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[Indonesia
Manual for Enumerator
Population Census 2010]

[The following consists of the instructions that specifically pertain to the completion of the questions in the enumeration form. These instructions come from a portion of Section 8, "Complete Enumeration Household and Population." P. 1 to 109 of the original document are not presented here.]

[p. 110]
Block II. Household Members Personal Characteristics
Before beginning the questions on household member personal characteristics, enter the serial number of the household member in the boxes provided in the upper right hand corner of the form and the name of the individual to be interviewed in the boxes provided for the Q201. Do this for every member of the household so that each individual member has a page of Block II questions of his/her own. If the number of household members is between 7 and 10, remember to use Form C1 (LP), or if the number is more than 10, use an additional set of Form C1.
Household Member Serial Number
Copy the serial number from the List of Household Members Column (1) into the boxes just mentioned above. Don't forget that the first serial number must be that of the head of household. The other serial numbers must follow the serial number of the household member from the smallest to the largest.

Question 201: Name of Household Member
Copy the name from the List of Household Members Column (2). If the length of a name exceeds the number of boxes provided for the name, then shorten the name. Try to shorten the name as little as possible.

Question 202: Relationship to Head of Household
Mark one of the codes for relationship to head of household according to the information in the List of Household Members Column (3).

Question 203: Sex
Ask for confirmation of the sex of the household member and mark the appropriate code. Even though sex was asked when recording the List of Household Members Columns (4) and Column (5), Q203 must be answered. If a different answer is given, ask again which answer is correct and make the adjustment.
It is possible that the respondent objects that the question is asked again. Tell the respondent the truth; say "I'm very sorry; I am only confirming the prior answer to make sure there are no mistakes in recording the sex of the members of the household."

[p. 111]
Question 204: Date, Month, Year of Birth and Age
Ask the date, month and year of birth and calculate the age of the household member. Write the date, month and year of birth, and age in the boxes provided. Then put a mark in the oval beside the two numbers matching with respondent's age; the ten's digit is marked in the column on the left and the unit's digit in the column on the right. Age must be filled in, even it is only a best estimate. If the respondent does not know his/her date and/or month of birth, then leave the boxes for date and/or month blank, and ask only the year. If the respondent knows his/her year of birth, write the birth year completely in the boxes for year. If, however, the respondent also does not know the birth year, leave the boxes for date, month and year blank. Then ask the respondent to estimate his/her age and fill in only the boxes for age. If the respondent does not know the date, month, and year of birth, then his age must be estimated. Leave the boxes for date, month and year blank.
Steps to be taken in questioning are:

1. Read the entire question: "On what date, month, and year were you (Ali, for example) born?"
2. If the respondent can answer then record the date, month and year, and calculate the age of the household member, and then ask to be sure: "Is it correct that (Ali, for example) is now (27, for example) years old?" (27, for example) is the number calculated by the enumerator.
3. If the respondent does not know his/her date and month of birth, ask the year of birth only: "If you do not know the exact date and month, what year were you (Ali, for example) born?"
4. If the respondent does not know his/her year of birth, then ask the age of this household member: "How old are you (Ali, for example)?"Then fill in the answer directly in the boxes for age without filling in the boxes for date, month and year of birth.

Write the month as a number: January is written as "01", February as "02", March as "03", April is written "04", May as "05", June as "06", July as "07", August as "08", September as "09", October as "10", November as "11", and December as "12".
[p. 112]
If the respondent gives the name of the month according to the Islamic calendar, for example, Ramadhan, write the name of the month given in the space below the question and then convert that month into the Gregorian calendar. For conversion guidelines see Procedures for Calculating Age (see appendix). The same procedure is to be followed if the year of birth is given in the Islamic calendar. Calculate the age based on the month and year in the Gregorian calendar and put the result in the boxes provided.
Age is calculated in years by rounding downwards which means the age at the last birthday will be used. Explanation:

1. If the respondent is 27 years and 9 months, record 27 years.
2. If less than 1 year old, record the age as 00 year.
3. If the respondent is 98 years or older, record the age as 98 years; for example, for someone 100 years old, enter the number 98 in the boxes with the understanding that the person is 98 years or older.
4. If the age is less than 10 years (that is, the age is only 1 digit), enter 0 in the first box provided to record the age, for example 01, 02... 09.

If the respondent doesn't know anything about his date of birth or his age, then estimate the respondent's age using various approaches, references, and information. The estimate must be a best estimate. If the age is obtained based on an estimate, the enumerator may not fill in the year of birth by working backwards, but should leave the boxes for date, month, and year of birth blank.
Marking the ovals should be done after the age of the household member has been obtained; fill in the oval in the left column corresponding to the ten's digit of the age and fill in the oval in the right column corresponding to the unit's digit of the age. (See the example which follows.)
Example: Household member Atika was born 23 October 1983 and the enumeration took place on 25 May 2010; Akita's age is 26 years 7 months. Record the age for Q204 as follows:
[The graphic illustrating this example is not presented here.]
[p. 113]
Method of Estimating Age
If the respondent doesn't know his age with certainty, try to obtain some information about his age using, among others, the methods described below:

1. Use a birth certificate, a letter about the birth, baptismal certificate, doctor's record, immunization record, health record or any other record. Pay attention to the date, month and year the population registration card or the family registration card was issued if only the age is recorded.
2. Relate the respondent's birth with the date, month, and year of known events or important events which happened in Indonesia or national or regional events.
Example: General elections, earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, fires, election of local officials, and the like. Some other important events that can be used in estimating age are:
a. Landing of the Japanese in Indonesia (1942).
b. Proclamation of Independence of the Republic of Indonesia (1945).
c. First elections (1955).
d. Communist Rebellion G30S/PKI (1965).
[Note within graphic box:] If the respondents have a tendency to give their age in numbers that end in 0 or 5, the enumerator must investigate further to be sure that the age is correct.
[p. 114]
3. Compare the age of a household member with the ages of his family members which are known. For example, begin by estimating the age of the youngest child, then for the next oldest child asking the approximate age or what things the older child could do such as sit up (about 6 months), crawl (8 months), stand up (9 months), walk (12 months) at the time of the birth of the younger child or at the time the mother became pregnant with the younger child. Then use this same technique to estimate the ages of all of the older children.
4. Make a comparison with a neighbor's child or with another family member whose age is known with certainty. Estimate how many months or years this child is older or younger than the child whose age is known.

It is not so rare that a respondent who says he doesn't have any idea what his age is, when asked again and again about his age will say "Whatever you want it to be." In cases like this, the enumerator must patiently follow again the methods outlined for determining the age.
Information on age must be filled in directly at the time Q204 is asked. Don't procrastinate.

Question 205: Place of Birth
Ask and write the name of the province and regency/city where the household member was born. The enumerator is only responsible for clearly filling in the name of the province and regency/city. The codes for the province and regency/city will be entered by the Team Coordinator.
Place of birth is the province and regency/city where the mother lived at the time of the household member's birth. The administrative boundaries of the regions where the respondent was born should be the latest ones which are used at the time of the enumeration.
[p. 115]

Example:
1. A mother resides in East Aceh (Province NAD); her child is born in the city of Medan (Province of North Sumatra). Then the child's place of birth is considered East Aceh (Province NAD).
2. Andika was born in 1990 in Manokwari. In 1990 Manokwari was in the Province of Irian Jaya. For Q205 enter the Province for Andika as West Papua and the Regency as Manokwari, because since 1999 the Regency of Manokwari became part of the Province of West Papua.

[Graphic illustrating example is not presented here.]
3. Tuti was born in 1985 di Cimanggis, Regency of Bogor, West Jawa. In 1985 Cimanggis became part of the Regency of Bogor. For Q205 fill in the place of Tuti's birth as Province West Jawa and City Depok, because since 2004 Cimanggis changed administrative districts and became part of the City of Depok.
[Graphic illustrating example is not presented here.]
[p. 116]
If a household member was born abroad, write the name of the country where the household member was born in the space for province/state and strike out the word "province"; enter a dash "in the space for the regency/city. A code for the country will be entered by the Team Coordinator (See Book 7: Codes for Ethnicity, Language, and Administrative Area).

[Graphic illustrating example is not presented here.]

The enumerator must take care in writing the name of the province/country or the regency/city so that he/she does not write in the boxes provided for the codes. If the name of the place of birth is long, use a common abbreviation or just write as much of the name as possible so that the writing does not extend into the boxes.

For Example: BARITO SEL (Barito Selatan), KALTIM (Kalimantan Timur), SULBAR (Sulawesi Barat), MALUT (Maluku Utara), TAPUT (Tapanuli Utara), TOBASA (Toba Samosir), OKU (Ogan Komering Ulu). If there is an acronym or an abbreviation that is standard or standard in the region, then use that.

If the enumerator knows that the name of the regency/city given by the respondent is not the name of a regency/city, then he/she should ask whether (mention correct name of regency/city) is the one intended by the respondent.

Question 206: Religion
[p. 117]
Ask: "Which religion do you embrace?" or "What is the religion embraced by (name of person, Surahman, for example)?"Ask the religion embraced by each household member, even babies. Don't presume the religion of one based on the religion of another member of the household. Let each respondent state his religion. It is all right if a respondent answers about the religion of the children and babies in the household. Don't make any judgments, either in word or expression, regarding the respondent's answers.
Put a mark in the oval beside the answer which corresponds to the respondent's answer. For those who do not embrace one of the six religions included here, select the answer "Other", mark the oval beside code 7, and write the name of the religion mentioned by the respondent in the space provided.

Question 207: Difficulty Carrying out Activities
The intention of this question is to obtain information about the number of disabled persons (functional disability) or those who have some difficulty in carrying out their day to day activities. Ask one by one how normal are the five physical and psychological functions of each household member to learn if they have difficulty: (a) to see, (b) to hear, (c) to walk, (d) to remember, to concentrate or communicate and (e) to take care of themselves.
Put a mark in one of the ovals for each item that indicates the level of difficulty: (1) None, (2) Some, or (3) Severe.

[Graphic illustrating example is not presented here.]
1. Seeing, even though eyeglasses are worn
A person is said to have difficulty seeing if at a distance of 30 cm and with sufficient lighting, he/she cannot see clearly shape, size or color. In the case where even though a person uses an aid (eyeglasses) he/she still has difficulty seeing, then this person is categorized as having difficulty. But, if a person using glasses can see normally, then that person is categorized as not having difficulty.
[p.118]
Those having difficulty seeing include:
a. Totally blind is the condition where there is no vision in either eye.
b. Low vision is the condition where both eyes cannot count the fingers that are being moved at a distance of 1 meter even though the person is wearing eyeglasses or there is sufficient light.
c. Color blind is the condition where both eyes cannot distinguish colors.

Note: If a person experiences difficulty seeing but doesn't wear eyeglasses, ask them how it would be if they were to wear glasses. If by wearing eyeglasses they would not have any difficulty seeing, then categorize this respondent as not having difficulty. On the other hand if the respondent still experiences difficulty when wearing glasses, ask the respondent the extent or degree of the difficulty.
2. Hearing, even though wearing a hearing aid
A person is said to have difficulty hearing if he/she cannot hear voices clearly, differentiate the source, volume and quality of sound and thus cannot respond to the sound properly. A person wearing a hearing aid, who can then hear normally, should not be categorized as having difficulty. Included in this category are those who have a disability in hearing.
Note: If a person has difficulty hearing but does not use a hearing aid, ask this person how it would be if they were to wear a hearing aid. If when using a hearing aid the person doesn't experience any difficulty hearing, then categorize this person as does not have difficulty. On the other hand if the person still has difficulty even though he/she uses a hearing aid, ask the extent or degree of difficulty.
[p. 119]
3. Walking or going up stairs
A person is said to have difficulty walking or going up stairs if he/she cannot walk normally for example going forward, backward, to the side, is unstable or has difficulty climbing stairs. Someone who must use an aid to walk or climb stairs is categorized as having difficulty.
4. Remembering or concentrating or communicating with others due to some physical or mental condition
A person is said to have difficulty remembering/concentrating if he/she experiences difficulty in remembering or concentrating. A person is said to have difficulty communicating if in face to face conversation, without there being anything such as a wall, loud music, something covering the ears, the person has difficulty understanding or can't converse at all due to some physical or mental problem. Included in this category are those who have difficulty hearing and speaking.
5. Take care of one's self
A person is said to have difficulty taking care of him or herself if he/she experiences difficulty with everyday activities such as eating bathing, dressing, going to the toilet, etc.

a. Difficulty eating refers to eating by one's self (being fed by someone else, difficulty using a spoon, fork for eating or difficulty drinking).
b. Difficulty taking a bath and cleansing one's entire body.
c. Difficulty dressing means taking the clothes from the place where they are stored, fastening the clothing [buttons, zippers, etc.], making a knot, etc.
d. Difficulty picking up or holding items (hands are weak, don't have all fingers).
[p. 120]
Select the answer "No" (code 1) if the household member does not have any difficulties. If the household member has difficulties, but can still carry out the activity, then select the answer some"(code 2). If the household member cannot carry out the activity or it is very difficult to carry out the activity, select the answer "severe"(code 3).
Be careful when asking questions about disabilities for babies and children under 5 years of age. For example, for the question about difficulties in taking care of themselves, babies and children under 5 normally are not able to take care of themselves; a baby or child under 5 is not considered to have a disability if he/she cannot take care of himself/herself. Babies and children under 5 of course are not yet able to take care of themselves without the assistance of their parents or others. This is also the case for Q207c and Q207d. A baby who is not yet 1 year old is normally not able to walk. However, if a baby is already 1 and a half years old and the development in walking is retarded or there is no development, then this child can be considered to have a disability. The extent of the disability is no disability, some disability, or severe relative to what is normal.
The purpose of question 207 is to know whether the household member is normal with regard to sight, hearing, walking/climbing stairs, remembering/concentrating/communicating, and taking care of himself/herself. The census only collects data regarding normalcy using observation, knowledge and admission of the household member. The scale used is not very precise. Nevertheless, the enumerator must thoroughly understand the intention of this question regarding difficulties or disabilities. No, some or severe difficulty of a household member is relative to what is considered normal.

Question 208: Ethnicity and Citizenship
Ethnicity consists of a variety ethnic groups which are viewed as cultural wealth. Having data on ethnic diversity enables us to know our own people who live by the slogan Bhinneka Tunggal Ika (Unity in Diversity), from many different ethnic groups come one people and one country. Data on ethnicity is important as a source of information which can be used as material for social research. Data on ethnicity was collected during the 2000 Population Census and used for research here as well as abroad.
[p. 121]
Ask the ethnicity and citizenship of each household member. If the household member is an Indonesian citizen, then write his ethnicity in Q208a. If the household member is a foreign citizen, then write the citizenship in Q208b. Codes for ethnicity and citizenship will be filled in by the Team Coordinator according to the list of codes in Book 7.
[Graphic illustrating example is not presented here.]
Citizenship and Ethnicity
Ethnicity is the ethnic group and culture which a person inherits. In general, ethnicity follows the paternal line (father/men), but there are some ethnic groups which follow the maternal line (mother/female) such as the Minangkabau.
Even though there is this "rule" there may still be some situations where a person has difficulty in deciding his ethnicity. For example, there are often difficulties when people of different ethnicities marry and even more so when different ethnicities have been mixed for several generations. In such cases, the ethnicity of a household member is whatever he thinks it is. Of course, a person usually leans toward an ethnicity in which he feels most comfortable. One measure is the cultural traditions which he/she follows most often. If the respondent "is confused", the enumerator can point him/her (with the respondent's permission) in the direction of his father's line, grandfather's line and so on.
[p.122]
If the citizenships of the parents are different, and the respondent cannot determine the citizenship of his children, then the citizenship of the children should be that of the father.
Indonesian citizens are those who are native Indonesians and those who are foreign born but have become Indonesian citizens.
Foreign citizens are those who have a nationality other than Indonesian. Citizenship is recorded as the name of the country in which he/she has citizenship. For example, if a person is of Chinese descent, but is a citizen of India, then record India as his citizenship.

Household members 5 years and older
Questions 209 through 214 are asked only to those household members who are 5 years old or older. See Q204; if the age is 05, 06, 07… 98, then continue the interview with Q209 through Q214. If Q204 has entries 00, 01, 02, 03, or 04, then the interview with this household member is complete and Q209 through Q221 should be left blank. The interview should continue with the next household member.

Question 209: Place of Residence Five Years Ago
Ask the province and regency/city of the place where the respondent lived 5 years ago, that is, May 2005. Ask the respondent to remember where he lived at that time. Write the name of the province and the regency/city according to the respondent's answer in the space provided. Remember not to write beyond the space provided for the answer.
[p. 123]
The enumerators are expected to know whether the place mentioned by the respondent is the name of a regency/city and most importantly whether it is located in the same province as the province in which he is currently living. If the enumerator isn't sure, then he should ask the respondent "Is that the name of a regency/city?"
It is hoped that the respondent knows about the development or growth of the area in which he lived 5 years ago. Therefore, the respondent himself will know the situation now regarding the name of the regency/city. Codes for country or province or codes for regency/city will be filled in by the Team Coordinator in accordance with Book 7.
If the respondent's residence 5 years ago was abroad, then is sufficient to write the name of the country in the place provided for province and put a dash in the space for the name of the regency/city.
Residence 5 years ago is the region where the household member lived in May 2005.
Similar to way of recording place of birth (Q205), the place recorded is the name used for the geographic division which is currently in effect (see explanation for Q205). If the household member has never lived at a residence in a different regency/city, write the name of the province and regency/city which is shown in the identification section for his/her current residence even though in 2005 the name of the regency/city or province was different.

Question 210: Language Usually Spoken at Home
The language normally used is an ethnic and cultural variable of the population. Like ethnicity, data about language can give a picture of the diversity and cultural wealth of society and is a source of data for research and science.
Ask and write the language usually spoken by the household member at home. In writing the language don't go beyond the space provided for this answer and write something in the red boxes. Codes for the language are in Book 7 and will be entered in the boxes by the Team Coordinator.
[p.124]
Language Usually Spoken
The language used by a person is not always based on his ancestry, but may be brought about by social interaction. For example, someone whose ancestors are Melayu may associate with a segment of the Javanese society and therefore, on a daily basis uses the Javanese language especially if at home they speak that language.
Language usually spoken is the language usually used in communication in the home with other members of the household. If more than one language is used, the local language and the Indonesian language, then record the local language as the answer. If more than one local language is usually spoken, record the one which is used most often.
Record the language of a person who is deaf and mute as sign language.
If a household member uses a foreign language, then record the name of the country from which the language originates.

Question 211: Ability to Speak the Indonesian Language
Able to speak Indonesian language

A person is said to be able to speak the Indonesian language if the household member understands what is being said (heard by the household member) and can speak words in the Indonesian language which are understood by others.
In particular, a person who is deaf and mute is considered to be able to speak Indonesian if he/she understands expressions in Indonesian.

One way to determine if a person has this ability is to ask the question in Indonesian: "Can you speak Indonesian?"(Don't translate this question into the local language even though the interview is being conducted in the local language.) If the respondent understands the question, then he/she is assumed to be able to speak the Indonesian language so the enumerator should make a mark in the oval for code 1. On the other hand, if the respondent gives signs that he/she doesn't seem to understand the question, for example, he/she asks the meaning of the question, then the respondent is considered not to be able to speak the Indonesian language and the enumerator should make a mark in the oval for code 2.

[p. 125]
Question 212: Schooling Status
Ask the schooling status of the household member and make a mark in the oval corresponding to the respondent's answer. If the household member has never or not yet attended school, then make a mark for code 1 and go directly to question to 214. If the respondent's answer is code 2 (still attending school) or 3 (no longer attending school), then continue the interview with the next question (Q213).
Schooling Status

1. Never/not yet attended school is the schooling status of someone who has never ever attended school, including those who have finished or have not yet finished kindergarten but have not yet entered Elementary school.
2. Attending school is the schooling status for the persons who are registered and actively attending a level of formal education.
3. No longer attending school is the schooling status of a person who has ever registered and actively attended a formal level of education but at the time of the enumeration is no longer registered and attending a formal level of education.

Note:

1. University students who are currently on vacation from school are considered still attending school.
2. Elementary, junior and senior high school students who have just been promoted to the next level at the time of the enumeration are considered still attending school.
3. Those who are currently attending an A/B/C program package or equivalent are considered no longer attending school.
4. A Diploma I program which is included in the criteria for attending school is only the diploma program in a formal level of education which is managed by an institution of higher learning.

[p. 126]
[Questions 213-214 were asked of persons age 5 or older who have ever attended school.]

Question 213: Has received a diploma/letter certifying course completion
Ask the highest level of education for which the household member has received a diploma/letter of course completion and make a mark in the oval for the code which corresponds to the respondent's answer.
Diploma/Letters of Course Completion include:

1. Never/not yet completed elementary school is the category for the person who has ever attended elementary school but never/has not yet completed elementary school, the elementary level of special schools for disabled children, elementary level of Madrasah Ibtidaiyah (Moslem religious education school), local elementary school organized by community, parents and teachers, Three Year Elementary School, A1 through A100 Packages, a pioneering project development elementary school or an Indonesian elementary school abroad. Those who have completed the third year of elementary school or an equivalent are considered not to have completed elementary school.
2. Completed elementary school or its equivalent means completed an elementary school/Madrasah Ibtidaiyah (Moslem religious education school), or an equivalent such as the elementary level of special schools for disabled children, local elementary school organized by community, parents and teachers, Three Year Elementary School, A1 through A100 Packages, a pioneering project development elementary school or an Indonesian elementary school abroad.
3. Completed Junior High School or its equivalent means completed junior high school (Madrasah Tsanawiyah) or an equivalent such as: MULO (junior high school during the Dutch time), HBS 3 years (type of school during the Dutch time), Secondary School for Children with Disabilities, Secondary School for Pioneering Project Development, Indonesian Junior High School (abroad) and Sports Junior High School.
[p.127]
4. Completed General Senior High School or its equivalent means completed general senior high school (Madrasah Aliyah) or similar schools such as: HBS 5 years and AMS (senior high schools during Dutch time), Senior High School for Development, Senior High School for Pioneering Project Development, Indonesian High School (abroad) and Senior High School for Sports.
5. Completed Vocational Senior High School means completed senior vocational school such as: Senior High School for Indonesian Crafts, Senior High School for the Arts, Senior High School for Traditional Music, Senior High School for Music, Senior High School for Agricultural Technology, Senior High School for Shipbuilding Technology, Senior High School for Mining Technology, Senior High School for Graphic Arts, Senior High School for Social Work, Senior High School for Family Welfare, Senior High School for Economics, Senior High School for Kindergarten Teachers, Senior High School for Pharmacy Assistant, Senior High School for Public Administration, Senior High School for Special Education Teachers, and Senior High School for Chemical Analysis.
6. Completed Diploma I/II means completed program DI/DII in an educational institution of higher learning which has the diploma I/II formal education program. The Akta I and II Programs are considered to be included in the DI/DII program.
7. Completed Diploma III/Academy means completed the DIII program or obtained a baccalaureate degree at an academy or an institution of higher learning which has such a program and confers a baccalaureate degree (sarjana muda) such as Academy of Arts of Indonesian Music, Academy of Arts of Indonesian Dance, Academy of Foreign Language, Academy of Management, Academy of Chemical Analysis, Academy of Meteorology and Geophysics.
[p.128]
8. Completed Diploma IV/S1 means completed a Diploma IV educational program or bachelor's degree at a University/Higher Learning Institution; the Akta IV Program is equivalent to the Diploma IV program.
9. Completed S2/S3 means completed a post graduate educational program including a Doctorate or Specialists I and II at a University or Institution of Higher Learning.

Note: Elementary, junior high and senior high students who have just passed the exam for their level of education can be considered as having received a diploma for that level.
Examples of enumerating household members who are attending Package A schools:

1. A household member studying Package A should be recorded as: Q212 = 3 and Q213 = 1.
2. A household member who has ever attended Package A but did not complete it (currently not active): Q212 = 3 and Q213 = 1.
3. A household member who has ever attended Package A and completed it and has passed the elementary school equivalent examination (currently not in school): Q212 = 3 and Q213 = 2.
4. A household member who has ever attended Package A and completed it (currently attending Package B): Q212 = 3 and Q213 = 2.
5. A household member who has ever attended Package A and completed it (currently attending junior high school): Q212 = 2 and Q213 = 2.

Question 214: Ability to Read and Write
Ask: "Can (Name) read and write Latin characters" and put a mark in the oval beside "Yes" or "No" in accordance with the respondent's answer to Q214a. Also ask: "Can (Name) read and write other characters" and put a mark in the oval beside "Yes" or "No" in accordance with the respondent's answer to Q214b.
[p. 129]
Able to Read and Write

A person is said to be able to read and write Latin characters if he/she can read and write some simple words/sentences written in Latin characters. Latin characters are those letters that are normally used to write in Indonesian, English, etc.
A person is said to be able to read and write other characters if he/she can read and write some simple words/sentences written in other characters such as Arabic and those used in Java (Hanacaraka), Batak, Lampung, China/Mandarin, Japan, Korea, and India.

Note:

a. A blind person who can read/write Braille is considered able to read and write.
b. A person who formerly was able to read and write, but because of a disability can no longer read and write is considered able to read and write.
c. A person who can only read but cannot write is considered able to read and write.

Household Members 10 Years or Older
Questions 215 through 218 are asked to household members who are 10 years of age or older. See Q204; if 10, 11, 12... 98 have been entered, then the relevant household member must be asked Q215 through Q218 where appropriate.

Question 215: Marital Status
Ask the marital status of the household member and mark the appropriate code. If unmarried mark code 1, married mark code 2, divorced code 3, and if widowed mark code 4.
Marital Status

1. Unmarried is the status of those who have not or are not married at the time of the enumeration.
[p. 130]
2. Married is the status of those who are married at the time of the enumeration, whether they live with the spouse or live separately. Here married includes those who are officially and legally married (according to custom, religion, the State, etc.) as well as those who live together and are considered to be husband and wife by society.
3. Divorced is the status of those who do not live together as husband and wife because they are divorced and have not married again. Those who say they are divorced, even though this status is not yet official, are considered divorced. On the other hand, those who temporarily are living separately, but do not considered themselves divorced, for example those who live separately due to school, work, search for work, or some quarrel, are not considered divorced.
4. Widow is the status of those whose husband/wife has died and they have not married again.

Explanation: A woman who is known to have never married but who has a child is considered divorced.

Questions 216 through 218: Labor Force
The objective of Q216 and Q218 is to obtain information about the labor force situation which covers activities carried out during the previous week, the main industry of that work, and the employment status of that main work activity.

Questions 216a through 216d: Activities during the Previous Week
Before asking the questions, begin with an introduction something like: "Now I will ask about work activities or endeavors of (Name) during the previous week. By previous week I mean the time period including yesterday, 2 days ago, 3 days ago, 4 days ago, 5 days ago, 6 days ago, and 7 days ago. During those 7 days (Pak Dodi) what were your activities?"
[p. 131]
Follow the questioning path correctly:

1. Begin with Q216a: Did the household member work or have some activity? If yes, go directly to QP217; if no, go directly to Q216b.
2. Q216b: Does the household member have a permanent job but was temporarily not working? If yes, go directly to Q217; if no, go directly to Q216c.
3. Q216c: Did the household member look for work or prepare for some activity? If yes, go directly to Q219; if no, go directly to Q216d.
4. Q216d: Is the household member available for work if there is some work? Regardless of the answer go directly to Q219.

Put a mark in the oval beside "Yes" or "No" in accordance with the respondent's answers to Q216a through 216d.
Activities the Previous Week
Some information necessary for filling in this question:

1. Previous week is the period of 7 consecutive days immediately prior to the day of the enumeration. For example, the enumeration is conducted on 16 May 2010, then the intended previous week includes 9 May through 15 May 2010.
2. Work is any type of activity that is carried out with the intention of obtaining or helping to obtain income or profit if performed for a period of at least one hour during the previous week. Work performed for one hour has to be performed continuously and cannot be interrupted. Income or profit can be in the form of wages/salary/income including all allowances and bonuses for a laborer/employee/worker or in the form of rent or profit for an entrepreneur.
3. Has a permanent job but during the previous week temporarily did not work due to vacation, illness, leave of absence, waiting for the next phase of work, or waiting to be called back to work.
[p. 132]
Explanation:
a. Carrying out work in the concept of working means conducting some economic activity which produces goods or services. Example: A household maid is considered working whether he/she is a member of the employer's household or not.
b. A person who has a profession which he uses to provide for his household needs is considered working. Example: A Doctor who gives medicine to one of his own household members, a construction worker who makes repairs to his own home and a tailor who sews his own clothes.
c. A household member who assists the head of household or another household member carry out his work such as in the rice field, other agricultural field, kiosk/shop and the like is considered to have work even though he does not receive wages/salary/income (unpaid worker).
d. A person who cultivates plants which are only for his own consumption is considered not working, except for the cultivation of main staple foods such as rice, corn, sago palm, or alternative crops (cassava, sweet potato, potato).
e. A casual worker either in the agricultural sector or nonagricultural sector who is waiting for work is considered not working.
4. Looking for work is the activity of those who are trying to find work.
Explanation:
Those classified as looking for work:
a. Those who have been relieved of their duties and will be called back to work, but currently they are looking for some other work.
b. Those who have never worked and now are looking for work.
c. Those who have ever worked, but for some reason stopped working or were terminated and now are looking for work.
d. Those who usually attend school or manage the household and now are looking for work. The time period is the previous week. Looking for work is not limited to the previous week, but can be carried out some time in the past as long as during the previous week they were still looking for work. Also included in this category are those who sent applications and are waiting for replies.
[p. 133]
5. Preparing for some activity is an activity carried out by someone in the framework of preparing for some "new" endeavor (not expanding or developing a current endeavor), with the intention of producing an income/profit at his own risk with or without employing a laborer/employee/worker either paid or unpaid.
Preparing for some activity means whether or not these measures were successful such as obtaining capital or equipment, looking for a place, obtaining license/permission to conduct a business and so on, these efforts were carried out.
Preparing for some activity doesn't include an activity which is just being planned, or just an intention and just attending courses/training for starting a business. Preparing for some activity in this question will later lead to a classification of one who works on his own (own account worker/self employed) or carries out a business/effort assisted by temporary workers/unpaid workers or assisted by permanent workers/paid workers.
Explanation:
The activity of preparing for some endeavor should not be limited to the period of the previous week, but could have been carried out some time earlier as long as during the previous week the respondent was still preparing for the endeavor.
Preparing for some endeavor includes the following:
a. Obtaining capital in the form of cash or kind needed for the endeavor or business either by obtaining the funds needed (the plans for the business are already clear/definite) or by borrowing from others or institutions which can extend credit.

[p. 134]

b. Those who are currently or have just recently organized the necessary licenses/permits in an effort to create a venture or business.
c. Those who currently or recently have looked for a place for the business or venture.
d. Those who have ever had a business and stopped/went bankrupt, but at the time of the enumeration were preparing for a venture/endeavor.
Examples:
a. Rahmi is building a store in the yard of his home as a means of preparing a business to sell Muslim clothing using funds borrowed from a cooperative.
b. After completing a beauty course last month, Intan is shopping for the items she needs for a beauty salon that she will open using money she has saved as the capital which she took from the bank two days ago.
c. Because Udin was let go from the company where he worked, he bought a motorbike last week in order to form a business of offering rides to those who need them [in Indonesian this type of business is called ojek).
d. Bingket is looking for a location to start a restaurant after her clothing store went bankrupt eight months ago.
6. Available for work means a person has the desire to work or accept a job, but is not actively looking for work. A respondent is categorized as available for work if the respondent spontaneously answers "Yes" or "I will". However, if the response contains certain conditions such as "Must see what the salary/wages are or asks what type of work it is or has other conditions or uses other words to express some hesitation such as perhaps, nevertheless, depends . . . ", then the respondent's answer is not classified as available for work.

Question 217: Industry/Field of Work of Primary Job
The objective of this question is to obtain detailed information on the industry/field of economic activity/work of the household member, which is carried out by asking place of work, what is the activity or the activity of the company where he/she works, and what is the product or what is produced by this company (product or service). It is expected that by asking the questions in this way, the detailed answers of the household member obtained about the industry of his/her work/economic activity can be categorized more precisely.
[p. 135]
[Note within graphic box:] Field of activity is the field of work or activity carried out by the business/endeavor/institution at the place where the respondent works.
Ask and then write clearly and in detail the field of activity of the primary job of the respondent. Putting a mark in the oval for one code in the list of field of activity of the main job will be carried out by the Team Coordinator.
The way to determine the primary job/economic activity is as follows:

1. If the household member during the previous week had only one job, then that job is recorded as his/her primary job/economic activity.
2. If the household member during the previous week had more than one job, then the job which required the longest amount of time or the most time is recorded as the primary job. If the amount of time is the same, then the job which has the largest income is recorded as the primary job. If the time and the income are the same, then the primary job is whichever the respondent considers to be his/her primary job.
3. A household member is considered to have more than one job if carrying out these jobs is done separately. A farm worker, even though he/she works for several farmers (carries out the work separately) is categorized as having only one job.

[Note from graphic box:] For a person who has more than one job during the previous week, the primary job is the one which requires the most time.
[p. 136]
Explanation:

1. If a household member who is currently on leave does not do any other work while on he/she is on leave, then the work from which he/she is on leave is his/her primary job. For example, a person works for an insurance company; during the past week while on sick leave, he/she does not do any other work. The job of this person is insurance company employee.
2. A household member is currently on leave and while on leave he/she does some other work; this other work is considered his/her primary job. For example, a person works in a wood furniture making factory; during the previous week during his leave or vacation he helps his wife sell clothing in the market. The job of this person is "helped wife sell clothing in the market."

Examples:

1. During the previous week, Rahmat who works as a doctor in the Maternity Clinic has some free time and during the previous week he spent more time helping his wife sell sports equipment. Rahmat's primary job during the previous week is selling sports equipment.
2. During the previous week a farmer, in addition to planting rice on his own field, also planted rice on someone else's field for a fee. This farmer is categorized as having two jobs which are planting rice on his own field and a farm worker planting food crops even though the industry is the same, that is, agricultural food crops.

[Note from graphic box:] Record the industry/field of activity as completely and as clearly as possible.
Various examples follow; hopefully these examples will give a true understanding of the intention of this question.

1. The response that is expected is not simply farmer, but a farmer who plants, takes care of, produces rice crop; then the industry is Agriculture, rice, corn, other grains.
2. The response that is expected is not simply driver, but driver of a private car, or driver in company making traditional herbs, or city transport driver. The answer is still a driver, but if the respondent's answer is detailed, then the classification of the industry/field of activity can be made with greater accuracy. For a driver of a private car, the industry is Other Services of an individual who serves a household. For a driver who works in a company making traditional herbs, the industry is Pharmaceutical and Herbal Industry, whereas for the city transport driver, the industry is Transportation and Storage.
[p. 137]
3. The response that is expected is not simply operates a business (entrepreneur), but sells household goods in a retail store. If only businessman/entrepreneur is recorded, it will be difficult to determine the industry, but a more complete response will aid in selecting the correct industry classification. For this example, the industry is Trade (Retail).

[Graphic box providing correct and incorrect examples for properly recording industry of main job is not presented here.]

Question 218: Status/Position of Main Job
192. Ask the status or position of the household member in his primary job. Put a mark beside the appropriate answer.
Job Status

1. Self employed is a job or activity in which a person takes all the economic risk including the risk of not being able to recover the cost of the production incurred, also without using either paid or unpaid workers. This includes situations where technology or expertise is required.
[p. 138]
Explanation:
If a company is founded by more than one person and no laborers/employees are used, each of the founders has the status of self employed.
Example:
A freelance driver (one who does not receive a salary) who uses the deposit system, pedicab driver, carpenter, stonemason, electrician, masseur, one who digs wells, newspaper agent, one who uses a motorbike to give people rides, merchant who works alone, doctor/midwife/shaman who has his/her own practice, ticket broker, real estate broker, and the like.
2. Self employed assisted by temporary laborers or unpaid workers is work or an endeavor at one's own risk and laborers/workers/employees are unpaid or temporary.
Example:
1. A food stall/store owner who is assisted by a member of the household who is unpaid or some other person who is paid based on the days he/she works.
2. Traveling merchant who is assisted by a temporary worker.
3. Traveling merchant who is assisted by a worker who is paid only when he/she works.
4. A farmer who works his farm land assisted by an unpaid worker. Even though the farmer shares part of the harvest with the worker, the worker is not considered a permanent worker.
3. Employer assisted by paid permanent workers is an endeavor at one's own risk in which at least one permanent, paid laborer/worker/employee is employed.
[p. 139]
Examples:
1. Shop owner who employs one or more permanent workers.
2. Cigarette factory which has permanent workers.
4. Laborer/worker/employee is a person who is employed by another person or institution/office/business on a permanent basis and receives wages/salary in the form of cash or kind. A worker who does not have a permanent employer is not classified as a laborer/worker/employee but as a casual worker. A worker is considered to have a permanent employer if he had the same employer as he had last month; in the construction sector a respondent would be considered a worker if he worked for the same employer for at least three months.
Examples:
1. Rico is a construction worker who has been repairing the house of Mr. Bedu for four months. Rico is classified as a laborer/worker/employee.
2. A housemaid who does not live in her employer's household but just works there is classified as a laborer/worker/employee.
5. Casual worker includes casual workers in agriculture and in non agriculture.
Casual Agricultural worker is a person who works temporarily for another person/employer/institution (more than one employer during the last month) in agriculture in the form of a household endeavor or not a household endeavor and gives his/her services in exchange for wages or payment in cash or in kind either using a daily payment system or a contract.
An agricultural endeavor includes food crop agriculture, plantations, forestry, animal husbandry, fisheries and hunting, and includes agricultural services.
An employer is a person or party that gives work and makes the payment agreed upon.
[p. 140]
Examples of a person who has the status of employer:
1. A rice farmer who employs a farm worker to harvest the rice and pays him a daily wage.
2. A plantation entrepreneur who hires a person to gather coconuts and pays him a wage.
Examples of casual agricultural worker:
1. Laborer who harvests rice,
2. Laborer who tills a rice/agricultural field,
3. Laborer who collects sap from rubber trees,
4. Laborer who catches shrimp from a pond,
5. Laborer who picks coffee, coconuts, cloves and the like.
Non agricultural casual worker is a person who works temporarily for another person/employer/institution (more than one employer during the last month), in a nonagricultural sector and receives a wage or payment in cash or in kind either with a daily payment system or a contract. Nonagricultural includes all sectors other than agriculture.
Examples of nonagricultural casual workers:
Porters in a market, station or other place who don't have a permanent employer, a recruiter for public transportation, traveling laundress, someone who picks through the trash, construction worker, someone directing parking, and the like.
6. Family or unpaid worker is someone who works assisting someone else without wages/salary neither in cash nor in kind.
[p. 141]
Family or unpaid workers can consist of:
1. A member of the household of the person assisted such as a wife who helps her husband in the rice field.
2. Not a member of the household but a member of the family of the person being assisted such as a sibling/relative who helps with sales in a food stall.
3. Not a member of the household or a member of the family of the person being assisted such as one who helps weave hats in a neighbor's cottage industry.

Ever Married Women Who Are 10 Years or Older
[p. 142]
Questions number 219, 220 and 221 are asked to women who have ever married who are 10 years or older. If Q203 has a code 2, Q204 (age) 10 or older, and Q215 has codes 2, 3 or 4, then Q219, Q220 and Q221 must be asked. If not all requirements are met, then Q219, Q220 and Q221 should not be asked and should be left BLANK (Don't enter code 00).
The information which will be collected from every female household member who has ever married aged 10 or older is: has she ever given birth to a baby born alive, number of children still living, number of children who have died and whether she has given birth to a child after 1 January 2009. Information about number of children born alive who are still living and number of children who died must be recorded in detail classified by sex and whether or not the living children live in this household or a different household. Stillborn children are not included in this question.

[The graphic illustrating this example is not presented here.]

Question 219: Children Born Alive
Ask Q219 carefully so that it is understood clearly by the respondent. When saying the phrase "born alive", don't separate the two words "born" and "alive" too much when asking the question. If it appears that the respondent doesn't quite understand, repeat the question completely. If necessary, explain the meaning of "born alive". (The enumerator is to be reminded that as he was trained, in reading the question he should be careful of his intonation so that the question is easily understood by the respondent.) If, after repeating the question, the respondent still doesn't understand, then the enumerator should try to ask the question in the local language which the respondent understands.

[p. 143]

Questions 220a, 220b and 220c: Total Number of Children Born Alive
Ask the total number of own children who were ever born alive to the household member who meets all the requirements [respondent has had a live birth]. Record the total number of children born alive, those who are still alive and live in this household or live in a different household as well as those who have already died. For the household member who has been married several times, this should include the children from all marriages from the first through the last.
Child born alive is an own child who at the time of its birth had signs of life, even though only for a very short time, such as heart beating, breathing, and crying.
Stillborn means that at the time of birth the child did not show any signs of life. A stillborn child is not included in this question.
If a child lives outside this household and it is not known whether the child is still alive, then it is assumed to be still alive.
In order to be clear and correct, the enumerator should read aloud the results he/she has recorded to confirm the information with the respondent. Say:

"So that I am sure that I have correctly recorded the information, please correct me if I have made any mistakes.
a. Number of own children of (Mrs. Arina, for example) still alive and who live in this household is (2, for example) boys and (1) girl.
b. Number of own children of (Mrs. Arina, for example) still alive and who live outside this household is (1, for example) boy and (no) girl.
c. Number of own children of (Mrs. Arina) who have died is (no) boy and (1) girl."

[p. 144]
Question 221: Children Born Alive since 1 JANUARY 2009
Ask the household member if she has ever given birth to a child born alive since 1 January 2009. The enumerator should be very careful in asking Q221 because this question if very similar to Q219. It must be noted that the time period being considered for Q221 is from 1 January 2009, to the time of the enumeration, not the life of the respondent.
[Note within graphic box:] Every female member of the household aged 10 years or older and has ever been married is asked:

a. Have you ever given birth to a child?
b. How many children do you have?
c. Have you given birth since 1 January 2009?

III. Mortality
Block III. Mortality
The objective of this Block is to obtain information about deaths that occurred in the household from 1 January 2009 until the time of the enumeration. Information collected is the total number of household members (during this period) who died, the names of those who died, their sex and their age at death, and the cause of death for females age 10 years or older.
In general a death is reported widely among the relatives and therefore it is not easy to forget. Information collected in this census also is information which is talked about so it is not something that is too personal or unlikely to be known. Nevertheless, the enumerator must ask in an intelligent and respectful manner since a death is always a sad event.
[Note within graphic box:] This data on deaths is important. It is expected that the enumerator will ask about the deaths from 1 January 2009 until the time of the enumeration in a careful way.

[p. 145]

Question 301: Deaths since 1 January 2009
Interview procedure regarding deaths:

1. Before beginning to ask the questions, begin with a brief statement, for example: "Now I will ask you about deaths that have occurred in this household during the last year and a half. Please call to mind whether or not there were any deaths among any members of this household during the last year and a half, that is, since 1 January 2009 until now.
2. If someone has died since 1 January 2009, ask: "How many have died and what are their names?" Then put a mark in Q301 for the answer "Yes", and write the number of deaths. Record the name of each person who died in Q302, with one name per Column, following the order given by the respondent. After the respondent mentions one name, ask: "Are there more?"
Continue in this manner so that the names of those who died during this period will be complete before going on to another question regarding each of these deaths. Calculate the number of names recorded and make sure that number agrees with the number recorded for the answer to Q301 about the number of deaths.
For example, the respondent mentions 2 names, that is, Amir and Badu, then record Amir in the first column of Q302 and Badu in the second column. In Q301 mark the answer 2 people.
3. Continue to ask about every death; begin with the name recorded in the first column and ask
Q303 Q305. Example:
Q303: "Now I will ask several questions about each person who died or about the late [Amir, for example). What was the sex of (Amir)?"
Q304": "What month and year did (Amir) die?"
Q305: "How old was (Amir) when he died?"
[p. 146]
4. Put a mark in the oval for Q306 according to the answers given for Q303 and Q305. If any of those who died were "female" and "10 years of age or older", mark code 1; for any other answer mark code 2.
5. If Q306 has a code 1 ask Q307. Then if Q307 has a code 1, directly fill in Q308.
6. Continue to the next death if there is one; if there aren't any more, then continue to Block IV.

When asking Q303 Q308 the enumerator may not move to the right to record answers or ask one question about the first person who died, then the second person who died, and so on, but must ask all questions about the first person who died and then ask all of the questions about the second person who died and so on.
Deaths recorded do not include babies who were stillborn (those who died in the uterus before being born, that is died without any sign of life such as crying, having a pulse, reflexes, movement and pale skin tone, at 22 weeks or more).
If the total number of deaths since 1 January 2009 is more than 3 persons, enter this in the box provided and to enter the information about the deaths of persons 4 and so on, use a new set of form C1. For example, if the total number of deaths is 5 persons, the method of recording this is:

1. Put a mark in Q301 for the answer "Yes" and enter the number "5"in the box on the main set of Form C1 and enter 2 on the additional set of form C1.
2. Write 3 names on the main set of Form C1 and 2 names on the additional set of Form C1.
3. Follow the instructions for entering the total number of sets on the cover page.
4. On the second set (the additional set) fill in the complete identification information.

Question 302: Names of Those Who Died
Write the names of all household members who died since 1 January 2009 in the appropriate column of Q302. If the one who died is a baby who had not yet been named, then write "Baby" as the name.

[p. 147]
Question 303: Sex
Put a mark in the oval beside the sex of the person who died.

Question 304: Month and Year of Death
Ask the month and year of death of each household member who died. Record the month as a number and mark the oval beside the appropriate year.

Question 305: Age at Time of Death
Ask the age at death of each person who died and round the age downward. The explanation for calculating age is the same as that for Q204.
Example:

a. If the age of a child who died is less than 1 year (0 11 months), the age at death is entered as 00 in the boxes.
b. If the age of a child at death is 1 year 11 months, enter the age as 01 in the boxes.
c. If a person is who died is 58 years and 4 months, the age at death is entered in the boxes as 58.
d. If the age at death is 98 years or older, enter the age in the boxes as 98.

[p. 148]
[Graphic showing questions 301 308 on the enumeration form is not presented here.]
Question 306: Deceased was female and aged 10 or older
Put a mark beside the answer "Yes" if the deceased is female aged 10 or older. If this is not the case, put a mark beside the answer "No". Q306 is used as a filter to determine whether Q307 should be asked.. If Q306 = Yes, continue to Q307; if Q306 = No, then continue to the next deceased person or directly to Block IV.

[p. 149]
[Note within graphic box:] Questions 307 and 208 are only concerned with females who are aged 10 or older.

Questions 307 308: Female Death Related to Pregnancy
Q307 Q308 are used as filters to determine whether a death occurred during pregnancy, during childbirth, or within 2 months of childbirth (masa nifas). Ask if the deceased died during any of these periods. Put a mark beside the answer "Yes" if the death occurred during one of these periods or put a mark beside the answer "No" if the death was not in one of these periods.
If the respondent does not have any knowledge about the death during pregnancy of the deceased, then for Q307 put a mark beside the answer "No" (code 2).
Death during pregnancy, childbirth, or the period of 2 months after childbirth

1. Death of a woman during pregnancy is a death that occurs while the woman is pregnant. The death can be caused by many factors, including complications such as bleeding or abnormal blood pressure.
2. Death of a woman during childbirth is a death that occurs during the childbirth process or the actual birth of the baby. Death can be caused by hemorrhaging during birth, abnormal position of the placenta, mistake made during the birth, and others.
3. Death of a woman during the 2 months after childbirth is a death that occurs during the 2 months which follow the birth of the baby. During these 2 months the death is considered related to childbirth.
[p. 150]
A woman who died during a miscarriage or abortion is categorized as the death of a woman, who died during pregnancy, and therefore Q307 will be coded 1 and Q308 will be coded 1.
A woman who died during the two month period following a miscarriage or abortion is categorized as the death of a woman within 2 months after childbirth (masa nifas); therefore Q307 will be coded 1 and Q308 will be coded 3.
Death can be also caused by problems that might not be directly related to pregnancy or childbirth, but happened when a woman is pregnant, during childbirth, or during the period of 2 months after the end of the pregnancy; record the answer as "Yes"(code 1) for Question 307.
Based on the explanation given by the respondent, record the answer to Q308 by putting a mark at one of the following:

1. Code 1 for those who died during pregnancy,
2. Code 2 for those who died during childbirth,
3. Code 3 for those who died during the period 2 months after childbirth.

It is important to know that pregnancy for a woman usually occurs when she is between the ages of 10 49 years. If there is a maternal death of a woman who is 50 years old or older, the enumerator must ask the respondent again to determine whether there was a mistake about the woman being pregnant or whether the age of the woman was incorrect.
Coverage of Death Events in a Household
Recording death events in a household, particularly if it is the former head of household or a former household member who died, can be confusing because the structure of the household will have greatly changed. Another complication arises if some of the household members have moved or changed. Situations with big changes seldom occur since the period under consideration in this census is the period of one and a half years.
The method of recording death events follows the examples in the three cases below:
[p. 151]

[The three examples referred to in the line above are presented in a table format p. 151to152 and are not presented here.]
[p. 153]

IV. Housing Characteristics
Block IV. Housing Characteristics
The objective of this Block is to obtain information on the availability of housing facilities and ownership of the living quarters of the household.

Question 401: Type of Largest Floor Area
Observe the floor or the covering/foundation/base of the building of the respondent's dwelling and determine the type of floor. If only a small portion can be observed, ask the respondent if the remainder of the floor which cannot be observed is the same as the type which can be observed. If there are different types of flooring, record the one with the largest area. If the building has more than one level, then determine the largest area of all the levels.
Put a mark beside the type of floor of the largest floor area of the dwelling occupied by the household; mark only one type of flooring. The categories of floor types consist of: ceramic/marble/granite, tiles/terrazzo, cement, bricks, wood/board, bamboo, dirt/earth, and others. A tile floor which has been covered with vinyl or carpet is still recorded as tile.
In some areas floors from marble/ceramic/granite, tile//terrazzo, or cement, are all referred to as "tile". Thus, the enumerator must be careful. Use the categories for floor type in Form C1.

Question 402: Floor Area
Carefully calculate floor area of the dwelling of the respondent's household. Write the result in square meters.
Floor Area is the total area of all floors from each part of the building (under the roof) which is occupied and used for the daily needs by the household, including a terrace, garage, place for washing, toilet, storage area, and includes all floors in a storied building that are in one census building.

The floor area of a dwelling of a household does not include a special area for some endeavor/venture, food stall, shop, beauty salon, place for livestock, place for drying clothing (even though cemented), place for storing grain, etc. For a storied building the floor area is the total floor area including all levels which are occupied.
[p. 154]
Note:

1. If one census building is occupied by several households, the floor area which is used by all of the households is divided by the number of households which use it.
2. If there are 2 separate buildings occupied by one household and they are both in the same census block, then the floor area is calculated including the floor area of both buildings.
3. If there is an indoor garden or a garden beside the house but still under the roof, then these areas are used to calculate the total floor area.
4. If the floor area is more than 9998 m2 enter 9998 as the area.

Example:
Mr. Rudi lives with his wife and 2 children in one census building. Kamila also lives in this census building; she is a university student who rents a room which measures (3x4) m2 and manages her food by herself. In addition to that room, Kamila also uses the bathroom which is owned by Mr. Rudi's family which measures (3 x 3) m2, and she may also watch TV in the family room which measures (4 x 5) m2. Mr. Rudi and his wife occupy a room measuring (4 x 4) m2, and their children occupy a room measuring (3 x 4) m2. The wife of Mr. Rudi cooks on a daily basis in the kitchen which measures (2 x 4) m2, and only Mr. Rudi's family may receive guests in the guest room which is (3 x 3) m2.
In this example, the answer to Q402 would be:
Mr. Rudi's household = 9/2 + 20/2 + 16 + 12 + 8 + 9 = 59.5 m2; enter 0060 in the boxes for Q402.
Kamila's household = 12+ 9/2 + 20/2 = 26.5 m2; enter 0026 in the boxes for Q402.

Question 403: Primary Source of lighting
[p. 155]
Select one of the codes for the lighting source used by the household, and then put a mark beside the source that corresponds to the respondent's answer. If the household uses more than one source of lighting, then select the lighting source that has the highest "value", which is usually the smallest code.

1. State Electric Company with meter is a source of lighting which is produced by PLN which is the State Electric Company; households are subscribers of the company and there is a meter used to measure the total amount of electricity used by the household. Included in this category are those households which share the use of a meter.
2. State Electric Company without meter is a source of lighting which is produced by PLN, which is the State Electric Company, but no meter is installed at the house. Included in this category are those households which are connected to the electrical source illegally.
3. Electricity not from the State Electric Company is a source of electrical lighting which is produced by an institution/other body other than the State Electric Company; this includes those who use batteries, generators and solar electrical power generation (not produced by the State Electric Company).
4. Non electric is a source of lighting of a household other than electricity, such as gas lamps (LPG liquid petroleum gas) and biogas produced by the individual or a group, light produced by using kerosene (high pressure lamps (petromak, Aladdin, small kerosene lamp that uses a wick and chimney and can be hung on the wall, flashlight, small lamp with wick and open flame, and the like) and others (lamp using carbide, candle, lamp whose oil comes from hazelnuts and castor oil nuts).

Question 404: Main Source of Energy for Daily Cooking
[p. 156]
Ask the main fuel or source of energy used by the household for daily cooking. Select one of the response codes in accordance with the respondent's answer, and put a mark beside that code. If a household uses more than one of type of fuel, select the one they use the most or the one which they use most often.

Question 405: Main Source of Drinking Water
Ask the main source of drinking water used by the household. Select one of the response codes in accordance with the respondent's answer.
It is important to remember that it is the source that is asked here. Thus, if a respondent's household gets its water from a well/spring that is channeled to the house, then the water source is well/spring. If a respondent uses water that comes from various sources, then select the source that provides the greatest volume of the water used by the household.
Source of Drinking Water

1. Bottled water is water produced and distributed by a company in bottles (500 ml, 600 ml, 1 liter, 12 liter or 19 liter) and glasses/cups; some of the brand names of these bottled waters are: Aqua, VIT, Airess, Moya, 2 Tang, MQ, and includes refilled drinking water bottles.
2. Water piped inside the house is water treated and purified before being sent to the consumer's house via water pipes. Some of the sources are The Drinking Water Company (Perusahaan Air Minum or PAM), the Local Drinking Water Company, or the Drinking Water Production Board managed either by the government or privately.
3. Piped water outside the house purchased at retail is water treated and purified before being sent to the consumer via water piped to a public/specified place. A household which obtains its water in this way whether they purchase it or not are included in this category.
4. Pump is ground water that is obtained using a manual pump, electric pump, or windmill, including artesian wells (sumur pantek).
[p. 157]
5. Wells are dug into the ground to find the water that is there. A bucket or dipper with a handle is used to obtain the water with or without a pulley. Well water is divided into 2 categories, they are, protected water well and non protected water well.
Protected water well (code 5) is water which comes from the ground where the outer perimeter of the well is protected by a wall at least .8 meters above the ground and 3 meters below the ground and there is a cement floor surrounding the opening of the well with a radius of at least 1 meter.
6. Unprotected Well (code 6) is water which comes from the ground where the outer perimeter of the well is not protected by a wall and does not have cement floor surrounding the opening of the well with a radius of at least 1 meter.
7. Spring is a source of ground water where the water comes to the surface by itself.
Protected spring (code 7) is one which is protected from dirty water used for bathing, washing, etc.
8. Unprotected spring (code 8) is one which is not protected from dirty water used for bathing, washing, etc.
9. River water is water which comes from a river.
10. Rain water is water that is collected when it is raining.
11. Other is any type of water source which is not included in the categories given above, such as water from basin/lake, sea water, and water from a pool.

Explanation:
[p. 158]

1. A household whose drinking water comes from a seller who goes from house to house is considered water outside the house purchased at retail.
2. A household whose drinking water comes from a spring or collected rain water but comes into the house through a pipe/plumbing without purifying it first, is still considered to have a spring or rain water as its source of drinking water.
3. A household whose drinking water comes from rain water during the rainy season and purchases water during the dry season is categorized based on which source provided the most drinking water during the past month.
4. A household which obtains it drinking water through refills is considered to have bottled water as its source of drinking water.
5. If a household uses a protected well as its source of drinking water, however, to bring up the water it uses a pump (either manual or electric), the source of drinking water for this household is protected well.
6. The source of piped drinking water which comes either from a protected or unprotected well depends on whether the pipes are inside the house, outside the house or in a public place.

Question 406: Type of Toilet Facility Used
229. Ask the type of toilet facility used by members of the household and put a mark beside the code which corresponds to the answer.
This question is asking if a toilet facility is available for the use of the members of the household.
Toilet Facility

1. Private means a latrine/toilet which is used only by the members of the respondent's household, even though from time to time it may be used by others.
2. Shared is a latrine/toilet which is used by several specific households.
[p. 159]
3. Public is a latrine/toilet whose use is not limited to certain households, but whoever wants to use it can use it.
4. No facility means there is no facility provided, for example an open field can be used (field/garden/yard/thicket), beach/shore, river, lake, pool, and other.

Question 407: Type of Waste Disposal System
Ask and place a mark beside the appropriate answer.
Waste Disposal System

1. With a septic tank is a place for disposing of waste which is usually a basin made from brick/stone or cement, with or without absorption.
2. Without a septic tank such as into a hole in the ground or directly into river/water.
3. No disposal facility means there is no disposal facility provided for the waste and waste is put into a pool, rice field, river, lake, sea, hole in the ground, shore, open field, garden.

Question 408: Telephone Usage
Ask if the household has a land line telephone (connected to a public telephone network) or a cellular telephone (mobile or hand phone). Select the code for the answer which corresponds to the respondent's answer.
Explanation:

1. If the land line or cellular telephone is not working at the time of the enumeration, but will soon be repaired or a new one will be purchased within the next month, then this household is considered to have a telephone.
[p. 160]
2. If at the time of the enumeration the household has a land line/cellular telephone which is dead because the telephone bill has not been paid, but if the bill will be paid within the next month, this household is considered to have a telephone.
3. If a household member has a subscription to the products Esia and Flexi which can function as a cellular phone and also a home telephone, then the household is categorized as one which has a cellular phone.
4. If in the area around the dwelling there is no signal, however, the cellular phone can be used once it is away from the dwelling no further than 5 km., then this household is considered to have a cellular phone.

Question 409: Accessed the Internet During the Last 3 Months
Ask whether there is any household member who accessed the internet in the last 3 months. Accessed the internet here means actively used the internet including access using a cellular phone.

Internet (Interconnected Network) is a global communication system connected to computers and computer networks around the world. Computers used to access the internet include computers inside the household and those outside the household (internet cafe, office, school, relative's house, friend's house, and others).

Question 410: Ownership Status of the Dwelling
Ask the ownership status of the dwelling of this household; put a mark beside one of codes which corresponds to the answer.
Ownership Status of the Dwelling
[p. 161]

1. Owned is the status if at the time of the enumeration the dwelling is really already owned by the head of household or by any household member. A dwelling purchased with credit from a bank with installments or a dwelling which is rented with an option to purchase is considered owned.
2. Rented is the status if the dwelling is rented by the head of household or any household member by making regular payments without a certain time limit.
3. Contract is the status if the dwelling is rented by the head of household or any household member for a fixed period of time based on an agreed contract between the owner and the occupant, say 1 or 2 years. Usually the entire amount of the contract is paid at the beginning of the contract or payments can be made over the life of the contract depending upon what was agreed upon by the parties. At the end of the contract, the one occupying the dwelling must leave the dwelling; if the two parties agree, the occupant can extend his stay by preparing a new contract.
4. Other is the status of a dwelling which cannot be categorized as one of the above categories, such as cooperative ownership, traditional house, official residence, and includes living rent free.

If the answer is OWNED, then continue with question 411. If the answer is anything other than OWNED, the interview with this household is finished.
[A graphic showing this question and where to stop on the enumeration form is not presented here.]

[p. 162]
Question 411: Proof of Ownership
Ask in 411 if his household has any proof of ownership of the land of this dwelling. If Yes, ask Q412 to obtain information about the type of proof of ownership. If No, the interview with this household is finished.

Question 412: Type of Land Ownership Proof
Ask what type of proof of ownership the household has for the land for this household's dwelling.
Ownership Proof

1. Certificate giving Property Rights (Hak Milik) in the name of a household member is a certificate which is issued by the National Land Board or the Agrarian Office regarding a piece of land to the owner of the land which in this case is a household member.
2. Certificate giving Property Rights (Hak Milik) not in the name of a household member is a certificate which is issued by the National Land Board or the Agrarian Office regarding a piece of land to the owner of the land who is not a member of this household.
3. Other certificate is a document issued by the National Land Board or the Agrarian Office regarding a piece of land to the owner of the land who is a member of this household. This certificate can be in the form of:
a. Certificate giving the right to build on the land (SHGB hak guna bangunan).
b. Certificate giving the right to use the land (SHP hak pakai).
c. Certificate giving ownership of a unit of an apartment building (SHM SRS).
4. Other (Title of land ownership, Purchase/Sale Agreement, etc.) is any other document showing ownership issued by an official who prepares land documents. Title of land ownership (Girik) is a letter confirming land ownership usually called a Letter C which is a copy of that issued by the Head of the Village either for a subdivision of a piece of land or for the entire plot of land. Purchase/Sale Agreement is an agreement issued by a notary regarding the sale and purchase of property, either one that is already in the name of a household member or another person. Included in Others is a certificate conferring the right to use the property for business (SHGU Sertifikat Hak Guna Usaha).

[p. 163]

Some other proof which strengthens the proof to control but not proof of ownership; examples are a letter from an institution not a notary/qualified officer to prepare land documents, letter confirming land control from the local government (formerly known as Ipeda/yellow card), other documents such as a building permit, permit to work on the land (normally from the State Forest Enterprise).

Note:

1. A certificate in the name of a family member who has been away more than 6 months (not a household member at the time of the census) is considered a certificate in the name of a household member. For example, a certificate in the name of a relative who works or goes to school elsewhere, but comes home when he/she has leave, is considered a certificate in the name of a household member.
2. If a certificate is in the name of a family member who has formed his own household, then the certificate is not in the name of a household member.

Example:
A piece of land is owned jointly (for example by households A and B) with one certificate in the name of A. Each household owns a building on the land according to the way it was divided. In this case, each household owns its dwelling (Q410 = 1), but only household A (whose name is on the certificate and holds it) has a certificate of proof of ownership in the name of a household member (Q411 = 1; Q412 = 1). Household B is not considered to have proof of ownership (Q411 = 2).
[p. 164]
If in the above case, A and B both have obtained a document prepared by notaries (probably a purchase/sell agreement or a bequest), however, a certificate in the name of each of them has not yet been issued, then A has proof of ownership in the name of a household member, however, B has a Purchase/Sell Agreememt (Q411 = 1; Q412 = 4). [In the original document, the code for Q412 was incorrectly given as 3]

COMPLETING THE INTERVIEW AND REVIEWING FORM C1
The quality of the enumeration depends very much on the completeness and correctness of the entries along with the clarity in writing/marking the entries. Because of this, before delivering Form C1 to the Team Coordinator, the enumerator must do the following:

1. Ensure that all household members have been enumerated with the household and individual questionnaire in accordance with the household as recorded in the listing.
2. Check that the total number of household members entered in Block I in the List of Household Members is the same as the total number of Block II forms for individual household members. The total number of household members in Block I must be the same as the number of filled in sheets of Block II.
3. Be sure the questionnaire is completely filled in. No question may be skipped (in accordance with the questioning path).
4. The numbers and 'markings' are clear and have been entered according to the specified rules.
5. If there are any responses about which there is doubt, re ask the questions to be clear and obtain the answer which is correct at that time.
6. At the time the interview is completed with the respondent, review the questionnaire so that if there is an answer which has not been entered, the question can be asked and answered to complete the questionnaire.

[p. 165]

Form C1(LP) or Form C1 Additional
One set of Form C1 is sufficient to record 6 household members and 3 death events in one household.

1. If the number of household members is 7 to 10 persons, use Form C1(LP). On Form C1 (LP) copy the Serial Number from the main Form C1.
2. If the number of household members is 10 or more, use an additional set or additional sets of Form C1. On these additional sets, copy the identification information and the total number of household members [from the main Form C1].
3. If there are more than 3 death events (Block III, Q301), use a new set of Form C1 for the additional death events. On the additional set of Form C1 copy the identification information and the total number of household members.

When storing and sending the documents, all additional Forms C1 should be placed inside the main Form C1.

[A graphic displaying how to complete the forms on p. 166 is not presented here.]