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Ireland Population Census 2002

28 April, 2002
Enumerators Manual
Central Statistics Office

[p.1]

Chapter 1: Census of population

Introduction
The Census is carried out every five years and counts all the households and persons in the country. The census is the largest statistical operation carried out in the State, involving around 4,000 enumerators. The next census will be taken on 28 April, 2002 (hereafter referred to as Census Day). Each enumerator will be assigned an Enumeration Area (hereafter referred to as EA) [Footnote: Enumeration Areas refers to the area covered by one enumerator. It is defined on enumeration maps using a purple boundary] and will be required to deliver a Census form/s to each household in the EA before Census Day and to collect and check each form for completeness commencing Monday 29 April.

The enumerators manual
This manual provides instructions on how to carry out the enumeration of all persons and households in your EA.
Because of the detail involved, you are advised to read it through once to initially familiarise yourself with the structure, timing and main tasks involved in enumeration. Then, as each phase of the enumeration arises, study the relevant chapter in detail before beginning that phase. Your Field Supervisor will train you thoroughly in all aspects of your duties. When you are doing your enumeration you will find it worthwhile to refer to this manual regularly. As your work proceeds, use your manual to ensure you are carrying out the enumeration accurately and effectively. If you are unsure of any procedure, ask your field supervisor before implementing it.

Role of the enumerator
1. As a census enumerator you are personally responsible for the enumeration of all persons in your EA. Each enumerator is responsible for the
- identification of all households
- delivery of the correct forms to all households
- collection of all forms delivered
- checking of all forms collected
- documenting and summarising the enumeration process in their own EA.
2. This enumeration must be carried out in accordance with the instructions in this manual and any other supplementary instructions/field circulars, which may be issued by the Central Statistics Office (CSO).
3. You must not delegate or sub-contract any enumeration task to any other person.
4. You must ensure that:
- All persons who pass the night of Sunday 28 April, 2002 (hereafter referred to as Census Night) within your EA are included in the Census enumeration; and
- All persons who arrive in your EA on the following morning (i.e. Monday 29 April, 2002), not having been enumerated elsewhere, are also included in the enumeration.

Main tasks and timetable for enumerators
[Figure of a calendar is omitted here]

Wednesday 20 March - Friday 22 March: training

  • Introduction to the Census
  • Forms and procedures
  • How form delivery is to be carried out (role play)

Monday 25 March - Tuesday 26 March: route planning/kick off

  • You plan your route with your field supervisor and prepare for the fieldwork.

Wednesday 27 March - Tuesday 23 April (evening):

  • Visual enumeration and distribution of forms

Wednesday 24 April - Thursday 25 April:

  • Training
  • Collection procedures and summarisation

Friday 26 April - Sunday 28 April:

  • Visit communal establishments and tie up loose ends

Sunday 28 April: Census Day

Monday 29 April:

  • Collect forms from communal establishments and transient populations

Tuesday 30 April - Sunday 26 May:

  • Collection
  • Checking of completed forms

Monday 27 May - Thursday 30 May:

  • Tie-up loose ends
  • Summarisation

Friday 31 May:

  • All forms and materials returned to field supervisor

[p.3]

Confidentiality
1. All information obtained by an Enumerator relating to individuals or households in the course of the Census enumeration must be treated as strictly confidential.
2. An Identity Card (ID) attached to a chain is issued to each Enumerator. It must be worn at all times and produced whenever you are introducing yourself to the householder or any other person.
3. On appointment, each Enumerator becomes an Officer of Statistics as defined in the Statistics Act, 1993. The Enumerator is bound by the conditions of this Act. The relevant sections of the Act are 32, 33, 38 and 44.

Statistics Act, 1993
32. All information furnished by a person, undertaking or public authority under this Act shall be used only for statistical compilation and analysis purposes.
33. No information obtained in any way under this Act or the repealed enactments which can be related to an identifiable person or undertaking shall, except with the written consent of that person or undertaking or the personal representative or next-of-kin of a deceased person, be disseminated, shown or communicated to any person or body except as follows:

a) for the purposes of a prosecution for an offence under this Act
b) to officers of statistics in the course of their duties under this Act
c) for the purposes of recording such information solely for the use of the Office in such form and manner as is provided for by a contract in writing made by the Director General which protects its confidentiality to his satisfaction.

38. Any person who uses information furnished under this Act or the repealed enactments in contravention of Section 32 of this Act or willfully discloses information relating to any identifiable person or undertaking in contravention of Section 33 of this Act shall be guilty of an offence.
44. A person guilty of an offence under any provision of this Act shall be liable

a) on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding 1,000 Pounds, or
b) on conviction on indictment, to a fine not exceeding 20,000 Pounds.

You must bear in mind the following in relation to confidentiality:
Information relating to any individual should not be passed on to any other person or body. If necessary, the information may be passed on to another Officer of Statistics.
No attempt must be made to obtain information other than that required by the census.
Remarks, even of a casual nature, regarding your enumeration work in one household must not be made to another household.
Any person guilty of an offence under the Statistics Act, 1993 may be liable to a fine of up to 1,200 Euro on summary conviction or up to 25,000 Euro on conviction on indictment.
Two lockable black cases are provided for the safe storage of all census forms and materials.

  • Completed returns must be kept in these cases at all times except when you have them in the field or are actually working on them
  • Both cases must be kept locked at all times
  • You must ensure that nobody, including members of your own household, has access to census materials
  • Only you, your field supervisor or an official of the CSO is entitled to see the returns
  • You must also ensure that census documents are never left unattended in cars.

Satchels are provided to hold census supplies including forms, maps, completed returns etc. You must carry all the necessary forms and other materials in your satchel during the course of the fieldwork. Satchels should never be used for any other purpose.

[p.4]

Chapter 2: Census definitions
Before embarking on the delivery of forms, you must understand the concepts of a dwelling and a household. The census collects information about people not only as individuals, but also about their living arrangements, so that they can be grouped into households, even if, as sometimes is the case, a household comprises only one person.
Each household has to be assigned a unique number (D no.), issued with a separate census form and the household address needs to be listed separately in your Enumerator Record Book (hereafter referred to as the ERB).

Definitions of households
Dwelling unit
A dwelling unit is living accommodation which is occupied or, if vacant, is intended for occupation, by one or more households.
Examples include: a family home, a family home on a farm, a separate flat or bed-sit, a caravan, a caretaker's accommodation located in an office building, living accommodation over a shop.
All buildings in your EA should be visited for the purposes of the census. All dwellings or places of habitation whether vacant or not should be listed in the ERB. No other structures or units need be listed.

Private household
A private household comprises either one person living alone or a group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address with common housekeeping arrangements - that is, sharing at least one meal a day or sharing a living room or sitting room.

Private household example [with one separate household]
- A person living alone.
Note: If the person is absent on Census Night use procedures for absent households (Form E).

- A single parent living together with his/her children. All present on Census Night.
Note: All household members present on census night should be entered on List 1, page 3 of Household Form.

- A husband and wife (or couple) living together with their children, who all share a living room and usually take at least one meal a day together. All present on Census Night.
Note: All household members present on census night should be entered on List 1, page 3 of Household Form.

- A husband and wife (or couple) living together with their children. The household have an Italian student on an exchange programme staying with them on Census Night. Their daughter is in Trentino staying with the Italian student's family on Census Night.
Note: Only household members actually present on Census Night should be listed on List 1, page 3 of Household Form. The Italian student should also be entered on List 1 as she is present in the household on Census Night. The daughter away in Trentino should be entered on List 2, page 3 of Household Form as she is absent from the household on census night.

- A group of students who are unrelated but all share a living room and usually take at least one meal a day together.
Note: All students are included in one Household Form.

- Four nurses who are unrelated. All share a living room, but only three of the nurses usually take at least one meal a day together.
Note: All the nurses are included on the same Household Form.

[p.5]

[Example of more than one separate private household]

- Six students who are unrelated. The accommodation does not contain a living room. Two of the students usually take at least one meal a day together. The other four eat their meals separately.
[This example is considered as five separate households.] The two students who take one meal together would count as one household. The other four students would count as four separate households.
Note: The two students who take one meal together would count as one household. The other four students would count as four separate households.
Communal Establishments (CEs) - Non-private households
The following are examples of communal establishments or non-private households.
- Hotel
- Boarding house
- Guest house
- Bed and breakfast
- Hostel
- Educational establishment
- Religious community
- Children's home
- Nursing home
- Hospital/nurses' home
- Prison
- Defence establishment (including ships)
- Civilian ships, boats and barges
- Garda station
- Holiday campsite

- Where the entire establishment or institution makes up one single non-private household, a Listing Form/s for that establishment or institution should be filled in by the person in charge (e.g., manager or administrator). An Individual Form should be completed by each person present in the establishment on census night.

- A proprietor, manager, head or any member of staff who resides on the premises with or without his/her family must be regarded as a distinct private household. The household must be assigned a separate D no., receive a separate Household Form and must be listed separately in the ERB.

- Staff of an institution (e.g. hospital) who are working a night-shift on census night and who return to their own homes the following morning should be enumerated at home.

List 1: Who is to be counted as present in a household on Census Night?
- Include every person who spent census night in the household or who arrived the following morning not having been enumerated elsewhere; even visitors who are only staying temporarily in the household.

- Include all persons alive at midnight on Sunday 28 April. Experience indicates that babies and very young children are sometimes omitted by the householder so care should be taken to ensure that all persons, regardless of age, are included.

- Do not include anyone who is temporarily away from home on census night (see list 2, page 3 of Household Form).

- Do not include students who are away from home on the night of Sunday 28 April (see list 2, page 3 of Household Form).

- Do not include babies born after midnight on Sunday 28 April.

Remember, only persons who are actually in the country at mid-night on Sunday 28 April 2002 should be enumerated in the census. Anyone who arrives from outside the country after mid-night should not be counted as being present.

[p.6 ]

List 2 - Who should be counted as absent from a household on Census Night?
Persons usually resident in a private household but who are TEMPORARILY AWAY from home on census night should be entered on list 2 on page 3 of the Household Form by the householder. The householder should also complete the questions relating to absent persons at the back of the form in respect of each person listed as absent.

The following persons or classes of persons should be counted as absent persons:

  • Household members who usually live at the address but are away from home on Census Night [Footnote: However, persons in the country at mid-night on 28 April and who return to the household on the morning of Monday 29 April, who were not enumerated elsewhere, should be entered on list 1 on page 3 of the Household Form as being present on Census Night]
  • Household members who usually live at the address but who are out of the country on Census Night
  • Students who are absent on census night and are living away from home during term time.

Absent persons only applies to private households. Persons absent from communal establishments on Census Night are not covered as absent persons in the census. Persons absent from communal establishments should of course be enumerated wherever they spend census night.

Census geography
An EA is the area assigned to each enumerator for the purpose of census enumeration.

Different types of EAs
For Census purposes EAs are divided into three main types:
- Urban EAs: these are mainly built up areas.
- Rural EAs: these are mainly rural in character.
- Mixed urban/rural: these are for the most part rural EAs which include all or part of a small town or village.

County
For census purposes, the country is divided into 34 counties. These include the four administrative counties that make up the old county Dublin (Dublin County Borough, Fingal, South Dublin and DĂșn Laoghaire-Rathdown), the county boroughs of Cork, Galway, Limerick and Waterford, Tipperary North and South Riding, and the 24 remaining counties. Each county is identified by a unique two digit code (e.g., 01 identifies County Carlow).

Electoral division
The Electoral Division (ED) was previously referred to as District Electoral Division (DED) or as a Ward in the county boroughs. The Electoral Division is the smallest legally defined area in the state and also the smallest area for which detailed census results are published. The boundaries of Electoral Divisions are displayed in RED on maps. Each Electoral Division is uniquely identified within a county using a three digit numeric code (e.g., 009 identifies the ED of Castle B in Limerick County Borough).

Townland
A townland is the smallest territorial division used for census enumeration purposes in rural areas, each townland is identified by a unique 5 digit code. The boundaries of townlands are displayed in BLUE on rural maps. A townland may be split into urban and rural parts. This occurs when an urban area, a town or village, divides a townland into two or more parts. On the form C these are listed separately under the urban and rural parts of the EA/ED and are distinguished by (PT) after the townland name. These parts are identified by the same townland code in all cases.

[p.7]

Street
A street is a group of adjacent buildings (e.g. houses, shops or businesses) having the same location address within a built up area. Each street within a town is uniquely identified by a 5 digit code. In cities and large towns a street may span more than one EA or ED. In such cases the street always uses the same street code.

Cities/towns
For census purposes, towns fall into two types: those with and those without legally defined boundaries.

Towns with legally defined boundaries
These comprise:
- The five county boroughs (Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Waterford and Galway);
- The five municipal boroughs (Clonmel, Drogheda, Kilkenny, Sligo and Wexford);
- The forty-nine urban districts (e.g., Arklow, Athlone); and
- The thirty-two towns under the towns improvement (Ireland) Act, 1854 (e.g., Greystones, Mullingar).

All of the above have legally defined boundaries (marked in green on enumeration maps) which must be strictly observed during the course of the enumeration.

Where built-up areas have extended beyond the legally defined town boundary, the CSO draws up new boundaries defining the suburban areas of county boroughs and the environs of other legal towns for census purposes. This is necessary for the analysis of population clusters.
CSO extensions to legally defined towns are marked in pink on enumeration maps.

Towns without legally defined boundaries, i.e. Census towns
A Census town is defined as a cluster of 50 or more occupied dwellings, not having a legally defined boundary. Census Town boundaries are determined by the CSO for census purposes only. There were 550 Census Towns in 1996. The boundaries of census towns and the environs of legal towns are denoted in pink on the maps.

Geography codes for your EA - Form C
Form C provides you with a summary listing of the names and codes of all streets and/or townlands contained in your EA. In addition, form C contains information on the population and number of households enumerated in each street or townland in the 1996 Census. The area within an EA is also classified as either urban or rural.
On form C, the streets or townlands within an EA are presented in alphabetical order within area type. The following is the order in which the streets or townlands appear for the different types of EAs:

  • Rural EAs: These for the most part consist of one or more complete EDs. Each ED is listed separately by townland in alphabetical order.
  • Urban EAs: All streets or parts of streets are listed in alphabetical order.
  • Mixed EAs: In this case the townlands in the rural areas are listed first followed by the urban areas listed alphabetically by street. In a small number of cases the EA may contain more than one small town or village. Each is listed alphabetically within EA.

[p.8]

Form C summary
You will find a summary of the EDs and the street/townlands within them at the end of form C. This summary should be carried with you and used as a reference to look up the correct geography codes needed to complete Form ID.

[Figure illustrating Form C summary on page 8 is omitted here]

You should note that a separate form C has been supplied to you for each Electoral Division in your EA. Thus, each ED or part of an ED in your EA must have a corresponding form C. If you notice that you are either short a form C or that you have too many forms C, notify your field supervisor immediately. You should not deliver any census forms without first entering the correct County Code, EA Code, ED Code, street/townland Code on the Form ID of each form.

[p.9]

Codes for streets definitely not listed on form C
Some EAs may not contain information on very recent housing developments, or a housing development may be identified on your enumeration map (usually as a pattern of red dots but with the outline of a house missing) without a street name.
At the end of the form C you will find 10 lines which are blank except for the street/townland codes. On these lines you should enter the details of all new streets which are not already listed on form C.
In cases where you encounter a new street which is not named on form C, you should:

  • Write in the name of the new street in the lines available on the last page of form C.
  • Use the relevant code (i.e., beginning with X) when completing the Form ID for all census forms delivered on this new street.

Only assign a new street code when you are certain a street is not listed on form C. Always double check the list with your field supervisor to ensure you have not passed over a street name before assigning one of the X: street codes reserved for new streets.

[A picture of form C is omitted]

In rural EAs that contain more than one ED a separate sheet of blank new street/townland codes is included for each EA/ED combination. In each the new street codes are the same. For processing purposes, it is important that the same new street code is not used more than once. If a situation arises where more than one ED within an EA contains a new street, care must be taken to ensure that a different street code is used to identify each of the streets.

Example:
EA 001 which consists of two EDs 008 and 009, an enumerator has identified that each ED contains a new street. Examination of the list of new street codes provided for each ED shows that the street codes in each begin with X0010. In this case the new street in ED 008 should be allocated X0010 and the new street in ED 009 should be allocated X0011, so as to ensure that street codes are not duplicated.

Streets no longer in use and estates not properly defined on form C
If you find that the list of streets provided is not accurate or complete you should:

  • Cross out streets no longer in use by drawing a line through their name(s) but do not alter the 1996 figures.
  • You may come across a housing estate listed as one entry, for example "Oakfield Estate" which actually consists of named streets and roads such as "Oakfield Drive", "Oakfield Crescent", "Oakfield Grove", etc. You should add each of these individual streets/roads as new streets/roads in form C and enter the relevant census population details for them when summing up your EA. A note to the effect that "Oakfield Estate" now corresponds to Oakfield Drive, Crescent and Grove should be added in red on Form C. Cross out "Oakfield Estate" in red.
[p.10]

Summary of main forms
Forms to be completed by the public:

Household form
The main census form to be completed by private households with up to six persons. Under no circumstances should more than one Household Form be delivered to a household unless it is a replacement for a lost form.

Continuation form
To be used in conjunction with the Household Form where the household has more than 6 persons present or more than 6 absent persons.

Listing form
To be used for Communal Establishments (CEs).
This form should be completed by the manager or person in charge of the establishment on census night. Information is sought about the type of establishment and the people present in the establishment on census night.

Individual form
Individual Forms are completed by persons enumerated in CEs and by a small number of individuals in private households who specifically request a separate form for privacy reasons.

Large print form
This is a large print version of the questions relating to persons present on Census Night provided for visually impaired persons (VIP). Details must be transcribed to a Household or Individual Form (for person in a CE). In private households you will need to go through the questions regarding the accommodation with the VIP and complete the Household Form for them.

Forms for completion by the enumerator:

Enumerator Record Book - ERB
The ERB is used by the enumerator to keep a record of the enumeration process from delivery to collection. This is a very important document. Don't lose it. Each ERB has space for 200 household entries so most EAs will require the use of two ERBs.

Form C
Form C lists the streets/townlands for each ED in your EA. You should consult Form C for the:
  • County/county borough code - 2 digit
  • EA code - 3 digit
  • ED codes - 3 digit
  • Street/townland codes - 5 digit

for your EA.
You should use form C as the source for these codes when completing the Form ID on all census forms. Use your form C to record the results of the summarisation of your EA and to note the cause of any major changes in the number of persons or households since the 1996 Census.

Cen 1
When you have called 4 times to deliver a Household Form and failed to make contact with the householder, it is permissible to deliver the Household Form without making contact. Cen 1 is a cover note used to accompany the Household Form in such situations.

Rem 1
A reminder used if you fail to make contact with the householder on your third visit to collect the completed census forms.

Rem 2
A second reminder used if Rem 1 has failed to elicit a completed census form from the householder, one week has elapsed and you fail to make contact with the household.
[p.11]
Rem 3
A third and final demand used if Rem 2 has failed to elicit a completed census form, 4 days have elapsed and you fail to make contact with the householder.

Ref 1
A form completed by the field supervisor where a household has refused to complete a census form despite intervention by the field supervisor. This is a last resort and will only be issued by the field supervisor with the approval of the Regional Supervisor.

Form E
A form used to initiate tracking of complete households who were absent from your EA on census night. The form ensures that the household was in fact enumerated where they spent census night.

Form H
A form completed by the field supervisor where a householder posts their census return directly to the regional office for confidentiality reasons. The completed census form/s are retained by the field supervisor, Form H provides you with the information you need to complete your EA summary.

Enumeration summary form - form B
Form B is used by the enumerator to summarize the number of households and persons enumerated in each Street/Townland within each Electoral Division (ED) in her EA.

Form LS
This form provides a final count of the number of boxes of forms, the number of forms within each box and the total number of households for the EA.

Examine all these forms thoroughly and become fully familiar with their purpose and contents.

Envelopes and labels
You are provided with:
- Census envelopes marked with the census logo which are large enough to fit the census forms without folding;
- Self adhesive labels addressed to your Regional Office (Freepost address).
- Census envelopes are mainly used in Communal Establishments to contain the completed Individual Forms. Census envelopes are also used on the rare occasion when an individual within a household requests an Individual Form for privacy reasons.

Regional Office address labels are used:

  • in exceptional circumstances where a householder or a resident in a Communal Establishment indicates that they do not want the Enumerator to see their completed census return and the Form H procedure is used;
  • to address envelopes used to accompany forms Rem 2 and Rem 3 where the householder may opt to post back the completed form.

[p.12]

Chapter 3: Preparation for visual enumeration/form delivery
The purpose of visual enumeration/form delivery is to identify every household and Communal Establishment within your EA and to deliver census forms to them.
Visual enumeration/form delivery, although one process, is carried out in two phases which are summarised below.

Visual enumeration/form delivery - Phase 1
- Familiarise yourself with your EA boundary defined on your map(s).
- Study the map(s) and identify possible dwellings.
- Identify the Electoral Divisions and streets/townlands within your EA.
- Study Form C and familiarise yourself with the codes to be used for completing the Form ID on census forms.
- Agree the best route for covering your EA with your field supervisor.
- Get to know your Enumerator Record Book (ERB) and the census forms.
- Visit every building and other places of possible habitation in your EA.
- Decide which buildings are dwellings. If in doubt make an entry in your ERB.
- For every dwelling/household in your EA, assign a D no., make an entry in your ERB, mark its position on the map with a red dot if it is not already marked and write the D No on the map beside the appropriate red dot.
- Where contact is made with the householder, deliver the appropriate census form/s.
- Regularly report back to your field supervisor on progress and completion of Phase 1.

Visual enumeration/form delivery - Phase 2
- Revisit any dwellings where you were unable to make contact with the householder in Phase 1.
- If you make contact, follow the Phase 1 delivery procedures.
- If you do not make contact, visit the dwelling again on another day and time.
- If you do not make contact on the fourth visit to a household, complete form Cen 1 and deliver it with a Household Form.

Study the EA map
It is essential that you organise yourself properly to carry out your visual enumeration and form delivery. Lay out the required forms and the maps on a large table. Study the relevant instructions, forms and maps carefully and ensure that you fully understand the job you are required to do. Begin by studying the EA maps thoroughly and familiarise yourself with the boundary colour coding scheme used on census maps.

Each enumerator is supplied with one or more maps covering his/her area according to the following scales:
- In rural areas, 1:10,000. In some rural areas which are very sparsely populated, maps on a larger scale of 1:15,000 are supplied.
- In urban areas other than Boroughs, 1:2,500.
- In boroughs, 1:1,000, 1:1,750 and 1:2,500.
- In some urban areas slightly different scales such as 1:1,750.
Where an EA covers a rural area and town environs (or suburbs) the enumerator will be given maps of the appropriate scale for each area. The following colour coding is used to distinguish boundaries and other features on enumeration maps:

[p.13]

Boundary/feature - Color
EA boundary - Purple
ED boundary - Red
Legally defined town boundary - Green
Census town boundary - Pink
Suburbs/environs of legally defined town boundary - Pink
Townland boundary - Blue
Relevant part of EA but included on another map - Purple cross hatched
Buildings - Red dot
Roads in rural areas - Yellow

Colour priorities on maps
Boundaries on enumerator maps are of two types:
(a) those drawn by hand in the CSO; these relate to EA boundary, purple and black hatching
(b) those automatically printed on maps; these include legal town, urban district, municipal and county borough boundaries, ED (electoral division), EA (in urban areas), environs of legal towns or boundaries of census towns, townlands, dwellings and major roads (in rural areas).

Boundaries drawn in CSO
In all EAs the EA (purple) boundary is outlined in marker on every map sheet. In situations where this boundary coincides with an ED (red) boundary, the purple boundary is always drawn outside the ED (red) boundary. The same applies to urban areas.

Boundaries printed on maps
In situations where one or more of the above boundaries coincide on maps, the following rules are used to decide which colour is plotted:
(1) Boundaries of legal towns, urban districts and municipal or county boroughs (green lines) have priority over all other boundaries and are always printed e.g. if a legal town boundary (green) and an ED boundary (red) coincide the green will only appear on the map.
(2) Second in order of priority are ED boundaries (red). These have priority over environs (pink), EA (purple), and townland (blue). If any of these coincide the ED (red) will only appear on the map.
(3) Third in priority are the environs of legal towns or the boundaries of census towns (pink). These have priority over EA (purple) and townland (blue). If any of these coincide only the environs (pink) will appear on the map.
(4) If an EA (purple) and townland (blue) coincide then only the EA (purple) will appear on the map.

Other colours appearing on enumerator maps
Buildings are identified on maps using a red dot, while roads in rural areas are marked in yellow. Black hatching on maps is used to identify areas that while on a map relating to a particular EA are not part of the EA. Purple hatching identifies parts of EAs that while they are part of the EA are provided on a different map.

[p.14]

The first step is to identify your EA
EAs are self-contained geographical areas which do not overlap. You should thoroughly familiarise yourself with the boundaries of your EA (including ED, street/townland, etc.) using the form C and maps provided. If you identify any apparent contradiction between the map and the form C you should immediately alert your field supervisor. Similarly, if you have any queries about the boundary of your EA you should discuss them with your field supervisor.

When you are familiar with the precise location of all significant boundary points in your EA, you must:

  • Discuss and decide on the precise location of boundaries with the enumerators in neighbouring EAs
  • Inform and agree with your field supervisor the decisions taken on the location of boundaries.
Route planning
You must visit every building and other place of possible habitation in your EA. To ensure that no dwelling is missed, you must plan your route in advance using the map(s) supplied.

Urban route planning:

  • Divide the EA into "blocks" of adjoining streets
  • Each distinct block should be completed before starting on the next block
  • An example of urban route planning is given in "Census 2002 enumerators manual example sets" which accompanies this manual (the order of the D numbers indicates the route).

Rural route planning:

  • Take an identifiable land-mark (e.g. an important road or junction) in your EA as a starting point
  • Divide the EA roughly into segments
  • Each distinct segment should be completed before starting the next.
  • An example of rural route planning is given in "Census 2002 enumerators manual example sets" which accompanies this manual

Your field supervisor will provide you with the necessary training in route planning.

By carefully planning your route before you set out on your visual enumeration/form delivery, your time in the field will be kept to a minimum. For your own convenience, ensure insofar as possible to keep traveling to a minimum.

[p.15]

Preparation of enumerator record book/s
The front cover of the ERB should be filled in the presence of your field supervisor. In addition, the County Code and EA Code should be entered on the top of each page of your ERB as you go.

[Figure illustrating the front cover of ERB is omitted here.]

[p.16]

Visual enumeration and form delivery - item checklist
Each time you go to carry out the visual enumeration/form delivery you should bring the following items with you in the satchel provided:

  • ID card
  • Enumerator Record Book with instruction summary divider
  • Clipboard
  • Satchel
  • Black biro (and spare) for making entries in the ERB and completing the Form ID on census forms
  • Red pen (and spare) provided for marking the map(s)
  • Map(s) covering your EA
  • Form C summary for your EA
  • Colour information leaflet
  • Household Forms
  • Individual Forms
  • Continuation Forms
  • Listing Forms for Communal Establishments
  • Form Cen 1
  • Multilingual cue-card
  • A copy of the Albanian, French, Polish, Romanian and Russian census form translations
  • Form E
  • Census envelopes
  • Regional Office address labels
  • Notebook
  • This Enumerators Manual

Obviously you will not be able to carry forms and envelopes for the whole of your EA. Each time you go out delivering take enough for the number of households you are likely to visit. Use this checklist each time you go out on visual enumeration and form delivery.

[p.17]

Chapter 4: Visual enumeration and form delivery

Health and safety
Your first line of support is your field supervisor. Keep in regular contact, discuss progress and potential problems.

On the doorstep:

  • There is no need to go into anyone's home.
  • Adopt a non-threatening stance.
  • If a householder becomes aggressive or you feel threatened, walk away from the situation, make a note in your ERB and report the incident to your field supervisor.

Practical hints:

  • Make sure that someone knows where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and clothes. Don't carry a handbag unless absolutely necessary.
  • If you think someone is following you, cross the street, keep moving and head for the nearest place where there will be other people, such as a shop or pub.
  • If someone grabs your satchel, let it go rather than risk injury.
  • Where possible, face on-coming traffic.
  • If you use a car, try to park it in a well-lit, preferably busy area and remember to lock it. Do not leave forms unattended in your car.

Beware of dogs:

  • When approaching a property, look for signs on gates or fences that indicate dogs may be present; try rattling the gate to see if a dog appears.
  • Remember, it is a dog's instinct to defend its territory; try to behave in such a way that the dog does not see you as a threat.

Dealing with the public
You may encounter people who need help with their census forms for a variety of reasons. Some may find the forms difficult to understand, may have literacy problems, or may not have English or Irish as their first language. The following points may help you bridge the communication gap.

Be courteous at all times:

  • Be polite and patient.
  • Listen to what people are saying and be prepared to adapt your approach to suit the circumstances.
  • Show consideration to householders by not calling after 9:30 p.m.
  • If a householder objects to you calling, ask when it would be suitable to call back and make a note in your ERB.
Irish language forms
Every person is entitled to receive an Irish language version of the form should they so wish. There are Irish language versions of all the census forms and reminders. Make sure you always have a sufficient supply of Irish forms available. If a householder requests an Irish language version of the form, write "Irish forms" in the notes section in your ERB to remind you to issue Irish language versions of reminder forms Rem 1/2/3 should the need arise.

[p.18 ]

Foreign language translations
Translations in Albanian, French, Russian, Polish and Romanian of the text of the Household Form, including the household and personal questions, are provided. A multilingual cue card is also provided in the same languages which you can use to introduce yourself where language difficulties arise.
Confidentiality should be stressed as asylum seekers may be reluctant to provide the information requested in Questions 5-9.
If someone only speaks a language other than English or Irish that you don't understand:

  • Show them your multilingual cue-card. If the householder understands one of the five minority languages, offer them a copy of the translation form in the appropriate language along with a copy of the Household Form. They must complete the English version of the form. The translation is provided only to assist the householder to complete the English version of the form
  • Try to seek help from another member of the household
  • If this fails then deliver an English form, make a note in your ERB and notify your field supervisor.
Be mindful of religious customs
Be aware of peoples' religious customs. Be prepared and offer to call back at a more suitable time. Make a record in your ERB.

  • Muslims may be at worship on Friday evening.
  • The Jewish Sabbath is the 24 hour period from sunset Friday to sunset Saturday with worship on Saturday morning.
Visually impaired persons
Access to the census for visually impaired persons (VIP) was a big issue in 1996 where no specific provision was made.
There are about 7,000 visually impaired persons in Ireland, most of whom can read large print format, with a small number of persons who can only read Braille and a small number who are totally blind who use audio tape.
In all cases where the VIP lives alone the enumerator will have to provide assistance with completion of the Census form. Large print, Braille, and audio tapes are available as aids to give the person some degree of independence in making their census return. In the majority of cases the VIP will be happy for the enumerator to go through the form and complete it for them but would like an accessible version of the form so that they can prepare their replies in advance.
A 16 page large print form has been printed, a single copy of which will be made available to each enumerator. Additional copies are available from you Field Supervisor.
A small number of Braille forms and audio tapes have been produced and will be posted out directly on request to the householder by CSO (phone 01 4984256).
The large print form allows the person to write the answers to the personal questions in respect of themselves. Where a person requesting a large print form lives alone, the enumerator will have to go through the household questions with the VIP as these are not catered for on the large print form. In all cases the enumerator will have to transcribe the answers provided to a standard Household Form.
In cases where large print, Braille or audio tapes are requested and the visually impaired person opts to provide their response on computer printout or diskette, this should be accepted and the response transcribed to a standard Household Form.
It is important that all enumerators carry a large print version of the form and are aware of the availability of Braille and audio tape forms from CSO should they be needed.

[p.19 ]

Your route through your Enumeration Area
You should follow your route in the order as planned out and discussed with your field supervisor.

The Enumerator Record Book (ERB):

Each page of the ERB is carbonised. You will be sending the bottom copy to your field supervisor as you complete sections of the delivery phase to keep her abreast of your progress. Use the summary instruction card as a divider to ensure that writing does not carry through to the following pages.

County Code: 2 digit numeric code assigned by CSO for each county. See form C.

[A figure of Form C is omitted here.]

EA Code: 3 digit numeric code assigned by CSO for your EA. See Form C.

D No.: This is a unique number assigned to each household in your EA. The numbering sequence should commence with "1". The D No. should increment by 1 for each household entered in the ERB. Most EAs will require two ERBs. The numbering sequence should carry through to your second ERB. Thus if your first ERB ends with D No. 200, your second ERB should begin with 201.
DUPLICATE D numbers ARE NOT ALLOWED. If, by mistake you use a duplicate D No., you should correct the error by using the next unused number in the sequence for the duplicate number. Thus, for example, the erroneous sequence
1, 2, ..., 100, 101, 101, 102, ..., 192
should be replaced by
1, 2, ..., 100, 101, 193, 102, ..., 192.
Make a note of the reason for the break in sequence in the notes. Don't forget to correct the D No. on the Census form after you collect it if the error was discovered after delivery.

Name of householder:

This is the person responsible for making the return. It should normally be the householder but can be any adult in the household.

Address:

The full address for every household. Confirm with the householder that it is correct.
Where contact is not made and you find it difficult to give the address of the dwelling, you should give an indication of the building's location. Examples may include something similar to the following: "... at the rear of 27 Main Street"; or "... in a laneway off High Street". A dwelling without a name situated in a rural area may not have a specific address; the Townland name can be used as the address in these cases.

Flats: The address of the building in which the flat is located should be given along with the number of the flat, if any.
Two or more families living at the same address (i.e. house or flat) should be treated as one household living in that dwelling unit if at least one of the following applies:
  • they have common housekeeping arrangements
[p. 20]
  • They share their meals
  • They share a common living or sitting room.
This is a multi-family household. One D No. only should be used for this dwelling unit.
Separate families NOT sharing housekeeping arrangements, etc. in a house and living at the same address should be treated as separate households. Each of these households should be entered separately in your ERB, given their own D No. and a note made about the household arrangements. This situation is likely to occur where a conventional house has been converted into two or more flats.

Dwelling status:

Indicate whether the dwelling will be occupied or if the household will be temporarily absent on census night.

Vacant status:

Indicate why a dwelling is vacant.

Record of calls:

Record the date of each attempt at delivering/collecting a form by drawing an X through or a circle around the date on the calendar. By varying the times at which you call on subsequent visits you may be more likely to find someone at home.

[An illustration of a record of calls is omitted here.]

Cen 1:

Record if you have called 4 times to the household and have had to deliver a census form accompanied by a Form Cen 1 without meeting and explaining the census to the householder.

Form E:

Record if you have completed Form E in respect of the absence of a complete household and have forwarded it to your field supervisor to verify that the household was in fact enumerated elsewhere in Ireland.

Form H:

Record if a household opted to send their completed forms directly to the regional office for confidentiality reasons. You should ensure you receive a Form H from your field supervisor in respect of forms received. You should record the number of forms retained by your field supervisor for No. of Forms collected.
Note: This procedure should only be followed in exceptional circumstances.

Rem 1:

Record if you have delivered form Rem 1 on your third attempt to collect the completed form(s).

Rem 2:

Record if you have delivered form Rem 2 on your fourth attempt to collect the completed form(s).

Rem 3:

Record if you have delivered form Rem 3 on your fifth attempt to collect the completed form(s).

Forms issued:

Record the number of each type of form delivered to the household/communal establishment.
[p.21]

Completed forms collected:

Record the number of completed forms of each type collected from each household/communal establishment. This should tally with the number of forms issued. If forms issued and collected don't tally recover the missing forms and record the reason why all forms delivered to the household were not completed in "Notes".

Notes:

The notes area should be used to record:
  • An identifiable feature of the dwelling that may assist you in finding it when you return to collect completed forms.
  • If the householder states that they are usually in only at certain times;
  • Anything out of the ordinary e.g. a threat from a householder;
  • Reasons why forms issued and completed forms collected do not tally;
  • Anything which assists you in your enumeration.

Return complete and passed doorstep check:

This is used to record that the number of forms collected is correct and that all forms collected passed the doorstep check described in Chapter 5.

[p.22]

Marking ERB entries on your map
The maps must be annotated in the field as the Visual Enumeration proceeds using the RED pen provided.

On the map(s) of your EA you must:

  • Mark the location of all dwellings not already on the map with a RED Dot (roughly the same size as those already on the map).
  • Verify the location of new buildings which the CSO may have marked in pencil on your map. Verified new buildings should be marked in RED on the map.
  • Write the D No. of all households/dwellings or places of habitation in RED. In the case of a Street or block of flats it is sufficient to write the range of D No's and outline the Street or block on the map.

[A map is omitted here]

The following additional features must be annotated in RED; they should clearly show:

  • The location of known extensive building development not shown on your map; these should be marked in RED.
  • Temporary habitations such as caravans, travelers' encampments, etc. must also be marked in RED.
  • When you encounter a dwelling unit shown on the maps which has become dilapidated and cannot be used any longer for human habitation, mark it with "D" in BLACK.
  • When you encounter a temporary dwelling marked on the map in a previous Census which is no longer there mark an "X" through it in BLACK.

Please study the maps in the example sets which accompany this manual for examples of marking up the map/s for your EA.

[p.23]

Should I make an entry in the ERB for this building?
Visit every building in your EA. Some buildings are not easily visible. To ensure that no dwelling or possible place of human habitation has been overlooked you must traverse every length of public thoroughfare in your EA. You must see all buildings for yourself. Do not take anyone else's word that there is no dwelling in a secluded area or in an area which is difficult to reach.

Examples of buildings which require extra vigilance include:

  • Flats over shops
  • Houses in alleyways or down narrow lanes
  • Caravans or mobile homes in back gardens
  • Outhouses converted into living accommodation
  • Isolated houses not visible from the roadway, etc
  • Multi-storey car parks with apartments on top.
Dwellings or buildings with living accommodation
If the building is a dwelling or has living accommodation attached you should automatically assign a D No. and make an entry in your ERB even if there appears to be no one living there.
When you make an entry in your ERB, ensure that you write the D No. assigned in red on your map.

Structures which should be assigned a D No. and listed in your ERB
Permanent

  • Dwelling houses
  • Watch out for:
  • Separate living accommodation attached (e.g., granny pads)
  • More than one bell indicating multi occupancy.
  • Blocks of flats/apartments
  • Hotels/hostels
  • Watch out for:
  • Separate living accommodation in grounds for staff.
  • Hospitals
  • Watch out for:
  • Separate blocks attached to the main hospital where patients may be staying.
  • Separate living accommodation for nurses or religious orders.
  • Nurses and staff on night duty should be enumerated at home.
  • Military barracks
  • Watch out for:
  • Married quarters separate from the main barracks which should be treated as separate private households.
  • Religious establishments
  • Prisons/places of detention
  • Watch out for:
  • Officers on night duty should be enumerated at home.
  • Schools
  • Watch out for:
  • Where there is boarding accommodation a listing is required.
  • Separate accommodation for religious orders.
  • Staff with separate living accommodation. These should be treated as separate private household/s, each having a unique D No.
  • Garda stations
  • Watch out for:
  • Living accommodation attached (treat as separate private household) or persons detained overnight (treat as communal establishment).
  • Garda on night duty should be enumerated at home.

Non-permanent

  • Caravans/mobile homes
  • Traveler encampments
  • Camper vans/cruisers
  • See Delivery situation 5.
  • Ships and houseboats and river cruisers
  • Watch out for:
  • Should be listed only if they are being used as living accommodation at the time of the census.
  • Lorries
  • Watch out for:
  • Lorries with sleeping accommodation parked in lay-bys or at the port should be listed if occupied on census night

[p.24]

Non-dwellings and buildings without living accommodation
In the case of all non-dwellings, you must satisfy yourself beyond all reasonable doubt that there will be no one spending census night at the address (Night security men should be enumerated at home unless they are normally resident at the premises) before deciding not to make an entry in your ERB. Ask someone in responsibility to confirm that no one will be present on census night. If in doubt make an entry in your ERB and revisit the building as soon as possible after census day to check whether the building was occupied on census night.

If you make an entry in your ERB, ensure that you have marked the D No. assigned in red on your map.

Every premises which is being used or could be used for human habitation must be assigned a D No., recorded in your ERB and marked on the map.

Structures which need NOT necessarily be listed in your ERB UNLESS there will be persons present on Census night who will not be enumerated at home.

Shops/restaurants*
Pubs*
Theatres
Cinemas
Garages
Filling stations
Club-houses
Factories/warehouses
Barns
Hay-shed
Green-houses
Outhouses
Milking parlours
Stables
Domestic outhouses/garden sheds
Domestic garages unless converted to separate living accommodation
Telephone kiosks
Bus shelters
Rain shelters
Public toilets
ESB sub-station
Television masts
Water towers
Sport stadia
Spectator stands
Dressing rooms
Street traders' stalls
Ancient monuments
Religious grottoes
Religious shrines
Churches
Very badly run-down buildings with some walls and roofs missing unless under construction

*Watch for living accommodation attached.

If in doubt about whether to list a building or not, you should consult with your field supervisor.

[p.25]

Basic form delivery routine
The following routine for form delivery is straight forward and will apply in most cases.
Always be aware that there could be more than one household at any address; use the household definition to identify separate households. There should be a separate entry in the ERB and D No. for each household.

Remember the household definition:

  • One person living alone, or
  • A group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address with common housekeeping arrangements -- that is, sharing a living room/sitting room or at least one meal a day.

1. Having assigned a D No. and marked it on the map, show your ID card and introduce yourself.

2. Say that you are the census enumerator and have come to deliver forms for the census on Sunday 28 April and that you need to ask a few simple questions to determine what forms to leave.

3. Ask who lives at the address. Use the household definition to establish how many households there are.

4. Ask for the name of the householder or person who will take responsibility for completing the form. Write the name and address in your ERB and record the date of delivery.

5. Transcribe the house number and street or townland from ERB on to the front of the Household Form.

6. COMPLETE THE FORM ID. Check that the ED and street/townland codes agree with the map and the codes on form C.

7. If there are more than 6 persons in the household, issue a Continuation Form/s and copy the Form ID from the Household Form onto each Continuation Form/s.

8. Complete form information on each form issued e.g.
- "1" of "1" (where one form was issued)
- "1" of "2" on the Household Form and "2" of "2" on the Continuation Form (where 2 forms were issued)
-"1" of "3", "2" of "3", "3" of "3" (where 3 forms were issued)

9. Record the number of each form type issued in your ERB.
[Footnote: A household should never be given more than one Household Form. Where two or more Household Forms were delivered in error, call back to the household and exchange for Continuation forms. If the error is only discovered at the collection stage, details for persons 7+ should be transcribed onto Continuation Form/s. The erroneous Household Form/s should be return with spoiled forms]

10. Hand over the form(s) and tell the householder to:

  • Complete the form/s on Sunday 28 April
  • List all persons who pass the night of Sunday 28 April in the household on List 1, page 3 of the Household Form
  • Answer the appropriate questions for each person on List 1 in the main body of the form and explain that a separate set of questions spanning 3 pages exists for each person present
  • List any persons who are usually resident in the household but who are absent on the night of Sunday 28 April on List 2 on page 3 and answer the questions at the back of the form in respect of these persons.

11. Tell the householder that you will call back to collect the completed form/s shortly after census day.

12. Ask the householder what would be the best time to collect the form.

11. Ask if anyone else lives there or if there is any other living accommodation attached.

[p.26]

The following is an example of an ERB entry following the delivery of a Household Form where forms were delivered on the fourth delivery call on 23 April accompanied by a form Cen 1 because contact could not be made with the householder.

[Illustration of the example mentioned above is omitted here.]

Golden Rule: Never deliver any census form without first completing the Form ID and writing the D No. on the map. If you do not correctly complete the Form ID, the form cannot be identified or classified geographically and will be treated as an uncollected form for payment purposes.

Form completion and census processing issues
For the first time ever the census forms will be scanned into the computer rather than keyed in, as has been done in previous censuses. This has important implications for the way the forms are handled in the field and the way they are returned to CSO. Because the forms will be processed in batches of 15-20 forms together rather than one by one (as when they were keyed in previous years) enumerators and field supervisors must pay particular care to certain instructions which did not apply to previous census.
When completed forms are received in CSO they will be unpacked separated into batches of around twenty census forms, ensuring that all forms for a particular household are kept together in the same batch. The spine of each form will be guillotined off the batch to separate the pages.

[p.27]

Each batch will be fed into a scanner to create an image of every page of every form. A computer system will read each batch of images and recognise each individual character and category ticked on the form. Characters and ticks which are unclear will be passed to CSO staff to decide what is the correct character or category ticked.
In order to ensure that the forms can be processed rapidly, the following general instructions should be strictly adhered to.

Instruction:

The form ID should only be completed in black biro. Do NOT use pencils or red biro anywhere on the form.

Possible problems:

  • If pencils are used poor character recognition will result. If light pencil is used first then gone over in biro and the pencil rubbed out, the computer will be unable to read the characters because of carbon left by the eraser.
  • Red ink will not be visible to the scanner.

Instruction:

Write clearly within the boxes. Characters should be NEAT and of a similar size to the pre-filled 1 on the front of the Household Form.

Possible problems:

If characters are not clearly written or overlap with the character in the adjoining box, poor recognition will result.

Instruction:

Make corrections by clearly crossing out the incorrect character and writing the correction in the white space above. Avoid corrections by being careful.

Possible problems:

  • If tippex is used it could damage the scanner and a correction written over tippex will not be recognised by the scanner.
  • If the correction is written over the existing character the CSO operator will have difficulty deciding which the correct character is.

Instruction:

Where a question does not apply because of age or a skip instruction, the question should be left blank. Under no circumstances should people write in NA (Not applicable) or draw an X or other marks through sections of the form that don't apply. It is vitally important that this is pointed out to the householder when delivering the form.

Possible problems:

  • Text such as NA or crosses through a question could be mistaken as responses by the scanner.
  • CSO operators will have to waste time looking at extraneous marks and confirming to the system that they are not valid responses.

Instruction:

  • Do not attach anything to the form.
  • Remove anything attached or inserted into the form by householders.

Possible problems:

Pins, staples, etc. will damage the guillotines and scanners used in processing the forms. Post-it notes will jam in the scanner. Loose pages inserted inside the form could damage the scanners.

Instruction:

  • Under no circumstance should any form be placed inside another.
  • Forms for household or communal establishments should be ordered correctly and kept together with the elastic bands provided.

Possible problems:

The computer system expects all pages for a particular form to be in sequence and multiple forms for a household to be in sequence. If forms are placed inside one another, the pages and forms will be out of sequence when guillotined and fed into the scanner.

[p.28]

How to adapt the basic delivery routine to particular situations
Above is the basic delivery routine which applies in most cases. You will come across situations, however where the procedure to follow is somewhat different.
The following is a list of situations and how you should adapt the basic delivery in specific circumstances.

Section - Situation
1 - No contact at a dwelling
2 - Absent households, Form E
3 - Households with more than 6 persons present or absent
4 - Communal establishments
5 - Caravans and other mobile or temporary structures
6 - Confidential returns
7 - Multiple households at an address
8 - Visitors
9 - Refusals
10 - Vacant accommodation
11 - Derelict dwellings
12 - Public enquiries at the doorstep
Situation 1: No contact at a dwelling
Previous experience has shown that where Enumerators deliver a census form in person and clearly explain when and how to complete the census form, the quality of the census return will be best. Inevitably, however, there may be one or two households where you will be unable to make contact when delivering the form.

No contact on first call (phase 1)
If you are unable to make contact with the householder at your first call:

  • Assign a D No., make an entry in your ERB and enter the D No. on your map.
  • Record the date that you called in your ERB ([circle] or [cross] the date).
  • Visit again during Phase two.
No contact on second/third call (phase 2)
  • If you are unable to make contact at your second/third call:
  • Record in your ERB the date that you called.
  • Try to establish how many households/persons live at the address and when they are likely to be at home. Make a note in your ERB.
  • Call again when you expect they might be at home.
No contact on fourth call (Phase 2)
If you are unable to make contact at your fourth call:

  • Record in your ERB the date that you called.
  • If you suspect that the dwelling contains more than 1 household you should discuss the matter with your field supervisor, who will recommend what action you should take.
  • If you are confident that the dwelling contains only one household complete Form Cen1 and deliver it with a Household Form (remember to complete the Form ID).
  • Place the completed Form Cen 1 and the Household Form in a blank envelope and drop it through the letterbox.
  • [Check] Cen 1 in your ERB.
[p.29]
  • If you have found out that there are more than 6 persons in the household you should also include a Continuation Form with ID completed.
Situation 2: Absent households, Form E
You may come across some households where the ENTIRE household will be away on census night, what we term an "Absent household". Form E also applies to one person absent households.

In these circumstances:

  • Assign a D No. and write the name of householder and address in your ERB.
  • Check temporarily absent in your ERB.
  • Ask the householder the address where the household will spend census night.
  • Tell the householder that they should be enumerated where they spend census night and that your field supervisor will be in contact with the enumerator covering the area in which they will be spending the night of 28 April to ensure that they are counted.
  • Ask the householder the names of the persons who usually reside in the household.
  • Complete form E.
  • Check E in your ERB.
  • Give the completed form E to your field supervisor to initiate form E tracking.

[An illustration of Form E is omitted here.]

Individuals absent from a household

Persons should be enumerated at the address at which they spent census night.
Where one or more members of the household who are normally resident at the address are away on census night, they should be included in the section on absent members at the back of the form. In particular students who are living away from home during term time, who are not present on Census Night, should be included at the back of the form.
In the case of a one person household where the sole resident (entire household) is absent on census night, the form E procedure outlined above will apply.

Individuals absent from a communal establishment

Persons normally resident in a communal establishment but who are not there on census night should be enumerated wherever they spend census night. They should not be enumerated as persons absent from the establishment. Absent persons only applies to private households.
[p.30]

Situation 3: Households with more than 6 persons present or absent
7-12 persons in the household (or 7-12 persons absent on Census Night):

  • You will be issuing a Household Form and one Continuation Form.
  • Mark in your ERB that you have issued 1 Household Form and 1 Continuation Form.
  • Remember that you have issued additional forms when completing "Form" on the Household Form. The Household Form should be marked Form "1" of "2" and the Continuation Form should be marked Form "2" of "2".

[An illustration of Continuation Form is omitted here.]

  • Explain to the householder the procedure for completing the Continuation Form. Stress that the relationship requested on the Continuation Form relates to Person 1 on the Household Form.
  • Follow the rest of the delivery routine.
  • Under no circumstances deliver 2 Household Forms. If you do not have a Continuation Form with you, call back later.

13-18 persons present in/absent from the household:

The number of private households with more than 12 persons will be very small. It will be necessary to issue a Household Form and two or more Continuation Forms in such cases. As the Continuation Form is printed to deal with persons 7-12 it will be necessary to amend the person numbers on the second and subsequent Continuation Forms issued to households using a black biro, striking out person 7 and writing "13", person 8 by "14" etc. as appropriate throughout the form. Remember to mark the Household Form "1" of "3", the first Continuation Form "2" of "3" and the second Continuation Form "3" of "3" etc. as appropriate.
[p.31 ]

Situation 4: Communal establishments
Hospitals, residential homes, boarding schools, prisons, religious establishments and other managed residential accommodation where specific groups of people, such as patients, inmates and students live communally are called Communal Establishments (CEs).

Your field supervisor will have contacted the managers of the larger CEs in your EA in advance and will inform you of this contact. Enumeration of smaller CEs is normally carried out by a manager or person in charge. You are responsible for contacting this person and issuing the appropriate forms and envelopes. It is important, therefore, that you have read and understood the completion instructions for the Listing Form and the Individual Form, so you can advise the manager. The manager completes a Listing Form and all persons present on census night complete an Individual Form.
A proprietor, manager, head or any member of staff who resides on the premises with his/her family which satisfies the definition of a Private Household should be regarded as a distinct private household and must receive a separate Household Form.
Boarding houses with less than five boarders on census night should be treated as a private household. This household should include the manager and his/her family. [Footnote: A boarding house is an establishment run for profit, which provides board (full or partial) and lodging for permanent or semi-permanent residents e.g. persons working away from home or university students during term time. Guest houses / BBs on the other hand cater for transient persons].
Boarding houses with five boarders or more on census night should be treated as communal establishments:
Staff in a communal establishment e.g. nurses who are working a night shift or on night duty on census night, and who return to their own homes the following morning should be enumerated at home.

The procedures to follow are:

Small communal establishments - small hotels and guesthouses - with less than 20 persons

  • Contact the manager or person in charge on or before Tuesday 23 April.
  • Introduce yourself and explain that you have come to deliver the census forms.
  • Go through the Listing Form and the Individual Form with the manager to be sure that he/she knows what is required.
  • Ask the manager or person in charge to complete the Listing Form.
  • Complete the name and address of the establishment and the Form ID on each Individual Form before handing it over to the manager. Leave the, Form" blank when completing the Form ID as this only applies to Individual Forms in private households. Leave the "Person Number" blank as it should only be completed after collection.
  • Leave enough Individual Forms with accompanying blank envelopes for everyone who will be present on census night. Allow a few extra forms to cover unexpected arrivals on census night. Don't forget to complete the Form ID on each Individual Form.
  • If the manager or person in charge refuses to distribute and collect the forms, offer to do so yourself (See below the procedure for CEs with more than 20 persons present on census night).
  • Update the ERB by recording the name of the manager or person in charge and the number of Listing Forms and Individual Forms issued.
  • The manager and his/her family should be treated as a separate private household.
[p.32]

Large communal establishments - hotels, hospitals, prisons - with 20 persons or more

Ask your field supervisor to make contact with the administrator or manager to explain the timing and procedures used to enumerate the establishment. Form delivery should take place on Friday 26 April - two days before the census or earlier where an EA has a number of large communal establishments.
  • Arrange a suitable time to meet the manager in order to explain the procedure you will be following to enumerate the establishment.
  • If a manager offers to provide a computer generated listing of people staying at the establishment on census night, this can be used in assisting you to write the names of persons on the Listing Form/s.
  • Assume the role of the manager and follow the enumeration procedure as instructed on the Listing Form. Where an individual is likely to have difficulties completing a form, ask the manager to provide help or to arrange for the form to be completed on the person's behalf.
  • Leave the Listing Form and some additional Individual Forms with accompanying blank envelopes with the manager. Don't forget to complete the Form ID on each Individual Form.
  • Ask the manager to ensure that anyone not listed on the Listing Form who arrives later and spends census night in the CE is entered on the Listing Form and completes an Individual Form.
  • Update the ERB by recording the name of the manager or person in charge and the number of Listing Forms and Individual Forms issued.
  • Arrange with the manager for you to collect the forms on the day after the census (Monday 29 April).
In the unlikely event that a person in the establishment is unwilling to return the Individual Form to you when you come to collect it, give the person an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached in which to return their Individual Form. Write "Form H" on the back of the envelope. You should not record this as "collected" on the Listing Form; write "Form H" beside the person and include the person in the number of Male/Females on the front of the Listing Form. Note: You should also [check] H on your ERB and make sure you receive a Form H from your field supervisor in respect of this form. This practice is a last resort and should be discouraged.

A private residence in the grounds of a communal establishment
Examples of this are a doctor's house, caretaker's cottage or porter's lodge. Treat as a separate private household, assign a D No., make a separate entry in your ERB and apply the usual delivery routine.
Situation 5: Caravans and other mobile or temporary structures
All caravans and mobile homes should be listed separately in your ERB except where:

1. A single caravan/mobile home is parked in the grounds of a private house and is NOT occupied by a separate household.
2. There is one or more unoccupied caravans in a caravan park. These should be assigned only one D No. in your ERB with a note of the total number of caravans unoccupied. [Check] "Holiday home" if the caravans are vacant holiday homes.
3. One or more unoccupied caravans are being displayed for sale or hire. These should be assigned only one D No. in your ERB. Write in the total number of caravans unoccupied and "For Sale" / "For Hire" in notes.
4. Two or more caravans/mobile homes are occupied by a single household. One listing only should be made in your ERB in this case.
[p.33 ]

The following procedures apply to:
- Caravans
- Mobile homes
- Houseboats
- Ships in port
- Converted railway carriages
- Other mobile or temporary structures.

Caravans on a site:

Speak to the manager of the site to determine which caravans will be occupied on census night. Visit each caravan.
Treat each occupied caravan as a separate dwelling unless two caravans are occupied by the one family. List each in your ERB and mark it on your map. When completing the address use the D No. as the Caravan number if no caravan numbers are assigned on the site.
Follow the delivery routine for each occupied caravan.

Caravans not on a caravan site (including unofficial halting sites)

List in your ERB and mark on your map. When completing the address use "Caravan at ...".
Mark a [star] in the Notes section to remind you that form/s must be collected early on the Monday morning after the census.
Follow the delivery routine.

Temporary or mobile structures

List in your ERB all temporary or mobile structures such as houseboats or converted railway carriages which are inhabited or look like they may be inhabited and mark them on your map. When completing the address use "Houseboat at ...", or an appropriate introduction to the address.
Mark a [star] in the notes section to remind you that form/s must be collected early on the Monday morning after the census.
Follow the delivery routine.

Situation 6: Confidential returns

Households seeking to make confidential returns

  • If you encounter a householder whom you know or who knows you and who therefore does not want you to see their completed form, you should explain that all information collected is confidential and is protected by the Statistics Act, 1993. If this does not reassure the householder
  • Give the householder an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached and ask him/her to return the forms in the post. Write "Form H" on the back of the envelope
  • Write "Confidential request" on your ERB
  • [Check] H in your ERB
  • Ensure you receive a form H from your field supervisor confirming that the householder has in fact posted back the forms
  • Follow the rest of the delivery routine.

Try to keep the number of such confidential returns to an absolute minimum.

[p.34 ]

Request from an individual member for confidentiality

If a member of a household has objections to other members of the household seeing his/her information:
  • Give the person an Individual Form (remember to complete Form ID) and a blank envelope to enclose the form after completion.
  • Record on your ERB that an Individual Form(s) was issued.
  • Ask the person to enclose his/her completed Individual Form in the envelope and return it with the Household Form.
  • If the person is not happy with this arrangement:
  • provide an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached and ask him/her to return the form by post (write "Form H" on the back of the envelope).
  • [Check] H in your ERB.
  • Write "Confidential request" on your ERB and make sure you receive a Form H from your field supervisor to confirm that the person has posted back the form.
  • Ask the householder to ensure that the person(s) requesting the Individual Form is entered on List 1, page 3 of the Household Form.
  • Remember that you have issued additional forms when completing Form ID. The Household Form should be marked Form "1" of "2" and the Individual Form should be marked Form "2" of "2".
  • Follow the rest of the delivery routine.

Try to keep the number of such confidential returns to an absolute minimum.

Situation 7: Multiple households at an address

It is important that you identify all the households at each address and deliver a separate Household Form to each. It is part of the delivery routine to establish the number of households at each address.
Signs such as several doorbells or dustbins will often indicate a shared entrance and multiple households.
Examples of the type of address where you may find more than one household include:
  • Tenements
  • A large old house which has been converted into flats or bed-sits
  • An address which includes accommodation occupied by a lodger or live-in relative who does not share a living room or meals with the remainder of the household.
Although grouping people into households is important it is not as important as ensuring everyone is included on a form. Bear this in mind if you are struggling to group people at an address into households.
Often the first person you talk to will be able to tell you how many other households live there.
  • Make sure you have assigned a separate D No. in the ERB for each household.
  • Mark the range of D numbers on your map in RED.
  • Ensure that each household can be separately identified in your ERB, with a flat number or a letter if it has one.
  • Otherwise note the location (e.g. 1st floor front). This is to help you identify the correct household when you return to collect the form.
  • Carry out the delivery routine.
Situation 8: Visitors
We want to enumerate everyone where they spend census night.

Visitors staying with a household on Census Night

Visitors staying with a household should be included on the Household Form irrespective of whether they are residents of the Republic of Ireland or not.
[p.35 ]

Visiting households on Census Night

Visiting households staying in holiday accommodation or in someone else"s home while the usual residents are away on census night should complete a Household Form irrespective of whether they are residents of the Republic of Ireland or not.
Visiting households may move on soon after the census, so for these households:
  • Mark a check in the Notes section to remind you that forms must be collected soon after the census.
  • Remember an enumerator in another area may have initiated Form E tracking for this visiting household so it is important to collect the completed forms ASAP after the census.
Situation 9: Refusals
We look to you to gain the public's confidence and encourage their participation.
If someone refuses to accept a form, be courteous and explain that:

  • The information is vital for planning the needs of their local area and is the only source of
  • Information such as that on the number of people over 65 or under 5 in their area
  • The form should only take a few minutes to complete and that although it is a 24 page form that most households will only have to complete less than half the form as it covers up to six persons
  • Most of the questions just require a tick
  • All information is confidential and is used for statistical purposes only
  • The census is compulsory and that the householder is obliged by law to ensure that the form is completed and may be fined up to 25,000 Euro for refusing to do so.

Do not cause any antagonism. Suggest the householder looks through the form.

If the householder still refuses:

  • Assign a D No. and make an entry in your ERB.
  • Record the date of the call.
  • Summarise your interaction with the householder under Notes and record the time of your call.
  • Notify your field supervisor of the refusal. She will in turn call on the householder to encourage participation.

Situation 10: Vacant accommodation
You may come across some vacant accommodation in your EA.
Types of vacant accommodation can include:

  • New accommodation, ready for occupation but not yet occupied.
  • Accommodation in the course of conversion, improvement, renovation or decoration and not occupied at the time of the census.
  • Existing accommodation clearly without furniture or which you have been reliably informed is not occupied; for example awaiting new occupants.
  • Holiday homes vacant at the time of the census.

If you come across this type of accommodation:

  • Assign a D No., mark it on the map and make an entry in your ERB.
  • Record the date you called.
  • [Check] the appropriate vacant status.
  • Try to confirm that the dwelling is in fact vacant when you call to the next building on your route.
  • Call again shortly after the census to reconfirm that the dwelling is vacant. Remember to write the date of this confirmation call in your ERB.
[p.36 ]

Situation 11: Derelict dwellings
Treat a dwelling as derelict if there are no indications that the building is being converted or renovated and:

  • The roof is partly or completely missing.
  • The floors or staircases are missing.
  • The entrance doors are missing.

These types of buildings may be unsafe and you should not go inside.

Accommodation which has doors or windows bricked or boarded up is not necessarily derelict as this may be a precaution against vandalism or squatters. If you have satisfied yourself that the building is not inhabited then [check] "Uninhabitable" in the ERB and write the D No. on the map in RED.

Situation 12: Public enquiries at the doorstep
Familiarity with this manual and the census forms will help you answer most questions you are likely to get from the public. If you cannot answer a question, refer the householder to the Census Helpline FreeFone 1800 28 04 02. Below are the answers to some of the more usual questions which may be put to you.

Question - Your response
Householder wants to know who should be listed as Person 1 under persons present.

It should generally be the householder but it can be any adult member of the household.

Householder wants to know why we need their name/address.

The address on the front of the form is necessary for the enumerator to ensure that she delivers and collects a form from every household in the area assigned to her.
The names on the form are necessary to ensure that everyone in the household is counted and to assist the householder in ensuring that the correct personal information for each individual is recorded. The names are also required for coding household composition and identifying family units within the household.
Names are not entered on any computer database.

Householder wants to know if CSO gives the name and addresses to anybody or the householder is concerned about confidentiality.

All information collected in the census will be treated as strictly confidential by the CSO and will be used only for statistical purposes. The names of individuals will not be entered onto any computer database. No other Government Department or Agency will have access to identifiable information relating to individuals or households.
The confidentiality of all information collected by the CSO from individuals, households or businesses is guaranteed by law. It operates as a "one way street" in the sense that identifiable data comes in but does not leave the Office.
The need for confidentiality is stressed in the training of CSO staff and field staff. The penalty for any breaches by staff can be as high as 25,000. All staff are made fully aware of their legal obligations in this respect. The CSO is justifiably proud of its unblemished record in protecting the confidentiality of data.

Householder wants to know what we do with the information gathered or Householder wants to know why he should co-operate or Householder wants to know why the census is being held.

The Census takes place every five years and counts all the people and households in the country. It will give a comprehensive picture of the social and living conditions of our people at the start of the 21st century. Only a census can provide such complete detail.
Ireland has been conducting Censuses of Population since 1841. This enables us to track developments over a long period with considerable accuracy. The census is therefore a fundamental part of our national heritage and collective knowledge.
At national level current population statistics are essential for planning the provision of health care, education, employment, etc. Regional figures are critical for determining regional policy and for the operation of regional authorities (e.g. Health Boards). The greatest strength of the census is the provision of detailed population figures at local level. These help to identify likely demand for schools and hospitals, areas of relatively high unemployment, the best location for new shops, etc.
The census is also the only means of accurately measuring the exact extent of migration.

Householder wants to know if the Census is compulsory; (or) householder wants to know what happens if he/she does not respond will he/she be fined?

There is a legal requirement on the public to participate in the census. The relevant legislation is the Statistics (Census of Population) Order, 2001 made under the Statistics Act, 1993. Any person who fails or refuses to provide the information requested on the census form or who knowingly provides false information may be subject to a fine of up to 25,000.
It is vital that the census is a complete count of all the people and households in the country and that no one is left out. If each enumerator were to miss one household, the census would be short 12,000 persons, equivalent to a town the size of Celbridge.

Has any householder ever been prosecuted or fined?

The co-operation of the public in Irish censuses has always been excellent. The success of the census is completely dependent on this traditional high level of public co-operation. The CSO is fully confident that the public will participate equally co-operatively on this occasion.

Householder wishes to know how or when he/she will be summoned.

This is a matter entirely for the Chief State Solicitors Office.

Householder asks why the form is so long; (or) householder asks why there are so many questions on the form.

The Household Form covers households with up to 6 persons. Most households will not have to complete the entire form.
Persons who are aged under 15 only have to answer questions 1-18.
Retired persons do not need to answer questions 29-31.
Students do not need to answer questions 26-31.
Those at work do not need to answer questions 33-35.

Householder wants to know when the results of the Census will be available.

The first results, which is a count of the number of males, females and households by area (by County down to the level of Electoral Division), will be available in July 2002.
The target date for processing all the forms is the end of December 2002. Over 30 million pages have to be scanned and the information on them captured. Final results will start to become available from April 2003. All results of the census should be published by the end of 2003.

Householder claims to have provided the same information to a CSO QNHS interviewer.

The Quarterly National Household Survey is an ongoing sample survey geared primarily to providing employment and unemployment statistics. The census is a complete count of all the persons and households in the country that takes place once every five years.
Although some of the questions are similar to those in the QNHS, the census has a wider range of questions of a more general nature. It is vital that all households are covered.
Thank the person for their co-operation in both the QNHS and the Census.

Can the householder reply by e-mail/internet?

No, because of the scale of the census and the importance of confidentiality it is not possible to respond on this occasion by e-mail or the internet.

Householder asks were there any advertisements for the census?

Yes -- There is a nation-wide publicity campaign using TV, local and national radio and the press.

Householder wants to know where they can get more information on the Census.

There is more detailed information on the CSO web site www.cso.ie

Household asks "Once I have completed and returned the census form will I be contacted again?"

No

[p.39]

Information about the QNHS and other CSO household surveys

What is the Quarterly National Household Survey?

As well as the Census which takes place every five years, the CSO also conducts many other surveys to keep the country's social and economic statistics up to date.
The Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS) is the largest of these surveys. It measures quarterly trends in the population, employment, unemployment and a range of other social topics.
Most Census Enumerators will meet some households who have taken part in the QNHS. About 10% of households have taken part in the survey at some stage in the past four years. The survey includes 3,000 households every week. About 6,000 households will be taking part in the QNHS for the first time in the weeks immediately before and after Census Day, 28th April.

Main features of the Quarterly National Household Survey

  • As the main source of short-term statistics on population and labour force trends, the QNHS complements the more detailed picture given every five years by the Census. The main features of the Quarterly National Household Survey are as follows:
  • Every week, 3,000 households throughout Ireland are asked to take part.
  • Households take part in the survey for five consecutive quarters. In each quarter, one fifth of - the households in the survey are being interviewed for the first time.
  • Almost 150 CSO staff work on collecting the survey data.
  • Information is collected on laptop computers.
  • The survey has included a range of social topics, with special reports prepared on: Housing and Households; Crime and Victimisation; Recycling and Energy Conservation; Travel to Work; and Home Computing.
  • As in all the CSO's surveys, the CSO guarantees the confidentiality of the details it collects in accordance with the Statistics Act 1993.

Why are some households asked to take part in both the QNHS and the Census?

Although many of the questions asked are very similar, the Census and the QNHS have a very different purpose. The Census is the detailed "snapshot" of our society, taken every five years. It provides the benchmark figures on Ireland's changing population and is the definitive source of statistics on local-areas.
The QNHS provides faster and more frequent statistics, but only broken down into eight regions. Results are available every quarter. The survey gives more detailed classifications of employment and unemployment. It also includes a greater variety of questions on social topics.
Both kinds of statistics are needed in order to measure changing economic and social trends -- detailed long-term statistics from the Census and quarterly short-term statistics from the QNHS.

Other CSO household surveys

The Household Budget Survey (HBS) takes place every five years, with the most recent survey conducted in 1999/2000. About 8,000 households took part, answering questions on their income and spending. These results are used in constructing the Consumer Price Index, which measures inflation.
Many rural households also co-operate regularly with the CSO's agricultural surveys. The most recent Census of Agriculture took place in June 2000 and results are planned to be published in February 2002. There are also regular surveys of farms, most notably in June and December each year. These surveys ask about crops, livestock, farm machinery, labour input, and other aspects of agriculture.

[p. 40 ]

Chapter 5: Collection
Collection will begin on Monday 29 April, the day after the census and must be completed by Sunday 26 May. You must collect a completed census form from all households who spent census night in your EA. The census is compulsory. Even one missed household per EA could mean an under count of 12,000 persons - equivalent to the population of a town like Mullingar.

Collection on the first day, Monday 29 April will concentrate on:

  • Caravans and other mobile or temporary structures (including traveler halting sites)
  • Ships in port, lorries, etc.
  • Communal establishments
  • Visiting households which you suspect may move on soon after the census in that order of priority.

Preparation at home
Thorough preparation will help to ensure that your collection will go smoothly. Before you set out, you should plan your route. The best route will most likely be that used to deliver the forms. You need to visit every address where forms have been delivered and those marked as vacant during form delivery. Familiarise yourself with the content of the census forms because often people will need assistance in completing them.

Form collection - item checklist
Each time you go to collect forms you should bring the following items with you in the satchel provided:

  • Your ID card
  • Enumerator Record Book with instruction summary divider
  • Clipboard
  • Satchel
  • Black biro (and spare) provided for making entries in the ERB and completing the Form ID on census forms
  • Red pen (and spare) provided for marking the map(s)
  • Map(s) covering your EA
  • Copy of form C summary for your EA
  • Spare copies of Colour Information leaflet
  • Spare copies of Household forms
  • Spare copies of Individual forms
  • Spare copies of Continuation forms
  • Spare copies of Listing Forms for communal establishments
  • Copies of Form Rem 1
  • Copies of Form Rem 2
  • Copies of Form Rem 3
  • Multilingual cue-card
  • A copy of the Albanian, French, Polish, Romanian and Russian census form translations
  • Copies of form E
  • Census envelopes
  • Regional office address labels
  • Notebook
  • This enumerator's manual.
[p.41 ]

Basic collection routine for households
Begin the collection of forms in your EA by visiting each dwelling or household listed in your ERB. In the unlikely event that you notice that a dwelling was missed during delivery or that a caravan, etc. has arrived since you delivered forms, deliver forms immediately, make an entry in your ERB, follow the delivery procedure and arrange to call back in a couple of days for the forms.
You should visit the first dwelling entered in your ERB and proceed to each dwelling, one after the other, as listed in order of your ERB or in keeping with collection times arranged during delivery.
The following collection procedure applies to the collection of all forms:

  • If you make contact show your ID card and introduce yourself.
  • Explain that you are calling to collect the census form/s.
  • Ask the householder how many persons spent the night of Sunday 28 April in the household = "Persons present". If there were no persons present in the household on Census night, initiate form E procedure.
  • Ask the householder if anyone who is usually resident in the household was temporarily away on the night of Sunday 28 April = "Absent persons"
  • When the householder returns the form(s) to you, you MUST carry out the following checks:
  • Check that the householder returns all the forms which you delivered.
  • Check that the householder has completed the household questions on Page 2.
  • Check that no person has been double counted on the form. Check in particular that any absent persons are not also listed as present.
  • Cross check that "Persons present" agrees with both the number of persons listed on List 1 on page 3 of the Household form and the number of persons present for which questions were answered on the Household Form (pages 4-21) and Continuation Form(s) (pages 2-19). If they do not tally you should check with the householder and ask him/her to carry out any necessary amendments. Amendments can be made by any adult member of the household.
  • Cross check that "Absent persons" agrees with both the number of persons listed on List 2 on page 3 of the Household form and the number of absent persons for whom questions were answered on the Household Form (pages 22-23). If they do not tally you should check with the householder and ask him/her to carry out any necessary amendments. Amendments can be made by any adult member of the household. Note you can NOT have a Household Form with absent persons but no persons present. This is an absent household so initiate Form E procedure.
  • If any Individual Forms were collected, check that the person has not been double counted on the Household Form or any Continuation Forms and complete person number on the ID of the Individual Form. The person number assigned to the Individual Form should be the number of the person on List 1 on page 3 of the Household Form or the next available blank person number on the household or continuation form/s.
  • Having completed the above checks, scan all the remaining questions looking for instances where questions which should have been answered have been left blank. You should request the householder to carry out the necessary amendments to questions left blank or correct any inconsistencies you see.
  • Check that the householder has signed the declaration on the back page of the Household Form and any Continuation Form(s).
  • Note in your ERB the number of form(s) collected and the date of collection.
  • Confirm that you have completed the doorstep check on the forms collected [check] "Return complete and passed doorstep check [checkbox]" in your ERB.
  • Thank the householder for completing the form(s) and for their participation in the census.

Please note that the best possible check of the accuracy and completeness of the information provided is that carried out by YOU, the enumerator on the doorstep. Under no circumstances should the enumerator amend any information provided on a form once they have left the doorstep.

[p.42]

How to adapt your collection routine in particular situations

Situation 1: If the householder tells you the form is not ready

  • Record the date of your collection call.
  • Try to have the form/s completed there and then. If this cannot be done, arrange a time to collect the form (record this in your ERB).
  • If on your third visit to collect the form it is still not ready, inform the householder that the census is confidential and compulsory and that he/she may be liable to a fine of up to 25,000 Euro if he/she refuses to complete it. Offer to assist the householder to complete the form there and then. If he/she does not take up this offer, you should tell him/her that you will be reporting the situation to your field supervisor who will no doubt be in contact.

Situation 2: If the householder has lost the form(s)

  • Complete the Form ID information on replacement form/s.
  • Give him/her the replacement form/s to complete.
  • Write "Original forms mislaid, replacements provided" in your ERB.
  • Wait until the householder completes the form. If that is inconvenient for the householder, make an appointment to return in order to collect the completed form.
  • If the householder finds the original copy before you make your subsequent visit to the household, ensure both copies of the household forms are returned to you. The uncompleted copy should be included with any other spoiled forms to be returned by you to CSO.

Situation 3: If the householder asks for your assistance

You may be asked to help with a particular question or to help complete the form. You may also encounter language difficulties - offer to provide a translation of the form in French, Albanian, Russian, Romanian or Polish. Be prepared to offer assistance if necessary.

Situation 4: If the householder refuses to complete the form

Try not to antagonise the householder. Tell the householder that:
  • The information is vital for planning the needs of their local area and is the only source of information such as that on the number of people over 65 or under 5 in their area
  • The form should only take a few minutes to complete and that although it is a 24 page form, most households will only have to complete less than half the form as it covers up to six persons
  • Most questions just require a tick to answer them
  • It is vital that the information is complete and that they are included
  • All information collected is confidential and is used for statistical purposes only
  • You can assist them to complete the form.
If this approach fails, informs the householder that:
  • The census is compulsory
  • Under the Statistics Act 1993 they may be fined up to 25,000 Euro for refusing to complete the form
  • They can post the form back if they are concerned about confidentiality. Offer to give him/her an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached in which to return the form. Write "Form H" on the back of the envelope. See next page Situation 5 on confidential returns.
Offer to assist the householder to complete the form there and then. If they do not take up this offer you should tell the householder that you will be reporting the situation to your field supervisor who will no doubt be in contact.
Make a full record of what transpired including any reasons which the householder gives for not wanting to complete the form. Inform your field supervisor who will advise you on how to proceed.
[p.43 ]

Situation 5: The householder does not want you to see the completed form - form H procedure

If you encounter a householder who is uncomfortable about giving you their completed return because they know you, explain that all information collected is confidential and is protected by the Statistics Act, 1993. If this does not reassure the householder:
  • Give the householder an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached
  • Write "Form H" on the back of the envelope. Ask the householder to return the form Freepost to the Regional Office. Make sure that the Form ID is accurate and complete
  • Write "Confidential Request" on your ERB
  • [Check] H in your ERB
  • Make sure you receive Form H from your field supervisor confirming that the householder has in fact returned the form by post to the Regional Office.
By patient explanation and persuasion you should aim to keep the number of such cases to a minimum. Remember form H gives rise to additional work for yourself and your field and regional supervisors.

Situation 6: The entire household was away on census night

You may come across some households where the ENTIRE household was unexpectedly away on census night:
  • [Check] "Temporarily absent" in your ERB
  • Ask the householder the address where the household spent census night
  • Ask the householder the names of the persons who usually reside in the household
  • Tell the householder that they should have been enumerated where they spent census night
  • Ask the householder if they know whether they were included on the census form at the address where they spent census night. Tell the householder that your field supervisor will be in contact with the enumerator covering the area in which they spent the night of 28 April to ensure that they were counted
  • Complete Form E
  • [Check] E in the ERB
  • Give the completed Form E to your field supervisor to initiate form E tracking
  • Ask the householder to return their incomplete Household Form(s) or Continuation Form(s) (These should be included with any other spoiled forms returned by you to CSO)
  • Amend the number of forms issued to 0 in your ERB
  • Make a note "Absent household" in your ERB
  • If your field supervisor discovers the household was not in fact enumerated at the address where they claim to have spent census night, you should return to the household. Tell them that you have confirmed that they were not enumerated at the address where they spent census night and that you need the householder to complete a census form for those usually resident at the address.

Situation 7: If you do not make contact on your first/second collection call

  • Record the date of the collection call in your ERB and call again (try to vary the time you call next time).

Situation 8: If you do not make contact on your third collection call:

  • Record the date of the call in your ERB.
  • Write in the Ref, household address, date, name of the householder and your phone number on a copy of Form REM 1 and sign it. Deliver the completed Form REM 1.

[Box: Ref is always entered as County Code/ EA Code/D NO. e.g. Ref 20/026/9]

  • [Check] Rem 1 on your ERB.
  • Call again in about a week (try to vary the time you call next time) unless you have received a call from the householder in the meantime, in which case you should arrange to collect the form.
[p.44 ]

Situation 9: If you do not make contact on your fourth collection call

  • Record the date of the call in your ERB.
  • Write in the Ref, household address, date, name of the householder and your phone number on a copy of Form REM 2 and sign it. Deliver the completed Form REM 2 to the household along with an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached (write "Rem 2" on the back) and another copy of the census form/s (remember to complete the Form ID).
  • [Check] Rem 2 on your ERB
  • Wait for 4 days. If you still have not heard from the householder and your field supervisor has not informed you that a completed return has been received in the post you should call again.

Situation 10: If you do not make contact on your fifth collection call

  • Record the date and time of the call in your ERB.
  • Write in the Ref, Regional Office address and phone number, household address, date, name of the householder, your phone number on a copy of form Rem 3 and sign it. Deliver the completed Form REM 3 to the household along with an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached (write "Rem 3" on the back) and another copy of the census form/s (remember to complete the Form ID).
  • [Check] Rem 3 on your ERB

That is the basic collection routine which applies in most cases. The following is the procedure to be used for collection from communal establishments and for confirming that accommodation marked as vacant during delivery was in fact vacant on census night.

Form collection - communal establishments
Collection from communal establishments will take place early on Monday 29 April.

Small communal establishments - with less than 20 persons

  • Make contact with the manager/administrator to collect all completed census forms.
  • Ask the manager/administrator for permission to view the register for Sunday night 28 April.
  • Check that every person on the register is named on the Listing Form.
  • If someone listed on the register is missing, ask the manager to confirm if the person spent census night in the establishment. Enter any persons on the register confirmed as being missed on the Listing Form and ask them to complete an Individual Form.
  • If someone listed on the Listing Form is missing from the register for 28 April, ask the manager to clarify the situation. If the manager confirms that the person did not spend census night in the establishment, strike through the person's name on the Listing Form. If the person has completed an Individual Form, write "Completed in error" across the Individual Form and include with any other spoiled forms to be returned by you to CSO. Amend the number of Individual Forms issued and collected on page 4 of the Listing Form.
  • If an Individual Form for a person listed on the Listing Form is missing or was not returned, ask the manager to account for the missing form. If the person involved has refused to return the completed form, as a last resort ask them if they are willing to return the form by post. Give the person an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached (write "Form H" on the back). Ask the person to post back the form and mark "Confidential request" on your ERB. [Check] H and make sure you receive a form H from your field supervisor confirming that the person/s has returned the form/s. If the person declines the offer to post back their Individual Form, use the same approach as for household refusals.
  • Check that you have an Individual Form for each person who passed the night in the establishment and was not enumerated at home. NB staff working night shift who return home the following morning should be enumerated at home.
  • Check that the manager has completed Question E1.
[p.45 ]
  • Check that the manager has completed the declaration at the back of the form.
  • Record the number of Listing Forms and Individual Forms collected on your ERB.
  • You should sign the declaration on the back page of the Listing Form.
  • You should complete the Form ID "Person number" on each individual form by reference to the name list on the listing form. Ensure that no two persons bear the same "Person number"

If the manager refuses to co-operate when you go back to collect:
Inform the manager that:

  • It is his responsibility to ensure that the establishment is enumerated
  • The census is compulsory
  • Under the Statistics Act 1993, he may be fined up to 25,000 Euro for refusing to co-operate.

Offer to assist the manager to complete the enumeration of the establishment. If the manager does not take up this offer you should tell him that you will be reporting the situation to your field supervisor who will no doubt be in contact.
Make a full record of what transpired, including any reasons which the manager gives for not co-operating and notify your field supervisor immediately of the situation.

Large communal establishments - with 20 persons or more

  • Enumeration is carried out by the enumerator.
  • Make contact with the manager/administrator.
  • Ask the manager/administrator for permission to view the register for Sunday night 28 April.
  • Check that the manager has completed Question E1 on the Listing Form.
  • Check that every person on the register is named on the Listing Form.
  • If someone listed on the register is missing, ask the manager to confirm if the person spent census night in the establishment. Enter any persons confirmed as being missed on the Listing Form and ask them to complete an Individual Form.
  • If someone listed on the Listing Form is missing from the register for the 28 April, ask the manager to clarify the situation. If the person did not spend census night in the establishment, strike through the person's name on the Listing Form.
  • If an Individual Form for a person listed on the Listing Form is missing or was not returned, ask the manager to account for the missing form. If the person involved has refused to return the completed form, as a last resort ask them if they are willing to return the form by post. Give the person an envelope with a Regional Office address label attached (write "Form H" on the back). Ask the person to post back the form. [Check] H and write "Confidential request" on your ERB. You should make sure you receive a Form H from your field supervisor confirming that the person(s) has returned the form(s). If the person declines the offer to post back their Individual Form use the same approach as for household refusals.
  • Check that the manager has completed the declaration at the back of the form.
  • Record the number of Listing Forms and Individual Forms collected on your ERB.
  • You should sign the declaration on the back page of the Listing Form/s.
[p.46]

When you are sure that you have a completed form for everyone who passed census night in the establishment, you should:

  • Complete the Form ID person number on each Individual Form by reference to the name listed on the Listing Form/s (you should have completed the rest of the ID before you handed out the Individual Forms); make sure that no two persons in the CE are assigned the same person number. Persons listed on a second Listing Form should be assigned Person Number 61, 62 and so on
  • Complete the number of Individual forms issued and collected on page 4 of each Listing Form
  • Complete the "Listing Form" on page 1 of each of the listing forms. Note that the total number of Males, Females and Persons is only entered on form 1 e.g. as this establishment has 75 residents two listing forms are required.

[Text in the box: Only complete the number of males, females and total on Listing Form 1 of N. This should be the total number of males, females and Persons in the establishment. When completing Person Number on the Individual Forms they will be assigned numbers 1-75.]

Confirmation of accommodation marked as vacant during delivery
You should revisit any dwellings marked in your ERB as vacant during the visual enumeration. One revisit will suffice.

  • If the dwelling was vacant on census night, record the date you call and write "Confirmed vacant on census night" in your ERB.
  • If the situation has changed and the accommodation was occupied on Census night, follow the doorstep routine for delivery. Ask the householder to complete the form while you wait or, if this is not possible, arrange to collect the form in a few days. Remember to amend the vacant status (black out box ticked) and forms issued in your ERB.

[p.47]

Problems with forms discovered after collection
This should not happen if you have carried out your doorstep check thoroughly.

Incomplete or defective forms

If after completing the collection of Household Forms you find a form is incomplete e.g.
  • a person named on page 3 of a form has not completed any of the questions in the main body of the form
  • Questions have been missed
  • The questions at the back of the form have be left blank for a person listed as absent on List 2, page 3
  • A Continuation Form is missing
you must re-visit that household. Inquiries must not be made by phone.

Soiled and torn forms or forms completed in red biro

If you find a soiled, torn or badly written form or a form completed in red ink you must carefully copy the contents of this form to a blank form, clearly marking "Copy" on the front beside Donal Garvey's signature and replacing the original with the copy you have made. All original forms which have been replaced should be bundled together separately and clearly labeled "Spoiled forms".

[p.48]

Chapter 6: Sorting and summarizing collected forms

Ordering of completed census forms
During the collection phase you should summarise and order the forms in D No. by "Form" (1 of 2 then 2 of 2) order as you go along. This will avoid a rush at the end and will also alert you early if there are any problems. The best time to do this is either when you come in from collecting or by sorting out the forms collected the previous day before you go out each day.
After summarising the forms for each household or communal establishment as instructed below, you should sort your summarised forms in to separate stacks for each Street/Townland within ED5. Within each separate Street/Townland stack, the forms should be sorted in ascending D No and Form (in a two form household the Household Form should come first, then the Continuation Form, etc.). All forms for a multi-form household/communal establishment should be kept together using one of the elastic bands provided. Within the elastic band the order should be Household form -- Continuation Form/s or Listing Form/s -- Individual Forms. Under no circumstance should forms be placed inside one another.

Summarising each household (D No.)
Check that you are not missing any forms for that household.
If some Individual Forms are missing because of "Privacy requests" which may be in the post, you will have to wait until you receive a Form H for each outstanding Individual Form from your field supervisor before summarising the household. The forms for such households should be stacked separately until all outstanding forms are received. Only at this stage can the household details be summarised. All the forms for that household can then be held together with an elastic band and inserted in the correct position in your stack of summarised forms.
If more than one Household Form has been used in error for a household with more than 6 persons, the details from the second Household Form should be carefully transcribed onto a blank Continuation Form. Clearly mark Copied from Household Form on the front beside Donal Garvey's signature. The spoilt Household Form should be returned with any other "Spoiled Forms".

Number of persons present
Count the number of males present 6 for which any questions have been completed on each form for the household (males_p) and write under "Males" on form 1. Count the number of females present6 for which any questions have been completed on each form for the household (females_p) and write under "Females" on the ID of form 1.
Count the number of persons present from List 1 on page 3 of the Household form or the total number of Individual forms in the case of communal establishments (persons_p).
Before writing persons_p under "Total" check that males_p + females_p = persons_p. If this is not the case, something is clearly wrong and you need to cross check List 1 on page 3 against the inside of the form. You may have to return to the household if a person has been missed. This is why the door step check is so important
If males_p + females_p = persons_p write persons_p under "Total"

[p.49]

Absent persons
Count the number of absent persons if any (persons_a) for which any questions have been completed at the back of the Household and Continuation forms. Before writing persons_a under "Absent persons", cross check against the number of absent persons on List 2 on page 3 of the Household Form. If the two counts of absent persons do not agree, something is clearly wrong and you need to cross check List 2 on page 3 against the absent persons declared at the back of the form/s. You may have to return to the household if a person has been missed, etc. If the cross check on the number of absent persons is OK then write persons_a under "ABSENT persons" on the ID.
If there were no absent persons i.e persons_a=0 then write 0 under "ABSENT persons".
In the example below two forms were delivered and collected. Counting across the two forms, questions were answered in respect of 4 Males, 5 Females (pages 4-21 of household form and 2-19 of continuation form) and 9 persons were listed on List 1 on page 3 which agrees with Males + Females. No questions were answered in respect of absent persons and no absent persons were listed on List 2 of page 3 of the Household form.

[Image not reported here]

After summarising forms for a household (D No.) you should put all forms for the household/D No. in form order (1 of 2 should be on top, then 2 of 2). An elastic band should be placed around the forms for multiform households to keep them together. The form/s should be placed in the correct position in your stack of summarised forms which will be sorted in order of D No. (hereafter referred to as your D stack).

[p.50]

Summarising each communal establishment (D No.)

  • Check that you are not missing any listing forms.
  • If some Individual Forms are missing because of "Privacy requests" which may be in the post, you will have to wait until you receive a Form H for each outstanding Individual Form from your field supervisor before summarising the CE. All forms for the CE should be stacked separately until all Individual Forms are accounted for, at which stage the CE can be summarised. Sort the Individual Forms in order of "Person number".
  • Count the number of males on the Individual Forms and write under "Males" on Listing Form 1.
  • Count the number of females on the Individual Forms and write under "Females" on Listing Form 1.
  • Count the number of Individual Forms and write under "Total" on Listing Form 1.
  • Check that when you add "Males" + "Females" the number of persons agrees with the Total number of Individual Forms you have counted.
  • After summarising the CE you should place the Listing Forms in order and place them on top of the Individual Forms which are in order. All forms for the CE should be kept together with an elastic band.
  • Note that you should only enter the number of persons on Form 1 where more than one Listing Form was used.
Summarizing returns for your EA
A soon as you have completed the collection of forms you should begin your summarization; this should be Monday 27 May at the very latest. At this stage all forms which you have collected should already have been summarized and sorted into D No. by "Form" order as you went along giving you your D stack.

Before you start summing up your EA you should contact your field supervisor:

  • Collect any outstanding Forms H from your field supervisor.
  • Collect any outstanding Household Forms, Continuation Forms, Listing Forms and Individual Forms received in the post at the Regional Office as a result of Rem 2 or 3.
  • Ensure that you update "Forms collected" in your ERB with the details of any forms picked up from your field supervisor.
  • Go through your ERB and ensure that you have collected all forms delivered and that you have all the forms you collected in your possession.
  • Summarise the number of persons for each household covered by the forms picked up from your field supervisor.
  • Insert the summarised forms in the correct place in your D stack.

Sorting your forms into street/townland order:

  • Go through your D stack and arrange the forms into separate stacks for each Electoral Division (ED).
  • Go through each separate ED stack and arrange the forms into separate stacks for each street/townland.
  • Sort each stack of forms relating to a street/townland in order of D No. and "Form". Forms for multiform households or communal establishments should be sorted in "Form" order and should be kept together by placing one of the elastic bands provided around the forms. Under NO circumstances should one form be placed inside another.
  • Complete a separate Form B in relation to each street/townland stack.
[p.51]

Completion of Form B for each street/townland:
The purpose of the Form B is to summarise the number of males, females and total persons in each household or CE by street/townland within the ED for your Enumeration area. This serves a dual purpose. Firstly, it provides the relevant population count. Secondly, it provides a quality control of the enumeration carried out compared with the results from the previous census. You will use a separate Form B for summarising each street/townland stack.

  • Complete the county name, county code, EA code, ED name, ED code, street/townland name and street/townland code of the stack on Form B.
  • Transfer the D No., "Form", Males, Females and Total persons from Form 1 for each household/CE in the stack.
  • If there are more than 30 households/CEs in the street/townland, sum each column in panel 1 and carry forward the totals to the first row of panel 2. Continue to enter details for the next 30 households/CEs in column 2.
  • If there are more than 60 households/CEs in the street/townland, sum the items in panel 2 and carry forward to Panel 1 on an additional Form B (don't forget to write in the EA code, etc.).
  • When you have entered the details for all forms in your Street/Townland stack, sum the columns.
  • Transfer the total number of households, males, females and persons to the row on the Form C for that Street/Townland (Use Form C for the correct ED if your EA is made up of more than 1 ED).

The diagram on the next page describes how to complete Form B and transfer the totals for each ED by Street/Townland stack on to Form C.

[p.52]

Summarising your EA - completion of form B and form C

[Illustration of Form B and Form C on page 52 is omitted here.]

[p.53]

Completion of form C
In Columns 4, 5, 6 and 7 you must record the number of households, males, females and total persons respectively for each Street/Townland listed on each Form C. These numbers are transcribed from the Total Line on each Form B for a Street/Townland within an ED.

  • Transfer the total figures from Forms B to the appropriate lines (i.e. street or townland listed) in columns 4, 5, 6 and 7 respectively of Form C for each street or townland, as shown on page 52.
  • Add up the numbers in columns 4, 5, 6 and 7. Place the totals in the spaces provided at the bottom of Form C.
  • The totals for males and females must tally with the total for persons.
  • Where there is more than one page on a form C relating to an ED, it is necessary to carry forward the sub-totals to the next page, in the same way as figures for 1996.
  • Check to see if there are any obvious discrepancies between the total number of households and persons between 1996 and 2002. If there are discrepancies, provide a brief explanation in column 8 (e.g. new hospital opened since 1996).

This is a very important phase of the enumeration as it represents a first quality assessment to be carried out on the figures from the census. It is of the utmost importance therefore that valid explanations are furnished where unexpected increases or decreases have taken place since 1996.

  • When you are satisfied that the form(s) C for your EA are complete and correct you should sign and date each one.

Returning form C
When you are satisfied that the summarisation on form C is complete, notify your field supervisor without delay. Your field supervisor will check and sign off form C and forward it to CSO without delay.
The publication of timely preliminary results of the census based on head count information is critically dependent on the speedy return of completed forms C from enumerators.

[p.54]

Chapter 7: Returning your census materials and completing your work returns

Sorting forms and packing them in boxes for return to CSO
Having completed your summarisation, you will have the forms sorted into separate bundles (one for each line on the Form C) for each Street/Townland within ED. These bundles will be referred to as S bundles in the following instructions. The forms are to be packed and returned in the boxes provided. Each box has space for approximately 160 forms.

  • Combine the S bundles into stacks which will fit into a box (approximately 140 forms). Most EAs will require 2-3 boxes.
  • If possible try not to break a Street/Townland within ED between two stacks. Under no circumstances should the forms for a household or communal establishment be separated.
  • Before placing each stack of completed forms in each box, do a final manual count of the number of forms in each stack. In the case of any Forms H, you should count the number of forms which have been retained by your field supervisor. Your field supervisor will replace any Forms H with the appropriate census forms before the boxes are forwarded to CSO.
  • Having counted the number of forms going into each box, complete Form LS -- EA Final box and form count.
  • Place the forms in each box and complete the summary on the side of the box.
  • Close the top on the filing boxes.
  • Transcribe the total number of households from Form C to Form LS.

[Images of two boxes not reported here]

Returning boxes of completed forms and other census materials
Two lockable black cases have been supplied to you for the safe transport of the boxes of census forms and other census materials back to CSO via your field supervisor. These two cases combined should contain the completed returns and materials for one complete EA only. The first black case should be labelled 1, second 2, using the gum back labels provided (write in county and EA code). Eight labels are provided and both cases should be labelled on the four sides to aid sorting in the CSO warehouse. Care should be taken not to cover the field supervisor address label already on the case when putting on the 4 EA labels. The first black case should contain all the items in the following list packed in the following order:

  • The first two boxes of the completed census forms (first to go into case one)
  • Your completed ERBs with divider/instruction summary
  • The map(s) covering your EA
  • Forms B (sealed in an envelope marked form B - County Code/EA code)
  • Forms E (sealed in an envelope marked form E - County Code/EA code)
  • Forms H (packed by the field supervisor in an envelope marked Form H - County Code/EA code after they replace each Form H with the appropriate retained census form/s)
  • This enumerators manual
  • Enumerators Manual accompanying example sets and map
  • Soiled or torn Household Forms, Continuation Forms, Individual Forms, Listing Forms (sealed in an envelope marked soiled forms - County Code/EA code)
  • Notebook
  • All unused forms
  • All unused envelopes
  • Your clipboard
  • Your satchel
  • Your ID card
  • Completed form L invoice (in duplicate)
  • Completed form LS EA box summary.

On Form L you must list all items being returned. Form LS and form L will be checked by your field supervisor. Three copies of form L are to be given with the materials listed above to your field supervisor who will sign them. One copy will be inserted in the first black case, one copy will be returned to you and one copy will be retained by your field supervisor. Form LS EA box summary should be the last item to go in to the first black case.

Any remaining boxes of completed forms should be packed in the second black case provided.

Both cases must be labelled as instructed above and be locked for transportation. Don't forget to give the keys to your field supervisor.

Reporting progress and recording time worked - WR1 and EP2
1. Recording: In your notebook you must at all times keep an accurate account of the time you spent working on the census. This information is needed to fill in your weekly progress report.

2. Form WR 1: You must furnish weekly progress reports to your field supervisor on form WR 1. This is provided in quadruplicate. You should complete it and forward the top three copies to your field supervisor. Retain the bottom copy for your records.

3. Your work returns should be compiled for each week ending on Friday. On each Saturday the completed returns should be forwarded to your field supervisor.

[p.56]

4. Form EP2: Calculation of an Enumerator's final payment depends on the careful completion of final report Form EP2. This form should be completed when you have completed your Census enumeration, summarisation work and WR1 reports. The figures for the weekly hours worked (see page 1 of Form EP2) should be taken from your retained copies of the form WR1. Sign the declaration that states that you have completed your duties as an Enumerator and forward it to your field supervisor. A final bonus will be paid when you have satisfactorily completed all tasks assigned to you.

Miscellaneous expenses - Exp.1
Form Exp.1: At the end of your period of employment, you should claim on Form Exp.1 any miscellaneous expenses (e.g. postage and telephone charges) which you may incur for the purpose of the census. The claim should be supported, where possible, by vouchers and receipts. This form should be checked and certified by the field supervisor who will forward it through the regional supervisor for payment.

Change of address
If you change your address during the period of employment on the Census, you should notify your field supervisor of your new address immediately.

[p.57]

Chapter 8: Specific notes on questions in the Census
1. What is your name? (Person 2)

The name is necessary to ensure that everyone in the household is covered and to assist the householder in ensuring that the correct personal information for each individual is recorded. The name also helps identify where forms are missing or duplicated. Names may assist in the identification of household and family groups. They are not retained as part of the computerized information.

First name and surname _____

2. Sex

Replies to question 2 are used to measure and compare trends in areas like education, employment/unemployment, etc. This information helps us to understand the changing roles of men and women in our families, communities and in the workforce.

[] 1 Male
[] 2 Female

3. What is your relationship to Person 1?

Question 3 establishes the usual make up of households and families in private dwellings. From it we can learn the number of children living with one parent or two parents and the number of people who live alone. The information shows changes in the nature of families and helps plan for housing, social welfare programmes and employment services.

[] 1 Husband or wife
[] 2 Partner
[] 3 Son or daughter
[] 4 Mother or father
[] 5 Son-in-law or daughter-in-law
[] 6 Mother-in-law or father-in-law
[] 7 Other related, write in relationship ______
[] 8 Unrelated (including foster children)

[p.58]

4. What is your date of birth?

Information on the age profile of the population is essential for measuring economic, social and demographic change. It helps to target the delivery of health, education, social welfare, housing and other community services.

_ _/_ _ / _ _ _ _ day/month/year

The purpose of questions 5 to 9 is to study migration patterns, both short-term and long-term. This information will give us a picture of where people are moving to or from and who is moving in terms of age, sex, education, occupation, etc.
Location is a key characteristic that is used with other data to build an accurate picture of our population. It is the basis for population estimates and projections and determining electoral boundaries.

5. What is your place of birth?

Give the place of residence of your mother at the time of your birth, not the location of the hospital where you were born.

If Ireland (including Northern Ireland), write in the county. _____
If elsewhere abroad, write in the country. _____

6. What is your nationality?

If you have more than one nationality, please declare all of them.

[] 1 Irish
[] 2 Other nationality, write in _____
[] 3 No nationality

7. Where do you usually live?

[] 1 Here at this address
[] 2 Elsewhere in Ireland (including Northern Ireland) write in the county _____
[] 3 Elsewhere abroad, write in the country ______

[p.59]

Comparing place of birth (question 5) and place of usual residence (question 7) indicates longer-term migration.
Likewise, if a person lived outside the country for a continuous period of one year or more.
By comparing a person's usual residence one year before the census (question 8) and their residence at census time (question 7), we get an indication of the extent to which people change residence.

Nationality is being asked for the first time and is important in the context of a more culturally diverse Ireland.

8. Where did you usually live one year ago?

Answer if [the respondent] is age 1 or older

[] 1 Same as now
[] 2 Elsewhere in Ireland (including Northern Ireland) write in the county _____
[] 3 Elsewhere abroad, write in the country ______

9. Have you lived outside the Republic of Ireland for a continuous period of one year or more?

Answer if [the respondent] is age 1 or older, and is living in Ireland.

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

If "Yes", write in the year of last taking up residence in the Republic of Ireland _ _ _ _ and the country of last previous residence _____

[p.60]

10. What is your current marital status?

Answer if [the respondent] is age 15 and older

[] 1 Single (never married)
[] 2 Married (first marriage)
[] 3 Re-married (following widowhood)
[] 4 Re-married (following divorce/annulment)
[] 5 Separated (including deserted)
[] 6 Divorced
[] 7 Widowed

Question 10 will show changes in marital status patterns over time. There will be a lot of interest in this question following the divorce referendum.

11. Can you speak Irish?

Answer if [the respondent] is age 3 and older

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

If "Yes", do you speak Irish?
[] 1 Daily
[] 2 Weekly
[] 3 Less often
[] 4 Never
Question 11 will provide information to help in the monitoring of policies and planning of delivery of services in relation to the Irish language. In particular, the results will enable policy planners to assess how language proficiency and usage varies with age and education participation.

[p.61]

12. What is your religion?

[] 1 Roman Catholic
[] 2 Church of Ireland
[] 3 Presbyterian
[] 4 Methodist
[] 5 Islam
[] 6 Other, write in your religion _____
[] 7 No religion

Question 12 provides information on the number of people of each religion or religious denomination. This question is asked in the census every ten years.
The religions listed have been chosen to cover the majority denominations. People are free to 6- Other and write in lapsed Catholic, lapsed Presbyterian, etc. if they wish.
The question does not refer to frequency of attendance at church.

[p.62]

13. Are you a member of the Irish Traveler Community?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

Question 13 was included after submissions from a number of organisations representing the Irish Traveller Community and various equality groups. Coupled with other questions on the form, it will facilitate a comparison between the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of travellers and those of the population at large.

14. Do you have any of the following long-lasting conditions:

(a) Blindness, deafness or a severe vision or hearing impairment?
[] 1Yes
[] 2 No

(b) A condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting or carrying?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

15. Because of a physical, mental or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, do you have any of the following activities:

Answer (a) and (b) if [the respondent] is age 5 and older

(a) Learning, remembering or concentrating?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

(b) Dressing, bathing or getting around inside the home?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

Answer (c) and (d) if [the respondent] is age 15 and older

(c) Going outside the home alone to shop or visit a doctor's surgery?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

(d) Working at a job or business?
[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

The results of questions 14 and 15 coupled with other questions will provide important data on the number of people whose activities are reduced because of a disability and the effect of the disability on their lives.
These questions were chosen after a number of meetings with experts from the various disability umbrella bodies and government departments.
The formulation of the questions was originally devised in the United States and included as part of their Census 2000 questionnaire. The questions were piloted in the September 1999 pilot test carried out in Ireland and found to be successful.
Some guidelines on answering questions 14 and 15:
  • Question 14 is to be answered for all persons.
  • Questions 15(a) and (b) are to be answered for all persons aged 5 years or over.
  • Questions 15(c) and (d) are to be answered for all persons aged 15 years or over.

[p.63]

16. How do you usually travel to work, school or college?

[Check] one box only, for the longest part by distance, to your usual journey to work, school or college.

[] 1 On foot
[] 2 Bicycle
[] 3 Bus, minibus or coach
[] 4 Train or DART
[] 5 Motor cycle or scooter
[] 6 Driving a car
[] 7 Passenger in a car
[] 8 Lorry or van
[] 9 Other means
[] 10 Work mainly at or from home
[] 11 Not applicable

17. What time do you usually leave home to go to work, school or college?

[] 1 Before 07:00
[] 2 07:00 - 07:30
[] 3 07:31 - 08:00
[] 4 08:01 - 08:30
[] 5 08:31 - 09:00
[] 6 09:01 - 09:30
[] 7 After 09:30

18. What distance is your journey from home to work, school or college and how long does it usually take?

Write in distance to the nearest mile and journey time in minutes.

Miles _ _ _
Minutes _ _ _

The replies to questions 16 to 18 in conjunction with the address where people work will provide valuable information on commuting patterns for planning public transport infrastructure.
Usual means of travel identifies the different modes of transport used by commuters. The time of leaving home will provide information on the volume of commuter travel by type of transportation at different time periods during a typical day. Distance and usual travel time will give us information on the efficiency of different modes of transport.

Some guidelines on answering questions 16-18:

  • Where different means of travel are used on different days, then the most frequently used method should be indicated.
  • Where the time of leaving home differs on different days, then the most frequent time of leaving home should be indicated.
  • Persons who do not work or attend school or college tick "Not applicable" for questions 16 and 17 and leave question 18 blank.
  • Persons who work daily from a fixed centre or depot, indicate the means of transport and distance travelled from residence to this centre or depot.
  • Persons with no regular place of work such as sales representatives, road workers or others who do not work at or from a fixed centre or depot, indicate "0" miles and "0" minutes for question 18.

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Questions 20 to 36 are to be answered only by persons age 15 and older.

20. Have you ceased your full-time education?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

If "Yes", write in AGE at which it ceased _ _

21. What is the highest level of education (full-time or part-time) which you have completed to date?

[] 1 No formal education
[] 2 Primary education
Secondary level
[] 3 Lower secondary: Junior/Intermediate/Group Certificate, "O" Levels/GCSEs, NCVA Foundation Certificate, Basic Skills Training Certificate or equivalent
[] 4 Upper Secondary: Leaving certificate (including Applied and Vocational Progammes), "A" Levels, NCVA Level 1 Certificate or equivalent
[] 5 Technical or vocational qualification: Completed apprenticeship, NCVA Level 2/3 Certificate, NCEA Foundation Certificate, Teagasc certificate/diploma or equivalent
[] 6 Both upper secondary and technical or vocational qualification
Third level
[] 7 Non degree: National Certificate, diploma NCEA/Institute of Technology or equivalent
[] 8 Primary degree (third level Bachelor degree)
[] 9 Professional qualification (of degree status at least)
[] 10 Both degree and a professional qualification
[] 11 Postgraduate certificate or diploma
[] 12 Postgraduate Degree (Masters)
[] 13 Doctorate (Ph.D.)

The replies to questions 20 and 21 will be used to monitor the impact of education policies, changing skill levels and the extent to which people use their formal qualifications.

Some guidelines on answering question 21:

  • Persons who received their education when institutional arrangements were different to those currently in place or who were not educated in Ireland, should select an equivalent option.
  • A person who attended primary level only should select 2- Primary education. A person who attended a second level school but left without sitting for the Junior Certificate, Intermediate Certificate, Group Certificate, etc. should also select this option.
  • A person who has sat for the examinations listed under options 3 (Lower secondary) and 4 (Upper secondary), should select the appropriate level of education completed irrespective of the results achieved.
  • A person who successfully completed a Post Leaving Certificate programme (VPT2) or a secretarial or commercial course lasting a year or more in addition to the Leaving Certificate should select 6 - Both Upper secondary or Technical….
  • A person who attempted a third level course but without obtaining the certificate, diploma or degree in question should select the appropriate option at Second Level.

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22. Do you hold any third level qualification(s) which you attained after completing 2 or more years of study?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

If "Yes", please indicate the main subject area(s) in which qualification(s) is held.
Check ALL boxes that apply.

1 [] Education
2 [] Art (including fine arts, performing arts, graphic and audio visual arts, design)
3 [] Humanities (including languages, literature, history, archaeology, philosophy, theology)
4 [] Social sciences/business/law (including economics and journalism)
5 [] Life sciences/medical laboratory science
6 [] Physical sciences/chemistry
7 [] Mathematics/statistics
8 [] Computing/information technology
9 [] Engineering/architecture
10 [] Agriculture/forestry/fishery/veterinary
11 [] Medicine/dentistry/ nursing/associated medical disciplines/social services
12 [] Tourism/hotel and catering/sports and leisure/transport services/environmental protection/security services
13 [] Other

Question 22: Regular information on skill levels is necessary to monitor whether the training being offered meets the needs of the labour market. The Government and employers use this data to evaluate whether there are enough people with the required education and training in particular areas of the work force. The information is used in developing new programmes to meet the changing needs of our work force. In previous censuses, only scientific and technological qualifications were recorded. The extension of this question to include all third level qualifications will provide more complete information.

Some guidelines on answering question 22:
  • Persons answering this question should have ticked a third level qualification at question 21: Highest level of education completed to date.
  • This question should only be answered by persons who have attained qualifications after 2 or more years of study at a third level college or university. One year post leaving courses (PLCs) are specifically excluded.
  • Persons who completed degrees where more than one subject area was covered should check only those subject areas taken as part of the final examination for their degree or diploma.
  • Where a person completes a Masters degree in one year this should be taken as a third level qualification attained after completing 2 or more years of study as the years of undergraduate study would count in this case. The subject(s) should be those taken for the Masters degree.

23. Do you provide regular unpaid personal help for a friend or family member with a long-term illness, health problem or disability?

Include problems which are due to old age.
Personal help includes help with basic tasks such as feeding or dressing.

[] 1 Yes, 1-14 hours a week
[] 2 Yes, 15-28 hours a week
[] 3 Yes, 29-42 hours a week
[] 4 Yes, 43 or more hours a week
[] 5 No

The results of question 23 will facilitate an assessment to be made of the extent to which unpaid personal help is provided by carers in our society, along with the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the carers themselves. This question is being asked for the first time in Census 2002.

Some guidelines on answering question 23:
  • The receipt of "Carers allowance" is not considered payment for the purposes of this question.
  • "Meals-on-wheels" staff are not considered as carers for the purposes of this question.

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24. How would you describe your present principal status?

Check one box only.

[] 1 Working for payment or profit
[] 2 Looking for first regular job
[] 3 Unemployed
[] 4 Student or pupil
[] 5 Looking after home/family
[] 6 Retired from employment
[] 7 Unable to work due to permanent sickness or disability
[] 8 Other, write in ____

Question 24 will provide information on principal economic status, allowing us to classify persons aged 15 years and over into those within and outside the labour force.

Some guidelines on answering question 24:
As the person's principal economic status is required, only one of the listed categories should be ticked.

The following should tick 1: "Working for payment or profit"
  • Persons who are self-employed
  • Persons mainly engaged as "Assisting relatives" on farms, in shops or in any other commercial enterprises even if they receive no payment or no regular payment
  • Priests, nuns and brothers except where they are 6 "Retired" or 7 "Unable to work due to permanent sickness"
  • Persons temporarily absent from work due to illness, holidays, etc.
  • Apprentices who are in employment and who also attend school or technical college
  • Full-time students who are in part-time employment should tick 4 "Student or pupil".

Questions 26 to 31 are to be answered by persons who are working for payment or profit, unemployed or retired (i.e., those who have ticked boxes 1, 3, or 6 for question 24).

26. Do (did) you work as an employee or are (were) you self-employed in your main job?

Your main job is the job in which you usually work(ed) the most hours

[] 1 Employee
[] 2 Self-employed, with paid employees
[] 3 Self-employed, without paid employees
[] 4 Assisting relative (not receiving a fixed wage or salary)

Question 26 is used in the analysis of people's employment. This information is used to show potential growth in business and employment.

Guidelines on answering question 26:
  • The term "Employee" should be used for a person receiving a fixed wage or salary, even if he/she is assisting a relative. However, if a person is assisting a relative without receiving a fixed wage or salary, he/she should 4 "Assisting relative"
  • Priests, nuns, brothers, etc. should 1 "Employee"
  • Persons employed as managing directors should 1 "Employee"
  • Persons in partnership in a firm having paid employees should 2 "Self-employed, with paid"
  • Persons in partnership in a firm not having paid employees should 3 "Self-employed, without paid".

27. What is (was) your occupation in your main job?

In all cases describe the occupation fully and precisely giving the full job title.

Write your main OCCUPATION. _______
If a farmer or farm worker, write the SIZE of the farm.
_ _ _ _ Acres OR _ _ _ _ Hectares

The information that Question 27 will provide is used to build a picture of occupational groups and how occupations are changing over time.

[p.68]

Guidelines on answering question 27:
The occupation must be provided for every person who ticked:
[] 1 Working for payment or profit
[] 3 Unemployed
[] 5 Retired from employment in Q24.
Housewives (i.e. those who ticked box 5 at Q24) often answer this question by writing "Home (or domestic) duties" as their occupation. Although inappropriate, no attempt should be made to alter this response.

You should ensure that the description of the occupation is precise in accordance with the question instructions

If asked, you should advise the householder/person to describe their occupation in precise terms. In the list below some examples of correct and inadequate occupation descriptions are given:
Inadequate entry - Possible correct entry
Analyst - analyst/programmer
Secretary - secretary/receptionist
Minder - child minder
Process worker - food process worker
Operator - chemical plant operator
Manager - retail store/shop manager/computer systems manager/garage manager
Accountant - trainee chartered accountant
Machine operator - wood machinist
Technician - medical laboratory technician/electronic technician
Labourer - builder's labourer
Worker - dock worker
Engineer - electrical engineer civil engineer/software engineer
Fitter - gas fitter
Foreman - garage foreman
Checker - ticket checker
Mechanic - motor mechanic
If in doubt as to how a particular occupation should be described, it is better to give a full and detailed description.

[p.69]
29. What is (was) the full name of the Organisation you work(ed) for in your main job?

If you have your own business, write the NAME of the business. ________

30. What is (was) the full address at which you actually work(ed)?

________

[] 1 Work mainly at or from home
[] 2 No fixed place of work

Questions 29 and 30 have two functions. They assist in coding industry where the description in Question 31 is unclear or inadequate. When combined with the travel to work questions, they also provide important information on commuting patterns.

Guidelines on answering questions 29 and 30:
  • For question 30, the full and exact address at which working is required, not the headquarters or head office of an employer, if that is different.
  • These questions should only be answered by those at work or unemployed, i.e. those who indicate on Question 24: 1 "Working for payment or profit" or 3 "Unemployed".
  • These questions need not be answered by those who are retired.

[p.70]

31. What is (was) the business of your employed at the place where you work(ed) in your main job?

If you are (were) self-employed answer in respect of your own business.

Describe the main product or service provided by your employer: _______

Is (was) the business of your employer mainly?
[] 1 Manufacturing
[] 2 Wholesale trade
[] 3 Retail trade
[] 4 Other (agriculture, building, services, government, etc.)

Question 31 will provide information that will be used to determine which industries people are working in. The categories are compared over time to show trends and rates of change in industry type.

Guidelines on answering question 31:
  • It is vitally important that the description given is detailed enough to enable it to be coded.
  • This question should only be answered by those at work or unemployed i.e. those who indicated 1 "Working for payment or profit" or 3 "Unemployed" in question 24.
  • It need not be answered by those who are retired.
  • The second part of question 31 should be ticked in all cases as it will assist the CSO to categorise the industry fully.

Inadequate Entry - Possible correct entry
Computers - Making computers
Cars - Repairing cars
Education - Primary education
Food - Bread wholesaler
Pharmaceuticals - Making pharmaceuticals
Cleaning - Contract office cleaning
Software - Software development and support
Recreation - Swimming pool
Local authority - Local authority cleaning dept./ library service/ housing dept.

[p.71]

Questions 32 to 36 will provide information which is comparable to that collected in the quarterly National Household Survey and enable the labour force to be defined according to International Labour Office criteria at small area level. This information is important in the planning of job creation measures in areas throughout the country.

32. In the week ended Sunday 28 April did you do any work, either full-time or part-time, for payment or profit:

  • as an employee
  • as a self-employed/freelance
  • in your own/family business
  • on a Community Employment Scheme or other Employer Scheme

Check "Yes" for any paid work, including casual or temporary work, even if only for one hour.
Check "Yes" if you were away from work ill, on holiday, on maternity leave or temporarily laid off.
Check "Yes" if you worked, paid or unpaid in your own/family business

[] 1 Yes, skip to question 36
[] 2 No

33. Were you actively looking for any kind of paid work in the last 4 weeks?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

34. If a job had been available last week, could you have started it within 2 weeks?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

35. Last week, were you waiting to start a job already obtained?

[] 1 Yes
[] 2 No

36. How many hours in total did you work last week?

Answer only if working for payment or profit.
Answer to the nearest whole hour.

_ _ Hours

Guidelines on answering questions 33--36:
  • Questions 33-35 should only be answered by those who in the week ended 28 April did not work either full time or part time for payment or profit, i.e. those who answered "No" to question 32.
  • Question 36 should also be completed by those working in a family business who do not receive a fixed salary or wage.

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Census Terms

Absent household: Where an entire household was away on census night.

Cen 1: A cover note used when you call 4 times to deliver a Household Form and fail to make contact with the householder.

Communal Establishment (CE): Accommodation such as hotels, boarding houses, guest houses, BBs, hostels, campsites, educational establishments, religious communities, children's homes, nursing homes, hospitals, nurses' homes, prisons, defence establishments (including ships), civilian boats and barges, garda stations, etc.

Delivery routine: The steps to follow at each address when delivering census forms. This may need to be adapted to specific situations.

Dwelling unit: A dwelling unit is living accommodation which is occupied or, if vacant, is intended for occupation, by one or more households.

Enumeration Area (EA): The area covered by one enumerator defined on enumeration maps using a purple boundary

Electoral Division (ED): An ED is the smallest administrative area for which population statistics are normally published. The boundaries of EDs are displayed in red on enumeration maps. EDs are always written on census forms using the 3 digit code specified on form C.

Enumeration: The process of counting people in a census.

Enumerator Record Book (ERB): The book used to record progress at each stage of the enumeration for every dwelling in the EA. Most EAs will require two ERBs.

Form C: The list of street and townland codes for each ED in your EA.

Form E: Form to be completed if an entire household is away on Census Night. Initiates [the] household tracking [process].

Form H: A form completed by the field supervisor where a household or individual posts their form directly to the Regional Office for confidentiality reasons.

Census Night: Sunday 28 April 2002.

Private household: The term used for groups of people living together is a household. A household is:

  • one person living alone, or
  • a group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address with common housekeeping arrangements - that is, sharing at least one meal a day or sharing a living room or sitting room.

Ref: County code/ EA code/D No. (e.g. 02/010/131) should be used as the reference for all forms.

Rem 1: A reminder used if you fail to make contact with the householder on your third visit to collect the completed Household Form.

Rem 2: A second reminder used if you fail to make contact with the householder on your fourth visit to collect the completed Household Form.

Rem 3: A third and final demand used if Rem 2 has failed to elicit a completed census form, 4 days have elapsed and you fail to make contact with the householder.

Ref 1: A form completed by the field supervisor where a household has refused to complete a census form despite intervention by the field supervisor. This is a last resort and will only be issued by the field supervisor with the approval of the regional supervisor.

Street: A Street is a group of adjacent buildings (e.g. houses, shops, businesses) having the same address within a built up area. Streets are always written on census forms using the 5 digit code specified on form C.
Townland: A townland is the smallest territorial division used for census purposes in rural areas. The boundaries of Townlands are displayed in blue on enumeration maps. Townlands are always written on census forms using the 5 digit code specified on form C.

Vacant accommodation: Residential accommodation where nobody is currently living.