and so on.

Complete the number of individual forms issued and collected on page 4 of each listing form.

[The original document includes an image below.]

On the form ID of the first listing form, complete the total number of males, females and persons in the establishment. In the example, the establishment has 75 residents and therefore two listing forms are required.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Complete the number of males, females and total on the first listing form only. This should be the total number of males, females and persons in the establishment. When completing person number on the individual forms they will have been assigned D. Nos. 1-75, in this example.

This must equal the number of completed individual forms collected.

[p. 74]

Once you have completed this process, you should circle the D.No. of the CE on the collection grid.

5.7 Form collection - revisiting vacant dwellings and holiday homes

If a dwelling was vacant on Census Night, record the date you called and write 'verified vacant' or 'verified holiday home' in your ERB. Mark the RF box in your ERB, which indicates you must fill out a reconciliation form for the dwelling. See chapter 6,

You must revisit any dwellings which you marked in your ERB as a vacant house, vacant flat or holiday home during the form collection stage. One revisit will suffice.

If the situation has changed and the accommodation was occupied on Census Night, deliver a form and try to get it completed on the spot.

5.8 Problems with forms discovered after collection

This should never happen if you have carried out your doorstep check thoroughly.

Incomplete or defective forms

If after completing the collection of household forms you find a form is incomplete, for example:

- A person named on page 3 of a form has not completed any of the questions in the main body of the form;
- Questions have been missed;
- The questions at the back of the form have been left blank for a person listed as absent on list 2, page 3;
- An individual form is missing;

You must re-visit that household. Inquiries must not be made by phone. A thorough doorstep check will minimize the need to have to revisit a household.

Soiled and torn forms

If you receive a soiled, torn or badly written form you must carefully copy the contents of this form to a blank form, clearly marking 'copy' on the front beside Padraig Dalton's signature and replacing the original with the copy you have made. All original forms that have been replaced should be bundled together separately and placed in an envelope. You should clearly label the envelope with 'spoiled forms' and fill in the county code and EA.

Forms completed in pencil

Forms which are completed in pencil cannot be read by CSO's processing software and are therefore invalid. If you collect forms which are completed in pencil, you will have to transcribe all the details in the forms onto new forms in black or blue pen.

The simple way to avoid this is to ensure the forms are completed in black or blue pen when performing the doorstep check as you collect the forms.

[p. 75]

Chapter 6 Reconciliation forms

You are required to complete and sign a reconciliation form for every dwelling / household listed or added to your ERB, for which you do not receive a completed census form.

A reconciliation form should be completed for the following situations:

1. Vacant dwellings (houses, flats, communal establishments);
2. Entire households temporarily absent on Census Night;
3. Holiday homes;
4. Dwellings under construction;
5. Derelict dwellings;
6. Dwellings pre-identified on your map and ERB which do not exist;
7. Commercial only addresses;
8. Occupied dwellings where the household cannot be contacted.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Reconciliation forms should be completed at home. Reconciliation forms for dwelling statuses under construction, derelict, commercial only and does not exist can be completed as they arise. Vacant houses / CEs, vacant flats and holiday homes must be verified by visiting the household after Census Night.

A reconciliation form must be completed for all dwellings listed in your ERB which were not occupied on Census Night, April 24 and for which no completed census forms were returned.

6.1 Completing the reconciliation form (RF) for unoccupied dwellings

RF Dwelling status

Dwellings which you have indicated in your ERB as a vacant house / CE, Vacant flat or holiday home must be revisited after Census Night to verify they were in fact vacant on April 24. This must be verified with a local source and be accompanied by a note of the verification in your ERB.

For dwellings which are pre-listed in your ERB and which you have decided are derelict, under construction, commercial only or does not exist, you can complete the reconciliation form once you have satisfied yourself the dwelling status is correct. You are not required to revisit these buildings after Census Night.

See section 3.3 and the inside cover of your ERB for how to decide on a dwelling status.

Dwellings temporarily unoccupied on Census Night - Form E

For households which were temporarily absent on Census Night, you should have completed a form E and given it to your field supervisor for tracking, i.e. to verify the household was in fact enumerated at the away address declared. If your field supervisor verifies the household spent Census Night at the address declared, you should complete a reconciliation form. If you verified that the household spent Census Night abroad, you must also complete a reconciliation form.

If household members spent Census Night in several different addresses in the republic of Ireland, a completed form E will be needed for each address. However, only one reconciliation form should be completed in respect of the household. If the household can't be tracked at the away address indicated, return to the household and get them to complete a census form. See section 4.2 for more details.

[p. 76]

Before completing the reconciliation form, you should have marked the 'RF' box in your ERB. You should proceed as follows:

1. Write in the address, eircode, County code, EA code, small area code and D.No. onto the form ID on Page 1 of the reconciliation form.
2. Leave the males, females and total boxes blank.
3. Mark the relevant dwelling status box. This should agree with the dwelling status marked in the ERB.
4. Sign and date the reconciliation form on the bottom of page 2.

You should leave the estimated persons in the dwelling section and the supervisor authorization sections on page 2 blank. There is no requirement to complete either of these sections of the form if a dwelling is not occupied on Census Night.

The following is an example of an ERB entry for a vacant house and how the associated reconciliation form should be completed.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Sign and date the reconciliation form at the bottom of page 2.

Remember: You must have either a completed census form (household or listing form and individual forms) or a reconciliation form for every dwelling marked on your map and listed in your ERB including any new D.Nos. you created.

[p. 77]

Completing the reconciliation form for occupied dwellings

Only in very rare situations will you need to complete a reconciliation form for a dwelling which is occupied on Census Night. Every household which passes Census Night in the state is required to complete a census form by law. It is the enumerator's job to gain the co-operation of householders. Therefore for every occupied dwelling in your EA you should collect the appropriate census form(s).

If you encounter a situation where a householder refuses to take a census form before Census Night, or you are unable to collect a completed census form from a dwelling you know to be occupied, you should follow the procedures outlined in section 4.11 and situation 4, section 5.5. Your field supervisor will be involved in both of these situations and may issue a ref 1 form.

If the intervention of your field supervisor still does not lead to the successful collection of a completed census form to the occupied dwelling, your field supervisor may decide to apply to his / her regional supervisor for authorization to complete a reconciliation form for that household. The regional supervisor will insist on evidence that all efforts have been exhausted in trying to get a completed census form including the issue of form ref 1 and will need details of the number of persons in the household.

When your field supervisor informs you that he/she has received authorization from the regional supervisor, your field supervisor will give you an authorization code to proceed with the completion of the reconciliation form.

Only under extremely rare circumstances should you have to construct a reconciliation form for an occupied household.

Every household which passes Census Night in the state is legally bound to complete a census form.

Failing to collect completed census forms for an occupied household is a very serious occurrence and will require authorization from your regional supervisor to proceed.

Completing the Reconciliation Form for occupied dwellings

1. Complete the Form ID.

2. Mark the 'occupied' dwelling status box.

3. Complete dwelling type question R2.

4. You should complete the 'estimated persons in the dwelling' section on page 2 with the sex, age and nationality details of persons residing in the dwelling. The householder may provide this information, but if not you should make discreet inquiries locally. The regional office may have involved the Gardaí in the refusal so they may be able to provide this information.

5. In the Form ID on Page 1 of the form, write in the number of males, females and total persons residing in the dwelling.

6. Sign and date the reconciliation form on the bottom of page 2.

[p. 78]

7. You will need an approval ID code from your field supervisor before the procedure is deemed complete. He / she will provide this code and will also need to sign and date the form on page 2.

8. Once you have the approval ID code on the form and it is signed by your field supervisor, the form is considered signed off for payment purposes.

Note: Under no circumstances should you write any notes on the reconciliation form. Any notes relating to the dwelling should be made in your ERB.

[p. 79]

Chapter 7 Summarization

Summarization is a three stage process: http://www.census.ie/How-we-do-it/enumerator- training/sortingsummarising

1. You must go through the completed forms for each occupied household/CE and count the number of males/females present, total persons present and absent persons in the household and write this on the form ID.

2. You must complete a reconciliation form for each unoccupied dwelling/CE in your ERB and complete the dwelling status and front panel information.

3. You must sort your forms from stage 1 and 2 into separate bundles for each small area, one bundle for reconciliation forms and one bundle for other forms. If you have 3 small areas in your EA you will have 6 separate bundles of forms at this stage, unless all dwellings are occupied.

Summarizing a private household or a communal establishment involves completing the males present, females present, total persons present and total persons absent information on the form ID box on the front of the appropriate census form (household or listing). These details and the details on the completed Reconciliation Forms are then copied onto the appropriate Summarization forms.

As soon as you have completed the collection of forms you should begin your summarization. This should be Monday 23 May at the very latest.

Before you start your summarization, you should ensure that:

1. You have collected any outstanding forms H from your field supervisor.

2. You update the form collection grid to include any forms H you have received from your field supervisor.

3. All form E procedures have been followed up and confirmed, with a reconciliation form completed if necessary.

4. You have gone through your ERB and ensured that you have collected all forms delivered and that you have all the forms you collected in your possession.

7.1 Summarizing each private household
Private households are those which have completed a Household Form and any Individual Forms required. Before you begin summarizing each private household, you should perform the following checks:

1. Check that you are not missing any forms for that household.

2. If some Individual Forms are missing because of 'privacy requests' which may be in the post, you will have to wait until you receive a Form H for each outstanding individual form from your field supervisor before summarizing the household. The forms for such households should be put aside until all outstanding forms H are received. Only at this stage can the household details be summarized. All the forms for that household can then be held together with an elastic band.

3. If more than one household form has been used in error by a household with more than 6 persons, the details from the second household form should be carefully transcribed onto one or more blank individual forms. Clearly mark 'copied from spoilt household form' on the front beside Padraig Dalton's signature. The spoilt household form should be returned with any other 'spoiled forms'.

[p. 80]

4. There are no pieces of paper or other census materials (e.g. cen 1s, rem 1s, calling cards etc.) inserted between pages in the household or individual forms.

Once you have completed these checks, you should proceed to summarize the form(s) as follows:

Number of persons present

Count the number of males present for which questions have been completed on each form for the household (including individual forms) and write under 'males' in the form ID box on the front page of the household form.

Footnote: Do not count on the basis of list 1 on page 3 of the form. Use the sex declared in question 2.

[The original document includes an image below.]

If zero [present persons] enter 0. There is no need to enter leading zeros.

Count the number of females present for which any questions have been completed on each form for the household (including individual forms) and write under 'females' in the Form ID box on the household form.

Count the number of persons present from list 1, page 3 of the household form or the total number of individual forms in the case of communal establishments. This should agree with the number of males present + females present derived by counting replies to Q2 sex on the form.

Before writing the total number of persons present under 'total' in the form id box, check that males present + females present = total persons present. If this is not the case, something is clearly wrong and you need to cross check list 1, page 3 against the inside of the form. You may have to return to the household if a person has been missed. This is why the door step check is so important.

If males present + females present = total persons present, write the number of total persons present under 'total' in the household form form ID box.

Absent persons

Count the number of absent persons, if any, for which any questions have been completed at the back of the household form on pages 22 and 23.

[The original document includes an image below.]

If no absent persons, enter 0

[p. 81]

Before writing this number under 'absent persons', cross check against the number of absent persons on list 2, page 3 of the household form. If the two counts of absent persons do not agree, something is clearly wrong and you need to cross check list 2, page 3 against the absent persons declared at the back of the form. You may have to return to the household if a person has been missed, etc.

If the cross check on the number of absent persons is ok then enter the number of absent persons under 'absent persons' in the form ID box.

If there were no absent persons, then write 0 under 'absent persons'.

7.2 Final check on persons present and contacting households

After you have completed the form ID panel, you should check to make sure that the number of persons present equals the number of persons detailed in list 1 on page 3 of the household form. You should also ensure that all the questions for each person on list 1 have been completed in the relevant sections of the form.

If you find that a person has been listed on list 1 page 3, but the questions on sex, date of birth, relationship, marital status and nationality (questions 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10) have not been answered for that person, you will need to contact the household and request the information for this person. You should have a contact number for the household in your ERB so you can arrange to call to the dwelling for the outstanding details. This should be a rare occurrence as you should make sure all the questions are answered for all persons listed on the form during the doorstep check when you collect the form.

7.3 Summarizing a private household (example)

In the example below, one household form and two individual forms were delivered and collected.

Counting the replies to Q2 on the three forms, questions were answered in respect of 4 males, 4 females (pages 4-21 of the household form and pages 2-4 on each of 2 individual forms) and 8 persons were listed on list 1, page 3 which agrees with males + females. No questions were answered in respect of absent persons and no absent persons were listed on list 2, page 3 of the household form. Persons 7 and 8 completed the individual forms.

The example presents the Form ID section for the Household Form and the two Individual Forms after summarization.

[The original document includes three images below.]

You should keep all forms from the same household together with an elastic band. Do not put one form inside the other. Put the household form at the front followed by the individual forms.

[p. 82]

After summarizing forms for a household (D.No.) you should put all forms for the household in form order (the household form should be on top, then any individual forms in person number order).

An elastic band should be placed around the forms for all multi-form households to keep them together. The household form should be kept on top with the individual form(s) underneath.

[The original document includes an image below.]

7.4 Summarizing each communal establishment

1. Check that you are not missing any listing forms.

2. Make sure there are no pieces of paper (cen 1s, calling cards etc.) inserted between the pages of the listing or individual forms.

3. If some individual forms are missing because of 'privacy requests' which may be in the post, you will have to wait until you receive a form H for each outstanding individual form from your field supervisor before summarizing the communal establishment (CE). All forms for each CE should be kept separately until all individual forms are accounted for, at which stage the CE can be summarized.

4. Sort the individual forms in order of 'person number'.

5. Count the number of males on the individual forms and write under 'males' in the form ID box on the front of the listing form. If there is more than one listing form for the CE, write the number of males on the front page of the first listing form you have for the CE.

6. Count the number of females on the individual forms and write under 'females' in the form ID box on the front of the listing form.

[p. 83]

7. Count the number of individual forms and write under 'total' in the form ID box on the listing form.

8. Check that when you add 'males' + 'females', the number of persons agrees with the total number of individual forms you have counted.

9. After summarizing the CE you should place the listing forms in order and place them on top of the individual forms, which must be in 'person number' order. All forms for the CE should be kept together in person order with an elastic band.

10. If there is more than one listing form place them in order on top of the individual forms. You only need to complete the number of males, females and persons on the first form and these totals should relate to all individual forms for the establishment.

[The original document includes an image below.]

7.5 Summarizing reconciliation forms

Only reconciliation forms completed for occupied dwellings should be summarized. There should be very few, if any, of these in your EA.

If there are, you should proceed as follows:

1. Count the number of males listed on page 2 of the reconciliation form;

2. Write the number of males into the 'males' box on the form ID on page 1 of the reconciliation form;

3. Count the number of females listed on page 2 of the reconciliation form;

4. Write the number of females into the 'females' box on the form ID on page 1 of the reconciliation form;

5. Write the total number of persons into the 'total' box on the form ID.

Note that you must include reconciliation forms for unoccupied dwellings later in the summarization procedure (see section 7.8).

7.6 Sorting summarized forms

Form order and placing forms H

After summarizing the forms for each household/CE in your EA, you should sort your summarized forms into two separate stacks in ascending D.No. order for each Small Area, one stack for reconciliation forms and the other stack for all other forms. Each stack should be in D.No. order. If there are four small areas in your EA you will have eight stacks of forms at this stage, each in ascending D.No. order.

Forms H are used as a substitute for a completed household or individual form when the householder doesn't want the enumerator to see their completed form. You should therefore insert forms H received from your field supervisor in the small area stack as you would a completed household or individual form. Forms H are an important part of summarization.

Remember to include forms completed by households for which you have allocated a new D.No. (9001+) in the correct small area stack.

[p. 84]

7.7 Completion of form B for each small area

A Form B should be completed for each small area stack containing household, individual and listing forms.

The purpose of the form b is to summarize the number of males, females and total persons in each household or communal establishment by small area for your EA.

This serves a dual purpose. Firstly, it provides a population count by small area. Secondly, it provides information that feeds into form C which is a quality control of the enumeration carried out compared with the results from the previous Census.

Each small area stack should be summarized on a separate form B. You should complete each form B as follows:

1. Complete the county code, EA code and small area code of the stack on the form B.

2. Transfer the D.No., males, females and total persons from the front of each household form or listing form for each household or CE in the small area.

3. For each D.No. entered on the form B, enter 1 in the 'No. of households' column (see the diagram in section 7.11).

4. If there are more than 25 households / CEs in the small area, sum each of the 4 columns on the left side of the form B and carry forward the totals to the first row on the right side of the form B. Continue to enter details for the next 25 households / CEs on the right side.

5. If there are more than 50 households / CEs in the small area, sum each of the 4 columns on the right side and carry forward the totals to the left side of page 2.

6. If there are more than 120 households / CEs in the small area, you will need to carry forward the totals to a new form B. Don't forget to complete the geography coding if you need to begin a new form B.

7. When you have entered the details for all forms in your small area stack, you should sum the four columns where you made your final entries.

8. When you are satisfied that form(s) B is complete and correct for each small area, you should sign and date each form B.

7.8 Completion of form BR for each small area

A form BR should be completed for each small area stack of reconciliation forms.

The main purpose of the form BR is to produce a count of the number of dwellings in each small area for each of the 8 possible Dwelling statuses. The information on form BR will also be used in the completion of form C, see below for details.

Remember each small area stack of reconciliation forms should be summarized separately on a form BR.

[p. 85]

To complete a Form BR for a small area you should:

1. Complete the county code, EA code and small area code of the stack on the Form BR.

2. Go through each reconciliation form in the stack and write the D.No. from the form into the appropriate section on the form BR. The sections on the form BR appear in the same order as on the reconciliation form.

3. For any reconciliation form completed for occupied dwellings, you must write in the D. No. as well as the number of males, females and total persons in the household.

4. If there are not enough spaces in a section to transfer the D.Nos., you should follow on to a new form BR, remembering to complete the county, EA and small area code. It is unlikely this will occur.

5. When you have accounted for all the reconciliation forms in the small area, you should total the sections. To do this you should simply write the number of D.Nos. in that section into the 'total No. of dwellings' box at the bottom right of the section.

6. For the occupied dwellings section, you should total the number of D.Nos. and write that in the 'total No. of dwellings' box at the bottom of the section. You should then add the number of males and write the total in the box at the end of the males column. You should do the same with females and persons in household.

7. In the unlikely event that you need more than one form BR for a small area, you should make sure when you are totaling the sections that you include the information from each form BR completed.

8. Once you have completed the form BR for each small area and you are satisfied each is correct, you should sign and date each form BR.

7.9 Completion of form C

Form C records the total occupied households, males, females, persons and dwelling types within each small area in your EA. These figures are taken from the 'total' lines on the Form B and form BR.

You should complete the form C as follows:

1. On form B the total households, males, females and persons within each small area should be transferred into the corresponding columns (i.e. columns 5-8) for that small area on the form C. Please check for any significant (i.e. more than 10%) differences between the total number of households and persons between 2011 and 2016. If there are large differences, a brief explanation should be provided in column 9 (e.g. a new hospital opened since 2011, new housing estate, building demolished etc.).

2. On the form BR, the total occupied dwellings, males, females and persons within each small area should be transferred into the corresponding columns (i.e. columns 10-13) for that small area on the form C.

3. For the remaining dwellings on the form BR (temporarily absent, vacant house / flat and communal establishment, vacant flat, holiday homes, under construction, derelict, commercial only, does not exist) the totals for each dwelling type within each small area should be transferred into the corresponding columns (i.e. columns 14-20) for that small area on the form C.
[p. 86]

Please ensure the following checks are made:

1. The totals for males and females must tally with the total for persons.
2. The total dwellings (i.e. occupied households / CEs and non-occupied dwellings) should equal the total number of entries recorded in your ERB.

Once you are satisfied that the Form C for your EA is complete and correct you should sign and date it.

Please note that a Form C will only be re-issued if the original is destroyed or misplaced. If this happens, then contact the census geography section immediately at 01 8951301or 01 8951370.

7.10 Sending forms B, BR and C to CSO

The forms B, BR and C are provided with an envelope marked 'forms B, BR and C' which is pre- addressed to CSO. This envelope should be used to return your completed form(s) B, form(s) BR and Form C directly to CSO at the end of summarization. This envelope should not be used for any other purpose.

It is very important that you send the form(s) b, form(s) BR and form C to CSO as soon as you have completed and checked them. Delays in receiving them may hold up the publication of the first preliminary estimate of the population.

Note that you should not pack these forms with your other census materials nor should you give them to your field supervisor to return to CSO.

In the unlikely event that you mislay the Forms B, BR and C envelope, return your completed Form(s) B, Form(s) BR and Form C in an A4 envelope addressed to:
Forms B, BR and C
Central Statistics Office
PO Box 2016 FREEPOST F4726
Swords Co. Dublin K67 D2X4

Ensure you transcribe the number of households from form C to Form LS before returning the 'forms B, BR and C' envelope.

[p. 87]

7.11 Completion of Forms B, BR and C - example

Form B and form C

Household Form ID

[The original document includes an image below.]

Absent persons are not recorded on Form B

Form B

[The original document includes an image below.]

Number of rows reduced for display purposes only.

[p. 88]

Form BR and form C

[The original document includes two images below.]

Form C

[The original document includes an image below.]

[Chapters 8 and 9, packing census materials and payment procedures, are not shown here.]

[p. 92]

Appendix A. Form delivery and collection - item checklist

Each time you go to carry out visual enumeration / form delivery / form collection you should bring the items on the checklist with you in the satchel provided.

You will not be able to carry forms and envelopes for the whole of your EA. Each time you are going out to deliver forms, make sure you take enough forms for the number of households you are likely to visit. Use this checklist each time you go out on visual enumeration and form delivery.

If there are a lot of Polish speakers in your EA you could carry the Polish translation form only. If a householder requests a foreign language form and you don't have it with you, make a note in your ERB and return to the dwelling the following day. You should also inform the householder that translation forms are available on the Census website www.cso.ie.

- ID card
- CSO high visibility jacket
- Your CSO issued mobile phone
- Map(s) covering your EA (If you forget your map you won't be able to locate dwellings!)
- Clipboard (if required)
- Your enumerator record book(s) and delivery grid
- Calling cards (prefill your contact details)
- Census 2016 biro (+ spare)
- Household forms (English and Irish versions)
- Individual forms (English and Irish versions)
- Listing Forms (English and Irish versions) for communal establishments
- Copies of the foreign language translation forms if required
- Blank forms E
- Copies of form cen 1
- Census envelopes
- This enumerator's manual

Also required for collection

- Copies of forms rem 1 and rem 2
- Collection grid

You should always wear your special CSO high visibility jacket and your ID card when carrying out your duties. The ID card should be worn around your neck and be clearly visible at all times.

[Appendix B on the delivery grid is not shown here.]


[p. 95]

Appendix C. Enumeration of homeless accommodation

A homeless person is an individual who lacks housing, including one whose primary residence during Census Night is a supervised public or private facility that provides temporary living accommodation; or whose primary residence is a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for persons.

Accurately capturing the homeless population of the country is an important aspect of the Census. A significant number of homeless persons will spend Census Night in communal establishments (CEs) which provide dedicated shelter and facilities for those without permanent homes. CSO will be producing a special release on homelessness based on the Census.

In the Irish census information about families is not captured for persons in communal establishments (everyone in a CE completes an Individual Form, including couples or families in hotels etc.). However, when reporting on the homeless it is important that we can report on the number of families that are homeless, and not just individuals. Accordingly in homeless accommodation all families (couples or parents with children) will be issued with a household form to complete, while individuals on their own will be issued with an individual form in the usual way.

There are two types of homeless accommodation classified in your ERB. One is 'gen' which is general homeless shelters / accommodation and the other is 'mix' which signifies private emergency accommodation - hotels or B and B's. Both types were identified for the Census by the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government in consultation with other organizations such as the Dublin Regional Homeless Executive, Focus Ireland and Simon.

Enumeration of homeless accommodation / shelters

In order to determine how many household forms and how many individual forms to distribute you should:

- Speak to the manager.
- Determine the number of families and individuals.
- Distribute a household form for each family according to instructions below.
- Ask the manager to complete a listing form and distribute an individual form for all other persons.

Gen -Enumerating family units in homeless shelters

You can identify General (gen) Homeless in your ERB as follows:
ERB entry for pre-identified homeless shelter (type gen)

[The original document includes an image below.]

Homeless accommodation is indicated in the enumeration alert by the words 'gen'.

[p. 96]

You should enumerate them as follows:

1. For each additional family unit provide a Household Form and you must create a new D.No. in a blank panel in your ERB.

For the purposes of enumerating homeless accommodation in the Census, family units are either:
- One or both parents and their children;
- Married couples;
- Partners.
2. For each individual provide an individual form, listing them on the listing form.

You should leave privacy envelopes with each household form and individual form.

As homeless persons may frequently move, it will be necessary to prioritize the collection of completed forms from communal establishments that cater for homeless persons first thing on Monday 25th April. You should be aware of this when making plans for when to visit homeless accommodation in your EA.

Before census

For the individual forms

- Complete the front panel of the individual form with necessary details.
- Ensure geography on listing form.
For the household forms
1. In the ERB
a. The D.Nos. created should be the next available numbers in the 9001+ range after the initial D. No. is allocated for the first family unit. For example, if there are three new family units staying together in the homeless accommodation (D.No. 124) and the first free D.No. in the 9001+ range in your ERB is 9002, you should allocate the three new families D.Nos. 9002, 9003 and 9004.

b. Once you have created the erb entry for a family unit, you should mark 'occupied' in the dwelling status column.

c. Write in the small area code which will be the same as for the original ERB entry.

d. In the name of householder box in the ERB, you should write in the name of the family. If this is not available, write in the name of the manager.

e. In the ERB address box, write 'GEN' and then the exact address of the homeless accommodation from the original ERB entry. At the end of the address, you should write 'ce' and the original D.No. which was allocated to the accommodation in the original ERB entry. Write in 'gen' in the enumerator alert field in the ERB. You should enter the eircode, county and EA codes in the normal manner, (see next page for example).

[p. 97]

ERB entries for family units in homeless accommodation (type gen)

[The original document includes an image below.]

New D.No. for family unit
Small area code is B as in the ERB entry above for originally listed building.
Write manager's name into this box if family name is not available.
Write 'gen': then address of the establishment, followed by CE and the original D.No. of the establishment.
Household form issued to family units in homeless accommodation.

f. For the 'persons expected' boxes in the ERB, you should complete the number of members in the family unit who will be in the homeless shelter on Census Night.
2. On The Map
g. You should mark all new D.Nos. allocated to family units in the pre-designated homeless accommodation on your EA map, indicating their position with a line drawn to the location of the homeless accommodation. You should add these new D.Nos. to the grid at the bottom of your map. You should also add them to your form delivery and collection grids to remind you to include the forms in your daily total of deliveries and collections.
3. On the census form
h. On the Form ID, you should write in the address of the homeless accommodation, followed by 'ce' and the original D.No. which was allocated to the accommodation. You should enter the eircode, County and EA Codes as for the ERB entry. Then you should write in the new D.No. (9002+) you have allocated as in the ERB. Do not add the word "homeless" in the address or onto the form as it could cause offence.

[The original document includes an image below.]

i. You can have absent persons from a family unit in homeless accommodation, for example where you had a mother with two children in homeless accommodation but one child is in hospital, the child should be treated as an absent person. The same would apply if this was a one child single parent family where the child normally resided with the parent but was temporarily absent from the homeless accommodation on Census Night.

[p. 98]

j. Ask the manager to distribute the household forms on Census Night and to arrange to collect them first thing on Monday 25th April.

After census night

For household forms and individual forms

- After you have collected the household forms and individual forms from the manager of the homeless accommodation, you should write the word 'gen' in capital letters in the address section of the form ID (directly above the SA code box). You should not do this before you deliver the forms. You should blot out the box for the small area code and write the SA Code above the SA code box. This step is important as it will allow CSO to count these additional homeless families units.

You should only write the word gen into the address bar after you have collected the form.
On the form ID of the household form, blot out the small area code and write the correct small area
Code above the blot.
Write CE and the D.No. of the original ERB entry for the accommodation at the end of the address.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Household forms issued for family units in pre-designated homeless shelter (type gen)

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 99]

Mix - Enumerating hotels and B and Bs providing private emergency accommodation (PEA)

In a small number of incidences a hotel / B and B manager may be providing private emergency accommodation (pea). These dwellings will be identified in the enumerator alert field as mix. The situation is delicate. No reference needs to be made to the hotel / B and B that you are aware that it accommodates homeless people. This information is strictly confidential.

In order to enumerate families in such types of accommodation the CSO has asked a local homeless agency (e.g. in Dublin, the Dublin Regional Homeless Executive) to distribute household forms on their behalf. These forms are stamped on page 23 with a label mix. These families will also be issued with Individual Forms in the same way as all other guests in the hotel, B and B etc. but they have been instructed by the relevant homeless agency to complete the Household Form only and to return all census forms (household form and individual form given to them by the hotel manager) in the envelope provided to them by the hotel manager.

Enumerate as usual

After you collect all forms from the manager:

1. On the ERB
- Open all envelopes and separate out any that contain a Household Form.

- For each household form returned check page 23 for stamp stating 'mix'.

- For the new ERB entries for each Household Form received, in the ERB address box, write 'MIX' and then the exact address of the homeless accommodation from the original ERB entry. At the end of the address, you should write 'CE' and the original D.No. which is the same as the original ERB entry. Write in 'mix' in the enumerator alert field in the ERB. You should enter the eircode, county and EA Codes in the normal manner. (See below for example).

ERB entries for family units in homeless accommodation (type mix)

New D.No. for family unit.
Small area code is B as in the ERB entry above for originally listed building.
Write manager's name into this box if family name is not available.
Write 'mix': then address of the establishment, followed by CE and the original D.No. of the establishment.
Household Form issued to family units in homeless accommodation given by Homeless Agencies.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 100]

2. On the map
- You should mark all new D.Nos. allocated to family units in the pre-designated homeless accommodation on your EA map, indicating their position with a line drawn to the location of the homeless accommodation. You should add these new D.Nos. to the grid at the bottom of your map. You should also add them to your form delivery and collection grids to remind you to include the forms in your daily total of deliveries and collections.

3. On the census form
- Complete the Panel ID of the form, allocating a new D.No. 9005 as per ERB entry. Ensure the eircode on the completed form is the same as the original listed building.

- The remaining occupants in the hotel fill out an individual form in the usual manner.

- Only persons returned on individual forms should be present on the listing form. If names of persons are present for which you have received a household form from, cross out the name, i.e. John Doe. It is very important that numbers are amended on the front of the listing form to reflect any changes.

After census night

After you have collected the household forms from the homeless accommodation, you should write the word 'mix' in capital letters in the address section of the form ID (directly above the SA code box). You should blot out the box for the small area code and write the small area code above the box.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Household forms issued for family units in pre-designated homeless shelter (type mix)

You should only write the word 'mix' into the address bar after you have collected the form.
Write CE and the D.No. of the original ERB entry for the accommodation at the end of the address.
On the form ID of the household form, blot out the small area code and write the correct small area code above the blot.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 101]

Non-identified accommodation

It is also possible that there may be homeless accommodation in your EA which has not been pre- identified in your ERB.

If you perceive that a communal establishment in your EA may be used for the accommodation of homeless persons but is not identified in your ERB with 'gen' or 'mix' in the enumeration alert field, you should ask the manager whether the CE is primarily used to accommodate homeless persons.

If the manager confirms that the CE is used primarily to accommodate homeless persons, you should proceed to enumerate as described for type 'gen' above. If the manager confirms that the CE is not used primarily to accommodate homeless persons, you should enumerate it in the usual manner for a CE.

It may also happen that a homeless person will be given a census form by the Dublin Regional Homeless Executive or another agency and spend Census Night in a hotel not marked on your ERB. In these instances enumerate as described for type 'mix' on previous pages.

Enumerating rough sleepers

In Dublin a separate rough sleeper count will be conducted by the Dublin Regional Homeless Executive on Census Night and the enumerators in the respective areas will be advised in advance, to ensure they do not enumerate rough sleepers and therefore avoid double counting.

In the areas outside Dublin your field supervisor should contact the local Garda station or local homeless agencies and enquire as to whether they are aware of persons who usually sleep rough in the enumeration area you are responsible for and inform you regarding same.

Any person found sleeping rough outside Dublin on Census Night, or the following morning if not enumerated the night before, should be enumerated as follows:

1. If enumerating a rough sleeper you should create a Household Form for each rough sleeper and assign a new D.No. (9001+) and mark the D.No. at the location where the person was found sleeping on the map. Complete as much information as possible on the household form. Some homeless people may have already been issued a household form. This should have a small stamp marked on the back page.

2. You should blot out the box for the small area code and write the SA code above the SA code box.

3. The address should be written as the address of the location where the person was found, followed by the word "Homeless". In such instances, the eircode field is not applicable.

4. Regarding form completion, the accommodation questions on page 2 can be left blank. In Q7 mark box 1, 'here' for usual residence. For Q3, date of birth, it is important to put in at least year of birth. If the day and month are not known then leave them blank - do not write in 00 or cross out. If the year is not known then estimate.

5. Care should be taken not to agitate the person sleeping rough and he / she should not be woken up if they are asleep.

[p. 102]

Appendix D. Enumeration of direct provision centers

Enumeration of direct provision centers

These facilities will be marked in your ERB with the text 'direct provision' in the enumeration alert field, see section 3.3. This will indicate that this dwelling has been identified as a dwelling that accommodates persons currently applying for refugee status. These establishments are being identified separately in the Census and are subject to different enumeration techniques to other establishments (which are outlined in section 4.6 and 5.6).

The key difference is that everyone is accounted for on a household form and therefore no listing form is required. Each room/hall door should be allocated a separate D.No. / ERB entry / point on the map and should be issued with household forms. A list of occupants should be obtained from the manager / caretaker and used to verify that all household forms account for all the occupants present.

Each room, cabin etc. is to be enumerated as a separate private accommodation similar to the case for student accommodation. No listing form is required.

Please note that there could be multiple entries for direct provision centers in your ERB to account for each dwelling in the center. Additional dwellings or families will need new D.Nos, ie. the next available number in the 9001+ range but ensure the eircode from the original listed building is entered.

[Appendices E, F, and G on packing procedures, use of mobile phones, and health and safety are not shown here.]

[p. 113]

Appendix H. Detailed notes on the household form

[Question 1: What is your name? (person 1).]

The name is necessary to ensure that everyone in the household is covered and to assist the householder in making sure that the correct personal information for each individual is recorded. The name also helps identify where forms are missing or duplicated. Names may also assist in the identification of household and family groups.

[Question 2: Sex.]

Replies to question 2 are used to measure and compare trends in areas like education, employment / unemployment etc. This information helps us to understand the changing roles of men and women in our families, communities and workplaces.

[Question 3: What is your date of birth?]

Information on the age profile of the population is essential for measuring economic, social and demographic change. It helps target the delivery of health, education, social welfare, housing and other community services.

[Question 4: What is your relationship to persons 1,2, 3 and 4?]

From the responses to Question 4, it is possible to build up a picture of the changing family situation in Ireland. The multiple categories will enable families in multi-generational households to be accurately distinguished. Information in relation to families which have been reconstituted following the break up of previous marriages can also be determined.

The results based on the responses to this question will allow the changing nature of families in Ireland to be charted.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 114]
[Question 5: What is your current marital status?]

The changes occurring in the marital status of the population is captured by the responses to question 5. In particular, it is possible to monitor the incidence of marital breakdown in Irish society. For Census 2016 the question was revised to incorporate registered same-sex civil partnerships.

This question should only be answered by those aged 15 or over.

[Question 6: What is your place of birth?]

The purpose of questions 6 - 10 is to study migration patterns, both short-term and long-term. The resulting information will give us a picture of where people are moving to and from and their characteristics in terms of age, sex, education, occupation etc.

Comparing a person's place of birth (question 6) and his or her current place of usual residence (question 7) gives an indication of the extent of longer term migration.

[The original document includes an image below.]

If the person was born in Ireland, they should write in the county their mother lived in at the time of the person's birth.

If the person was born outside Ireland, they should write in the country their mother lived in at the time of the person's birth.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 115]

[Question 7: Where do you usually live?]

Location (question 7) is a key characteristic that is used with other data to build an accurate picture of our population. It is the basis for the annual population estimates and for population projections. It is also used to determine changes to electoral boundaries.

This box should be marked if the person lives at the address on the front of the Census Form.

Mark this box if the person usually lives somewhere else in Ireland, and write in the full address.

There are 7 spaces at the end of the address for the eircode of the place of usual residence to be written in if known.

Mark this box if the person usually lives outside Ireland, and write in the country.

By comparing a person's usual residence one year before the Census (question 8) and their residence at census time (question 7), we get an indication of the extent to which people change residence. The responses also provide data on the extent of internal migration within Ireland.

[Question 8: Where do you usually live one year ago?]

Mark this box if the person lived at the same place one year ago as they do now.

If the person lived somewhere else in Ireland one year ago, they should mark this box and write in the county.

If the person lived somewhere else outside Ireland one year ago, they should mark this box and write in the country.

[p. 116]

[Question 9: Have you live outside the republic of Ireland for a continuous period of one year or more?]

The information collected in this question is used to establish migration patterns, which, combined with nationality, sex, age and economic status, provides a detailed picture of who immigrated to Ireland by year of arrival since the last census and their reasons for doing so.

If the person has lived outside of Ireland for one year or more they should mark the 'Yes' box and if not mark the 'No' box.

If the person has lived outside of Ireland for a continuous period they should write in the year they returned to live in Ireland and also the country they previously resided in.

[Question 10: What is your nationality?]

Nationality is now a key demographic variable on the census and is analyzed in conjunction with age, sex and economic status to provide invaluable information on the profile of the population at small area level. The information is used by a broad spectrum of local, community and government based organizations.

If the person is Irish, they should mark this box.

If the person is not Irish, they should mark this box and write in their nationality.

If the person is not considered a national by any state, they should mark this box.

[Question 11: What is your ethnic or cultural background?]

The responses to this question will facilitate a comparison of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the different ethnic and cultural groups living in Ireland.

The person should mark one box only.
If the person's ethnic/cultural background is not listed or if a person feels that the tick box options listed are not adequate, they should mark this box and write it in.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 117]

[Question 12: What is your religion?]

Question 12 provides information on the number of people of each religion or religious denomination. Everyone should answer this question, whether or not they have a religion.

This question is not about frequency of attendance at church or other place of worship. People should answer the question based on how they feel now about their religious beliefs, if any. The question is asking about the person's current religion or belief and not about the religion the person may have been brought up with.

If the person does have a religion they can identify that religion by ticking one of the tick box categories, or by writing in a description of your religion or belief in the write-in boxes.

If they do not have a religion - they should go to the end of the question and mark the 'no religion' box.

If a person's religion is not listed, they should mark this box and write it in.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[Question 13: How many children have you given birth to?]

The answers to question 13 allow an assessment to be made of the factors impacting the fertility rate of women in Ireland, i.e. the extent to which fertility will vary with educational attainment, labor market status etc.

[Question 14: Can you speak Irish?]

Question 14 will provide information to help in the monitoring of policies and the planning of service delivery in relation to the Irish language. In particular, the results will enable policy planners to assess how language proficiency and usage varies with age and education participation. Only persons aged 3 and over should answer this question.

If the person answers 'yes' to the first part of the question, they must mark one or more of these boxes to indicate how often they speak Irish.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 118]

[Question 15: Do you speak a language other than English or Irish at home?]

Question 15 was first introduced in 2011. The question provides data on what languages other than English or Irish are spoken in households. It also provides information on how well English is spoken by people who have a language other than English or Irish as their mother tongue. This information can be used to target state resources in areas such as education and health to support people who may struggle speaking English.

All persons should answer the first part of the question. If the person answers 'yes', they should write in the other language they speak at home. If they answer 'no', they should go on to Question 16.

Only people who answer 'yes' to the first part of the question and have written in another language should answer this part of the question.

[The original document includes an image below.]

The results of questions 16 and 17 coupled with other questions will provide important data on the number of people whose activities are reduced because of a disability and the effect of the disability on their lives. In question 16, vision and hearing impairments have been separated and there is a separate category for intellectual disabilities.

[p. 119]

[Question 16: Do you have any of the following long-lasting conditions or difficulties?]

All persons should mark 'yes' or 'no' to each of the categories in question 16.

[Question 17: If 'yes' to any the categories specified in question 16, do you have any difficulty in doing any of the following?]

People who answered 'yes' to one of the categories in question 16 should answer 'yes' or 'no' to each of the categories in question 17.

[Question 18: How is your health in general?]

Question 18 asks each person how their health is in general. Studies show strong links between how people view their health and the actual state of their health. The answers to this question will provide a country-wide picture of people's health and how it is related to various factors such as age, labor market position and educational attainment. This question was asked for the first time in 2011.

[p. 120]

The answers to questions 19, 20 and 21 in conjunction with the address where people work or go to school/college will provide valuable information on commuting patterns for planning public transport services and infrastructure. Usual means of travel identifies the different modes of transport used by commuters. Time of leaving home will provide information on the volume of commuter travel by transport type at different times of the day. Usual travel time will give information on the efficiency of various modes of transport.

[Question 19: How do you usually travel to work, school or college?]

If the person is not at work, school or college they should mark "not at work, school or college."

If the person travels by two or more modes of transport, they should mark the box for the longest part of the journey.

[Question 20: What time do you usually leave home to go to work, school or college?]

If the person is not at work, school or college they should mark "not at work, school or college."

[p. 121]

Notes on answering Questions 19-21

Where different means of travel are used on different days, the most frequently used method should be indicated.

Where the time of leaving home differs on different days, the most frequent time of leaving should be indicated.

Persons who do not work or attend school or college should mark 'Not at work school or college' in questions 19 and 20 and leave question 21 blank.

Persons who work daily from a fixed center or depot and travel a lot in their jobs should indicate the means of transport and distance travelled from their residence to this center or depot.

[Question 22: Do you provide regular unpaid personal help for a friend or family member with a long-term illness, health problem or disability?]

The results of question 22 will facilitate assessment of the extent to which unpaid personal help is provided by caregivers in our society, along with the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the careers themselves. Those who provide regular unpaid help as a caregivers, regardless of whether or not they receive caregivers' allowance / benefit, should mark box 1 (yes) and write in the weekly number of hours of caring. This question is being asked of persons aged 14 and younger for the first time.

[Question 23: If you are aged under 15 go to Q34.]

Children are not required to answer the questions on education and work. They are directed to the question on name and address of place of school.

Questions 24 to 33 should be answered only by persons 15 years and over

[p. 122]

[Question 24: Have you ceased your full time education?]

[Question 25: What is the highest level of education / training (full time or part time) which you have completed to date?]

The replies to questions 24 and 25 will be used to monitor the impact of education policies, changing skill levels and the extent to which people use their formal qualifications.

Persons who received their education when institutional arrangements were different to those currently in place or who were not educated in Ireland should select an equivalent option. For more information on the national framework of qualifications (NFQ), see www.QQI.ie

A person who attended primary level only should select primary education. A person who attended a second level school but left without sitting the group, intermediate or junior cert should also mark primary education.

A person who sat the group, intermediate or junior cert should mark lower secondary, regardless of the results achieved. Similarly, a person who sat the leaving cert should mark upper secondary regardless of the results achieved.

A person who attempted a third level course but without obtaining the certificate, diploma or degree in question should select the appropriate option at second level.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 123]

[Question 26: What is the main field of the highest qualification you have completed to date?]

Regular information on skill levels is necessary to monitor whether training being offered meets the needs of the labor market. The Government and employers use this data to evaluate whether there are enough people with the required education and training in particular areas of the work force. The information is used in developing new programs to meet the changing needs of the work force.

This question is to capture post-secondary school qualifications only. Intermediate, junior and leaving cert subjects should not be written in.

[Question 27: How would you describe your present principal status?]

Question 27 will provide information on principal economic status, allowing us to classify persons aged 15 years and over into those within and outside the labor force.

As this question is asking about the person's principal economic status, only one of the boxes should be marked.

The following should mark 'working for payment or profit':

- Persons who are employed or self-employed.

- Persons mainly engaged in 'assisting relatives' on farms, in shops or in any other commercial enterprises, even if they receive no regular payment.

- Priests, nuns and brothers except where they are retired or unable to work due to permanent sickness or disability.

- Persons temporarily absent from work due to illness, holidays etc.

- Apprentices who are in employment and who also attend school or college.

Full-time students who are in part-time employment should mark 'Student or pupil'.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 124]

[Question 28: If you are working go to Q29.
If you are student, go to Q34.
Otherwise, go to Q35.]

Only those persons who are working are required to provide information on their industry and occupation and place of work. Retired persons are asked about their former occupation only in order to assign a social class to their household. Unemployed persons are asked about their occupation and industry in order to produce a detailed profile of the unemployed at small area level. Only persons who travel outside the home to work school or college are asked to provide the name and address of where they go.

Persons who are working should answer questions 29, 30, 32 and 34.

Persons who are retired should answer questions 29 and 30 only.

Persons who are unemployed should answer questions 29, 30 and 32 only.

All other persons should not answer any of the questions 29, 30, 32, 33 or 34.

[Question 29: Do (did) you work as an employee or are (were) you self-employed in your main job?]

Question 29 is used in the analysis of people's employment. The information is used to show potential growth in business and employment.

Retired and unemployed people should answer question 29 based on the work they did last.

[The original document includes an image below.]

Priests, nuns, brothers etc. should mark 'Employee'.

Persons employed as managing directors should mark 'Employee'.

Persons in partnership in a firm having paid employees should mark 'Self-employed with paid employees'.

Persons in partnership in a firm not having paid employees should mark 'Self-employed without paid employees'.

[p. 125]

[Question 30: What is (was) your occupation in your main job?]

The information that question 30 will provide is used to build a picture of occupational groups and how occupations are changing over time.

Persons who are unemployed or retired should base their answer on the work that they did last.

Some guidelines on answering question 30:

- The occupation must be provided for everyone who marked the following in question 27
Working for payment or profit
Unemployed
Retired from employment
- Those who marked looking after home / family in question 27 often answer question 30 by writing 'home (or domestic) duties' as their occupation. Although inappropriate, no attempt should be made to alter this response.

- You should ensure that the description of the occupation is precise and in accordance with the question's instructions.

- If in doubt as to how a particular occupation should be described, it is better to give a full and detailed description.

- The final part of the question (size of area farmed) should only be answered by farmers or farm workers.

[p. 126]

[Question 31: If you are retired, go to Q35.]

Retired persons are not required to answer the questions on the business of their employer and name and address of place of work.

[Question 32: What is (was) the business of your employer at the place where you work(ed) in your main job?]

Question 32 will provide information that will be used to determine the industrial sectors in which people work. The categories are compared over time to show trends and rates of change in industry type.

Guidelines on answering question 32

- It is vitally important that the description given is detailed enough to enable it to be coded.
- This question should only be answered by those at work or unemployed.
- It need not be answered by those who are retired.
- Answers should be in precise terms, e.g.

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Inadequate response
(B) Possible correct response

Inadequate response: Computers.
Possible correct response: Making computers.

Inadequate response: Cars.
Possible correct response: Repairing cars.

Inadequate response: Education.
Possible correct response: Primary education.

Inadequate response: Food.
Possible correct response: Bread wholesaler.

Inadequate response: Pharmaceuticals.
Possible correct response: Making pharmaceuticals.

Inadequate response: Cleaning.
Possible correct response: Software development and support.

Inadequate response: Software.
Possible correct response: Repairing cars.

Inadequate response: Education.
Possible correct response: Primary education.

Inadequate response: Recreation.
Possible correct response: Swimming pool.

Inadequate response: Local authority.
Possible correct response: Local authority cleaning department; local authority library service; local authority housing department.


[Question 33: If you are unemployed, go to Q35.]

Unemployed persons are not required to answer the question on name and address of place of work.

[p. 127]

[Question 34: What is the full name and address of your place of work, school or college?]

Question 34 will assist in putting a geography code on the person's place of work, school or college. This will provide important information on commuting patterns in the state. This question will also assist in coding the industrial sector of a person's employer. The question should be answered by all those who leave the household to attend work, school or college. For children who attend pre-school facilities outside the home, the full name and address of this facility should be supplied.

The person should write the full name of their place of work, school or college.

There are 7 spaces at the end of the address for the eircode of the place of work, school or college to be written in if known.

The person should mark this box if they usually work in more than one location.

[Question H1: What type of accommodation does your household occupy?]

The results from question H1 will help build a picture of the type of housing stock in the country, and what types of accommodation are prevalent in certain areas. It will also allow us to examine what accommodation types are occupied by people of different ages, nationalities, educational attainment etc.

[p. 128]

[Question H2: When was your house, flat or apartment first built?]

Question H2 will give data on the age of the housing stock across the country. It will provide an insight into the number of new dwellings built in recent years. The question refers to when the house was first ready for occupation, not the date of any the start of construction or any subsequent renovations.

If the person is unsure of the year the house was built, they may wish to ask a neighbor.

[Question H3: Does your household own or rent your accommodation?]

[Question H4: If your accommodation is rented, how much rent does your household pay?]

Question H3 will establish on what basis the household occupies their dwelling - whether they are an owner, renter or live rent free. Those who rent should answer the second part of the question and indicate the identity of their landlord.

Persons who indicated that they rent their accommodation in question H3 are required to answer question H4 and provide, in Euros, the amount they pay in rent. They should also indicate the frequency of their rental payments - weekly, monthly or yearly.

The data from these questions are used in the compilation of the annual National Accounts, from which the GDP and GNP figures are taken.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[p. 129]

[Question H5: How many rooms do you have for use only by your household?]

The results to this question will allow a comparison of how many rooms households have available to them in their dwelling. This will facilitate comparisons with past censuses, across the country and across various demographic and social groups.

[Question H6: What is the main type of fuel used by the central heating in your accommodation?]

This question requires the householder to indicate the type of central heating, if any, which is used in the dwelling. The results of this question will provide more information on the nature of the fuel types which are used by home heating systems in Ireland and the location and type of homes which do not have central heating.

[Question H7: What type of piped water supply does your accommodation have?]

[Question H8: What type of sewerage facility does your accommodation have?]

Question H7 is used to provide information on the nature of the piped water supply used in dwellings across the state. The results of question H8 will indicate the type of sewerage systems used in dwellings. Both of these questions provide useful information for local authorities and planning bodies involved in housing projects.

[Question H9: How many cars or vans are owned or are available for use by one or more members of your household?]

The results of question H9 will provide a detailed picture of the number of cars available to private households in Ireland.

[Question H10: Does your household have personal computer (PC)?]

[Question H11: Does your household have access to the Internet?]

Questions H10 and H11 establish the level of PC ownership and access to internet services. The results will provide an important gauge of the uptake of information technology around the country and the access to broadband internet connections. The results will allow a comparison to be drawn between PC ownership and internet access levels during the previous Census.

[The original document includes an image below.]

[Appendix I regarding guidance on the National Children First Guidelines is not shown here.]

[p. 133]

Appendix J. Miscellaneous issues

Other surveys

CSO surveys

CSO Survey interviewers are in the field across the country 52 weeks of the year. These survey staff are conducting interviews for the quarterly national household survey (QNHS) and the EU survey of income and living conditions (EU SILC).

Unlike enumerators, these survey staff will call to random households in pre-assigned blocks of dwellings and ask the householders specific questions face to face.

It is possible that enumerators will call to dwellings at similar times to the CSO interview staff. This may lead to queries or even hostility from householders. Enumerators should therefore be made aware of the possible overlap and be ready to explain that they are there for the Census, which is taken every 5 years. The precise areas in which they work are decided on a weekly basis and as such there is not advance information available on where overlaps may occur.

Surveys from other state agencies

Other state agencies may be calling to dwellings later in the year after the Census field operation is over with their own surveys / questionnaires. In previous years it has been alleged that in an effort to secure a completed form, some enumerators informed householders that the Census was the only government questionnaire they would have to complete. It has been claimed that this had a direct impact on the response rate for other government surveys/questionnaires. Census enumerators should therefore not tell householders that the Census is the only government form they will be required to complete.