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Census of Population of Ireland
Sunday, April 10 2011
Enumerator's Manual

[Table of Content is omitted.]

Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.1 Introduction
The Census of Population is carried out every five years and counts all the dwellings, households and persons in the country. The Census is the largest statistical operation carried out in the State, involving around 4,900 Enumerators. The next census will be taken on Sunday 10 April 2011 (hereafter referred to as Census Night). Each Enumerator will be assigned an Enumeration Area (hereafter referred to as EA) and will be required to identify all dwellings and deliver a census form(s) to each household in the EA before Census Night and to collect and check each form for completeness commencing Monday 11 April.

1.2 Enumerator's Manual
This manual provides instructions on how to carry out the enumeration. Because of the detail involved, you should read it through once to initially familiarise yourself with the structure, timing and main tasks involved in enumeration. Then, as each phase of the enumeration arises, study the relevant chapters in detail before beginning that phase. Your Field Supervisor will train you thoroughly in all aspects of your duties. As your work proceeds, use your manual to ensure that you are carrying out the enumeration accurately and effectively.

1.3 Role of the Enumerator
As a Census Enumerator you are personally responsible for the enumeration of all dwellings, households and persons in your EA. Your work is key to the success of the Census.
As an Enumerator your job is:

1. To locate and identify every dwelling – house, flat, apartment, mobile home etc. – in your Enumeration Area (EA)
2. To write the dwelling's geography codes onto the Census form
3. To deliver a census form to every dwelling before Census Night
4. To collect every census form after Census Night
5. To check that all householders have filled out their census form correctly
6. To count the number of people on each Census form and to summarize this information
7. To complete a Reconciliation Form for every dwelling from which no census form was returned such as vacant or derelict dwellings and commercial only buildings
8. To document and summarize the enumeration process in your EA using your map etc.

To do this you have been given:

1. A map of your area with all dwellings marked clearly, and identified with a 3-digit number
2. An Enumerator Record Book (ERB) which lists the address of every dwelling on your map
3. Enough Census forms for your area
4. A set of various administrative forms used to handle absent households etc.
5. A mobile phone.

The enumeration must be done exactly as instructed in this manual and any other supplementary instructions/field circulars, which may be issued by the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

If you are unsure of any procedure, ask your field supervisor before implementing it.

You must not delegate or sub-contract any enumeration tasks to any other person.

1.4 Confidentiality
All information obtained by an Enumerator relating to individuals or households in the course of the Census enumeration must be treated as strictly confidential.

An Identity Card (ID) attached to a chain is issued to each Enumerator. It must be worn so that it is clearly visible at all times and produced whenever you are introducing yourself to the householder or any other person.

[The session outlining the Statistics Acts is omitted here.]

You must bear in mind the following in relation to confidentiality:

  • Information relating to any individual should not be passed on to any other person or body. If necessary, the information may be passed on to another Officer of Statistics.
  • No attempt must be made to obtain information other than that required by the Census.
  • No remarks, even of a casual nature, regarding your enumeration work in one household should be made to another household.
  • Any person guilty of an offence under the Statistics Act, 1993 may be liable to a fine of up to €1,200 on summary conviction or up to €25,000 on conviction on indictment.

Two crates (one red, one black) are provided for the safe storage of all Census forms and materials:

  • Completed returns must be kept in these cases at all times except when you have them in the field or are actually working on them.
  • Both crates must be kept closed at all times.
  • You must ensure that nobody, including members of your own household, has access to Census materials.
  • Only you, your Field Supervisor or an official of the CSO is entitled to see the returns.
  • You must also ensure that Census documents are never left unattended in cars.
  • You must carry your map, ERB, forms and other materials in the satchel provided during the course of the fieldwork. Satchels should never be used for any other purpose.

1.5 Glossary of important Census terms

This section contains a list of Census terms which are used throughout the manual. You will need to be familiar with the terms to fully understand this manual.

GeoDirectory A national database of addresses compiled by An Post and Ordnance Survey Ireland.

Enumeration Area (EA) The area in which you must deliver and collect census forms.

Small Area (SA) Your Enumeration Area is divided into a number of Small Areas, each of which will be given a code letter. Small areas will be used by CSO to improve the results published after the returned Census forms have been scanned.

D Number (D.No.) A unique number assigned by CSO to every dwelling, household and communal establishment (hotels, hospitals, prisons etc.) in your Enumeration Area which has been identified on the GeoDirectory.

Enumerator Map A map of your Enumeration Area. The map contains all the addresses listed on the Geodirectory for your EA, marked with their D numbers.

Enumerator Record Book (ERB) A book containing a listing of all D Numbers in the Enumeration Area. You will use it to record details of your visits to each dwelling in your Enumeration Area.

Unlisted dwellings Dwellings which are in your Enumeration Area but are not identified on the Geodirectory. A new D number must be assigned to these dwellings and they should be marked on your map and in your ERB.

Delivery Grid A numbered grid, used to record to which households you have delivered Census forms. They are used to help you send daily text messages to CSO on your progress.

Collection Grid Like the delivery grid, but used to record form collection.

Main tasks and timetable for Enumerators
[A chart presenting a schedule for enumeration tasks is omitted here.]

1.6 Census definitions and basics
Before you begin to deliver forms, you must understand the concepts of a dwelling and a household. The Census collects information about all persons individually and also about their living arrangements, so that they can be grouped into households even if a household comprises only one person.

1.7 Definition of dwelling
A dwelling is a self-contained unit of living accommodation that is occupied or, if vacant, is intended for occupation, by one or more households. A dwelling should have a separate access to the street (direct or via a garden or grounds) or to a common space within a building (staircase, passage gallery, etc.).

Examples include: a family home, a family home on a farm, a separate flat or apartment or bed-sit, a caravan, a caretaker's accommodation located in an office building, living accommodation over a shop.

1.8 Definition of a private household
A private household comprises either one person living alone or a group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address with common housekeeping arrangements - that is, sharing at least one meal a day or sharing a living room or sitting room.

In the rare case where a dwelling houses more than one private household, each individual household within the dwelling should be assigned a separate unique identifying Dwelling
Number, or D. No. based on the original D. No. See Section 2.15, page 28 for more details.

Examples of private households
[Examples of private households and which forms to use are omitted here.]

1.9 Communal Establishments (CEs) or non-private households
A Communal Establishment is defined as an establishment providing managed residential accommodation. Managed means full-time or part-time supervision of the accommodation.

In most cases (for example, prisons, large hospitals, hotels) Communal Establishments can be easily identified. However Boarding Houses with less than five boarders on Census Night should be treated as private households. This household should include the manager and his/her family.

The following are examples of communal establishments or non-private households.

Hotel
Educational establishment
Prison
Boarding house
Religious community
Defense establishment (including ships)
Guest house
Children's home
Civilian ships, boats and barges
Bed and breakfast
Nursing home
Garda station
Hostel
Hospital/Nurses' home
Holiday campsite
  • A Listing Form(s) listing all persons present on Census Night should be completed by the manager or person in charge. An Individual Form should be completed by each person present in the establishment on Census Night.
  • A proprietor, manager, head of the establishment or any member of staff who resides on the premises with his/her family must be regarded as a distinct private household. The household should have a separate D. No. on the map and ERB, should receive a separate Household Form and should be listed separately in the ERB.
  • Any member of staff who resides on the premises alone (i.e. without a family) should be included on the Listing Form and should complete an Individual Form.
  • Any member of staff who resides on the premises with a group of unrelated persons should be included on the Listing Form and should complete an Individual Form.
  • Staff of an institution (e.g. hospital) who are working on a night shift on Census Night and who return to their own homes the following morning should not be enumerated in the institution. They should be enumerated at their homes.

Note: A Boarding House is an establishment run for profit, which provides board (full or partial) and lodging for permanent or semi-permanent residents e.g. persons working away from home or university students during term time. Guest Houses/Bed and Breakfasts on the other hand cater for transient persons.

1.10 Present and absent persons
The Census counts persons where they are on Census Night. Situations will arise where some or all persons in a household are absent from their home on Census night.

Who is to be counted as present on Census night? - List 1

  • Include every person who spent Census Night in the dwelling or who arrived the following morning not having been enumerated elsewhere; even visitors who are only staying temporarily in the household should be included.
  • Include all persons alive at midnight on April 10. Experience indicates that babies and very young children are sometimes omitted by the householder so care should be taken to ensure that all persons, regardless of age, are declared on the form.
  • Do not include anyone who is temporarily away from home on April 10. They should be declared as absent (see List 2, page 3 of Household Form).
  • Do not include students who are away from home living in other accommodation on the night of April 10 (see List 2, page 3 of Household Form).
  • Do not include babies born after midnight on Census Night.

Remember only persons who are actually in the country at midnight on Census Night should be enumerated in the Census. Anyone who arrives from outside the country after midnight should not be counted as being present.

Who should be counted as absent on Census night? - List 2

Persons who usually reside in a private household but who are temporarily away from home on Census Night should be entered on List 2, page 3 of the Household Form by the householder. The householder should also complete the questions relating to absent persons on pages 22-23 of the form in respect of each absent person.

The following persons or classes of persons should be counted as absent persons:

  • household members who usually live at the address but are away from home on Census night;
  • household members who usually live at the address but who are out of the country on Census Night;
  • primary, secondary and third level students who are absent on Census Night and are living away from home during term time.
Absent persons only applies to private households. Persons absent from Communal Establishments on Census Night are not covered as absent persons in the Census.

If an entire household is temporarily absent on Census Night, a Form E must be completed for the household. The Form E procedure ensures that members of the household who spend Census Night elsewhere in Ireland are enumerated at the location where they spend the night. See Section 4.2, page 45.

1.11 Census geography
There are three key levels of geography which the Enumerator needs to be aware of.

County: For Census purposes the country is divided into 34 administrative counties. Each county is identified by a unique two digit code e.g. 01 identifies County Carlow.

Enumeration Area: An Enumeration Area (EA) is the area assigned to an Enumerator.

Small Area: Each EA is sub divided into number of divisions called Small areas indicated by upper case letter, usually beginning with A. Small area boundaries are marked in blue on your map. Some EAs will contain small areas that begin with a code other than A.

1.12 Summary of main forms
Forms to be completed by the public

Household Form - The main Census form to be completed by private households. If there are more than 6 persons present in a household on Census Night, Individual Forms should be provided for the additional persons. Under no circumstances should more than one Household Form be delivered to a household unless it is a replacement for a lost or badly soiled form.

Listing Form - To be used for Communal Establishments (CEs). This form should be completed by the manager or person in charge of the establishment on Census Night.

Individual Form - Individual Forms are completed: (1) by persons enumerated in CEs, (2) by individuals in private households who specifically request a separate form for privacy reasons or (3) where there are more than 6 persons present in the household on Census Night.

Forms for use by the Enumerator in the field operation

Enumerator Record Book (ERB) - The ERB is used by the Enumerator to keep a record of the enumeration progress of all Census forms from delivery to collection. It is pre-printed with the D. Nos. and address details of dwellings in your EA. There are blank panels at the back of the ERB where you will record the D. Nos. of unlisted addresses of habitable dwellings. The ERB is a very important document and cannot be reprinted. Do not lose it. Blank ERBs are available from your Field Supervisor should you run out of blank panels in your first ERB.

Enumerator D. No. Delivery and Collection Grids - These two grids are printed on A4 card, one for delivery and the other for collection. The grids are used to keep a daily record of form delivery/collection. You will need to refer to these grids when you send daily SMS message updates to CSO during the delivery and collection phases of enumeration.

Calling Card - This is a card which can be left at a dwelling if you are unable to make contact. You should complete all the information on the calling card including the date and time you called, when you will call back, your CSO mobile number, your name, the County, EA, and D. No. before delivering.

Cen 1 - When you have called 3 times to deliver a Household Form and failed to make contact with the householder it is permissible to deliver the Household Form without making contact if the dwelling is likely to be occupied on Census Night. Cen 1 is a covering note used to accompany the Household Form. You should not deliver a Census form with a Cen 1 before Friday March 25th.

Rem 1 - A reminder used if you fail to make contact with the householder on your fourth visit to collect the completed Census form(s).

Rem 2 - A second reminder used if contact cannot be made with the householder after several visits to collect the completed Census forms.

Ref 1 - The Ref 1 form is issued when the Rem 1 and Rem 2 forms have been delivered but you still cannot make contact with the householder to collect the completed Census forms or if the householder refuses to complete a delivered Census form. The Ref 1 is a formal request and will be issued by registered post by the Regional Office and can only be sent once your Field Supervisor has been notified.

Form H - A form completed by the Field Supervisor when the householder posts his/her Census form(s) directly to the Regional Office or CSO for privacy reasons. The Regional Office will send the Census form(s) to the Field Supervisor. The completed Census form(s) are retained by the Field Supervisor who issues the Enumerator with a Form H. The Form H provides the Enumerator with the information needed to complete the EA summary and is counted for payment purposes. Census Forms received by CSO will be retained unless they are incomplete. You will receive an SMS from CSO indicating that the form has been received. Your Field Supervisor will complete a Form H and give it to you for summarization.

Form E - You should complete a Form E when the entire household in a dwelling is away on Census Night. If the household spent Census Night elsewhere in the Republic of Ireland, your Field Supervisor will be required to verify they were enumerated where they spent the night.

Reconciliation Form
This form must be completed for every dwelling/CE listed in your ERB for which you do not collect completed Census forms.

Form B - The Form B is used by the Enumerator to summarize the number of households and persons enumerated in each Small Area in their EA based on the Census forms collected.

Form BR - The Form BR is used by the Enumerator to summarize the Reconciliation Forms completed for each Small Area in their EA.

Form C - Form C is used to record the results of the summarization of your EA and to note the cause of any significant changes in the number of persons or households since the 2006 Census in each Small Area.
Form C provides you with a summary listing of the names and codes of the Small Areas contained in your EA. In addition Form C contains information on the population and number of households enumerated in each Small Area in the 2006 Census.

The Form C for every EA in the country will be used to produce the preliminary population count after the Census. You will use the Form C to indicate significant changes in the number of occupied dwellings and the number of people resident in the Small Areas in your EA compared to Census 2006. If the number of occupied dwellings in a Small Area has changed by more than 10% since 2006, you will be required to provide a reason as to why this occurred, e.g. buildings demolished, hotel closed, new housing estates etc. For more detailed information on how to complete a Form C, please see Section 7.9, page 80.
Form LS - This form provides a final count of the number of boxes of forms, the number of forms within each box and the total number of households for the EA.

Form EF - The Enumerator uses this form to fill in the names of absent household members and the address at which they spent Census Night on receiving a Form E request from the Field Supervisor. The Enumerator uses the information on the Form EF to check that the household members were enumerated on the Census form for the address given after it is collected.
Examine all these forms thoroughly and become fully familiar with their purpose and contents.

1.13 Confidential Census return envelopes
You are provided with Confidential Census Return Envelopes and a supply of address labels for your Regional Office. The labels can be affixed to the Confidential envelopes which can be sent Freepost.

The envelopes are marked 'confidential' on the bottom right with boxes to enter County and EA Codes.

Confidential Census Envelopes are used in the following instances:

  • When a householder, an individual in a household or a resident in a Communal Establishment indicates that they do not want the Enumerator to see their completed Census form and the Form H procedure is used. You should put a label with the address of the Regional Office on the front of the envelope and 'Form H' should be written onto the envelope before it is handed over.

To avoid operational complexity, the number of Form Hs should be kept to an absolute minimum while bearing in mind that there may be no alternative but to use this procedure in a small number of cases.

  • When an individual within a household requests an Individual Form for privacy reasons. To store soiled/damaged forms (envelopes should be marked 'soiled forms'). In Communal Establishments when distributing the Individual Forms. With a Cen1 Form when delivering a Census Questionnaire to a household which could not be contacted prior to Census Night. Delivered with a Rem 2 Form during collection to allow the householder to post the completed Census form back to the Regional Office.

[Chapter 2 containing information about visual enumeration and form delivery is omitted here.]

Chapter 3 - The Enumerator Record Book (ERB)

The ERB is a vital document that you will need at all stages of your work as an Enumerator. It contains information which is important to you in your role as an Enumerator and is highly confidential. For these reasons, you must take great care of your ERB at all times.

The details of the dwellings in your EA which have been identified on the GeoDirectory will be listed sequentially in your ERB along with a D. No. and Small Area code. There are a number of blank panels at the back of your ERB. These are for details of dwellings which you may locate which have not been listed in your ERB. If you fill all of these blank panels, you can obtain a second blank ERB from your Field Supervisor.

It is very important that you familiarize yourself with your ERB and the link between your ERB and EA map before you begin your field work. Of particular importance is the list of addresses in the ERB. You should study it carefully, making sure you know the streets, roads and areas where dwellings are located within your EA with reference to the map. You should also note what appear to be commercial addresses because these are most likely related to persons operating a business from their residence.

3.1 ERB cover page
The following will be printed on the cover page of your ERB

County Name: The county in which your EA is located.

Field District: A numeric code representing the Field District in which your EA is located.

You should fill in the Enumerator Record Book number box. This records whether the ERB is the first or second ERB you have used. If you only use one ERB, you should fill in '1 of 1'. If you require a second ERB, you should fill in '1 of 2' on the front page of the first ERB and '2 of 2' on the front page of the second ERB.

3.2 Inside front page
The inside front page of the ERB contains basic information on the visual enumeration/form delivery process and notes on how you should decide the status of a dwelling.

3.3 ERB dwelling panels
All the dwellings on the GeoDirectory for your EA will be listed in your ERB panels. At the end of this listing, a number of panels have been left blank for you to detail dwellings you find during visual enumeration which have not been listed on your map or in your ERB. See Section 2.15 on assigning new D. Nos.

Each page in the ERB contains four panels. At the top left of each panel is the D. No. and Small Area (SA) Code. D. Nos. are unique numbers assigned to each dwelling or household in your EA and are related to a position on your map. The D. No. in your ERB corresponds to the D. No. printed on your map.

The Small Area Code indicates in which of the Small Areas in your EA the dwelling is located. This can also be seen on your map. The D. No. and Small Area code will be pre-printed for dwellings which have been identified on the GeoDirectory for your EA.

Name of householder
This is the person responsible for making the return. It should normally be the householder but can be any adult member in the household. You must fill the name in on the ERB.

Address
The postal address for every household listed in the GeoDirectory will be printed in the box beside the householder name. When you allocate a new D. No. to a blank panel in the ERB, you will be required to complete the address in this box.

If the text such as "additional dwelling 2" has been inserted before the address this has been done because the postman has indicated that there are more dwellings in a building than there are unique addresses. In such cases CSO has automatically generated additional dwellings to agree with the postman's determination of the number of dwellings in a building. Where these additional dwellings can't be found, treat them as 'does not exist', see below.

Dwelling status
The dwelling status box is underneath the D. No. There are nine categories in the dwelling status box. You should mark the relevant one for each dwelling during the visual enumeration/delivery phase. It is important that you know the definition of each dwelling status.

Occupied: For all dwellings where persons are expected to be present on Census Night. A form must be delivered to and collected from all dwellings marked as occupied.
When you make contact with the householder, you should note the householder's name and mark 'occupied' as the dwelling status in the ERB. You should record the number of forms issued, and the number of males and females expected to spend Census Night in the dwelling. You should also request a contact telephone number from the householder to facilitate form collection.

You should mark every visit to the dwelling with an x on the calendar in the ERB and make appropriate notes. If you drop a calling card then mark the visit with a C.

If you mark a dwelling as occupied but find out after Census night that it was not occupied on Census Night, you should put an X through the mark beside 'occupied' and mark the correct dwelling status. If the entire household was unexpectedly absent, you should complete a Form E.

Temporarily absent: For dwellings where the entire household is away on Census night. This information will usually come from the householder. You will need to complete a Form E and get the householder to sign it (See Section 4.2, page 45). If the household will be away in the Republic of Ireland, you will be required to complete a Reconciliation Form once the Form E procedure has been confirmed by your Field Supervisor. If the household will be away outside the Republic of Ireland, you should complete the Form E, ask the householder to sign it and present it to your Field Supervisor before completing the Reconciliation Form.

It is important to note that in cases where the householder indicates that the household will be outside the state, they must sign a declaration on the Form E to that effect. A check should be made after Census Night to ensure that there was no change of plans.

You should note the name of the householder in the ERB, mark 'temporarily absent' as the dwelling status, and mark 'Form E' to indicate you have initiated a Form E tracking procedure. When the Form E procedure has been verified by your Field Supervisor or if you have verified that the household was outside the Republic of Ireland on Census Night, you should mark the 'RF' box at the bottom right of the ERB panel, which indicates you will need to complete a Reconciliation Form for this dwelling.

Vacant house/CE: You may come across vacant accommodation in your EA. Types of vacant accommodation can include:

  • New accommodation, ready for occupation but not yet occupied.
  • Accommodation in the course of conversion, improvement, renovation or decoration and not occupied at the time of the Census.
  • Existing accommodation clearly without furniture or which you have been reliably informed is not occupied; for example awaiting new occupants.

To confirm whether a habitable house is vacant, you should call to it several times prior to Census Night. You should vary the times you call in case the householder is working a set pattern of hours.

You should look for signs that the house is not occupied, e.g. no furniture, no cars outside, junk mail accumulating, overgrown garden etc. It is important that you try to find out from neighbours whether the house is vacant or not as they are likely to have the best information about the house.
Non-occupied houses with doors and windows which look to have been recently boarded up should be classified as vacant. A dwelling should only be classified as derelict if it is dilapidated and looks to have been boarded up for a significant time.

It is not sufficient to classify a house as vacant after one or two visits. Householders may be attempting to avoid making contact with you or the house may be occupied by an elderly/disabled person who has difficulty answering the door. You must visit several times before Census Night until you are fully satisfied that it is not occupied.

For a vacant house, you should mark the calendar on the ERB panel each time you visit the house and make appropriate notes. When you decide that the house is vacant, mark the dwelling status 'vacant house'. You should mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a completed Reconciliation Form will be required for the dwelling.

Note: Vacant communal establishments should be marked 'vacant house/CE' in your ERB.

Vacant flat: You should apply the same rules for confirming the vacancy of a flat or apartment but should mark the vacant flat box in the ERB and the resulting Reconciliation Form.

When you decide a house/CE or Flat is vacant, you must revisit it again after Census night to verify that nobody spent Census Night in the dwelling.

A house/flat or apartment can only be marked as vacant if it is fit for habitation i.e. It has a roof, walls, hall door and windows installed and you call after census night to confirm vacancy.

Holiday home: This category covers all dwellings that are only occasionally occupied. Holiday homes are mainly found in rural areas; however the description also covers all dwellings that are only occasionally occupied, including city apartments used for week-end breaks etc.

As with vacant dwellings, if you do not make contact with a householder you should call to the dwelling several times prior to Census Night and vary call times. Information that the dwelling is used as a holiday home is likely to come from neighbors, so it is vital that you speak with neighbors if you think the dwelling may be used as a holiday home.

You should mark every visit to the dwelling on the ERB calendar and make appropriate notes. When you have clear information that the dwelling will be unoccupied on Census Night and is used as a holiday home, you should mark 'Holiday home' as the dwelling status. You should mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a completed Reconciliation Form will be required for the dwelling.

When you decide a dwelling is a holiday home, you must revisit it again after Census Night to verify that nobody spent Census Night in the dwelling.

Under construction: You should always exercise caution around buildings which are under construction and never attempt to enter them.

You do not need to visit a dwelling several times to decide that it is under construction. You should mark the dwelling status as 'under construction' and mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a Reconciliation Form must be completed for the dwelling and make appropriate notes.

Under no circumstances should you add a new D. No. to your ERB for a dwelling that is under construction but is not pre-printed in your ERB. New D. Nos. (9001, 9002, etc.) may only be allocated for habitable dwellings.

For census purposes, a dwelling is to be considered 'under construction' if it is not yet fit for habitation because the roof, doors, windows or walls have not yet been built or installed.

Derelict: You should always exercise caution around derelict buildings and never attempt to enter them.

Note that a dwelling which has windows and doors recently boarded up (typically by the local authority to prevent vandalism) but does not appear dilapidated and run down should be classified as a vacant house. Derelict dwellings which are boarded up are likely to have been abandoned some time ago and show other signs of exterior deterioration.

Mark the ERB calendar each time you visit the dwelling and make appropriate notes. Once you are sure that the dwelling is derelict, you should mark 'derelict' as the dwelling status and mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a Reconciliation Form must be completed for the dwelling.

You are not required to revisit dwellings which are derelict after Census Night.

Under no circumstances should you add a new D. No. to your ERB for a dwelling that is derelict but is not pre-printed in your ERB. New D. Nos. (9001, 9002 etc.) should only be allocated for habitable dwellings.

Derelict buildings are those which have been abandoned, look dilapidated and the windows and/or doors are boarded up. The grounds may be overgrown and they are likely to be older buildings.

Commercial only: Entries in your ERB may include buildings classified by the GeoDirectory as both commercial and residential. You may find that some do not have a dwelling attached. You should confirm with the person in charge that no one lives at the building before marking it as 'commercial only'. This should be backed up with appropriate notes and a record of visits on the calendar.

Mark the 'RF' box to indicate that a Reconciliation Form must be completed for the dwelling.

Under no circumstances should you add a new D. No. to your ERB for a building that is commercial only but is not pre-printed in your ERB. New D. Nos. may only be allocated for habitable dwellings.

Buildings are to be marked as commercial only if the premises are used solely for commercial purposes and no part of the building will be used as a dwelling on census night.

Does not exist: If you cannot find a dwelling corresponding to a point on the map, you should perform a thorough check of the area to make sure that you have not missed the dwelling.
This should involve checking behind trees, around nearby buildings and other structures that may be obscuring the dwelling from view. It is possible that the dwelling has been marked in the wrong place on the map and is located close by. If this is the case, you should follow the procedure indicated in Section 2.13, page 25. You should consult with someone in the locality to see if they are aware of a dwelling at that position on the map. Only when you are sure that the address does not exist at or near the indicated location should you mark the 'does not exist' box in your ERB, mark the RF box and complete a Reconciliation Form.

You should also note the D. No. in the 'does not exist' box at the bottom of your EA map.

Note: You can only use the 'does not exist' category if there is no dwelling at the location indicated on the map. If there is a dwelling at the location, but the address in the ERB is incorrect, you should follow the procedure in Section 2.17, page 30.

Visit Calendars
The left panel is used to record household visits during visual enumeration/delivery beginning on the 8 March through to Census Night on the 10 April. The other panel is used to record visits during the collection period. Record the date of each attempt at delivering/collecting form(s), by marking an X through the date on the calendar, or with a C if you deliver a calling card. You can record the time of the visit in the notes section. By varying the times on subsequent visits you may be more likely to find someone at home.

Cen 1, Form H, Form E, Rem 1, Rem 2, Ref 1
Cen 1: Mark the 'Cen 1' box if you have called 3 times to the household, have been unable to make contact with the householder, but suspect that the dwelling will be occupied on Census night.

You should deliver the appropriate Census form(s) with a Cen 1 form and mark the 'Cen 1' box in your ERB. You should record the form types issued in your ERB (see Forms Issued section below) and mark the appropriate D. No. on your delivery grid. Because it is better to make contact and explain the Census Form a Cen 1 cannot be issued until Friday March 25th at the earliest. More detail on the Cen 1 procedure can be found in Section 4.1, page 43.

Form H: Mark the 'Form H' box if a household or member of a household insists on sending their completed form(s) directly to the Regional Office for confidentiality reasons. The Regional Office will send the form to your Field Supervisor who will ensure you receive a Form H in respect of the form(s) that they have received. Remember to record any forms collected in this manner on the collection grid see Section 4.8, page 54.

Form E: Mark the 'Form E' box if an entire household at a dwelling will be temporarily away on Census night to indicate Form E tracking has been initiated. See Section 4.2 for full detail.

Rem 1: Record if you have delivered a Form Rem 1 on your fourth attempt to collect the completed form(s).

Rem 2: Record if you have delivered a Form Rem 2 after repeated unsuccessful attempts to collect the completed form(s).

Ref 1: Record if you have arranged for a Form Ref 1 to be sent to the household after repeated unsuccessful attempts to collect the completed forms. A Regional or Field Supervisor will be required to sign the Ref 1 which will be sent by registered post from the Regional Office. More detail on the Rem 1, Rem 2 and Ref 1 procedures can be found in Section 5.5, page 62.

Forms issued, forms collected
Forms issued: Record the number of each type of form delivered to the household/communal establishment.

Forms collected: Record the number of completed forms of each type collected from each household/communal establishment. This should tally with the number of forms issued. If forms issued and collected don't tally, recover the missing forms and record the reason why all forms delivered to the household were not completed in the Notes section.

Persons expected
When you make contact with the householder/manager, you should ask him/her how many males and females they expect will be present on Census Night. If they are not sure, ask them for their best guess. You should write this information into the relevant boxes in this section.

Notes section
The notes section should be used to record:

  • an identifiable feature of the dwelling that you may record in the absence of a full postal address or that may assist you in finding it when you return to collect the completed forms;
  • if the householder states that they are usually at home only at
  • certain times;
  • anything out of the ordinary e.g. a threat from a householder or the presence of a dog;
  • reasons why forms issued and completed forms collected do not tally;
  • reason why a dwelling is vacant and the source of this information;
  • if the householder has requested an Irish form;
  • if a second household exists at a pre-printed address to remind you to collect the form(s) from the second household;
  • anything that assists you in your enumeration.

Should you need more room for notes, there are a number of pink notes pages at the back of the ERB.

Telephone icon: Used to record the householder's contact/mobile number. The householder is not obliged to give you their telephone number but if they do it will be easier for you to contact them if necessary.

Doorstep check, RF box
Doorstep check: This is a check you will need to make during form collection and is described in more detail in Section 5.3. It is a check to ensure the household returns all the forms delivered and that the forms have been completed correctly, no questions have been missed and no persons have been omitted.

RF: Mark this box if you need to complete a Reconciliation Form for a dwelling. See Chapter 6 for more information on when and how you should complete a Reconciliation Form.

Blank dwelling panels
There are a number of blank dwelling panels at the back of your ERB. These should be used to note the details of any unlisted D. Nos. you find during visual enumeration. For unlisted dwellings to which you have allocated a new D. No., you will be required to write in the new D. No., Small Area Code and dwelling address.

Blank ERBs
In the unlikely event you fill all the blank dwelling panels at the back of your ERB, you should request a blank ERB from your Field Supervisor. The additional ERB contains blank panels only and these should be completed in the same way as the blank dwelling panels in your original ERB. Don't forget to fill in the front cover of the blank ERB.

Chapter 4 - Adapting delivery to particular situations

Section 2.12 described the standard delivery routine which applies in most cases. You will come across situations, however where the procedure to follow is somewhat different.

The following is a list of situations and how you should adapt the basic delivery in specific circumstances.

4.1 Situation 1 - No contact at a dwelling
Previous experience has shown that where Enumerators deliver a Census form in person and clearly explain when and how to complete the form, the quality of the Census return will be best. Inevitably, however, there may be households where you will be unable to make contact when delivering the form.

No contact on first call
When you are unable to make contact with the householder on your first call:

1. If there is already a D. No. allocated for the dwelling on your map and ERB, record the date that you called in your ERB with an X on the calendar.
2. For unlisted, habitable dwellings, follow the procedure in Section 2.15, page 28, Assigning new D. Nos. Mark an X on the calendar in your ERB.
3. You may write your CSO mobile telephone number on a Calling Card and put it through the letterbox. If you do this, write a C on the calendar date to remind yourself that you have delivered a calling card. Do not leave calling card without first completing it and writing in your CSO mobile number.
4. Arrange to visit again within the next few days.

No contact on second call
When you call a second time, you should vary the time of the day you call if possible.

1. Record in your ERB the date that you called with an X on the calendar or a C if you deliver a Calling Card. You should not issue more than 2 calling cards to any one household.
2. Look for signs that the dwelling is occupied. Try to establish how many households/persons live at the address and when they are likely to be at home. A neighbour may be able to indicate if someone is living at the address. Make a note in your ERB.
3. Call again when you expect the household might be at home.

No contact on third call - Cen 1 procedure
If you are unable to make contact on your third call:

1. Record in your ERB the date that you called with an X on the calendar.
2. If you are confident that the dwelling contains only one household and will be occupied on Census night, complete Form Cen1 and deliver a Household Form. Make sure that you complete the Form ID on the front of the Census form.
3. To complete a Form Cen 1, write the county code, EA code and D. No. and complete the address of the dwelling at the top of the form. You should mark the date you are completing the Cen 1, along with a time and date when you will call to collect the form. You should complete your mobile phone number and the D. No. reference in the space provided and sign the form.
4. Deliver the Census form with the completed Cen 1 in a confidential envelope. Mark 'Cen 1' in your ERB and mark the dwelling as Occupied on the dwelling status list.
5. If you have found out that there are more than 6 persons in the household you should also include the appropriate number of Individual Forms for each additional person. Make sure that you complete the Form ID on the front panel of each Individual Form that you enclose in the envelope.
6. If you have clear information that the dwelling is occupied and contains more than 1 household you should discuss the matter with your Field Supervisor, who will recommend what action you should take.
7. You should not deliver a Census Form with a Cen 1 before Friday March 25th.
8. When you deliver a Census form(s) with a Cen1, you should treat it as a delivery. This means you should circle the appropriate D. No. on the Delivery Grid and include the household in your tally when you are sending your daily SMS message.
9. If you decide the dwelling is vacant you will need to revisit it after Census Night to verify.

Remember, it is always preferable to make contact with a householder when delivering forms. The quality of the completed Census form will generally be better when you have met the householder and explained to him/her how to properly complete the form. Making contact will also make it easier for you to collect the form.

4.2 Situation 2 - Absent households - Form E procedure
You may come across some private households where the entire household will be away on Census night. This is an 'absent household'.

If you make contact with the householder in advance of Census Night and he/she informs you the entire household will be away on Census night, you will need to complete a Form E. You will also need to complete a Form E if a householder tells you after Census night that the entire household was unexpectedly away on Census Night.

When you learn that an entire household will be or was absent on Census Night, you should follow the Form E procedure.

Form E procedure

If a D. No. has already been listed for the dwelling on your map and your ERB, mark 'temporarily absent' in your ERB. If the household has not been listed in your ERB and on your map, assign a new D No. and follow the procedure below.

Mark the box for 'Form E' in your ERB.

If the household will spend Census Night elsewhere in the Republic of Ireland

  • Write the name of the householder, the home address and the County, EA, Small Area Code and D. No. at the top of Form E.
  • Write the number of males and females and total number of persons usually in the household (Note: you do not need to write this information into your ERB).
  • For every household member who is spending/who spent Census Night at another address in the Republic of Ireland, write their name in Section A (Within the State) as well as the address of the place they spend Census night.
  • If household members spent Census Night at more than one address in the Republic of Ireland, you will need to complete a separate Form E for every additional address.
  • If more than five household members spent Census Night at one address in the Republic of
  • Ireland, you will need to complete an additional Form E with the details of these household members.
  • Ask the householder to sign the front page of the Form E. This is a statutory declaration.
  • You should now give the Form E to your Field Supervisor. He/she will proceed to track whether the household members were enumerated at the address/addresses given to you. If they were enumerated at this address/addresses, your Field Supervisor will inform you.
  • Only then should you complete a Reconciliation Form for the home address, marking 'temporarily absent - Form E confirmed' as the dwelling status.
  • If your Field Supervisor informs you that the household did not spend Census Night at the address/addresses given, you will have to go back to the household and ask them where they spent Census Night and deliver a Census form in the usual manner if you find out the household spent Census Night at home.

The procedure to be followed differs depending on whether the household spends Census night elsewhere within the Republic of Ireland or outside the Republic of Ireland (including Northern Ireland)

If the household will spend Census Night outside of the Republic of Ireland (including Northern Ireland)

  • Complete the Form ID as described above.
  • Write the name and surname of each household member into Section B (Outside the State), mark whether the person is male or female and complete the full address at which they will spend/spent Census Night.
  • Writing in a country name is not sufficient. The full address (or hotel and city) of where the person is spending/spent Census Night is required.
  • If more than five persons are usually resident in the household, complete an additional Form E.
  • Ask the householder to sign the form. This is a statutory declaration by them.
  • You should ask the householder for evidence that the household will spend/did spend Census Night abroad, e.g. plane tickets, booking details, receipts etc. You should not however demand this information in an aggressive manner. You are, however, entitled to take reasonable steps to satisfy yourself that the household was outside the state on Census Night.
  • Give the completed Form E to your Field Supervisor who will sign and keep it.
  • After Census Night, you should call to the household and check to ensure that the household was in fact absent outside the state on Census Night.
  • You should complete a Reconciliation Form for the D.No. of the home address, marking 'temporarily absent - Form E confirmed' as the dwelling status.

Checking a Form E request received from another EA
An Enumerator in another EA may complete a Form E in respect of a household which intends to spend Census Night at an address in your EA. If this occurs, your Field Supervisor will contact you and ask you to verify that the household members were captured on the Census form for that address. You will be provided with the address and a list of the names of the persons to check. You should write these details onto a Form EF.

When you collect the form/s for the address, you should check to make sure the persons are included on it. Once you have done this, you should inform your Field Supervisor immediately.

Individuals absent from a household
Persons should be enumerated at the address at which they spent Census Night.

Where one or more usually resident members of the household but not all of the household members are away on Census Night, they should be included on List 2 on Page 3 of the Household Form with their details supplied on Pages 22-23.

In particular note that primary, secondary and third level students who are living away from home during term time and who are not present on Census Night should be included on the Household Form as absent persons.

Individuals absent from a communal establishment
Persons normally resident in a Communal Establishment but who are not there on Census Night should not be enumerated as persons absent from the establishment. Absent persons only applies to private households.

4.3 Situation 3 - Households with more than 6 persons present

You should issue a Household Form and one Individual Form for each additional person over 6 persons e.g. if there were 8 persons then you should issue one Household Form and two Individual Forms.

Make sure you complete the County, EA and Small Area Code as well as the D. No. for the dwelling on each Individual Form you deliver.

Note in your ERB that you have issued one Household Form and the number of Individual Forms issued. This will help you remember how many forms to collect after Census Night.

Explain to the householder the procedure for completing the Individual Form(s). Stress that the Question 4 (Relationship) on the Individual Form relates to Persons 1-4 on the Household Form.
Follow the rest of the delivery routine.

You should never deliver two Household Forms to any household. If you do not have sufficient Individual Forms with you, call back later.

4.4 Situation 4 - Households with more than 4 persons absent

In the unlikely situation where there are more than 4 persons absent from the household on Census Night issue an Individual Form for each additional absent person and ask the householder to record the additional absent person's details on the Individual Form(s). Write the words 'absent person' on the front page of the Individual Form on the right hand side of the address box in the Form ID.

4.5 Situation 5 - Apartment complexes and gated communities

Apartment complexes with multiple dwelling units will be marked on your map with a blue triangle. The D. No. of the first apartment will appear beside the triangle followed by the number of apartments in the complex. For example, if the first apartment in the complex has been allocated D No. 373 and there are 10 apartments in the complex, 373#10 will appear on your map.

In your ERB, all the D. Nos. allocated to the apartment complex will be printed.

You may come across situations where there are fewer D. Nos. allocated to an apartment complex than there are apartment units. In this case, you should allocate new 9001+ D. Nos. in the usual manner and mark them on your map, map grid, in your ERB and on the Delivery and Collection grids.

You may also come across situations where there are more D. Nos. allocated to an apartment complex than there are apartment units. In this case, you should:

1. Correct the number of apartment/flats allocated to the building on the map.
2. Write the D.Nos. of the apartments which do not exist into the 'does not exist' box into the 'does not exist' grid on the map.
3. Mark the dwelling status of the ERB entry as 'does not exist'. Mark the RF box.
4. Complete a Reconciliation Form for each apartment which does not exist.

Apartment buildings crossing Enumeration Area or Small Area boundaries
In some EAs, there are apartment buildings which straddle a boundary into an adjacent EA or small area. This has resulted in apartments in the one building being physically located in two EAs or small areas.

In these instances, a decision has been made by CSO to allocate the whole building to one particular EA or Small Area and the blue triangle on the map indicating the apartment building will appear in only one of the small areas or EAs. All apartments will be listed in one EA or small area.

Apartment buildings not marked on your Map/ERB
In the course of visiting dwellings in your EA you may discover an apartment building which is not listed on the map/ERB. The location of these buildings must be marked on the map with a triangle and the D. No. you have allocated to it (in the same format as for other apartment buildings) with a black biro and pink highlighter. All the D. Nos. should be entered into your ERB and you must also write all the newly allocated D. Nos. into the 'added' D. Nos. grid on the map.

If this new building crosses EA/Small Area boundaries you should contact your Field Supervisor for guidance as to which Enumerator should cover it.

Gaining access to gated communities and apartment complexes with security gates/doors
Gated housing developments and apartment complexes requiring security fobs or access codes can be difficult to access. When you are performing your visual enumeration, you should take note of any such developments which you encounter. If there is a security guard present, he/she may grant you access to the development.

Your Field Supervisor will provide you with assistance in accessing gated communities which are difficult to enter.

4.6 Situation 6 - Communal establishments

Hotels, hospitals, residential homes, boarding schools, prisons, religious establishments and other managed residential accommodation where specific groups of people such as guests, patients, inmates and students live communally are called communal establishments (CEs).

Your Field Supervisor will have contacted the managers of the larger CEs in your EA in advance to inform them that the Census is taking place and asking for their co-operation. Enumeration of smaller CEs, such as BandBs, is normally carried out by a manager or person in charge. You are responsible for contacting this person and issuing the appropriate forms and envelopes. It is important, therefore, that you have read and understood the completion instructions for the Listing Form and the Individual Form, so you can advise the manager. The manager completes a Listing Form. Each person present on Census night completes an Individual Form.

Boarding Houses
Boarding Houses with less than five boarders on Census Night should be treated as private household. This household should include the manager and his/her family.

Boarding houses with five boarders or more on Census Night should be treated as communal establishments. In communal establishments, the manager and his/her family are treated as a separate private household so you will have to have to generate D No. (2000+), create an ERB entry and mark the D. No. added on your map and collection grid.

CEs providing shelter for homeless persons
There are slightly different procedures to be followed in CEs which provide shelter for homeless persons. The procedures to be followed are detailed in Appendix C.

Standard procedures for enumeration in communal establishments

Small communal establishments (with less than 20 persons)
1. Contact the manager or person in charge on or before Tuesday 5 April.
2. Introduce yourself and explain that you have come to deliver forms for the Census.
3. Ask the manager whether he/she wishes to complete an Irish or English version of the Listing Form.
4. Go through the Listing Form and the Individual Form with the manager to be sure that he/she knows what is required.
5. Complete the name and address and the Form ID (County, EA, Small Area and D. No.) on the Listing Form. As with the Household Form, the D. No. for the establishment should be on your map with a corresponding entry in your ERB. If not generate the next unused 9001+
D. No. and enter on Map/ERB see Section 2.15.
6. Mark the dwelling status as 'occupied' in the ERB.
Write in the manager's name, get a contact number and write it in your ERB.
7. Ask the manager how many males and females are expected to be in the CE on Census Night. If the manager is unsure, ask for an estimate. Record this in your ERB.
8. Complete the name and address of the establishment and the Form ID on each Individual Form before handing it over to the manager. The D. No. on each Individual Form should be the same as the D. No. on the Listing Form. Leave the 'person number' blank on the Individual Forms as it should only be completed after collection.
9. Leave enough Individual Forms with accompanying confidential envelopes for everyone who will be present on Census Night. Only leave extra forms if there will be a real need for them.
10. Ask the manager to write each person's name on the front of the privacy envelope before distributing them on the evening of Sunday April 10. This will allow the manager to check that he/she has collected forms from every person who spends Census Night in the establishment.
11. Ask the manager or person in charge to complete the Listing Form on Census Night and deliver the Individual Forms. He/she should write the names of each person staying in the CE on pages 2-4 of the Listing Form and mark the appropriate response to question E1 on page 2.
12. On issuing an Individual Form to a person staying in the CE, the manager should mark the corresponding 'issued' box on the Listing Form.
13. If the manager or person in charge refuses to distribute and collect the forms, offer to do so yourself (See below for the procedure for CEs with more than 20 persons present on Census Night).
14. Update the ERB with the number of Listing Forms and Individual Forms issued.
15. Ask the manager to collect the completed Individual Forms on the morning of April 11. On receipt of each Individual Form, he/she should mark the 'Collected box' in the appropriate space on the Listing Form.
16. Once you have finished this procedure, you should circle the appropriate D. No. on your delivery grid.

Treatment of the manager and other staff members spending the night in the CE

Living with family
If the manager or other staff members live on the premises of the CE with their family, they should be regarded as a private household separate to the CE. This means they should receive a separate Household Form with a 2000+ D. No. unless the manager's dwelling is listed separately in the ERB.
Living alone or with unrelated persons
If the manager or other staff members live on the premises of the CE alone or with unrelated persons, they should be enumerated in the same manner as other residents of the CE, i.e. they should be listed on the Listing Form and should complete an Individual Form.
Not living in the CE
If the manager or other staff members spend Census Night at work in the CE, but do not live in the CE and return home in the morning, they should be included on the Census form in their usual address. They should not be enumerated in the CE.

Communal establishments based in multiple buildings
You may encounter a Communal Establishment that is based in more than one building at the address listed in your ERB, for which only one D. No. has been listed.

For example, a hotel that has several smaller buildings on the grounds which can be booked by guests or a convent and a nursing home run by the same religious order.

If a building is used for a different function to the main buildings, a new 9001+ D. No. should be created on your map and in your ERB. In cases such as these, the manager of the Communal Establishment should fill out a separate Listing Form for the building with the different function. Each will be treated as separate CEs.

The general rule to follow in situations like these is when the additional buildings are used for the same function as the main building, you should not create new D. Nos. for them

[Example omitted.]

For a hotel with separate buildings used by guests on its grounds, you should only use one D. No. You should not assign new D. Nos. for each of the separate buildings on the grounds as they are being used for the same purpose as the main hotel building - i.e. guest accommodation.

Vacant communal establishments
If no one is staying in a Communal Establishment on Census Night you should mark 'vacant
house/CE' in your ERB and complete a Reconciliation Form, marking the dwelling status 'vacant house/vacant communal establishment'.

If a CE is vacant on Census Night but the manager is staying on the premises, you should use the D. No. allocated to the CE in your map/ERB to enumerate the manager.

Large communal establishments (with 20 persons or more)

Your Field Supervisor will make contact with the administrator or manager to explain the timing and procedures used to enumerate the establishment. In most cases, form delivery should take place on Friday 8 April - two days before the Census. If an EA has a number of large communal establishments, form delivery can take place before this, but should be done in the week before Census Night.

For large hospitals you may also deliver forms before Friday 8 April. The hospital manager may know who will be in the hospital on Census Night and may be able to complete the list of patients on the Listing Form in advance. If necessary patients can be removed from or added to the Listing Form after Census Night (e.g. due to subsequent births, deaths, unexpected admissions etc).

You should follow the same procedure as for smaller CEs except that

1. You should arrange a suitable time to meet the manager in order to explain the procedures you will be following. Be sure to inform the manager that he/she will be responsible for completing the Listing Form and for distributing the Individual Forms.
2. Inform the manager that he/she will need to complete the list of persons staying in the CE on Census night on pages 2-4 of the Listing Form. The guest or patient register can be used as a source for the names if available.
3. Ask the manager to mark the appropriate response to question E1 on page 2 of the Listing Form.
4. Should there be more than 60 persons in the CE, you should use a second Listing Form.
5. Ask the manager to distribute the Individual Forms and envelopes to the persons staying in the CE on the evening of Census Night. Once an Individual Form has been distributed to a person staying in the CE, the manager should mark the appropriate 'issued' box on the Listing Form on pages 2-4.
6. You should leave extra Individual Forms if there will be a real need for them. Do not estimate the extra forms required based on empty beds, for example. Ask the manager the likely number of extra forms needed.
7. Ask the manager to ensure that anyone not listed on the Listing Form who arrives later and spends Census Night in the CE is entered on the Listing Form and completes an Individual Form.
8. Inform the manager that you will return to collect the forms on the day after the Census (Monday 11 April).
9. Where an individual is likely to have difficulties completing a form, ask the manager to provide help or to arrange for the form to be completed on the person's behalf.
10. Where the manager will have difficulty carrying out the task, you should assume the role of the manager and follow the enumeration procedure as instructed on the Listing Form. In a large establishment such as a hospital you may have to arrange a short information session for staff such as ward managers to explain the procedures. Your Field Supervisor may assist with this.

Note that when you successfully deliver forms to a Communal Establishment, you should circle the D. No. on the delivery grid as you would for a normal household.

Private residences in the grounds of a communal establishment
Examples of this are a doctor's house, caretaker's cottage or porter's lodge.

These dwellings are separate private households and require a separate entry in your ERB. The details should be pre-printed in your ERB and on your map. If this dwelling is unlisted, assign a new D No. and follow the procedure in Section 2.12 and apply the usual delivery routine.

Note that if you have a number of large CEs in your EA, your Field Supervisor may decide to ask an Enumerator from a nearby EA to help you with collecting the CE forms on the morning of April 11.

4.7 Situation 7 - Caravans and other mobile or temporary structures
Caravans and mobile homes should be listed separately in your ERB and assigned a 9001+ D. No. if not already listed, except where:

  • A single caravan/mobile home is parked in the grounds of a private house and is NOT occupied by a separate household. You should not allocate a new D. No. or list in your ERB.
  • One or more unoccupied caravans are being displayed for sale or hire.
  • These should not be assigned D. No. in your ERB or marked on your map.
  • There are one or more unoccupied caravans in a caravan park. If not already listed with a D. No. on your map and in your ERB, these should be assigned one new 9001+ D. No. You should note in your ERB the total number of caravans unoccupied. Mark 'Holiday home' if the caravans are vacant holiday homes. Remember to fill one Reconciliation Form for all Holiday homes (see Section 6.1).
  • Two or more caravans/mobile homes are occupied by a single family. A D. No. may already exist on your map and in your ERB . If this is not the case, you should assign only one 9001+ D No. and carry out the delivery procedure.

Enumerating caravans on a managed site
Speak to the manager of the site to determine which caravans will be occupied on Census Night. Visit each caravan.

Treat each occupied caravan as a separate dwelling unless two caravans are occupied by the one family (see bullet point 4 above). Each caravan containing a separate household may have a D. No. listed on your map and in your ERB. If not, assign a 9001+ D. No. and follow the delivery procedure. When completing the address on the form, use the D No. as the caravan number if no caravan numbers are assigned on the site. Do not generate new D.No.s for unlisted caravans which are unoccupied on Census night.

Caravans not on a caravan site (including unofficial halting sites)
If the caravan is not pre-printed on your map and in your ERB, you should assign a new 9001+ D. No. and follow the procedure in Section 2.12.

Each separate household should have one D. No. each. If you need to complete the address in your ERB, use 'Caravan at ____'.

Put a reminder in the Notes section to remind you that form(s) must be collected early on the Monday morning after the Census.

The CSO has identified the location of all known halting sites in advance of the Census. Your Field Supervisor will notify you if there is a halting site in your EA which you should be aware of to ensure it is properly enumerated.

Temporary or mobile structures or truck cabs
You should enumerate all temporary or mobile structures such as camper vans, houseboats, parked trucks that are habitable or look like they may be inhabited with new D. Nos. and follow the delivery procedure. When completing the address use 'Truck parked at ………..', or an appropriate introduction to the address. Put a reminder in the notes section to remind you that form(s) must be collected early on the Monday morning after the Census.

4.8 Situation 8 - Confidential returns

Households seeking to make confidential returns
If you encounter a household which does not want you to see their completed Census form, you should explain that all information collected is confidential and is protected by the Statistics Act 1993. If this does not reassure the householder:

1. Give the householder a confidential envelope with a Regional Office address label affixed and ask him/her to return the form(s) in the post. Write 'Form H' on the back of the envelope.
2. Make a note in your ERB and mark the 'Form H' box.
3. On receiving the Census form(s), the Regional Office will send them to your Field Supervisor. Your Field Supervisor will send you a completed Form H which will allow you to complete your summarization and will ensure you receive full payment for a collected form.
4. You should treat a completed Form H for an entire household received from your Field Supervisor as a collected form.

Try to keep the number of such confidential returns to a minimum.

Request from an individual for confidentiality
If a member of a household has objections to you or other members of the household seeing his/her information:

1. Give the person an Individual Form (remember to complete the Form ID before giving it to them) and a blank Census envelope to enclose the form after completion.
2. Record on your ERB that an Individual Form(s) was issued.
3. Ask the person to enclose his/her completed Individual Form in the envelope and return it with the Household Form when you come to collect the forms.

If the person is not happy with this arrangement:

1. Provide an envelope addressed to the Regional Office and ask him/her to return the form by post (write Form H on the back of the envelope). When this is received, the Regional Office will send it to your Field Supervisor.
2. Make a note in your ERB and mark the 'Form H' box.
3. Make sure you receive a Form H from your Field Supervisor to confirm that the person has posted back the form.
4. Ask the householder to ensure that the person requesting the Individual Form is entered on List 1, page 3 of the Household Form.
5. Remember that you have issued additional forms when completing the Form ID and note in your ERB that more than one form has been issued.

Try to keep the number of such confidential returns to an absolute minimum.

4.9 Situation 9 - Multiple households at an address
It is important that you identify all the households at every dwelling and deliver a separate Household Form to each. It is part of the delivery routine to establish the number of households at each dwelling. Signs such as several doorbells or dustbins will often indicate a shared entrance and multiple households.

Examples of the type of dwelling where you may find more than one household include:

  • tenements
  • a dwelling which includes accommodation occupied by a lodger or live-in relative who does not share a living room or meals with the remainder of the household.

Although grouping people into households is important it is not as important as ensuring everyone is included on a form. Bear this in mind if you are struggling to group people into households at a dwelling.

Often the first person you talk to will be able to tell you how many other households live there.

If you discover additional households at a dwelling you should follow the procedure in Section 2.15.

Remember:

If there is a second household sharing the same hall door in a dwelling unit (e.g. a lodger living separately in a house), the new D. No. you allocate should be 2000 plus the D. No. of the first household. If there is a third household, the new D. No. you allocate should be 3000 plus the D. No. of the first household and so on.

If there is more than one household in one building but the households live in separate dwelling units (e.g. flats with separate dining areas in a large house), the new D. No. you should allocate should be 9001+ as described in Section 2.15.

If you encounter more than one household at one address for which you need to allocate new D. Nos., it may be useful to note the new D. Nos. in the notes section of your ERB for the original printed address. If you do this, when you go to collect forms from the address, you will know that there are other households resident in the dwelling and you have to collect forms from them. See below for an illustration.

On your map, you should write any new D. Nos. you have allocated beside the D. No. of the first household and highlight it in pink. You should also write this D. No. into the 'added' D. Nos. box at the bottom of your map and onto your Delivery and Collection Grids.

4.10 Situation 10 - Visitors
We want to enumerate everyone where they are in the country on Census Night.

Visitors staying with a household should be included on the Household Form irrespective of whether they are residents of the Republic of Ireland or not.

Visiting households on Census night
Visiting households staying in holiday accommodation or in someone else's home while the usual residents are away on Census Night should complete a Household Form irrespective of whether they are residents of the Republic of Ireland or not.

Visiting households may move on soon after the Census, so for these households:

Put a reminder in the Notes section that forms must be collected soon after the Census.

4.11 Situation 11 - Refusals
We look to you to gain the public's confidence and encourage their participation.

If someone refuses to accept a form, be courteous and explain that:

  • the information is vital for planning the needs of their local area and the Census provides the only source of information for many areas. For example, it provides information on the number of people over 65 or under 5 in their area;
  • the form is easy to fill out and should only take several minutes to complete. Although it is a 24 page form, most households will have to complete less than half the form as it covers up to six persons;
  • most of the questions just require a mark;
  • all information is confidential and is used for statistical purposes only;
  • the Census is compulsory and that the householder is obliged by law to ensure that the form is completed and may be fined up to €25,000 for refusing to do so;
  • Do not cause any antagonism. Suggest that the householder looks through the form if they are reluctant to complete it.
  • Make sure you listen to the householder. Very often a person will be co-operative after having had his/her say. Under no circumstances should you threaten a householder or engage in any activity which could be considered harassment.

If the householder still refuses:

1. Record the date and time of the call in your ERB.
2. Summarize your interaction with the householder in the Notes section.
3. Notify your Field Supervisor of the refusal. He/she will call on the householder to encourage participation.

4.12 Situation 12 - Deliveries made after Census Night
There may be rare situations where you have to deliver a form after Census Night. Examples of this may be:

  • When you re-visit a dwelling which you believed was vacant after Census Night but find it is occupied;
  • When you missed a dwelling during your visual enumeration and did not deliver a form to the household;
  • Where a member of the public has contacted the Census Regional Office or CSO to say that they did not receive a Census form. You will receive a text message with the address details requesting you to deliver a Census form.

Should you need to deliver a form after Census Night, you should follow the usual delivery routine, but you should ask the householder to complete the form as soon as possible and arrange a time to collect the form. You may need to make alterations to your ERB (e.g. if you had indicated a dwelling was vacant).

4.13 Situation 13 - Public enquiries at the doorstep
Familiarity with this manual and the Census forms will help you answer most questions you are likely to get from the public. Below are the answers to some of the more usual questions, which may be put to you.

Why do you need names on the form?
Names enable the householder and the Enumerator to distinguish different people on the form to help check that everyone has been included. They also assist in the verification of family relationships.

Why do you need my address?
We need to ensure that a form has been delivered to every address in the country and we need to record where a form has been received from and where we need to call back to collect the form.

Will my answers be confidential?
Yes. Confidentiality is guaranteed by law. Everyone working on the Census has to sign an undertaking guaranteeing that they will not disclose any information collected in the course of their work.

Is participation in the census voluntary?
No. There is a legal requirement on householders and individuals present in the country on Census Night to be enumerated in the Census.

How much does the census cost?
The census is the largest and most complex statistical operation in the State and costs around €55 million spread over 5 years.

Once I have completed and returned the census form will I be contacted again?
No, not for the Census.

More detailed questions regarding the census form?
Read the Explanatory Notes on the back page of the Census Form. Also, see Appendix G.

4.14 Situation 14 - Media enquiries
It is important to note that Enumerators do not conduct media interviews or provide information or comments to the media. Nothing is ever 'off the record' and even the most casual of comments can result in a news story quoting 'an official spokesperson'.

You should not get involved in discussing politics, religion or debating issues in the media.

Remember, the Enumerator's job is to deliver and collect completed Census forms.

Should you receive media enquiries, you should immediately alert your Field Supervisor and pass them to him/her.

[Chapter 5 discussing Form Collection is omitted here.]

Chapter 6 - Reconciliation Forms

You are required to complete and sign a Reconciliation Form for every dwelling/household listed or added to your ERB, for which you do not receive a completed Census form.

A Reconciliation Form should be completed for the following situations:

1. Vacant dwellings (houses, flats, communal establishments);
2. Entire households temporarily absent on Census Night;
3. Holiday homes;
4. Dwellings under construction;
5. Derelict dwellings;
6. Dwellings pre-identified on your map and ERB which do not exist;
7. Commercial only addresses;
8. Occupied dwellings where the household cannot be contacted.

Reconciliation Forms should be completed at home. Reconciliation Forms for dwelling statuses under construction, derelict, commercial only and does not exist can be completed as they arise. Vacant houses/CEs, vacant flats and holiday homes must be verified by visiting the household after Census Night.

A Reconciliation Form must be completed for all dwellings listed in your ERB which were not occupied on Census Night, April 10 and for which no completed Census forms were returned

6.1 Completing the Reconciliation Form (RF) for unoccupied dwellings

RF Dwelling status
Dwellings which you have indicated in your ERB as a Vacant house/CE, Vacant flat or Holiday home must be revisited after Census night to verify they were in fact vacant on April 10. This must be verified with a local source and be accompanied by a note of the verification in your ERB.

For dwellings which are pre-listed in your ERB and which you have decided are derelict, under construction, commercial only or does not exist, you can complete the Reconciliation Form once you have satisfied yourself the dwelling status is correct. You are not required to revisit these buildings after Census night.

See Section 3.3 and the inside cover of your ERB for how to decide on a dwelling status.

Dwellings temporarily unoccupied on Census Night - Form E
For households which were temporarily absent on Census Night, you should have completed a Form E and given it to your Field Supervisor for tracking i.e. to verify the household was in fact enumerated at the away address declared. If your Field Supervisor verifies the household spent Census Night at the address declared you should complete a Reconciliation Form. If you verified that the household spent Census Night abroad, you must also complete a Reconciliation Form.

If household members spent Census Night in several different addresses in the Republic of Ireland, a completed Form E will be needed for each address. However, only one Reconciliation Form should be completed in respect of the household. If the household can't be tracked at the away address indicated, return to the household and get them to complete a Census form. See Section 4.2 for more details.

Before completing the Reconciliation Form, you should have marked the 'RF' box in your ERB.

You should proceed as follows:

1. Write in the address, County code, EA code, Small Area Code and D. No. onto the Form ID on Page 1 of the Reconciliation Form.
2. Leave the males, females and total boxes blank.
3. Mark the relevant dwelling status box. This should agree with the dwelling status marked in the ERB.
4. Sign and date the Reconciliation Form on the bottom of Page 2.

You should leave the estimated persons present section and Supervisor Authorization sections on page 2 blank. There is no requirement to complete either of these sections of the form if a dwelling is not occupied on Census night.

Remember: You must have either a completed census form (Household or Listing form and Individual Forms) or a Reconciliation Form for every dwelling marked on your map and listed in your ERB including any new D.Nos. you created.

The following is an example of an ERB entry for a vacant house and how the associated Reconciliation Form should be completed.

[Example omitted.]

Completing the Reconciliation Form for occupied dwellings
Only in very rare situations will you need to complete a Reconciliation Form for a dwelling which is occupied on Census Night. Every household which passes Census Night in the state is required to complete a Census form by law. It is the Enumerators job to gain the co-operation of householders. Therefore for every occupied dwelling in your EA you should collect the appropriate Census form(s).

If you encounter a situation where a householder refuses to take a Census form before Census Night, or you are unable to collect a completed Census form from a dwelling you know to be occupied, you should follow the procedures outlined in Section 4.11 and Situation 4, Section 5.5. Your Field Supervisor will be involved in both of these situations and may issue a Ref 1 form.

If the intervention of your Field Supervisor still does not lead to the successful collection of a completed Census form to the occupied dwelling, your Field Supervisor may decide to apply to his/her Regional Supervisor for authorization to complete a Reconciliation Form for that household. The Regional Supervisor will insist on evidence that all efforts have been exhausted in trying to get a completed Census form including the issue of Form Ref 1 and will need details of the number of persons in the household.

When your Field Supervisor informs you that he/she has received authorization from the Regional Supervisor, your Field Supervisor will give you an Authorization Code to proceed with the completion of the Reconciliation Form.

Only under extremely rare circumstances should you have to construct a Reconciliation Form for an occupied household.

Every household which passes Census Night in the state is legally bound to complete a Census Form.

Failing to collect completed Census forms for an occupied household is a very serious occurrence and will require authorization from your Regional Supervisor to proceed.

Completing the Reconciliation Form for occupied dwellings

1. Complete the Form ID.
2. Mark the 'occupied but no completed Census Form collected' dwelling status box.
3. You should complete the 'estimated persons present' section on Page 2 with the sex, age and nationality details of persons residing in the dwelling. The householder may provide this information, but if not you should make discreet inquiries locally. The Regional Office may have involved the Gardai in the refusal so they may be able to provide this information.
4. In the Form ID on Page 1 of the form, write in the number of males, females and total persons residing in the dwelling.
5. You will need an approval ID code from your Field Supervisor before you can sign off the form for payment purposes. He/she will provide this code and will also need to sign and date the form on Page 2.
6. Once you have the approval ID code on the form and it is signed by your Field Supervisor, you should sign and date the Reconciliation Form on the bottom of Page 2.

Note: Under no circumstances should you write any notes on the Reconciliation Form. Any notes relating to the dwelling should be made in your ERB.

Chapter 7 - Summarization

Summarization is a three stage process.

1. You must go through the completed forms for each occupied household/CE and count the number of males/females present, total persons present and absent persons in the household and write on the Form ID.
2. You must complete a Reconciliation form for each unoccupied dwelling/CE in your ERB and complete the dwelling status and front panel information.
3. You must sort your forms from stage 1/2 into separate bundles for each Small Area, one bundle for Reconciliation Forms and one bundle for other forms. If you have 3 Small Areas in your EA you will have 6 separate bundles of forms at this stage, unless all dwellings are occupied.

Summarizing a private household or a communal establishment involves completing the males present, females present, total persons present, and total persons absent information on the Form ID box on the front of the appropriate Census form (Household or Listing). These details and the details on the completed Reconciliation Forms are then copied onto the appropriate Summarization forms.

As soon as you have completed the collection of forms you should begin your summarization. This should be Monday 9 May at the very latest.

Before you start your summarization, you should ensure that:

1. You have collected any outstanding Forms H from your Field Supervisor.
2. You update the Form Collection Grid to include any Forms H you have received from your Field Supervisor.
3. All Form E procedures have been followed up and confirmed, with a Reconciliation Form completed if necessary.
4. You have gone through your ERB and ensured that you have collected all forms delivered and that you have all the forms you collected in your possession.

7.1 Summarizing each private household

Private households are those which have completed a Household Form and any Individual Forms required. Before you begin summarizing each private household, you should perform the following checks:

1. Check that you are not missing any forms for that household.
2. If some Individual Forms are missing because of 'privacy requests' which may be in the post, you will have to wait until you receive a Form H for each outstanding Individual Form from your Field Supervisor before summarizing the household. The forms for such households should be put aside until all outstanding Forms H are received. Only at this stage can the household details be summarized. All the forms for that household can then be held together with an elastic band.
3. If more than one Household Form has been used in error by a household with more than 6 persons, the details from the second Household Form should be carefully transcribed onto one or more blank Individual Forms. Clearly mark 'copied from spoilt Household Form' on the front beside Gerard O'Hanlon's signature. The spoilt Household Form should be returned with any other 'spoiled Forms'.
4. There are no pieces of paper or other Census materials (e.g. Cen 1s, Rem 1s, Calling Cards, etc.) inserted between pages in the Household or Individual Forms.

Once you have completed these checks, you should proceed to summarize the form(s) as follows:

Number of persons present
Count the number of males present4 for which questions have been completed on each form for the household (including Individual Forms) and write under 'males' in the Form ID Box on front page of the Household Form.

Count the number of females present for which any questions have been completed on each form for the household (including Individual Forms) and write under 'females' in the Form ID box on the Household Form.

Count the number of persons present from List 1, page 3 of the Household Form or the total number of Individual Forms in the case of communal establishments. This should agree with the number of males present + females present derived by counting replies to Q2 Sex on the form.

Before writing the total number of persons present under 'total' in the Form ID box, check that males present + females present = total persons present. If this is not the case, something is clearly wrong and you need to cross check List 1, page 3 against the inside of the form. You may have to return to the household if a person has been missed. This is why the door step check is so important.

If males present + females present = total persons present, write the number of total persons present under 'total' in the Household Form ID box.

Absent persons
Count the number of absent persons if any for which any questions have been completed at the back of the Household Form on pages 22 and 23.

Before writing this number under 'absent persons', cross check against the number of absent persons on List 2, page 3 of the Household Form. If the two counts of absent persons do not agree, something is clearly wrong and you need to cross check List 2, page 3 against the absent persons declared at the back of the form. You may have to return to the household if a person has been missed, etc.

If the cross check on the number of absent persons is ok then enter the number of absent persons under 'absent persons' in the Form ID box.

If there were no absent persons, then write 0 under 'absent persons'.

7.2 Final check on persons present and contacting households

After you have completed the Form ID panel, you should check to make sure that the number of persons present equals the number of persons detailed in List 1 on Page 3 of the Household Form. You should also ensure that all the questions for each person on List 1 have been completed in the relevant sections of the form.

If you find that a person has been listed on List 1 page 3, but the questions on sex, date of birth, relationship, marital status, and nationality (Questions 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10) have not been answered for that person, you will need to contact the household and request the information for this person. You should have a contact number for the household in your ERB so you can arrange to call to the dwelling for the outstanding details. This should to be a rare occurrence as you should make sure all the questions are answered for all persons listed on the form during the doorstep check when you collect the form.

7.3 Summarizing a private household (example)
In the example below, one Household Form and two Individual Forms were delivered and collected.

Counting the replies to Q3 on the three forms, questions were answered in respect of 4 males, 4 females (pages 4-21 of the Household Form and pages 2-4 on each of 2 Individual Forms) and 8 persons were listed on List 1, page 3 which agrees with males + females. No questions were answered in respect of absent persons and no absent persons were listed on List 2, page 3 of the Household Form. Persons 7 and 8 completed the Individual Forms.

The example presents the Form ID section for the Household Form and the two Individual Forms after summarization.

After summarizing forms for a household (D.No.) you should put all forms for the household in form order (the Household Form should be on top, then any Individual Forms in person number order).

An elastic band should be placed around the forms for all multi-form households to keep them together. The Household Form should be kept on top with the Individual Form(s) underneath.

7.4 Summarizing each communal establishment

1. Check that you are not missing any Listing Forms.
2. Make sure there are no pieces of paper (Cen 1s, calling cards etc.) inserted between the pages of the Listing or Individual Forms.
3. If some Individual Forms are missing because of 'privacy requests' which may be in the post, you will have to wait until you receive a Form H for each outstanding Individual Form from your Field Supervisor before Summarizing the Communal Establishment (CE). All forms for each CE should be kept separately until all Individual Forms are accounted for, at which stage the CE can be summarized.
4. Sort the Individual Forms in order of 'person number'.
5. Count the number of males on the Individual Forms and write under 'males' in the Form ID box on the front of the Listing Form. If there is more than one Listing Form for the CE, write the number of males on the front page of the first Listing Form you have for the CE.
6. Count the number of females on the Individual Forms and write under 'females' in the Form ID box on the front of the Listing Form.
7. Count the number of Individual Forms and write under 'total' in the Form ID box on the Listing Form.
8. Check that when you add 'males' + 'females', the number of persons agrees with the Total number of Individual Forms you have counted.
9. After summarizing the CE you should place the Listing Forms in order and place them on top of the Individual Forms, which must be in 'person number' order. All forms for the CE should be kept together in person order with an elastic band.
10. If there is more than one Listing Form place them in order on top of the Individual Forms.
You only need to complete the number of males, females, and persons on the first form and these totals should relate to all Individual forms for the establishment.

7.5 Summarizing Reconciliation Forms
Only Reconciliation Forms completed for occupied dwellings should be summarized. There should be very few, if any, of these in your EA.

If there are, you should proceed as follows:

1. Count the number of males listed on page 2 of the Reconciliation Form;
2. Write the number of males into the 'males' box on the Form ID on page 1 of the
Reconciliation Form;
3. Count the number of females listed on page 2 of the Reconciliation Form;
4. Write the number of females into the 'females' box on the Form ID on page 1 of the
Reconciliation Form;
5. Write the total number of persons into the 'total' box on the Form ID.

Note that you must include Reconciliation Forms for unoccupied dwellings later in the summarization procedure (see Section 7.8).

7.6 Sorting summarized forms

Form order and placing Forms Hs
After summarizing the forms for each household/CE your EA, you should sort your summarized forms into two separate stacks in ascending D. No. order for each Small Area, one stack for Reconciliation Forms and the other stack for all other forms. Each stack should be in D No. order. If there are four small areas in your EA you will have eight stacks of forms at this stage, each in ascending D.No. order.

Form Hs are used as a substitute for a completed Household or Individual Form. You should therefore insert Form Hs received from your Field Supervisor in the Small Area stack as you would a completed Household or Individual Form. Form Hs are an important part of summarization.

Remember to include forms completed by households for which you have allocated a new D. No. (9001+, 2000+ etc.) in the correct small area stack.

7.7 Completion of Form B for each small area

A Form B should be completed for each small area stack containing Household, Individual, and Listing Forms.

The purpose of the Form B is to summarize the number of males, females and total persons in each household or communal establishment by small area for your EA.

This serves a dual purpose. Firstly, it provides a population count by Small Area. Secondly, it provides information that feeds into Form C which is a quality control of the enumeration carried out compared with the results from the previous Census.

Each small area stack should be summarized on a separate Form B.

You will later summarize each Reconciliation Form stack on to a Form BR, see Section 7.8.
You should complete each Form B as follows:

1. Complete the County Code, EA Code and Small Area Code of the stack on the Form B.
2. Transfer the D. No., males, females, and total persons from the front of each Household or Listing Form for each household or CE in the Small Area.
3. For each D.No. entered on the Form B, enter 1 in the 'No. of households' column (see the diagram in Section 7.11, page 82).
4. If there are more than 25 households/CEs in the small area, sum each of the 4 columns on the left side of the Form B and carry forward the totals to the first row on the right side of the Form B. Continue to enter details for the next 25 households/CEs on the right side.
5. If there are more than 50 households/CEs in the Small Area, sum each of the 4 columns on the right side and carry forward the totals to the left side of Page 2.
6. If there are more than 120 households/CEs in the Small Area, you will need to carry forward the totals to a new Form B. Don't forget to complete the geography coding if you need to begin a new Form B.
7. When you have entered the details for all forms in your small area stack, you should sum the four columns where you made your final entries.
8. When you are satisfied that Form B(s) is complete and correct for each Small Area, you should sign and date each Form B.

7.8 Completion of Form BR for each small area

A Form BR should be completed for each small area stack of Reconciliation Forms.
Remember each Small Area stack of Reconciliation Forms should be summarized separately on a Form BR.

The main purpose of the Form BR is to produce a count of the number of dwellings in each small area for each of the 9 possible dwelling statuses. The information on Form BR will also be used in the completion of Form C, see below for details.

To complete a Form BR for a Small Area you should:

1. Complete the County code, EA code and Small Area Code of the stack on the Form BR.
2. Go through each Reconciliation Form in the stack and write the D. No. from the form into the appropriate section on the Form BR. The sections on the Form BR appear in the same order as on the Reconciliation Form.
3. For any Reconciliation Form completed for occupied dwellings, you must write in the D. No. as well as the number of males, females and total persons in the household.
4. If there are not enough spaces in a section to transfer the D. Nos., you should follow on to a new Form BR, remembering to complete the County, EA and Small Area Code. It is unlikely this will occur.
5. When you have accounted for all the Reconciliation Forms in the Small Area, you should total the sections. To do this you should simply write the number of D. Nos. in that section into the 'total no. of dwellings' box at the bottom right of the section.
6. For the occupied dwellings section, you should total the number of D. Nos. and write that in the 'total number of households' box at the bottom of the section. You should then add the number of males and write the total in the box at the end of the Males column. You should do the same with females and persons in household.
7. In the unlikely event that you need more than one Form BR for a small area, you should make sure when you are totaling the sections that you include the information from each Form BR completed.
8. Once you have completed the Form BR for each small area and you are satisfied each is correct, you should sign and date each Form BR.

7.9 Completion of Form C

Form C records the total occupied households, males, females, persons and dwelling types within each Small Area in your EA. These figures are taken from the 'total' lines on the Form B and Form BR.

You should complete the Form C as follows:

1. On Form B the total households, males, females and persons within each small area should be transferred into the corresponding columns (i.e. columns 5-8) for that small area on the Form C. Please check for any significant (i.e. more than 10%) differences between the total number of households and persons between 2006 and 2011. If there are large differences, a brief explanation should be provided in column 9 (e.g. a new hospital opened since 2006, new housing estate, building demolished etc.).
2. On the Form BR, the total occupied dwellings, males, females and persons within each small area should be transferred into the corresponding columns (i.e. columns 10-13) for that small area on the Form C.
3. For the remaining dwellings on the Form BR (temporarily absent, vacant house/CE, vacant flat, holiday homes, under construction, derelict, commercial only, does not exist) the totals for each dwelling type within each small area should be transferred into the corresponding columns (i.e. columns 14-21) for that small area on the Form C.

Please ensure the following checks are made:

1. The totals for males and females must tally with the total for persons.
2. The total dwellings (i.e. occupied households/CEs and non-occupied dwellings) should equal the total number of entries recorded in your ERB.
Once you are satisfied that the Form C for your EA is complete and correct you should sign and date it.

Please note that a Form C will only be re-issued if the original is destroyed or misplaced. If this happens, then contact the Census Geography section immediately at 01 8951330 or 01 8951328.

7.10 Sending Form C to CSO
The Form C is provided with an envelope marked 'Form C' which is pre-addressed to CSO. This envelope should be used to return your completed Form C directly to CSO at the end of summarization. This envelope should not be used for any other purpose.

It is very important that you send the Form C to CSO as soon as you have completed and checked it. Delays in receiving them may hold up the publication of the first preliminary estimate of the population.

Note that you should not pack the Form C with your other Census materials nor should you give it to your Field Supervisor to return to CSO.
In the unlikely event that you mislay the Form C envelope, return your completed Form C in an A4 envelope addressed to

Form C
Central Statistics Office
PO Box 2011
Freepost 4726
Swords
Co. Dublin

[Examples omitted.]

[Chapter 8 discussing packing and returning Census materials procedure is omitted here.]

[Appendix A and B containing checklist and examples for form delivery and collection are omitted here.]

Appendix C - Enumeration of homeless accommodation

A homeless person is an individual who lacks housing, including one whose primary residence during Census night is a supervised public or private facility that provides temporary living accommodation; an individual who is a resident in transitional housing; or an individual whose primary residence is a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.

Accurately capturing the homeless population of the country is an important aspect of the Census. A significant number of homeless persons will spend Census Night in Communal Establishments (CEs) which provide dedicated shelter and facilities for those without permanent homes.

These establishments are being identified separately in the Census and are subject to different enumeration techniques to other CEs (which are outlined in Section 4.6 and Section 5.6). The key difference is that family units which spend Census Night together in the homeless accommodation should be allocated a separate D.No./ERB entry/point on the map and should be issued with Household Forms rather than Individual Forms. Individuals who spend Census Night on their own in homeless accommodation will be enumerated in the same manner as in other CEs.

CSO will be producing a special release on homelessness based on the census.

Identifying homeless accommodation

Pre-identified accommodation
A list of facilities which provide accommodation for homeless persons has been compiled by the Department of Environment, Heritage, and Local Government in consultation with the Health Service Executive and other organizations such as Focus Ireland, Simon and the Homeless Agency.

These facilities will be marked in your ERB with the text 'homeless count:' before the address in the address box. Your Field Supervisor will also be supplied with a list of any of these facilities in your EA and will make sure you are aware of them before you begin your enumeration.

For some mainly urban EAs it is possible that there will be a number of homeless accommodation providers within the EA. Each will be allocated a D. No. in your ERB and on your EA map in the usual manner.

Non-identified accommodation
It is also possible that there may be homeless accommodation in your EA which has not been pre-identified in your ERB. If you perceive that a Communal Establishment in your EA may be used for the accommodation of homeless persons but is not identified in your ERB with 'homeless count:' in the address box, you should ask the manager whether the CE is primarily used to accommodate homeless persons.

If the manager confirms that the CE is used primarily to accommodate homeless persons, you should proceed to enumerate as described below. If the manager confirms that the CE is not used primarily to accommodate homeless persons, you should enumerate it in the usual manner for a CE.

Enumeration of homeless accommodation
Contact the manager of the accommodation well in advance of Census Night. Confirm with him/her that the establishment name/address in the ERB is correct and that there are homeless persons staying in the establishment.

As homeless persons may frequently move, it will be necessary for you to collect the completed forms from around 7:30pm on Census Night or earlier if the manager can confirm that all residents will be on site at an earlier time. You should be aware of this when making plans on when to visit homeless accommodation in your EA.

Family units or individual enumeration
The enumeration procedure will differ depending on whether the persons in the homeless accommodation will spend Census Night alone in the shelter, or with members of their family unit. You should ask the manager whether there will be any family units staying together in homeless accommodation on Census Night.

For the purposes of enumerating homeless accommodation in the Census, family units are either:

1. One or both parents and their children;
2. Married couples;
3. Partners.

Enumerating family units

If there are family units in the homeless accommodation, you should enumerate them as follows:

1. For each family unit you must create a new D. No. in a blank panel in your ERB. The D. Nos. created should be the next available number in the 9001+ range. For example, if there are three family units staying together in homeless accommodation and the first free D. No. in the 9001+ range in your ERB is 9023, you should allocate the three family units D.Nos. 9023, 9024, and 9025.
2. Once you have created the ERB entry for a family unit, you should mark 'occupied' in the dwelling status column.
3. Write in the Small Area Code. You should use the same Small Area Code as for the homeless accommodation in the original ERB entry.
4. In the name of householder box in the ERB, you should write in the name of the family. If this is not available, write in the name of the manager.
5. In the ERB address box, you should transcribe exactly the address of the homeless accommodation from the original ERB entry including the word 'homeless count' at the start of the address. At the end of the address, you should write 'CE' and the original D. No. which was allocated to the accommodation in the original ERB entry. (See below for example).
6. For the 'persons expected' boxes in the ERB, you should complete the number of members in the family unit who will be in the homeless shelter on Census night.
7. Write in a mobile contact number for the family if provided. Otherwise, write in the contact number of the manager.
8. You should mark all new D. Nos. allocated to family units in the pre-designated homeless shelter on your EA map, indicating their position with a line drawn to the location of the homeless shelter. You should add these new D. Nos. to the grid at the bottom of your map. You should also add them to your Form Delivery and Collection grids to remind you to include the forms in your cumulative total of deliveries and collections.
9. You should issue a Household Form for each family unit in the shelter. On the Form ID, you should write in the address of the homeless accommodation, followed by 'CE' and the original D. No. which was allocated to the accommodation. You should enter the County and EA Codes in the normal manner. Do not add words "homeless count" at the start of the address on any Form Ids as it could cause offence.
10. You should blot out the box for the Small Area Code and write the SA Code above the SA Code box. This step is important as it will allow CSO to count these additional homeless families. Then you should write in the new D. No. (9001+) you have allocated to the family unit. Ask the manager to distribute the forms on Census night and to collect them after 19:30 on Census night.
11. It should be left up to the respondent to determine their usual residence in Q7 but if asked for guidelines the respondent should leave Q7 blank.
12. You can have absent persons from a family unit in homeless accommodation for example where you had a mother with two children in homeless accommodation but one child is in hospital, the child should be treated as an absent person. The same would apply if this was a one child single parent family where the child normally resided with the parent but was temporarily absent from the homeless accommodation on Census night.
13. You should leave privacy envelopes with each Household Form.
14. After you have collected the Household Forms from the manager of the homeless accommodation, you should write the word 'homeless' in capital letters in the address section of the Form ID. You should not do this before you deliver the forms.

Enumerating individuals
For persons staying alone in homeless accommodation, you should proceed as follows:

1. Each person spending Census Night alone in homeless accommodation should be included on a Listing Form and issued with an Individual Form. The manager of the shelter should be asked to complete the Listing Form in the same way as for other CEs (Section 4.6 and Section 5.6).
2. The ERB entry for the shelter should be made in the original panel in the pre-printed part of the ERB.
3. You should ask the manager to distribute and collect the Individual Forms on Census Night and leave a supply of privacy envelopes.
4. The manager should complete the Listing Form in the same way as is done in other CEs.
5. When you return to collect the Census forms, you should make sure you have completed Individual Forms for each person on the Listing Form and completed Household Forms for each new D. No. you have created for family units.

Homeless accommodation not listed in your ERB
It is possible that Communal Establishments providing homeless accommodation have not been identified on the Geo-Directory and are therefore not listed on your map or in your ERB. If you find such an establishment in your EA, you should allocate it a new 9001+ D. No. and record it on your map and in your ERB in the usual manner. You should then proceed to enumerate as in the section above.

[Examples omitted.]

Appendix D - Packing procedure
[Omitted.]

Appendix E - Use of mobile phones

For Census 2011 all Enumerators will be supplied with a mobile phone for use in their Census duties. All mobile phones will be associated with the geography related to the Enumerator. This will facilitate CSO computer systems to automatically identify:

  • specific Enumerators responsible for any given address;
  • who the staff member's immediate supervisor is;
  • from text messages received by CSO, the current position of any given EA relating to the number of forms delivered, collected and new D.Nos. identified.

[The remainder of this appendix is omitted.]

[Appendix F on Health and Safety is omitted.]

Appendix G - Detailed notes on the Household Form

Question 1. The name is necessary to ensure that everyone in the household is covered and to assist the householder in making sure that the correct personal information for each individual is recorded. The name also helps identify where forms are missing or duplicated. Names may also assist in the identification of household and family groups. CSO does not maintain a database of names to ensure that the anonymity of details supplied is preserved.

Question 2. Replies to Question 2 are used to measure and compare trends in areas like education, employment/unemployment etc. This information helps us to understand the changing roles of men and women in our families, communities and workplaces.

Question 3. Information on the age profile of the population is essential for measuring economic, social and demographic change. It helps target the delivery of health, education, social welfare, housing and other community services.

Question 4. From the responses to question 4, it is possible to build up a picture of the changing family situation in Ireland. The multiple categories will enable families in multi-generational households to be accurately distinguished. To facilitate this, the category of grandparent is being included for the first time. Information in relation to families which have been reconstituted following the break-up of previous marriages can also be determined. The results based on the responses to this question will allow the changing nature of families in Ireland to be charted.

Question 5. The changes occurring in the marital status of the population is captured by the responses to Question 5. In particular, it is possible to monitor the incidence of marital breakdown in Irish society.

This question should only be answered by those aged 15 or over.

Question 6-10. The purpose of questions 6 - 10 is to study migration patterns, both short-term and long-term. The resulting information will give us a picture of where people are moving to and from and their characteristics in terms of age, sex, education, occupation etc.

Comparing a person's place of birth (question 6) and his or her current place of usual residence (question 7) gives an indication of the extent of longer term migration.

[Examples omitted.]

Location (question 7) is a key characteristic that is used with other data to build an accurate picture of our population. It is the basis for the annual population estimates and for population projections. It is also used to determine changes to electoral boundaries.

By comparing a person's usual residence one year before the Census (question 8) and their residence at Census time (question 7), we get an indication of the extent to which people change residence. The responses also provide data on the extent of internal migration within Ireland.

Question 11. The responses to this question will facilitate a comparison of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the different ethnic and cultural groups living in Ireland. This question was asked for the first time in 2006.

Question 12. Question 12 provides information on the number of people of each religion or religious denomination. Taken in conjunction with information on country of birth, nationality and ethnicity, information on religion will help complete the picture in relation to a changing society. The religions listed have been chosen to cover the most frequent responses given in the 2006 Census. This question does not refer to frequency of attendance at church.

Question 13. The answers to Question 13 allow an assessment to be made of the factors impacting the fertility rate of women in Ireland, i.e. the extent to which fertility will vary with educational attainment, labor market status etc.

Question 14. Question 14 will provide information to help in the monitoring of policies and planning of service delivery in relation to the Irish language. In particular, the results will enable policy planners to assess how language proficiency and usage varies with age and education participation. Only persons aged 3 and over should answer this question.

Question 15. Question 15 is a new Question on the Census. It was tested in the Pilot Survey in 2009, having been supported for inclusion by several bodies including the Department of Education and Skills and the ESRI. The question will provide data on what languages other than English or Irish are spoken in households. It will also provide information on how well English is spoken by people who have a language other than English or Irish as their mother tongue. This information can be used to target state resources in areas such as education and health to support people who may struggle speaking English.

Questions 16 and 17. The results of questions 16 and 17 coupled with other questions will provide important data on the number of people whose activities are reduced because of a disability and the effect of the disability on their lives. The questions are slightly different to those asked in 2006. In question 16, vision and hearing impairments have been separated and there is a separate category for intellectual disabilities. The questions were chosen after pre-Census consultation with experts from the various disability umbrella bodies and government departments.

Question 18.Question 18 is a new question on the Census. It asks each person how their health is in general. Studies show strong links between how people view their health and the actual state of their health. The answers to this question will provide a country-wide picture of people's health and how it is related to various factors such as age, labour market position, and educational attainment.

Questions 19-21. The answers to questions 19, 20 and 21 in conjunction with the address where people work or go to school/college will provide valuable information on commuting patterns for planning public transport services and infrastructure. Usual means of travel identifies the different modes of transport used by commuters. Time of leaving home will provide information on the volume of commuter travel by transport type at different times of the day. Usual travel time will give information on the efficiency of various modes of transport.

Notes on answering questions 19-21
Where different means of travel are used on different days, the most frequently used method should be indicated.

Where the time of leaving home differs on different days, the most frequent time of leaving should be indicated.

Persons who do not work or attend school or college should mark 'not at work school or college' in Questions 19 and 20 and leave Question 21 blank.

Persons who work daily from a fixed centre or depot and travel a lot in their jobs should indicate the means of transport and distance travelled from their residence to this centre or depot.

Question 22. The results of question 22 will facilitate assessment of the extent to which unpaid personal help is provided by carers in our society, along with the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the carers themselves. Those who provide regular unpaid help as a carer, regardless of whether or not they receive Carer's Allowance/Benefit, should mark box 1 (Yes) and write in the weekly number of hours of caring. This question is being asked of persons aged 14 and younger for the first time.

Questions 24 to 33 should be answered only by persons 15 years and over

Questions 24 and 25. The replies to Questions 24 and 25 will be used to monitor the impact of education policies, changing skill levels and the extent to which people use their formal qualifications.

  • Persons who received their education when institutional arrangements were different to those currently in place or who were not educated in Ireland should select an equivalent option. For more information on the National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ), see www.nqai.ie
  • A person who attended primary level only should select Primary education. A person who attended a second level school but left without sitting the Group, Intermediate, or Junior Cert should also mark Primary Education.
  • A person who sat the Group, Intermediate or Junior Cert should mark Lower Secondary, regardless of the results achieved. Similarly, a person who sat the Leaving Cert should mark Upper Secondary regardless of the results achieved.
  • A person who attempted a third level course but without obtaining the certificate, diploma or degree in question should select the appropriate option at second level.

Question 26. Regular information on skill levels is necessary to monitor whether training being offered meets the needs of the labour market. The Government and employers use this data to evaluate whether there are enough people with the required education and training in particular areas of the work force. The information is used in developing new programmes to meet the changing needs of the work force.

Question 27. Question 27 will provide information on principal economic status, allowing us to classify persons aged 15 years and over into those within and outside the labour force.

As this question is asking about the person's principal economic status, only one of the boxes should be marked.

The following should mark 'working for payment or profit':

  • Persons who are self-employed.
  • Persons mainly engaged in 'assisting relatives' on farms, in shops or in any other commercial enterprises, even if they receive no regular payment.
  • Priests, nuns and brothers except where they are retired or unable to work due to permanent sickness or disability.
  • Persons temporarily absent from work due to illness, holidays etc.
  • Apprentices who are in employment and who also attend school or college.

Full-time students who are in part-time employment should mark 'Student or pupil'.

Persons who are working should answer questions 29, 30, 32 and 34.

Persons who are retired should answer questions 29 and 30 only.

Persons who are unemployed should answer questions 29, 30 and 32 only.

All other persons should not answer any of the questions 29, 30, 32, 33 or 34.

Question 29. Question 29 is used in the analysis of people's employment. The information is used to show potential growth in business and employment.

Retired and unemployed people should answer question 29 based on the work they did last.

Priests, nuns, brothers etc. should mark 'employee'.

Persons employed as managing directors should mark 'employee'.

Persons in partnership in a firm having paid employees should mark 'self-employed with paid employees'.

Persons in partnership in a firm not having paid employees should mark 'self-employed without paid employees'.

Question 30. The information that question 30 will provide is used to build a picture of occupational groups and how occupations are changing over time.

Persons who are unemployed or retired should base their answer on the work that they did last.

Some guidelines on answering question 30

  • The occupation must be provided for everyone who marked the following in question 27
Working for payment or profit
Unemployed
Retired from employment
  • Those who marked looking after home/family in question 27 often answer question 30 by writing 'home (or domestic) duties' as their occupation. Although inappropriate, no attempt should be made to alter this response.
  • You should ensure that the description of the occupation is precise and in accordance with the question's instructions.
  • If in doubt as to how a particular occupation should be described, it is better to give a full and detailed description.
  • The final part of the question (size of area farmed) should only be answered by farmers or farm workers.

Question 32. Question 32 will provide information that will be used to determine the industrial sectors in which people work. The categories are compared over time to show trends and rates of change in industry type.

Guidelines on answering question 32

  • It is vitally important that the description given is detailed enough to enable it to be coded.
  • This question should only be answered by those at work or unemployed.
  • It need not be answered by those who are retired.
  • Answers should be in precise terms, e.g.

[Examples of inadequate responses and corrections are omitted.]

Question 34. Question 34 will assist in putting a geography code on the person's place of work, school, or college. This will provide important information on commuting patterns in the state. This question will also assist in coding the industrial sector of a person's employer. The question should be answered by all those who leave the household to attend work, school or college. For children who attend pre-school facilities outside the home, the full name and address of this facility should be supplied.

Question H1. The results from question H1 will help build a picture of the type of housing stock in the country, and what types of accommodation are prevalent in certain areas. It will also allow us to examine what accommodation types are occupied by people of different ages, nationalities, educational attainment etc.

Question H2.Question H2 will give data on the age of the housing stock across the country. It will provide an insight into the number of new dwellings built in recent years. The question refers to when the house was first ready for occupation, not the date of any the start of construction or any subsequent renovations.

Questions H3 and H4. Question H3 will establish on what basis the household occupies their dwelling - whether they are an owner, renter or live rent free. Those who rent should answer the second part of the question and indicate the identity of their landlord.

Persons who indicated that they rent their accommodation in question H3 are required to answer question H4 and provide, in Euros, the amount they pay in rent. They should also indicate the frequency of their rental payments - weekly, monthly or yearly.

The data from these questions are used in the compilation of the annual National Accounts, from which the GDP and GNP figures are taken.

Question H5. The results to this question will allow a comparison of how many rooms households have available to them in their dwelling. This will facilitate comparisons with past censuses, across the country and across various demographic and social groups.

Question H6.This is an expanded version of the home heating question asked in Census 2006. The householder is now required to indicate the type of central heating, if any, which is used in the dwelling. The results of this question will provide more information on the nature of the fuel types which are used by home heating systems in Ireland and the location and type of homes which do not have central heating.

Questions H7 and H8. Question H7 is used to provide information on the nature of the piped water supply used in dwellings across the state. The results of question H8 will indicate the type of sewerage systems used in dwellings. Both of these questions provide useful information for local authorities and planning bodies involved in housing projects.

Question H9. The results of question H9 will provide a detailed picture of the number of cars available to private households in Ireland.

Questions H10 and H11. Questions H10 and H11 establish the level of PC ownership and access to internet services. The results will provide an important gauge of the uptake of information technology around the country and the access to broadband internet connections. The results will allow a comparison to be drawn between PC ownership and internet access levels during the previous Census.