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[Indonesia
Manual for Enumerator
Population Census 2005]

[p. 1]

I. Introduction

1.1 Background
The main source of demographic data is the Population Census, which according to law must be conducted once every ten years. Since Indonesia's independence, a population census has been conducted in 1961, 1971, 1980, 1990 and 2000. The next Population Census will be carried out in 2010.

The Intercensal Population Survey (SUPAS) is the source of mid-decade data between two population censuses. SUPAS has already been conducted three times, that is, in 1976, 1985 and 1995. Now in 2005 this SUPAS will be executed under the name SUPAS05.

As in previously-conducted intercensal surveys, the data to be collected cover: basic population characteristics, fertility, mortality, migration, employment, and living quarters. In addition to those items, SUPAS05 will also cover population registration, commuters, circular migrants, ethnicity, and the elderly.

1.2 Objectives of SUPAS05
The objectives of SUPAS05 are to:
a. Estimate the population by sex and urban/rural [area] with details at the regency/municipality level, as of the middle of 2005.

b. Provide data for various estimates and analyses of fertility.

c. Provide data for various estimates and analyses of mortality.

d. Provide data for various estimates and analyses of migration.

e. Provide data to be used to evaluate the completeness of the population registration and the reporting of vital events such as births, deaths and migration.

f. Provide data to observe the phenomenon of population mobility.

[p. 2]

g. Provide data to be used to evaluate the family planning program from the program side as well as from [the point of view] of the people.

h. Provide data on population demographic characteristics such as sex, age, marital status, nationality, ethnicity, education, religion, occupation, the elderly and the condition of living quarters.

1.3 Area of coverage
SUPAS05 will be conducted in all regions of Indonesia, and thus will cover all (30) provinces and all (440) regencies/municipalities. The Survey's target is the population who permanently reside in an area that has been divided into a number of units called normal census blocks (CB). A number of CBs are selected at random to represent the regencies/municipalities. The statistical estimates that are produced represent the numbers at the national, provincial, and regency / municipality levels. Nevertheless, it must be realized that not all characteristics collected in SUPAS05 can be presented at the regency/municipality level, because for some characteristics the occurrence is rare or because there is a limitation in the definition or concept of a particular characteristic.

1.4 Population coverage
The definition of a resident for SUPAS05 follows the so-called de jure approach, that is a person is a resident of the region where he/she usually lives, in his/her house or wherever he/she is a member of a household, or where he/she resides permanently. This differs from the de facto approach, in which a person is a resident of the region in which he/she is living/staying at the time he/she is found during the enumeration, even though he/she is staying there temporarily (lodge for the night/visiting). If someone has resided in a place already 6 months or more, then he/she is already considered a resident there, and he/she can be counted as a resident there using the de jure approach. If someone has been residing in a place for fewer than 6 months, but he/she intends to stay there, then he/she can also be considered a resident there using the de jure approach.

[p. 3]

1.5 Methods of data collection
In the same manner as in the Population Census and previous SUPAS, SUPAS05 will collect data using the household as the unit to be interviewed. A household is a group of people that is the smallest unit in the community; it can be considered unique (specific) in the sense that each is unrelated to the others and any individual can only belong to one household (mutually exclusive) using the definitions that are operational in the field. Households can be grouped into units called census blocks, which will form the framework (sampling frame) of households to be used to select the sample.

The data collection phase begins by listing or registering all buildings and households in the selected CBs. All buildings used as living quarters and those who live there are recorded on Form SUPAS05--L. Based on the results of the listing, 16 households per selected CB are randomly selected as the sample to be enumerated in the second phase. Every household selected is visited again for enumeration using Form SUPAS05--S.

1.6 Types of data collected
Information collected in SUPAS05 covers, among others:

a. Information on the building, household and the number of household members.
b. Information on basic demographics, such as name, relationship to head of the household, sex, age (month and year of birth) and marital status.
c. Information about participation of the household in the population registration, that is, birth certificate, identity card, family registration card, birth registration, death registration, and letter of relocation.
d. Deaths that have occurred since January 2002.
e. Information on nationality, religion and ethnicity.
f. Information of education and literacy.
g. Information on lifetime migration, recent migration, total migration, and circular migration.
h. Information on commuting of household members.
i. Information on the economic activity of household members age 10 or older.

[p. 4]

j. Information on household members who are age 60 or older.
k. Information on women who have ever been married and are age 10 or older (EMW) about marriage and fertility.
l. Information on the birth history of own-children of EMW.
m. Information on the practice of family planning by EMW.
n. Information on the own sisters of EMW.
o. Information on the condition and facilities of the living quarter.

[Sections 1.7.1-1.7.2 listing preparation and field operations in the original document are omitted here.]

[Page 5 listing stages of data processing in the original document is not presented here.]

[Page 6 is blank]

[p. 7]

II. Methodologies of SUPAS 2005
The survey methodologies used in SUPAS05 cover: sampling design, the plan for methods of data collection and field organization, and data processing and estimation procedures.

2.1 Sampling design
The sampling design for SUPAS05 consists of three stages, that is, selection of the sample of CBs (census blocks), selection of sub-CBs, and selection of the sample households. The selection of sub-CB stage is only conducted for CBs that contain 150 households or more.

The selection of sample CBs is conducted using PPS (probability proportional to size) -- linear systematic sampling where size refers to the number of households in the selected census block resulting from the sustainable voter and population registration (P4B -- Pendaftaran Pemilih dan Pendataan Penduduk Berkelanjutan). The sampling frame of CBs used is the list of CBs in each regency/municipality classified by urban and rural.

The selection of sub-CBs is conducted using the linear systematic technique also, selecting one sub-CB in any given CB that has 150 or more households. The sampling frame is the list of sub-CBs, namely one or some nearby segments, formed in such a manner that at most each sub-block contains only around 100 households. Forming a sub-CB is based on the results of the P4B from a previous BPS survey activity.

Selection of the sample households is conducted in each CB or sub-CB is carried with the linear systematic technique, selecting 16 households per CB or sub-CB. The sampling frame of households is the result of the listing for SUPAS05 using Form SUPAS05-L.

[p. 8]

2.2 Plan for data collection
Data collecting is conducted in two stages: listing the CB or sub-CB sample and enumerating the selected households. The result of the listing is used as the sampling frame for the household selection; thus, the summary of the listing data can be used as the basis to estimate the number of households and the total population. The results of the enumeration of the sample households provide the basic data for household characteristics and population.

To collect the data mentioned above the procedure will be as follows:

i. Field preparation consists of: (a) inventorying and identifying the selected CBs; (b) selecting sub-CBs for CBs of 150 or more households; (c) copying of sketch maps of CBs/sub-CBs; (d) canvassing the selected CBs/sub-CB; and (e) distributing documents.

ii. Conduct the listing of buildings and households in the CB/sub-CB using Form SUPAS05-L.

iii. Select the sample households based on the results of the listing.

iv. Enumerate the selected households using Form SUPAS05-S.

Data collected are generally the result of the interview and the result of the observation of the enumerator. The basic questions are organized in two different forms, that is: Form SUPAS05-L and Form SUPAS05-S. The enumerator asks the questions in accordance as written on the forms in Indonesian, but he/she can raise additional questions or re-word the question if a respondent does not understand the language used in the forms. The respondent's answer is noted by circling codes or writing the respondent's answer on the appropriate forms provided.

[p. 9]

[The graphic representation of the data collection process in the original document is omitted here.]

[Page 10 is blank]

[p. 11]

III. Field organization
To facilitate the flow of all activities in SUPAS05, a technical and administrative committee was formed at the central office. This committee coordinates and integrates all activities beginning with the planning phases, and continues with the preparation, field execution, processing, dissemination and analysis phases. At the regional level SUSPAS05 activities are concentrated in the field operations which include recruitment of field workers, training, and data collection (listing and sample enumeration).

In general the person responsible for the field operations at the provincial level is the head of the statistics office in the province. At the regency/municipality level the person responsible is the head of the regency/municipality statistical office. At each respective level the activities of SUPAS05 are coordinated by the head of the Social Statistic Branch of the provincial statistical office and the head of the Social Statistics Section of the regency/municipality statistical office.

The technical personnel needed in the field operation of SUPAS05 are the field workers and the instructors. The field workers consist of the enumerators and the supervisors/examiners. The instructors consist of the national instructors (Innas) and the master instructors (Intama).

This chapter will elaborate the duties and functions of these personnel involved in the field operations of SUPAS05, types of documents (data collection instruments) and the flow of the documents, and general guidelines for interviewing.

3.1 Field workers for SUPAS05
a. Enumerators for SUPAS05 are the BPS staff or the sub-district statistical coordinator (KSK) / statistical officer or the appointed statistical officer who were trained for SUPAS05 and considered competent to undertake the task by the national instructors (Innas) based on the training results.

[p. 12]

b. Supervisors/examiners for SUPAS05 are the head of the Social Statistics section of the regency/municipality statistical office, or the staff of the provincial/regency/municipality statistical office, or the KSK who was trained for SUPAS05 and considered competent to undertake the task by the national instructors (Innas) based on the training results.

[Section 3.2 listing responsibilities of the enumerators in the original document is not presented here.]

[Page 13 listing responsibilities of supervisors in the original document is not presented here.]

[Page 14 listing types of forms used in the original document is not presented here.]

[p. 15]

3.6 General guidelines for interviewing
Data collecting in SUPAS05 is conducted by visiting the selected household and interviewing household members. For the best possible results, the enumerator must pay attention to the following guidelines:

a. When making a visit, be on time. Visit the household when the respondent is likely to be at home. Don't visit when the household is busy entertaining at a party or ceremony.

b. No one is allowed to accompany the enumerator when the interview takes place, except for a supervisor/examiner or a BPS officer to monitor the enumeration.

c. Before entering the respondent's house, the enumerator must request permission to enter by saying a greeting, knocking at the door, or by some other method that is normally used in that particular region.

d. The enumerator should begin by introducing himself/herself and explain the reason for the visit. If necessary, show the identity letter or badge.

e. Before asking the questions on the questionnaire, the enumerator should explain the importance of this population survey (SUPAS05) and assure the respondent that all information given by the respondent will be kept confidential.

f. The enumerator should confirm that all information collected will only appear in the aggregate to be used for development planning programs and there is no connection with investigations or taxes.

g. The enumerator must always be friendly and polite with the respondent.

h. The enumerator must take care that there is always a communicative atmosphere so that the respondent does not feel a lack of respect and become unwilling to give precise and correct answers. If the respondent does not understand the Indonesian language, the enumerator may use a language the respondent understands as long as the meanings of the questions are not changed.

i. In conducting the interview, the enumerator will encounter respondents with various attitudes; some of them will be honest and willing to help, some will be doubtful and imprecise; a small part will be suspicious and confrontational. The enumerator must use his/her communication skills and be patient and sociable in order to successfully complete the interview.

j. If the respondent tries to take control of the conversation and turn to other matters which are not related to SUPAS05, the enumerator must skillfully bring the discussion back to the material in the questionnaire.

k. Sometimes an enumerator will find a respondent who refuses to answer. Work prudently to get the information needed. If the respondent continues to refuse and the questionnaire cannot be completed, report this to the supervisor/examiner.

l. The enumerator should not give any negative comments to the respondent's answers and should not lose patience. Remain calm when facing any undesirable situation.

m. The enumerator should be patient in trying to get correct and clear answers to the questions.

n. After completing the enumeration, the enumerator must not forget to thank the respondent for his assistance. Tell the respondent that a colleague may come to his household if there is some additional information needed, and then continue to the next household.

o. Conduct repeat visits if needed. This may be necessary if at a previous visit the enumerator failed to get all needed information or the enumerator is asked to make a repeat visit by his/her supervisor/examiner.

p. The supervisor/examiner will give advice and supervise the enumerator in the listing and household sample. The supervisor will help the enumerator solve all problems encountered, especially if the problem was not explained during the training or in the manuals. Of course, the supervisors have been selected from those who have some experience in conducting a census or survey.

[Page 18 is blank]

[p. 19]

IV. Sketch maps of census/sub-census blocks

4.1 Definitions of census block, sub-census block, segment and building
A census block (CB) is a part of a village that forms the working area for an enumerator. The criteria for a CB are as follows:

1. Every village will be completely divided into CBs.

2. Every CB must have boundaries that are clear and easily recognized; these should either be natural boundaries or man-made. The boundaries of the local neighborhood unit (Satuan Lingkungan Setempat or SLS such as: RT, RW, dusun, lingkungan, etc) should primarily be the boundaries of the CB if the SLS boundaries are clear (natural or man-made).

3. One CB must be located in only one village.

There are three types of census blocks:

  • Normal census blocks (N) for the most part are those that contain 80 to 120 households or buildings containing residences, census buildings that do not contain residences or a combination of the two.
  • Institutional census blocks (I) are those that have special characteristics and contain at least 100 people; there is no limit on the number of people for correctional facilities. Examples of institutional census blocks are: military barracks; military housing complex with a guarded entrance.
  • Preparatory census blocks (P) are census blocks that are empty such as rice fields, gardens, non-irrigated dry fields, bogs, forests, former settlements where people have been removed or which have been burned. Only normal census blocks will be covered during SUPAS 2005.
[p. 20]

A sub-census block (sub-CB) is part of a census block that consists of several segments. A census block that has more than 150 households must be subdivided into sub-CBs.

A segment is a part of a CB that has a clear boundary (natural/man-made) such as rivers/streets/alleys. The size of a segment is not defined by the total number of households but by the clear boundaries in the CB. For CBs that contain storied buildings such as apartment buildings or houses with several stories, these storied buildings form the boundary of a segment.

Building
a. A physical building is a shelter, either fixed or temporary, that has walls, floor and roof, which can be used for a residence or not. Buildings that are not used for residence are considered physical buildings if the floor area is at least 10 square meters. This floor area requirement is not applicable for buildings used as living quarters; this means that if a building is a living quarter even though the floor area is less than 10 square meters, the building is considered a physical building.

b. A census building is part or all of a physical building that has a door for entering and exiting and has only one usage.

4.2 Census block/sub-census block sketch maps
In 1998 and 1999, the Central Bureau of Statistics (Badan Pusat Statistic - BPS) conducted a mapping of all villages in all regions of Indonesia. On these maps every village is divided into census blocks, that is, areas that have clear boundaries and contain between 80-120 households or census buildings that are not residences or are a combination of residences and other usage. It is hoped that these blocks will not change for the next 10 years. Every census block consists of some segments.

[p. 21]

For the SUPAS 2005 enumerator's use, the supervisor must beforehand copy the sketches of the CB/sub-CB from ST2003-UWB or KPU-UWB to Form SUPAS05-SWB. These copies are necessary because the enumerators are not allowed to carry the original sketches into the field. An example of a census block sketch is shown in Figure 4.1.

CB/sub-CB sketch maps that are copied by the supervisor include:

1. Boundaries of the CB/sub-CB;
2. Segment boundaries and their numbers;
3. Identification of the local neighborhood units RT, RW, etc.;
4. Names of streets, alleys, rivers, lakes, etc.

Drawings of boxes that represent physical buildings with their description and number from ST2003-UWB are not to be copied.

Before the sketches of the CB/sub-CB are used, a check must be made to determine whether there have been any changes since the maps of the CB/sub-CB were drawn. If there have been changes, the copies of the sketch maps must be updated to reflect the situation that the enumerator will actually encounter.

4.3 Method of numbering buildings
To avoid having buildings outside the selected CB/sub-CB or having buildings in the selected CB/sub-CB missed, before the household listing is conducted, using a copy of the CB/sub-CB sketch map (SUPAS05-SWB), the enumerator along with his supervisor must walk through the CB/sub-CB that has been assigned to the enumerator. When walking through the CB/sub-CB, it is expected that the enumerator will take note of the situation in the selected CB/sub-CB so that he/she can begin preparing a proper strategy for listing the households and buildings.

[p. 22]

When an enumerator is listing the buildings and households, he/she can add drawings of physical buildings and their numbers on the copy of CB sketch maps (Form SUPAS05-SWB) to facilitate the enumerator in conducting the household listing so that none of the households will be skipped or duplicated. The building number will be needed for the enumeration of the selected households in SUPAS 2005.

Steps in the household listing:

1. Listing the buildings and households and giving the symbol and number to the physical buildings on the copy of CB/sub-CB sketch map (SUPAS05-SWB), begins with the segment with the smallest number

2. Building numbering should begin with the building located in the south west-most point in the segment with the smallest number, and then proceeds in an easterly direction in that segment until all buildings in that segment have been listed

3. Finish one segment before continuing to the next closest segment

4. The listing must include all households in the CB/sub-CB.

[Page 23 illustrating Census block sketch map in the original document is not presented here]

[Page 24 is blank]

[p. 25]

V. Building and household listing using form SUPAS05-L

5.1 Building and household listing
5.1.1 Using form SUPAS05-L
Form SUPAS05-L is used to list all buildings and households located in one CB (census block) or sub-CB. The completed forms SUPAS05-L will be used as the frame from which the sample of households will be drawn. These completed listing forms will also be used as an important component in the computation of the sampling faction which will be used to make estimations based on the results of SUPAS 2005. Therefore the quality of the results of SUPAS 2005 is very dependent on the careful execution of the listing. Thus, the enumerators must be careful to record every building, household, total number of household members, and other information on Form SUPAS05-L.

5.1.2 Procedures for conducting the building and household listing
Activities carried out by the supervisor during the building and household listing are:

a. Forming and selecting sub-CBs for CBs that have 150 or more households. This activity is conducted in the supervisor/examiner training class under the supervision of the National Instructor using Form SUPAS05-LK and drawing paper to help with the process.

b. Making a sketch of the selected CB/sub-CB map. The supervisor copies the sketch maps of the CBs/sub-CBs from SP2000-WB or KPU-WB or ST2003-UWB or ST2003-SWB on a worksheet SUPAS05-SWB. If SP2000-WB, KPU-WB, ST2003-UWB or ST2003-SWB is not available, a sketch map of the CB/sub-CB is copied from the village sketch map. The sketch map must contain the boundaries of the CB/sub-CB, the segment boundaries, the segment numbers, and SLS; a legend for the sketch is very important.

[p. 26]

A sketch map should be made in such a manner that there is enough room for the enumerator to draw boxes to represent the physical buildings in the sketch.

c. Canvassing the CB/sub-CB along with the enumerator. During this activity the supervisor should give directions to the enumerator about the boundaries and sequence of listing.

d. Inspecting the results of the listing on form SUPAS05-L and the CB/sub-CB sketch map, form SUPAS05-SWB.

e. Select the sample of households in the CB/sub-CB and deliver the completed forms SUPAS05-DSRT to the enumerator so that he/she can conduct the interviews using form SUPAS05-S. Activities carried out by the enumerator during the building and household listing are:

a. Canvas the CB/sub-CB to familiarize himself/herself with the boundaries of the area of his/her responsibilities.

b. List every building and household using form SUPAS05-L. The listing is conducted segment by segment, starting with the smallest segment number until all segments are listed.

c. Draw a picture of the physical buildings using boxes on the census block sketch maps and mention the number of each physical building in the appropriate box.

d. Deliver the completed forms SUPAS05-L to the supervisor so that he can select the sample of households.

[p. 27]

5.2 Method of completing form SUPAS05-L

5.2.1 Block I. Geographic identification
Points 101 through 104: Province, regency/municipality, sub-district, and village

Write the names of the province, regency/municipality, sub-district, and village in accordance with the List of Sample Census Blocks (Daftar Sampel Blok Sensus - DSBS) of SUPAS05. Remember, when entering the regency/municipality and village, to strike out the one that is not applicable. Enter the code for each item in the appropriate box.

Point 105: Urban/rural classification

If a village is classified as urban, circle code 1, and if it is not, circle code 2; then write the code in the box that has been provided to the right. Explanations for the classifications urban and rural can be obtained from DSBS of SUPAS05 which have been recorded by the supervisor/examiner or staff of the regency/municipality statistical office.

Points 106a and 106b: Census block and sub-census block number

Write the CB number and the sub-CB (if there is one) in the place provided. These numbers are written in latin letters, not roman or other letters. The CB number should be copied from DSBS of SUPAS05, whereas the sub-CB number should be copied from Form SUPAS05-LK, Block II Column (1).

Point 107: Sample number code (SNC)

Write the SNC of SUPAS05 in the place provided. This number is copied from DSBS of SUPAS05. Pay careful attention that the SNC for rural areas are in the range 0001 - 4999, whereas for urban areas the numbers are in the range 5001 - 9999.

[p. 28]

5.2.2 Block II. Summary
Block II is filled in by copying the data from the last page of Block IV where there is an entry. Before being copied, Block IV must be checked carefully.

Point 201: Total number of physical buildings

This number is copied from the last page of Block IV Column (3), the last line for which there is an entry.

Point 202: Total number of census buildings

This number is copied from the last page of Block IV Column (4), the last line for which there is an entry.

Point 203: Total number of households

Point 203a Normal: copied from the last page of Block IV Column (7) Line C.
Point 203b Institutional: copied from the last serial number in Block IV Column (5) minus Column (7) Line C
Point 203c Normal and Institutional: copied from the last serial number in Block IV Column (5).

Point 204: Total number of household members in the CB/sub-CB

These numbers are copied from the last page of Block IV Column (8) through Column (10) Line C in order:
Point 204a Males: copied from Block IV Column (8) Line C
Point 204b Females: copied from Block IV Column (9) Line C
Point 204c Total: copied from Block IV Column (10) Line C.

Point 205: Total number of normal households by number of household members

These numbers are copied from the last page of Block IV Column (11) through Column (14) Line C by the number of household members. Total number of Normal households must equal the number on the last page in Column (7) Line C or Point 203a.

[p. 29]

5.2.3 Block III. Field worker particulars
Block III contains information about the enumerators and the supervisors/examiners, which they fill in themselves.
Points 301 and 304: Name and civil service (NIP/NMS) of enumerator and supervisor / examiner

Write the name and numbers of the field worker in the place provided. Use NIP for BPS staff (including those civil servants who are seconded to BPS), but use NMS for non-BPS staff field workers. NMS consists of a sub-district code (first three digits) and a two digit serial number within the sub-district in which he/she is assigned (last two digits). To write the NIP code, use only the last five digits.

Example of writing NIP:
NIP: 340017073

Example of writing NMS:
Regency code: 080
Field worker serial number: 03

Points 302 and 305: Occupation codes for enumerator and supervisor/examiner

Circle the appropriate occupation code and fill in that code in the appropriate box provided. Staff as mentioned here covers structural as well as functional staff.

Points 303 and 306: Declaration of enumerator and Supervisor/examiner

Each field worker must put his/her signature as a declaration in the space provided. The signer is the one who really has carried out the duties assigned to him/her. The field worker

[p. 30]

should also fill in the date when he signed the document. He/she should also write his/her name clearly in the space provided.

5.2.4 Block IV. Listing of buildings and households
This Block is used to list all buildings and households and to provide additional information about the selected census block.
The enumerator must make a list of all buildings and households in the selected CBs/SUB-CBs.
An incomplete list of buildings and households in the selected CBs/SUB-CBs will result in errors in the estimates of total population and the total number of households.

Column (1): Segment number

Write the number of the segment in which the building or household is located. If the building site is in the same segment as the previous building, then the segment number for this building doesn't need to be written again (leave the space empty). So when reading the completed form if the line for segment number is empty, this means it is the same as the previous segment number. On the line at the top of every page, write the segment number.

Column (2): Local neighborhood unit or SLS (RT, RW, dusun, name of street/alley)

Write the information regarding the local neighborhood unit as completely as possible. Write the number or name of the unit, for example: RT 05 RW 07 Kampung Gudang Baru; RT 01 Dusun Kepanjens; Jalan Melati Blok B Kompleks BTN Manusela; Jalan Raden Panji Gg.I No. 28; Jalan Raden Panji Gg.III No. 2; Dusun Sukarame, etc. The writing of SLS may use several lines in the form. When going to the next page, the SLS does not need to be rewritten if it is the same.
[p. 31]

[An example in the original document is not presented here.]

Column (3): Physical building serial number

Write the serial number of the physical building beginning with serial number 1 and continuing to the last number in one CB/sub-CB. If a physical building consists of several census buildings, then write the serial number of the physical building number only on the line of the first census building. On the first line of each new page, write the number of the physical building. Some physical buildings are not adjacent, for example, school buildings or factories; it is sufficient to write the serial number on one line and only give one serial number.

A physical building is a shelter that has walls, floor, and roof, either fixed or temporary, either used as a living quarter or not. If the floor area of a building is less than 10 square meters and not used as a living quarter, it is not considered a physical building. Example: residential house, hotel, store, factory, school, mosque, temple, church, office building, meeting hall, etc.

[p. 32]

SUPAS 2005 does not cover households that do not occupy a physical building, such as unauthorized dwellings below/under bridges, at the edge of railroad tracks, in carts/wagons, on river banks, etc. For a physical building not used as living quarters, write the use of the building such as the examples given in Column 6; for example, mosque, elementary school, tiling factory, etc.

The physical building serial number begins with the number 1 and continues to the last number needed to give a number to every physical building in the selected CB/sub-CB beginning from the segment with the smallest number.

Kitchens, bathrooms, garages and other buildings that are built separately from the main building are considered as part of the main building (these are not considered separate physical or census buildings) if they are located within the boundary of the property of the main house.

Column (4): Census building serial number

Write the serial number of each census building beginning with the number 1 and continuing to the last number needed to assign a number to every census building in the CB/sub-CB. If a census building contains several households, then write the census building number only on the line for the first household, and thereafter for the same census building the serial number does not need to be written. On the first line of each new page, write the serial number of the census building.

A census building is part or all of a physical building that has its own door for entering and exiting and has only one usage. In order to be able to determine the use of a census building, they can be differentiated into three types:
[p. 33]
  • A census building for living quarters is a census building that is used either partly or entirely by households.
  • A census building for living quarters but not occupied is a census building for living quarters, but the living quarters are not occupied. A shop-house that has not yet been occupied is classified as this type of building.
  • A census building not for living quarters is a census building that is not used for living quarters. For example, office, store, factory, mosque, church, and other empty buildings not used as living quarters.
Some census buildings not for living quarters located in one complex can be recorded on one line. One physical building (one serial number) and one census building (one serial number) are recorded on one line. For example, in a school complex there are three physical buildings each consisting of two classrooms (two census buildings). Even though, according to the definitions above, the school building consists of three physical buildings and six census buildings, in this case it is sufficient to record one physical building serial number and one census building serial number.

The enumerator must be careful when listing schools/factories/offices, because sometimes one part of the building is used as a living quarter by a custodian or worker. The enumerator should check carefully to be certain that in such buildings as mentioned above no

[p. 34]

part of the building can be categorized as a household. If in fact there is a household, then the living quarter should be noted as a census building on its own.

Buildings that are not living quarters located in one complex such as offices, factories, and schools, although every room has its own door for entry and exit, in this listing these buildings are listed as one physical building and one census building.

[Figures 5.1 - 5.4 in the original document are not presented here.]

[p. 36]

[Figure 5.5 in the original document is not presented here.]

Column (5): Household serial number

Fill in the household serial number beginning with the number 1 and continue until all households in the CB/sub-CB have been numbered. In assigning the Household serial number no number may be skipped or repeated. One household can have only one serial number.

A normal household is an individual or a group of people who inhabit part or all of the physical or census building and usually live together and eat together from one kitchen. One kitchen means that the daily needs are managed and provided by one budget.
A normal household generally consists of a father, mother, and child(ren). A household is often interpreted as a family. Nevertheless, the field worker must be careful, since one family is not always the same as one household, and one household is not always the same as one family. The criterion for a household depends more on the aspect of the management of the "kitchen" or the everyday needs. Also considered normal households are the following:
[p. 37]
1. Someone who rents a room or some part of a census building, but manages his/her meals by himself/herself.

2. Families that live separately in two census buildings but eat from one kitchen, provided that both census building are still in one census block.

3. Lodger who eats (boards) with the household; if the number of lodgers is less than 10 people, they are considered as members of the household.

4. People who live together in one room in one census building or physical building, and each manages his/her own daily food needs, are each considered to be individual households.
Institutional households:
1. When a number of people live in a dormitory, that is, a living quarter where the management of the everyday food needs is arranged by an institute or foundation (non-profit institution), for example, nurses' dormitory, student dormitory, and military/police dormitory (barracks), these dormitories are considered institutional households. Members of the military/police who live in barracks with their families and manage their everyday daily food needs by themselves are considered a normal household.

2. People who live in a public institution such as reformatories, prisons, orphanages, and similar institutions are considered institutional households.

3. When a household has a group of 10 or more individuals who lodge and eat (boarders) with the household, the group of lodgers are considered an institutional household.
One family is not always equal to one household, and one household is not always equal to one family.

[p. 38]

Explanation:
  • A household that has fewer than 10 lodgers who eat and live there (board) is considered one normal household that includes the boarders. If the number of lodger eating with the household is 10 or more, then the household is considered a normal household, but the lodgers who eat with the household are considered an institutional household.
  • Those who manage dormitories, reformatories, public institutions, and other similar institutions who also live there either alone or with their families are considered a normal household.
Institutional households are not to be enumerated using form SUPAS05-S
Institutional households are only listed on form SUPAS05-L

Recording of missed households:
1. If an enumerator finds a living quarter which is empty, he should still write the serial number of the household temporarily in columns (6) through (14); never mind that the living quarter is empty (the form will be filled in when an enumerator can meet the members of this household).

2. If later when someone is found at home, it is found that more than one household exists in that building mentioned above, then the enumerator will be forced to write the serial number(s) for the other household(s) after the last household already listed.

3. If, after waiting until the deadline for completing the listing, it is found that the household has not returned to the house, then to fill in columns (6) through (14), the enumerator can ask a neighbor who knows precisely who the members of that empty household are.
[p. 39]
Some examples of completing the listing form:
Nanang Andriyanto an enumerator in the village of Turi, sub-district Jetis, Ponorogo Regency, will enumerate census block number 2. The situation and the usage of the physical buildings are as follows:

[Graphic representations of physical buildings in the original document are not presented here.]

[p. 43]

Column (6): Name of head of the household

The head of the household is the member of the household who is responsible for the everyday needs of the household or the member who is assumed/assigned to be the head, for example because of the age of the head of the household.

Fill in the name of the head of the household using capital letters, writing clearly so that it is easy to read. Do not use more than one line; if necessary, abbreviate some portion of the name. For institutional households that consist of lodgers, write the name of the person who represents the lodgers as the head of the household. For other institutional households such as an orphanage, write the name of the institution so that its use is clear. For census buildings that are not living quarters, write the usage of the census building, for example: Gramedia bookstore, mini market, public elementary school number 06, mosque Al-Rasyid, church GPIB, or forestry office. For mixed-use census buildings, write the use of the building in addition to the living quarter, for example: dedy (tailor), oneng (salon), or jono (food stall). For an empty household write: "Empty house".

If a building is not a living quarter, fill in Column (5); Columns (7) through (14) must remain blank. A name written in Column (6) must reflect the usage of the building.

To prevent skipping or duplicating in recording the household members, especially the head of the household, at every household the enumerator must ask:
  • Does the head of the household have any other living quarter besides this one where he also lives?
  • Is there a member of this household who has another living quarter in a building that is within this census block where he/she also lives?
Explanation:
A head of the household who has more than one living quarter should be enumerated only in the living quarter where he/she resides the most. For the special cases where the head of the household has an activity/work in another place and returns home to his wife and children

[p. 44]

periodically (every week, every month, every 3 months) but fewer than 6 months, he should be recorded as the head of the household in the living quarter where his wife and children reside.

Column (7): Type of household

Write the number one (1) for a normal household. If a household is categorized as an institutional household, then write the dash sign (--). On the line for a census building that is not a living quarter, do not fill in anything. By using this method to fill in this column, it will be easy to add the number of normal households on a page and put that number on line A (total number of normal households on this page). For institutional households, only fill in the columns up to Column (10).

For institutional households, only fill in Column (1) through Column (10).

Column (8) through column (10): Total number of household members (HM)

Fill in the total number of household members, including the head of the household, according to their sex. Column (8) is for males (M), Column (9) is for females (F), and Column (10) is for the total of males and females (M and F). If there are no males, use the dash sign (--) in Column (8). Likewise, if there are no females, use the dash (--) in Column (9). This information will be used to count the population according to sex and will be used as the basis to determine the remainder of the data characteristics.

To get the information on the total number of household members, ask: "Who usually resides and eats in this household, men and women, including infants, parents who live with you, others including housemaid who reside here?" The enumerator must assist in counting the number of people the respondent mentions. It is suggested that the enumerator use a separate sheet of note paper to be help him/her count carefully. Before writing the number on the form, confirm again with the respondent by saying: "Therefore, the total number of household members is ___ (mention the number) of males and ___ (mention the number) of females,

[p. 45]

and in total there are ___ (mention the number). Is that correct? Is there anyone who has still not been counted? Has anyone been counted who is not really a member of this household? Have all recently-born babies been counted?" If there is an error, ask the respondent to repeat the names of the members of the household one by one.

Information on the total number of household members must be correct and in accordance with the situation at the time of the survey. Accuracy in the field is of vital importance, as errors at this stage will impact the quality of the data as a whole. Therefore, as far as possible, the information obtained from the head of the household or other household member, who knows the household information, should reflect the actual situation. Don't ever use any other data source (RT or Dusun registration or family card or KK or others) to fill in Form SUPAS05-L because the definitions and procedures for collecting the data differ.

Information on the total number of household members must be correct and in accordance with the real situation at the time of the survey.

A household member (HM) is every person who usually resides in a household, those who are residing in house when the listing is done as well as those who are temporarily not at home at that time.
Household member includes:
1. New baby
2. Guests who have remained in the household for 6 months or more, even though they do not yet intend to stay permanently (or intend to move).
3. One who has been there for fewer than 6 months but has the intention to stay (to move there).
4. Housemaid or driver who lives and eats with the employer's household.

[p. 46]

5. One who lodges and eats (boarder).
Relatives or others who reside in the household.
Head of the household who works in another place (outside this area), comes home periodically (fewer than every 6 months) such as a seaman, pilot, inter-island merchant, or miner.
Household members (HM) are all individuals who usually live in one household, those who are there at the time of the listing, as well as those who are temporarily away.

Not included as members of the household:
1. A child who lives in another place, for example for school or work, though he/she returns to his/her parents once a week or whenever there is a holiday, has formed a household on his/her own or has formed a household with others where he/she lives every day.
2. Someone who has already been away 6 months or more, even though it is unclear if he/she will move.
3. Someone who has been away for fewer than 6 months but intends to move.
4. Housemaid who does not live in the employer's household.
5. A lodger who does not eat in the household.

[p. 47]

Additional information:
If it is known that a husband has more than one wife, then he must be listed in the household with the wife he lives with the most. If he lives with each the same amount of time, then he should be listed in the household of the wife he has been married to the longest.

Example:
a. Hentiek lives in Pisangan Baru, East Jakarta. She works at the BPS headquarters. Every Saturday and Sunday, Hentiek goes home to her parents' house. In this case Hentiek should be listed as a member of the household in Pisangan Baru, East Jakarta.

b. Andre is a head of the household who works and lives in Jakarta during the work week. His wife and children live in Cirebon. Every Friday afternoon, he goes home to Cirebon and returns to Jakarta every Monday morning. He should be listed as the head of the household in Cirebon.

Column (11) through Column (14): Total number of normal households by number of household members

Fill in the check sign (X) in one of the Columns (11) through (14) in accordance with the total number of household members in Column (10). Insert the dash sign (--) in columns that do not have a check sign (X) on the line for normal household. For a building not a living quarter or an institutional household, Columns (11) through (14) should be left blank.

After listing all households in one CB/sub-CB, make sure the total number of normal households in Column (7) is equal to the total number of check signs in Columns (11) through (14). This Column will be used in selecting the sample of households in the CB/sub-CB.
[p. 48]

Page numbers:
At the top right-hand corner of every sheet of Block IV write "Page ____ of ____ pages", which can be filled after the listing has been completed in a CB/sub-CB.

Example: If in a selected census block, there are 74 households, and the total number of pages of Block IV that were used was 5 (five), then fill in the page numbers as follows: On the first page of Block IV write page "2" of "6" pages, and on the last page write page "6" of "6" pages.

Filling in the lines for totals:
Add the entries in columns (7) through (14) and place the totals in the appropriate column in the lines for totals at the bottom of each page. The total of Column (7) is the sum of the numbers "1" in all lines for Column (7). The totals for Columns (8) through (10) are the sums of the numbers that are filled in on all lines for that column. The total for Columns (11) through (14) is the sum of check signs (X) that are filled in for all lines for that column.

A. Line A. The totals on each page are the sum of the numbers or the check signs (X) on the relevant page.

B. Line B. Cumulative totals of previous pages are copied or transferred from line C of the previous page, except for page 2 (the first page of Block IV) where the dash sign (--) should be filled in on line B.

C. Line C = A+B. Total numbers up to this page is the sum of line A plus line B on the relevant page. The number on this line is thereafter transferred/copied to Line B on the next page.

[p. 49]

5.3 Inspection of completed Block IV of form SUPAS05-L by the enumerator
The enumerator must re-examine his/her results before he/she delivers the documents to his/her supervisor/examiner. Some of the basic items that must be checked are as follows:

1) The writing must be clear and easily read, the numbers, letters and also the dash sign (--) and the check sign (X).

2) Check that the serial number of the physical building was put in Column (3), the serial number of the census building in Column (4), and the serial number of the household in Column (5) in accordance with the rules and guidelines.

3) Check whether Column (6) can be clearly read and filled in properly with the name of the head of the household or the name of the building that shows the usage of the building if the building is not a living quarter.

4) Check Column (7):

a. Contains the number one (1) or a dash sign (--) only if Column (10) is filled in.
b. Is blank if Column (10) is also blank, for the line for a building not a living quarter or an empty building.
c. If Column (7) contains a dash sign (--), this means this is an institutional household; remember this when in the field:
i. If Column (10) is fewer than 10 and this really is a dormitory, mess, or care institution or the like, and in this institutional household there is no one who manages his own household.
ii. If Column (10) is 10 or more but this is not an institutional household, that is, it is not a dormitory, mess, care institution or the like, then it is a group people who lodge (board) and there is no one person who manages the household.
[p. 50]

5) Check that Column (8) + Column (9) = Column (10).

6) Check that the number of check signs (X) in Columns (11) through (14) agrees with the number entered in Column (10) for which entry of Column (7) is a "1":

a. Only one column can have a check sign (X).
b. If Column (10) = 1 or 2, there should be a check sign (X) in Column (11) and dash signs (--) in Columns (12), (13), and (14).
c. If Column (10) = 3 or 4, there should be a check sign (X) Column (12), and dash signs (--) in Columns (11), (13), and (14).
d. If Column (10) = 5 or 6, there should be a check sign (X) in Column (13), and dash signs (--) in Column (11), (12), and (14).
e. If Column (10) is greater or equal to 7, there should be a check sign (X) in Column (14), and dash signs (--) in Columns (11), (12), and (13).
f. In each Line A, B and C: Column (7) = Column (11) + Column (12) + Column (13) + Column (14).

[p. 51]

VI. List of the selected sample households on form SUPAS05--DSRT
The 16 sample households selected from form SUPAS05-L should be copied by the supervisor / examiner to form SUPAS05-DSRT. On form SUPAS05-DSRT write the identity of the sample households as a guide for the enumerator as to which households must be visited and enumerated with form SUPAS05-S. In addition to using form SUPAS05-DSRT as a guide, the enumerator should also use the sketch map of CB/sub-CB form SUPAS05-SWB, which has already been completed.

The following is an explanation of the items included in form SUPAS05-DSRT.

6.1 Geographic identification, summary, and sample selection worker
Block I: Identification
This block contains identifying information about the CBs/sub-CBs consisting of name/code of the province, name/code of the regency/municipality, name/code of the sub-district, name/code of the village, classification of village into urban/rural, number of census blocks, number of sub-census blocks, and the sample code number.

Block II: Household summary
Fill in Block II by copying from form SUPAS05-L, Block II points 201 through 205.

Block III: Worker selecting the sample
Block III contains the identity of the worker who selected the sample and who checked the accuracy of the sample.

[p. 52]

6.2 Block IV: Sample selection
This Block is filled in or used by the supervisor/examiner in order to select the sample households. Guidelines for using this block are in a separate book: Guide book for supervisors SUPAS05 (Book 2).

6.3 Block V: Selected household's information
Information written in Block V is household number of the selected household, name of head of the household, the total number of household members, and the geographic identification of the household's living quarters using the segment number, the number of the physical building, the number of the census building and local designations such as RT, RW, Dusun, and street name. This information can be used as a guide for the enumerator in visiting and enumerating the selected household.

Note:
If in reality the enumerator cannot interview the selected household, then the enumerator must report to his supervisor and make a note at the bottom of Block V.

The enumerator may not change the household to be interviewed, because this would destroy the data collecting system. Only households that are contained in the DSRT may be enumerated using Form SUPAS05-S. If problems arise that prevent the enumeration of the selected household using Form SUPAS05-S, the problem must immediately be reported to the supervisor. The supervisor can decide whether the selected household can be replaced, and if a change must be made, the supervisor will determine which household can be substituted.

If the address of the selected household is correct (SLS, segment number, number of physical building and number of census building), but when the enumerator arrives at that address, if the occupant has changed in the period of the few days between the listing and the enumeration and the former occupant has moved far away, then the new occupant should be the one enumerated. The definition of "far away" in this case is the former occupant is outside the census block or it is difficult to find him. However, if the former occupant has moved only a few

[p. 53]

houses away or it is easy to find him, then the enumerator should conduct the interview with the selected household. In cases like this the enumerator does not need to report to the supervisor/examiner before making the substitution, but must make a note on Form SUPAS05-DSRT and Form SUPAS05-S.

If after the listing, there are changes in the structure or the number of members of the selected household, for example, the head of the household has changed, then the enumerator should conduct the interview with the household with the new structure or with the new number of household members in accordance with the situation at the time of the enumeration. Then, in line with the principle mentioned earlier, Form SUPAS05-L need not be changed based on the results of the enumeration using SUPAS05-S.
[Page 54 is blank]

[p. 55]

VII. Enumeration of the selected households using form SUPAS05-S
The sixteen households selected in one CB/sub-CB have been entered by the supervisor / examiner on form SUPAS05-DSRT. The enumerator must repeatedly visit a selected household until he has obtained the information about the various characteristics of the individual household members as well as the characteristics of the household. The information about the household should be obtained from the head of the household or some member of the household who knows well the household details. Information about the individual household members, in principle, should be obtained from the relevant household member. All information obtained should be recorded systematically, completely, consistently and correctly (reliable) on form SUPAS05-S.

7.1 Method of completing SUPAS05-S
A set of Forms SUPAS05-S are used for each sample household. Every form consists of questions about household and individual characteristics. Household characteristics consist of: list of the household members, vital events reported to the population administration, list of deaths, and condition of the living quarters. Questions for individual household members are grouped into these sections: all household members regardless of age, members of the household age 5 or older, members of the household age 10 or older, and members of the household age 60 or older. There are questions for ever-married women consisting of: marriage, family planning, fertility, child birth history, and list of own sisters.

It is expected that the individual sheets provided for individual blocks will be enough for one household. If additional individual sheets are needed, then the enumerator can add one or more sets of Form SUPAS05-S. Geographic identification must be written in Block I for all additional questionnaires, and clearly marked in the top right-hand corner of each additional questionnaire: "Additional", or if more than one questionnaire was added then write: "Additional 1", "Additional 2", etc. On the main questionnaire in the top right-hand corner

[p. 56]

also clearly write the word "Addition". When the questionnaire is submitted or stored, the additional questionnaire(s) should be put inside the main questionnaire.

Form SUPAS05-S consists of:
Block I -- Geographic identification
Block II -- Summary
Block III -- Enumerator's particulars
Block IV.A -- List of household members
Block IV.B -- Death events since January 2002
Block V.A -- Report of vital events
Block V.B -- Condition of living quarters
Block VI -- Characteristics of individual household members
Block VI.A -- Household members of all ages
Block VI.B -- Household members age 5 or older
Block VI.C -- Household members age 10 or older
Block VI.D -- Household members age 60 or older
Block VII -- Ever-married women age 10 or older
Block VII.A -- Marriage
Block VII.B -- Family planning
Block VII.C -- Fertility
Block VII.D -- Child birth history
Block VII.E -- List of own sisters

Phases in filling out form SUPAS05-S and conducting the interview:

1. Fill in the geographic identification in Block I before going to the field.

2. Interview the head of the household or another household member who can represent the head in order to complete Blocks IV.A, IV.B, V.A and V.B.

3. Interview each household member in order to complete Blocks VI.A, VI.B, VI.C and VI.D in accordance with the relevant ages of the household members.
Completing Block VI of form SUPAS05-S according to age group
Age: 0-4
VI. A: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI. B: this block should be left blank for respondents in this age group
VI.C: this block should be left blank for respondents in this age group
VI.D: this block should be left blank for respondents in this age group

Age: 5-9
VI. A: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI. B: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI.C: this block should be left blank for respondents in this age group
VI.D: this block should be left blank for respondents in this age group

Age: 10-59
VI. A: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI. B: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI.C: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI.D: this block should be left blank for respondents in this age group

Age: 60+
VI. A: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI. B: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI.C: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group
VI.D: this block should be completed for respondents in this age group

Begin the interview by filling out the individual information on the head of the household (serial number 1), and continue with the household member with serial number 2, and so on until all members of the household have been interviewed.

4. For every female member of the household who has ever been married (WPK - Indonesian Wanita Pernah Kawin) and age 10 or older complete Blocks VII.A, VII.B, VII.C, VII.D and VII.E. Block VII.C is filled in only if WPK has ever had a live birth. Begin with the WPK household member who has the lowest serial number and continue until all WPK household members have been interviewed.

Complete Blocks VI.A, VI.B, VI.C and VI.D for every household member and then continue the interviews with WPK household members to complete Blocks VII.A, VII.B, VII.C, VII.D and VII.E.

[p. 58]

There are several ways of completing form SUPAS05-S; these are:

1) Write answers in the space provided.
2) Write answers in the space provided and write in the codes in boxes provided.
3) Cross out the incorrect answers.
4) Circle the appropriate code.
5) Circle the appropriate code, and then write in the code in the box provided.
6) Place a check in the space provided.
7) Follow the instructions indicated by the arrow sign
8) Write the complete answer and leave blank the box marked "To be filled by supervisor/editor"
9) Note any important items in the Note section and/or in the margin of the page of the questionnaire.
Instructions and possible answers are printed in upper-case letters whereas questions that must be read by the enumerator are printed in lower case letters.

[Examples of correct and incorrect writing in the original document are not presented here.]

[p. 60]

7.2 Geographic identification, summary and field worker particulars

Block I. Geographic identification
Points 101 to 107
Copy the name and code for province, regency/municipality, sub-district, village, village classification, CB number, sub-CB number, and sample code number from the sample list of form SUPAS05-DSRT, Block I point 101 to 107.

[p. 61]

Point 108: Physical/census building numbers
Write the physical building number and the census building number as shown on Form
SUPAS05-DSRT, Block V Columns (3) and (4).

Point 109: Serial number of the sample household
Write the serial number of the sample household as shown on Form SUPAS05-DSRT,
Block V Column (1).

Block II. Summary
Point 201: Name of head of the household
Name of head of the household is copied from Block IV.A line 01 Column (2), form SUPAS05-S.

Point 202: Number of household members
The total number of household members should be equal to the last serial number of Block IV.A Column (1) for which Column (2) has an entry or the same as the number of Block VI.A sections that have been filled in.

Point 203: Number of household members age 5 or older
This number is equal to the number of Block VI.B sections that have been filled in, or equal to the number of household members that have a number 5 or larger in Block IV.A Column (5).

Point 204: Number of household members age 10 or older
This number is equal to the number of Block VI.C sections that have been filled in, or equal to the number of household members that have a number 10 or larger in Block IV.A Column (5).

Point 205: Number of ever-married women age 10 or older
This number must be equal to the number of Block VIIs that are filled in or equal to the
number of household members that have code 1 in Point 408 in Block IV.A Column (9).

Point 206: Number of household members age 60 or older
This number must be equal to the number of Block VI.D sections that are filled in, or equal to the number of household members that have a number 60 or larger in Block IV.A Column(5).

[p. 62]

Point 207: Number of deaths
This is the last serial number in Column (1) Block IV.B for which Column (2) has an entry.

Block III. Enumerator's particulars
The method of filling out this block is the same as that of Block III, Form SUPAS05-L.

7.3 Block IV.A. List of household members
This Block is used to record all members of the household without any exception. In filling out Block IV.A it is best to interview the head of the household or another household member who is considered to have knowledge about all household members.

Read off the questions that are printed in lower case

Household member serial number
Serial numbers from number 01 up to 10 are provided. If the number of household members is more than 10, then use additional forms SUPAS05-S. Write the word "Addition" in the upper right-hand corner of the cover page of the main form SUPAS05-S, and the word "Additional" in the upper right-hand corner of the cover page of the added form SUPAS05-S. Copy the geographic identification on the added Form SUPAS05-S. The serial number in Block IV.A Column (1) of the added form SUPAS05-S should be replaced by 11, 12, and so on. Thereafter number "1" as printed in Block IV.A Column (3) line 01 of the added form SUPAS05-S should be replaced accordingly.

[p. 63]

Questions 401 to 403: Name of the household member, relation to head of the household, and sex.
Ask Q 401 to 403 at the same time (this is noted by the bold vertical lines on Form SUPAS05-S). After all household members are listed, ask A 404 through Q 407 to each household member.

Relation to head of the household:

The head of the household is the member of the household who is responsible for the daily needs of the household or the member who is considered/appointed as head of the household because of his/her advanced age.
Wife/husband is spouse of the head of the household.
Child includes own child, stepchild and foster child (adoption) of the head of the household.
Daughter/son-in-law is the husband/wife of the head of the household's child.
Grandchild is the child of the head of the household's child.
Parents/parents-in-law are the father/mother of the head of the household or the father/mother of the spouse of the head of the household.
Other relatives are other people who are related to the head of the household or to the spouse of the head of the household, for example: sisters/brothers, cousins, other in-laws, nephews/nieces, aunts, uncles, grandfathers, grandmothers, etc.
Housemaid is someone who works as household help and lives in the household and receives a salary either in cash or kind.
[p. 64]
Others are those who live in the household but are not related to the head of the household or the spouse.

Explanation:

1. Family members who work as household help (receive a wage/salary) should be considered as "Housemaid" (code 8).
2. For drivers and gardeners who live in the household (eat and live in the household), the driver should be considered as "Other" (code 9) while the gardener is considered as "Housemaid" (code 8).
3. Children of the housemaid who work as housemaids (receive wage/salary) are considered as "Housemaid" (code 8). Children of the housemaid who do not work are considered as "Other" (code 9).

Write the name of each member of the household on the appropriate line in Column (2), his/her relation to the head of the household in Column (3) and his/her sex in Column (4). Begin with the head of the household, and continue with the spouse, unmarried children, married children, daughter/son-in-law, grandchildren, parents/parents-in-law, other relatives, housemaid, and others.

To ensure that all household members have been recorded:
1. Read the name of each household member one at a time.

2. Ask questions 1 to 4 at the bottom of the page to find out if anyone has been omitted, such as:

a. Small child or baby,
b. Others such as a friend or housemaid who normally live in the household,
c . Guests who have stayed in the household for 6 months or more,
d. Anyone else who normally lives in the household, but has been away for fewer than 6 months.

If the answer is "Yes", then place a check X in the "Yes" box, and write the names on the list beginning with the next serial number. After writing the name, cross out the X in the "Yes" box with two horizontal lines and put the X in the "No" box.

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3. Ask question 5 to check whether anyone whose name has been recorded has been away for 6 months or more or has been away for fewer than 6 months but intends to stay in the new location. If the answer is "Yes", place an X in the "Yes" box. After the name of that person has been crossed out with two horizontal lines, place an X in the "No" box and cross out the X in the "Yes" box.

4. Re-assign the serial numbers of the members of the household in Column (1) taking into consideration the entry in the column "Relation to the head of the household".

Question 404: Age
Age is of vital importance in demographic data, because it is the basic for calculating fertility, mortality, population projections, and other demographic indicators.

Age must be estimated even if it is only a best estimate

Ask the age of the respondent and write the answer in the box provided. Age is calculated in years and rounded downwards or age at the last birthday. Age is calculated based on the Gregorian calendar. Experience indicates that respondents tend to round their age upwards. For this reason, asked if he/she has reached that age.

Explanation:
1. If the respondent's age is 27 years and 9 month, record the age as 27 years.
2. If the age is less than 1 year, record the age as 0 years.

If the respondent does not know his/her exact age, try to obtain an estimate of the age by the following methods:

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1. Ask the respondent to show some birth documents, such as, a birth certificate or a letter from someone who can certify the birth. For children younger than 5 years, ask for a doctor's record, an immunization card, health card, or other record made by the parents. Pay attention to whether the document mentions the age at the time the documents was prepared or the date of birth.

2. Convert Arabic or other calendars to the Gregorian calendar. In some areas where the majority of the population is Moslem, they may only be able to remember some important religious events, for example, fasting month, Idul Fitr, Idul Adha, or prophet day. Use the Age conversion guide (see Appendix 1).

3. Make a correspondence between the respondent's birth and the date, month, and year of important national and/or regional events in Indonesia. Some examples of important events are volcano eruptions, floods, fires, election of chief of the village, start of the Japanese occupation (1942), Proclamation of Independence of the Republic of Indonesia (1945), first general election (1955), and the communist rebellion of 30 September 1965 (G30S/PKI 1965).

4. If the respondent is a child, the age of the child can be compared to age of other siblings. Start by estimating the age of the youngest child. Then compare that age to the second youngest child and ask how old this child was when the younger sibling was born or what was this child able to do (taking steps, sitting up, standing up, walking) when the younger child was born or at the beginning of the pregnancy of the younger child. Continue this procedure to estimate the age of the older children.

5. Compare the age of the child to a neighbor child or other relative whose exact age is known. Estimate how many months older or younger this child is compared to the child in question.

Since only two boxes are provided to record the age, for those who are younger than 10 years put a zero in the first box and for those older than 95 years, write "95".

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Example:
11 months: "00"
5 years, 11 months: "05"
102 years: "95"

Question 405: Marital status

Ask each household member his/her marital status. If not married, write code 1, if married write code 2, if divorced write code 3, and if widow write code 4.

Unmarried is a status of those who are not yet legally married at the time of the enumeration.

Married is a status of those who were legally married at the time of the enumeration, either living together or separately. This includes not only those who have been certified as married by law (local custom, religion, state, etc.), but also those who live together and are considered as wife and husband by society.

Divorced is a status of those husbands and wives who no longer live together because they are legally divorced. This includes those who say they are divorced even though they are not legally divorced. On the other hand, those who live separately and do not considered themselves divorced, are considered married; for example, a husband/wife who has been left by his/her spouse to go to some other place for education, employment, or looking for work, or because of some disagreement.

Widow is a status of those whose spouse has passed away and they have not yet remarried.

Question 406: Having a birth certificate
This question is for household members aged 0-4 years to obtain information on whether these children have a birth certificate issued by a Civil Registration Office.

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If a child has a birth certificate, write code "1", and if the child does not have a certificate, write code "2".

A birth certificate is a form stating the birth details of a person that is issued by the Civil Registration Office. Based on a United Nations convention, it is the right of every child to have a birth certificate.

Question 407: Ownership of a Personal Identity Card (KPT)
This question is for household members age 17 or older, or for those who are younger than 17 but have ever been married, to know whether they have a personal identity card. If a household member has a KTP, write code "1", otherwise write code "2". For household members who are younger than 17 years old and never married, leave Column (8) blank.

Question 408: Women ever married age 10 or older
See Q 403 (sex), Q 404 (age) and Q 405 (marital status). If Q 403 has code "2", Q 404 is "10" or more, and Q 405 is not "1", write code "1" on the appropriate line and for other lines write code "2".

7.4 Block IV.B. Death events since January 2002
Fill in the information about every person who died since January 2002, excluding any baby who was stillborn. If a household has more than four deaths in the past year, use additional forms SUPAS05-S. For the additional questionnaire, clearly mark in the top right-hand corner the word "Additional" and in the upper right-hand corner of the original questionnaire the word "Addition".

Stillborn means that the baby died during the pregnancy/before birth or was born without showing any signs of life such as crying, heartbeat, any movement, especially if the fetus is already 22 week or over. A stillborn baby should not be recorded in this survey.

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Question 409: Names of those who died
Record the name of every person who died since January 2002 in Column (2). If a baby was born alive but subsequently died before the baby was given a name, write "Baby" in the place for the name. The death events to be recorded are those that occurred in the respondent's household from January 2002 until a day before the enumeration.

Explanation:
Recording of death events in a household where the person who died was the former head of the household or one of the members of the household can be confusing if after the death the household breaks apart (some of the household members move out). The way or place to record the death events shall be as follows:

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Case 1
One household consists of three household members: A (head of the household), B (wife of A), and C (child of A). A died.

1. Situation: B and C still live in the old house
Household: The death of A is recorded at B and C's house (the old house)

2. Situation: B and C still live in the old house
Household: The death of A is recorded at B's or C's house (whoever lives in the old house)

3. Situation: B and C moved to a new house in the same village, the old house is empty
Household: The death of A is recorded at B and C's house (the new house)

4. Situation: B and C move to different houses in the same village (the old house is empty)
Household: The death of A is recorded at B's house (wife of the head of the household)

5. Situation: B and C move to another village (and live together), the old house is empty
Household: The death of A is not recorded

6. Situation: B and C move to another house in the same village, the old house is occupied by D
Household: The death of A is recorded at B and C's house (the new house)

7. Situation: B and C move to different houses in the same village, the old house is occupied by D
Household: The death of A is recorded at the B's house (wife of the head of the household)

8. Situation: B and C move to another village (and live together), the old house is occupied by D
Household: The death of A is not recorded

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Case 2
One household consists of three household members: A (head of the household), B (wife of A), and C (child of A). B died.

1. Situation: A and C still live in the old house
Household: The death of B is recorded at A and C's house (the old house)

2. Situation: A or C still live in the old house
Household: The death of B is recorded at A's or C's house (whoever lives in the old house)

3. Situation: A and C moved to a new house in the same village, the old house is empty
Household: The death of B is recorded at A and C's house (the new house)

4. Situation: A and C moved to different houses in the same village (the old house is empty)
Household: The death of B is recorded at A's house (the head of the household)

5. Situation: A and C moved to another village (and live together), the old house is empty
Household: The death of B is not recorded

6. Situation: A and C moved to another house in the same village, the old house is occupied by D
Household: The death of B is recorded at A and C's house (the new house)

7. Situation: A and C move to different houses in the same village, the old house is occupied by D
Household: The death of B is recorded at A's house (the head of the household)

8. Situation: A and C move to another village (and live together), the old house is occupied by D
Household: The death of B is not recorded

Case 3
One household consists of 4 household members: A (head of the household), B (wife of A), C (child of A), D (relative). A, B and C died.

The deaths A, B and C are recorded at D's house, their residence before they died.

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Question 410: Year of death
Ask the year of death for each person who has died and write the year in Column (3).

Example:
If the death occurred in November 2003, then write: "03"
If the death occurred in February 2004, then write: "04"

Question 411: Sex
Enter the code for sex for each person who died.

Question 412: Age at death
Ask the age at the time of death for each person who died. The recording of the age at time of death is done in two ways; these are:

Column (5): For those who were younger than 2write their age in months.
Column (6): For those who were age 2 or older, write their age in years.

Note: The age at the time of death written either in months (Column 5) or in years (Column 6) should be rounded downward. If one of these columns (5 or 6) is filled, then the other one must be blank.

Example:
Ahmad died when he was 18 months old; record this as:

Months: "18"
Years: _ _

When Mrs. Tuti died she was 34 years old; record this as:

Months: _ _
Years: "34"

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Question 413: Cause of death
Ask the cause of death for each person who died. Enter the code accordingly. The list of causes of death is given at the lower right-hand corner of the questionnaire. If the death was a result of a traffic accident, enter code "1". For accidents that are not traffic accidents, enter code "2". If the cause of death was not an accident, enter code "3".

Example: Code "1" is used for a traffic accident; code "2" is used for various situations such as an act of violence/criminal act, fall, burn, drowning, poisoning, suicide, etc. Code "3" is used for deaths caused by disease, old age, and other factors other than accidents.

Question 414: Was the death related to pregnancy, childbirth/miscarriage, or period after childbirth (Nifas period)
The question for Column (8) through Column (10) is intended to capture maternal deaths, that is, deaths related to pregnancy, childbirth/miscarriage or the Nifas period (in general up to two months after childbirth/miscarriage). Information obtained from this question can be used as a guide in estimating the maternal mortality ratio for a certain reference period of time. Maternal mortality is an important indicator to measure the level of mothers' health. Therefore, information regarding women who die during pregnancy, childbirth/miscarriage or the Nifas period is badly needed.

Pregnancy, childbirth/miscarriage, or period after childbirth (Nifas period)

  • Death during pregnancy is a death that occurred due to some pregnancy-related problems; for example: bleeding, high blood pressure, etc.
  • Death during childbirth is death that occurs due to complications during the actual birth. For example: bleeding during childbirth, placenta blocking the mouth of the womb.
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  • Death related to a miscarriage is a death that occurs due to complications during the miscarriage, including death because the mother wanted to abort the pregnancy.
  • Death during the Nifas period is a death that occurred during that period; for example: continuous bleeding after childbirth.

7.5 Block V.A. Reporting vital events
This block is used to record whether there is a Family Card in the household and to measure the level of awareness of the population in reporting births, deaths and relocations to the village office.

Question 501: Family Card ownership
Ask whether the household has a Family Card issued by the village office for this residence. If yes, circle code "1" and go directly to question 503 and if no, circle code "2" and continue to question 502.

Family Card (KK) is a civil administrative document containing information about each family member issued by the village office. Sometimes the content of the KK is not consistent with structure of the household in SUPAS05. It is possible that not all members of the household are listed in the KK, and on the other hand not everyone listed in the KK is considered a member of the household. Therefore, in order to record that a household has a KK as the answer for Q 501, at least one member of the household must be listed on that KK.

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Question 502: Ownership of Family Card (KK) with a different address
If this household does not have a KK with the address in the village where the residence is located, ask whether the household has a KK issued by some other village. If the answer is yes, circle code "1"; if the answer is no, circle code "2". The KK referred to here is a valid KK in the possession of a member of this household, and there is at least one member of this household listed on that KK.

Question 503: Have there been any births in the past year
Ask if there have been any births in this household in the past year. A birth has occurred in this household if at least one member of this household has given birth. If the answer is yes, circle code "1" and continue to the next question. If the answer is no, circle code "2", and go to Q 506.

Example: Mr. Aji, Mrs. Aji and their children live in Bojong Gede. Previously, they lived in the house of Mr. Aji's parents in Otista region. Mr. Aji's child was born in November 2004 when Mr. Aji and his wife lived in his parents' house. In this case Mr. Aji's parents' household as well as Mr. Aji's household experienced a birth event.

Question 504: Births reported to the village office
If there has been a birth in the household (Q 503 code 1), then ask if this event was reported to the village office.

Yes: If all birth events occurring in the household were reported to the village office.
Yes, some: If there were more than one birth event in the household and at least one birth event was reported to the village office.
No: If the household did not report any of the birth events to the village office.
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In this survey, report to village office does not mean that the respondent must report in person; he may ask someone else to report (for example: broker service, neighbor, etc). If the answer is code "1" or "2", there is an event reported, continue to the next question. If the answer is code "3", no birth event reported, go to question 506.

Question 505: Birth reporting to obtain a letter confirming the birth event
Ask if a letter confirming the birth event was obtained from the village office when the report of the birth event was made. When a birth event is reported to the village office, the village office should issue a letter confirming the birth event. Such a letter may be used for various purposes, such as, an attachment to an application for a birth certificate to the Civil Registration Office. Another example of the use of this letter is in Jakarta where such a letter may be used to obtain a personal identification number issued by the Civil Administration Office. It may well be that in other areas, the civil administration procedures are different; however, there should be a common basic rule that should be followed.

If the respondent says he has a birth certificate issued by the Civil Registration Office, even though he says he did not receive the letter confirming the birth event from the village office, then this household is considered to have reported to the village office and has obtained the letter confirming the birth event.

Question 506: Death event in the last year in the household
Ask if there were any deaths in this household during the past year. The household is considered to have a death event if there is at least one household member or former household member who has died. If there is a death, circle code "1" and continue to the next question. If no, circle code "2" and go to Q 509.

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Question 507: Death reporting to the village office
Ask whether the death event was reported to the village office. If the death event was not reported in person by a member of the household but through someone else such as head of the local neighborhood association or the equivalent in a different place, it is considered that the death event was reported to the village office. If all death events were reported, circle code "1". If there were more than one death events and not all events were reported, circle code "2". If none of the deaths were reported, circle code 3 and go to Q509.

Question 508: Death reporting to obtain a letter confirming the death event

Ask if a letter confirming the death event was obtained from the village office when the report of the death event was made. If all death events were reported and a letter was issued for all of them, circle code "1". If some death events were reported and a letter was issued for those reported, circle code "2". If a letter was not issued for any of the deaths reported, circle code "3".

Question 509: Household member or former household member who moved out of the village in the past year
Ask if there is any member or former member of the household who has moved out of the village in the past year. Moving means leaving the village with the intention to reside in another village for an indefinite period of time. Specifically, it is not necessarily the case that if a person moves out of the village he will no longer be considered a member of the household. A household which has a member who is temporarily away, even though for more than 6 months, is not considered to have a moving-out event in accordance with the civil registration system rules. Moreover, to be away temporarily a person may only need a letter of travel rather than a letter of relocation.

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If there is a moving-out (relocation) event, then circle code "1" and continue to the next question. If no one has moved out, circle code "2", and go to Q 512.

Question 510: Reporting moving-out event to the village office
Ask if the move was reported to the village office. If every move was reported, then circle code "1". If there were multiple events and only some of the moves were reported, then circle code "2". If none of the moves was reported, circle code "3", and go to Q 512.

Question 511: Reporting moving-out event to obtain a letter confirming the move
Ask if a letter confirming the move was received when the report was made to the village office. The letter confirming the move can also be used as an introduction letter from the village office when needed for any purpose in dealing with the sub-district office or other offices at the regency/municipality or provincial level.

If a letter is issued for every report of a move that has been made, circle code "1". If there were several moving events that were reported and a letter was issued for only some of them, circle code "2". If a letter was not issued for any of the reports, circle code "3".

Question 512: Household member or former household member who moved into the village in the past year
Ask if there is any member or a former member of the household who has moved into the village in the past year. The moving-in event in this case is the reverse of that of the moving-out event. To be considered a person who has moved in, the person must intend to stay permanently or for an indefinite period. It is not necessarily the case that if a person moves into the village he will be considered a member of the household. Having guests or visitors who stay in the

[p. 79]

household more than 6 months does not necessarily mean that the household has a moving-in event in accordance with the civil registration system rules.

The rule about temporary visitors has not been adopted as a general rule by the civil registration system. In some areas there are rules that require that a guest must be reported to the head of the neighborhood association; however, this may be required more for neighborhood security than for recording vital events in the civil registration system.

If there is a moving-in event, circle code 1, and continue to the next question. If there is no moving-in event, circle code 2, and go to Q 515.

Question 513: Reporting a moving-in event to the village office
Ask if the move was reported to the village office or if the report has been processed so that the person has been recorded as a local resident. If every moving-in event was reported, circle code "1". If there were multiple events and only some were reported, circle code "2". If none of the events was reported, circle code "3", and go to Q 515.

Question 514: Reporting a moving-in event to obtain a letter
Ask if the reporting of the moving-in event was made to the village office in order to obtain a moving-in letter or if the report has been processed so that the person has been recorded as a local resident. If the entire household is moving in, then a new family card should be processed and issued. If someone moves in as an additional member to an existing household, then the particulars of this person should be recorded in the existing family card. Therefore, if the moving-in event has been recorded in the family card, then it is considered that the moving-in event has been reported and the moving-in letter has been issued.

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If a moving-in letter was issued for every moving-in report, circle code "1". If there were multiple moving-in reports but letters were issued for only some of the reported events, circle code "2". If no letters were issued for any of the moving-in reports, circle code "3".

Example
1. Mr. Siswono's younger brother lived in his household for 8 months (May 2004 until January 2005). When he was accepted for work in another city, he had to move out in February 2005. When he came to Mr. Siswono's household in May 2004, his moving-in was reported to the Sidodadi village office and his name was recorded in Mr. Siswono's family card. However, when he moved out from Mr. Siswono'[s house, his moving-out was not reported because he needed the address for his correspondence and his identity card still used this address in Sidodadi village. Filling out Q 509 through Q 514 for Mr. Siswono's household is as follows:

Q 509 = 1
Q 510 = 3
Q 511 = (blank)
Q 512 = 1
Q 513 = 1
Q 514 = 1

2. During the past year three of Mr. Mahdum's nieces and nephews (Tasya, Reza and Fiqa) moved in to his household from another village with the intention to stay. The moving-in of Tasya and Reza was reported to the village office, but only Tasya was recorded on Mr. Mahdum's family card; Reza case is still under review and Reza received proof of registration. Fiqa moved in one month ago and her moving-in has not yet been reported. Tasya currently goes to school and boards in the city; she goes home to Mr. Mahdum's house every holiday/Sunday. The way to fill out Q 509 through Q 514 for Mr. Mahdum's household is as follows:

Q 509 = 1
Q 510 = 3

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Q 511 = (blank)
Q 512 = 1
Q 513 = 2
Q 514 = 2

7.6 Block V.B. Condition of living quarters
This block is used to record information regarding the condition and facilities of the living quarters.

Question 515: Ownership status of the living quarters
Ask the ownership status of the living quarters of this household. Living quarter ownership status of the household is seen from the point of view of the members of the household who live in it. Ownership status is the status at the time of the enumeration and consists of: owner occupied, lease, rental, rent free, official housing, owned by parents/other relatives, others. Circle the appropriate code. If the answer is others, write the status in the space provided.

Owner occupied means that the living quarter is legally owned by one of members of the household. This includes those living quarters that still have an existing mortgage from a bank or other party that is being paid in installments by one of the members of the household.

Lease means that the household in the living quarters has a contract agreement with the owner of the living quarters for a certain length of time, for example, one or two years. At the end of the contract period, the household members must move out unless both parties agree to extend the lease or sign a new agreement.

Rental means that one of the members of the household that occupies the living quarters signs a rental agreement and pays rent regularly and continuously without a time limit.

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Rent-free means that the household occupies the living quarters owned by another party (non-relatives/parent) without any payment.

Official housing means the household occupies the living quarters owned by an institution where one of the members of the household works. There is no need to consider whether or not there is any payment.

Owned by parents/relative means the household occupies the living quarters owned by the parent/relative without any payment.

Others means that the ownership status of the household occupying the living quarters cannot be classified into one of above-mentioned categories; for example cooperative ownership, traditional house and others.

Example: Andi's household occupies a living quarter rent free; the living quarter was rented by Bambang's household from Cici's household. The ownership status of Andi's household is "Free rent".

Question 516: Construction material of the roof
This question is asked if the enumerator cannot see the construction material of the roof of the building in which the household lives. If the enumerator can see and knows the materials type for the majority of the roof, circle the appropriate code of the answer. A roof is the top cover of the building so that those living in the building are sheltered from the sun, rain, etc. For multi-storied buildings, the roof is the top cover of the highest story.

Concrete roof is a roof that is made from a mixture of cement, gravel, sand and water.

Wood roof/shingles is a roof that is made of wood materials.

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Tiled roof is a roof made from clay that has been molded and baked. This category also includes tiles made from a cement mixture, fiber cement, and ceramic.

Asbestos roof is a roof made from a mixture of asbestos fiber and cement. In general asbestos roofs are made into wavy pieces.

Zinc roof is a roof made from zinc. A zinc roof can be in the form of flat zinc sheets or wavy zinc pieces; also included in this category are zinc roof tiles called decrabond (zinc that is arranged in layers with epoxy and acrylic).

Fiber roof is a roof made from the fiber of sugar palm trees or other similar trees that are generally black in color.

Foliage roof is a roof made from types of leaves that can be woven or not. Example: thatched.

Others are roofs that cannot be classified into one of the above-mentioned categories. Example: carpet, tarpaulin, plastic, bamboo.

Question 517: Construction material of the walls
Look at the walls of the respondent's living quarters. A wall is the outside boundary / divider with another building or the exterior of the building. The interior walls which divide the living quarters into rooms are not considered. If the enumerator can see only a small part of the wall, then ask the respondent for the construction material used for the part of the wall that cannot be seen. If several types of construction materials have been used, make a simple estimate to determine which material was used most. Circle the appropriate code for the construction material most widely used for the walls. Wall types are classified according to the type of material use, that is: brick, wood, bamboo, and other.

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Brick wall is a wall made from red brick, concrete blocks (pressed, chalk, or gypsum), or concrete and usually coated with plaster.

Wooden wall is wall made of wooden boards, plywood and other similar materials.

Bamboo wall is a wall made from bamboo, woven from the outer layer of the bamboo.

Others are wall types that cannot be classified into one of the above-mentioned categories; for example, glass, plastic, nipah (similar to a small palm) leaf, etc.

In certain areas there are walls made from woven bamboo mats which have a wooden frame which are approximately 1 meter x 1 meter and then coated with plaster. This type of wall is categorized as a bamboo wall. In other areas there are also walls made from bricks with wood studs placed every 1 to 1.5 meters apart and plastered. This type of wall is classified as a brick wall.

Question 518: Construction material of floor
Look at the floor or lower parts of the respondent's living quarters and determine the construction material used for the floor. If the enumerator can see only a small part of the floor, then ask the respondent for the construction material used for the part of the floor that cannot be seen. If several types of construction materials have been used, make a simple estimate to determine which material was used most

Circle the appropriate code for the construction material most widely used for the floor. Floor types are classified according to the type of material used, that is, ceramic/marble/granite, tiles/tegel/terrazzo, cement/red brick, wood/board, bamboo, dirt, and others. A cement/cement tile floor covered by vinyl or carpet is considered a cement floor.

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Explanation:
There are some areas where construction materials for the floor made from marble/ceramic/granite, tile/tegel/terrazzo, or cement, are called tile. Therefore the enumerator must be careful. Use the appropriate category of floor type detailed in this handbook.

Question 519: Floor area
Carefully calculate the floor area of the living quarters where the respondent lives. Write the result on the dotted line in square meters and fill in the numbers in the three boxes provided.

Floor area is the total area of each living space under the roof which the household occupies and uses for daily needs by the household, including porches, garages, laundry areas, toilets, storage areas, and all floors on all levels for multi-storied buildings in one census building. Special spaces for business, for example food stall, restaurant, shop, salon, barn, area for drying clothes, grain storage area, and others such as these are not included.

Note:

  • If one census building is occupied by several households, then the common floor area that is used by all households is divided equally among the households that use it.
  • If there are two separate buildings occupied by one household within one census block, then the floor area must include the floor area of all buildings. For multi-story buildings, the floor area is the sum of the floor area of all levels occupied.
  • Gardens that have a roof or those located inside or beside the living quarter but still under the roof should be included in the floor area.

Example:
Mr. Rudi, his wife and two children live in one census building. Kamila a student rents a room (3 x 4 square meters) in the same census building and is responsible for her own meals. In addition to the bedroom, Kamila is allowed to use the Rudi family bathroom (3 x 3 square meters), and may watch TV in the family room (4 x 5 square meters). Meanwhile Mr. Rudi and his wife have a bedroom (4 x 4 square meters), and

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his children have a bedroom (3 x 4 square meters). Everyday Mrs. Rudi cooks in the kitchen (2 x 4 square meters), and only Mr. Rudi's family may accept guest in the sitting room (3 x 3 square meters).

From this example, Q 505 will be filled out as follows:
Mr. Rudi's household floor area = 9/2 + 20/2 + 16 + 12 + 8 + 9 = 59.5 square meters, write the number 060 in the boxes provided for Q 505.
Kamila's household floor area = 12 + 9/2 + 20/2 = 26.5 square meters, write the number 026 in the boxes provided for Q 505.

Question 520: Primary source of lighting
Ask the type of lighting used. Sources of lighting are electricity, gas, petromax/Aladdin, kerosene, and others. If there is more than one source, select the highest quality type of lighting (code with the smallest number).

Electricity includes electricity supplied by the state electric company (PT. PLN), by a rural electrification project, private electric company, and electricity generated with a diesel/generator owned personally or with a group of households.

Gas includes gas-lamp using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or biogas that is generated personally or with a group of households.

Petromax/alladin includes pumped/depressed lamp or Aladdin.

Kerosene includes hanging oil lamps, wall lamps, table lamps, and other similar lamps.

Others include light provided by carbide, wax candle, castor oil, walnut oil, palm oil.

[p. 87]

Question 521: Primary fuel for cooking
Ask the type of fuel the respondent's household uses daily for cooking. If more than one type of fuel is used, ask which type is used most. If there are two or more types that are used with the same frequency, circle the fuel with the smaller code.

Question 522: Main source of drinking water
Ask the main source of drinking water that the respondent's household uses. If there are several sources of drinking water, ask which source the household uses most. If the source of drinking water depends on the season, record the most recently used source. If a household gets its drinking water from a single source and it is piped into the house, then record that source.

"Piped water" is water from a source that has been filtered and purified at the drinking water reservoir such as from a drinking water company, either private sector or government.

"Protected well" is ground water that is drawn by bucket or ladle; the well is protected by a brick wall and a surrounding platform so that water from outside sources cannot seep into the well. Water that is pumped out of the well either by hand or by electric/diesel pump is considered a protected well.

"Unprotected well" is a source of ground water that can be drawn by ladle or bucket that does not have a concrete wall; it is possible that water that has been used outside the well can seep back into the well.

"Spring water" is a source of water on top of the ground which springs out by itself. It is classified as protected (code 04) if the spring is protected from water used for bathing, washing, and other purposes.

[p. 88]

"River water" is water that is taken from a river.

"Lake or dam water" is water that is taken from a lake or dam.

"Rain water" is water that is collected into containers during rain falls.

"Bottled water" is water that has been bottled commercially such as Aqua, Vit, Airess, MQ, refilled water, and others.

"Others" are any sources of drinking water that cannot be classified into the above categories, such as sea water, and pool/pond water.

Drinking water from piped water, protected and unprotected wells includes those that are located inside the house, outside the house and in public places. Circle the appropriate code for source of drinking water in Q 522. If the drinking water is purchased, then ask the source of the water.

Question 523: Distance to closest sewage disposal
If the answer to Q 522 is a well (code "02" or code "03"), ask the distance between the well and the closest sewage disposal. In this case the sewage disposal is not necessarily from the respondent's household but can also be from the next-door neighbor or other households. Fill in the distance rounded to the nearest meter. If there is no sewage disposal because the people in this area defecate in the river, use code 96. The maximum code for distance is 95 meters.

Question 524: Place of bathing
Circle the appropriate code for the place to bathe that is normally used by members of the household. If the answer is others, circle code "6" and write the place used for bathing in the space provided.

"Own bathroom" is a place to bathe which is used specifically by members of this household, although sometimes it may be used by boarders.

"Common bathroom" is a bathroom that is used by members of several specific households.

[p. 89]

"Public bathroom" is a bathroom that can be used by anyone and is not limited to certain households.

"Others" are places to bathe that cannot be classified into one of categories mentioned above, and usually are in an open site and frequently are not specifically constructed for bathing (bathing in a river, lake, wellspring, well, etc.).

Question 525: Toilet facilities
As in the case of Q 522, the question is intended to obtain information regarding the sanitation conditions of the household because the availability of clean water and toilet facilities are important in the prevention of diseases and improvement of health. If the respondent answers that they defecate in the garden or in other places, circle code "96" ("Others"), and write "Garden".

"Own toilet with septic tank" is a toilet facility used by only one household with a sewer line from the toilet so that the waste will go to a place that is waterproof and has a seepage channel (septic tank).

"Own toilet without septic tank" is a toilet facility used by only one household with a sewer line to a place that is not waterproof and seepage proof or has no septic tank.

"Common toilet" is a toilet that is used by members of several specific households.

"Public toilet" is a toilet that can be used by anyone.

[p. 90]

"River toilet" is the toilet facility if the members of the household defecate in the river.

"Hole in the ground" is a hole in the ground where members of the household defecate where there is no sewer line. This is called by different names in different areas.

"Yard/bush" is an open field that can be used to defecate; there is no specific facility like a hole or walls for privacy.

"Others" are places used to defecate that cannot be classified into one of categories mentioned above such as a lake or sea.

Circle the appropriate code for the toilet/place to defecate that is normally used by the members of the household. If the answer is others, circle code "96" and write the type of place in the space provided.

Question 526: Ownership of household items
Questions on the ownership of some household items can be used to measure the socio-economic level of the household. Ask each item one by one for all items and circle the code corresponding to the respondent's answer. If the respondent says that the household owns certain items such as a radio or motorbike but they are out of order, it should still be considered that the household owns the items and therefore code "Yes" should be circled. The concept used here is ownership and not usage.

Example:
Mr. Rahmat's household owns a refrigerator, but because the house has no electricity, the refrigerator has been placed at his sister Zaenab's residence. In this case, it is still considered that Mr. Rahmat owns a refrigerator. Meanwhile, if Zaenab's household is selected in the sample,

[p. 91]

then the answer for Q 526 for Zaenab's household would be that the household does not own a refrigerator.

7.7 Block VI. Characteristics of individual household members
The purpose of this block is to obtain information on the individual members of the household such as age, religion, ethnicity, citizenship, relocation, education, literacy, circular migration, commuting, economic activities and profile of the elderly population, starting from the household member with the first serial number to the one with the last serial number.

To complete this block, the enumerator should, as far as possible, interview the relevant respondent.

7.7.1 Block VI.A. Household members of all ages

Questions Q601 through Q610 are asked to all members of the household

Question 601: Name and serial number of household member
Write the name and serial number of the household member as written in Blok IV.A Column (2) and Column (1).

Question 602: Date, month, and year of birth
Ask the date, month, and year of the respondent's birth. Write the date, month, and year in the appropriate boxes provided. If the respondent only knows the year and month of birth, write the year and month on the line provided and in the appropriate boxes, and place a dash on the line for date and leave the corresponding boxes blank. If the respondent only knows the year of birth, write the year on the appropriate line and put dashes on the other two lines and leave the corresponding boxes blank. If the respondent does not know the year of birth, then the year of birth must be filled in by estimating the year based on the age that is written in Q 404. If the respondent knows the date, month, and year of birth based on the Islamic, Javanese, or Sundanese calendar, this information must be noted as completely as possible in the blank space in Block VI.

[p. 92]

Use the Age Conversion Guide (Appendix 1) to convert the information on date, month, and year to the Gregorian calendar.

Example: Question 602
1. Respondent says he was born on 19 July 1999; fill in lines and boxes as follows:
Date: 19
Month: July
Year: 1999

2. Respondent was born in the month of Syawal in the Gregorian year 1937; because the month of Syawal in the Gregorian year 1937 coincides with the month of December, fill in the lines and boxes as follows:
Date: --
Month: December
Year: 1937

Question 603: Age (year)
Calculate the respondent's age based on the information in Q 602. If the answer is different from that written in Q 404, the enumerator must ask the respondent again to confirm his age and correct the age in Q 602.

Question 604: Religion
Ask: "Which religion do you embrace?" Circle the code corresponding to the respondent's answer; do not ask anything further. For anyone who does not

[p. 93]

embrace one of the six religions in the list, circle code 96 ("Others") and write the respondent's answer in the space provided.

Question 605: Nationality
Ask: "What is your nationality?" Circle the code corresponding to the respondent's answer; do not ask anything further. If the nationality of the parents of a respondent is different from [that of] the respondent, [or] the respondent cannot determine the citizenship of his/her child, the nationality of the child will be the same as that of the father. If code "1" is circled, ask Q 606.a about ethnicity. If code "2" is circled, ask Q 606.b about citizenship.

Indonesian citizens are those who are descendants of native Indonesians and those who are descendants of non-Indonesians who have obtained Indonesian citizenship.

Foreign citizens are those who have non-Indonesian citizenship.

Question 606.a: Ethnicity
Ethnicity is the ethnic group to which the respondent belongs. Write the ethnicity as completely as possible in accordance with the respondent's statement. If the ethnicity of the parents of a respondent is different from [that of] the respondent, [or] the respondent cannot determine the ethnicity [of his/her child], the ethnicity of the child will be the same as that of the father, except for the ethnic group Minangkabau where the child will follow the mother's lineage.

Questions on ethnicity are different from the language that is used daily; because it can happen that someone uses the local language daily, but in fact has another ethnicity.

In recording the ethnicity, the enumerator must write the answer as completely as possible including the island where the respondent comes from. If possible write the name of the province or region where the ethnic group originally comes from.

[p. 94]

Question 606.b: Citizenship
Write briefly the respondent's citizenship.

Question 607: Place of birth
Fill in the province and regency/municipality of the respondent's place of birth. Place of birth is the province and regency/municipality of the respondent's mother when she gave birth to the respondent. For example, a mother resides in Central Jakarta (DKI Jakarta); she gives birth to a child in the Regency of Malang (East Java). If the mother and child return to Central Jakarta (DKI Jakarta) in fewer than 6 months, then the child's place of birth should be recorded as Central Jakarta (DKI Jakarta). However, if the child remains in the Regency of Malang for 6 months or more, then the child's place of birth should be recorded as Regency of Malang (East Java).

The administrative boundaries used in this survey are the latest administrative boundaries. Write the name of the province and the name of the regency/municipality of the respondent's place of birth according to the boundaries used in this survey.

Example: Andika was born in 1990 in the Tangerang Regency, West Java Province. If Andika is selected in the sample, then to fill out Q 607, the province is Banten and the regency is Tangerang. This is due to the changes in the administrative boundaries where the Tangerang Regency became part of Banten Province.

Note: If the respondent's place of birth was abroad, write the name of the respondent's place of birth.

Question 608: Have ever lived in other regency/municipality
Ask whether the respondent has ever lived in another regency/municipality. If yes, circle code "1", and go to Q 609. If no, circle code "2", and if the respondent is younger than 5 years old (Q603 smaller than 5) continue to the next household member or go to Q 616 if the respondent is 5 years or older (Q603 greater or equal to 5).

[p. 95]

Explanation: If someone lives in a regency that at the time of the enumeration had been converted into a municipality, then that person cannot be recorded as having ever lived in another regency.

Question 609: Previous residence
Write the name of the province and regency/municipality of the last place of residence of the respondent prior to residing in the present province and regency/municipality.

Note: If the last place of residence of the respondent was abroad, write the name of the country of the respondent's last residence.

Question 610: Duration of living in present regency/municipality
Write the length of time in years that the respondent has lived in the present regency/municipality. If the length of time is less than 1 year, write "0" year and record "00" in the boxes provided.

7.7.2 Block VI.B. Household members age 5 or older
[Questions Q611 through Q625 are asked only to members of the household age 5 or older]

Question 611: Return to hometown periodically
Ask the respondent whether he/she goes to his/her hometown periodically. Here hometown means a place that the respondent periodically visits back and forth because of certain attachments.

Circle code 1 if the answer is "Yes", and continue to Q 612. Circle code 2 if the answer is "No", and go to Q 613.

Question 612: Frequency of visiting the hometown
Ask the respondent how often he/she returns to his/her hometown. Circle the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

[p. 96]

Example: Josh works in Jakarta but his relatives live in Bandung. Every Saturday he goes to Bandung and returns to Jakarta on Monday. For Q 611 circle code 1 ("Yes"), and in Q 612 circle code 1 ("At least once a week").

Question 613: Filter question
See Q 610; if 5 year or over, place an X in the box "5 years or older", and go to Q 616. If the respondent is 4 year or less, place an X in the box "4 years or younger", and continue to Q 614.

Questions 611 through 625 are asked only to members of the household age 5 or older

Question 614: Residence 5 years ago
Ask the respondent his place of residence 5 years ago including the province and regency / municipality. Write the respondent's answer in the space provided.

Note: If the respondent's place of residence 5 years ago was abroad, write the name of the country where the respondent lived.

Question 615: Main reason for relocating from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago
Ask the respondent the main reason for relocating from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago; circle the code corresponding to the respondent's answer. If the respondent answers "Other", circle code "96" and write the answer as completely as possible.

[p. 97]

Reasons for relocating:

"Job" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago because of his work; for example, tour of duty or change of job.
Example:
1. Mr. Mandra at this time is a section head in the city of Padang government office, West Sumatra. Previously (5 years ago) Mr. Mandra was one of the staff members of a similar office in Jakarta. Then the reason Mr. Mandra moved from Jakarta to Padang is because of his job.

2. Eko at this time is an employee of PT. Telkom in Jakarta. Five years Eko just graduated from Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB) with a degree in civil engineering and applied for a position at PT Telkom Pusat, Bandung. After being accepted, Eko was placed in Jakarta. The reason Eko relocated from Bandung to Jakarta is because of his job.

3. Mr. Syarif and his wife relocated from Yogyakarta to Bandung in 2001 because of his job. In 2003 his wife died, and he relocated to Jakarta. The reason for Mr. Syarif's relocation from Yogyakarta to Bandung for Q 614 is because of his job.

"Looking for work" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of his residence 5 years ago because he was looking for work.
Example: Wika at this time is an employee of Toko Selalu Maju, Jakarta. Five years ago, after she graduated from high school in Denpasar, Wika relocated to Jakarta to look for work. The reason for Wika's relocation from Denpasar to Jakarta is looking for work.

"Education" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of his residence 5 years ago because of education including on the job training.
Example: Tomi at this time is in his senior year at the University of Gadja Mada in Yogyakarta; previously (5 years ago) he lived with his parents in Jakarta. The reason Tomi relocated from Jakarta to Yogyakarta is education.

[p. 98]

"Change of marital status" is the answer if the respondent has relocated due to a change in marital status such as getting married or divorced.
Example: Since 1997, Dendy has worked and lived in Surabaya. In 2003 he married Farah in Jakarta, and they both work and live in Jakarta. The reason for Dendy's relocation from Surabaya to Jakarta is because of change of marital status.

"Follow husband/wife/parent/child" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago in order to follow his/her husband / wife / parents / child regardless of the reason for the relocation of the person he/she followed.
Example: Mr. Syahrul's wife and their children at this time live in the city of Medan because Mr. Syahrul got a new assignment. Previously (5 years ago) they lived in Bekasi. The reason for Mr. Syahrul's wife and his children's relocation is to follow the husband/parent.

"Follow sibling/other relatives" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago in order to follow his/her sibling/other relatives regardless of the reason for the relocation of the person he/she followed.

"Housing" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago because the respondent moved to another house (BTN, new house, etc).
Example: Karen, her husband and child live in a house they lease in Tanah Abang. After saving for a period of time, they can finally buy a BTN house in Bekasi. The reason for the relocation for their family is housing.

"Security" is the answer if the respondent relocated from the regency/municipality of residence 5 years ago for security reasons.
Example: Karlina has lived in Kerawang for 2 years; previously she lived in Ambon. Because of violent clashes between groups in Ambon, Karlina had to leave Ambon. If Karlina is selected in the sample, then main reason for moving from Ambon to Kerawang is security (code 08).

"Others" are any reasons which cannot be classified into the categories above such as retirement.
[p. 99]

Questions 616 through 619: Respondent's education.
Someone is considered going to school if he/she is registered and actively attends classes in a formal level of education, either under the auspices of the Ministry of Education or other department/institution.

Formal levels of education consist of:

a. Basic level education covers primary school (SD) including schools organized and managed by society, parents, and teachers, primary level of special schools (for children with disabilities) (SLB), primary level of Moslem religious schools (Madrasah Ibtidaiyah), junior high school, general/vocational, (including open plan SLTP, SMEP, ST, SKPP), and Madrasah Tsanawiyah.

b. Intermediate level education covers public high school (SMU), Madrasah Aliyah (MA), vocational high school (including SMEA, STM, SPG, SGA, vocational high schools organized and managed by a ministry other than the Ministry of Education).

c. Higher level education covers:
1. Degree program is a program with emphasis on providing academic expertise including expertise related to research and development, improvement/application of concepts and operational methods in a certain field of science, technology, or arts organized and managed by an institution of higher learning offering baccalaureate degrees/strata I (S1), graduate or master degrees/strata II (S2), and doctoral degrees/strata III (S3).

2. Non-degree program is a program with emphasis on providing professional expertise including expertise related to skills and application of certain fields of science, technology or arts in a work-oriented environment. This program covers diploma education I (DI), diploma education II (DII), diploma education III (DIII), diploma education IV (DIV), specialist education I (Sp I), and specialist education II (Sp II).

[p. 100]

Question 616: School attendance
"No/never attended school" is the answer if the respondent has never registered or never actively attended classes in a formal level of education, including those who have attended kindergarten but have never attended basic level education.

"Currently attending school" is the answer if the respondent registered and actively attends classes in some formal level of education. Note: university-level students who temporarily are not attending are still considered currently attending school.

"No longer attending school" is the answer if the respondent has ever registered or has ever actively attended classes in a formal level of education, but currently he/she is no longer registered or actively attending classes.

Note:
1. Those who are attending a package A equivalent program and have ever attended basic level education are classified as no longer attending school.

2. Diploma Program I is only those former education programs managed by higher learning institutions.

If Q 616 has code 1 ("No/never attended school"), go to Q 620.

Question 617: Highest level of education ever attended/currently attending
Use codes 1 through 8 for highest level of education ever attended/currently attending which is the highest level of education the respondent ever attended regardless of whether he/she is currently attending school or is no longer attending school.

Elementary school/Madrasah ibtidaiyah is basic level education of 5/6/7 years or equivalent (including basic level of special schools for disabled children, schools organized and managed by society, parents, and teachers).

[p. 101]

Junior high school/Madrasah tsanawiyah or equivalent/vocational is a junior level of basic level education either general or vocational, Madrasah Tsanawiyah or equivalent [MULO, HBS 3 year, special schools for children with disabilities at junior high school level, home economics school for Girls (SKP), economics junior high school (SMEP), technical junior high school (ST), family welfare junior high school (SKKP), vocational skill junior high school, farm management junior high school, agricultural junior high school, teacher's aide school (SGB), school for Islamic educators (PGA), public administration Courses (KPA), school for religious court staff].

General senior high school/Madrasah aliyah or equivalent is an intermediate level general education (SMU), Madrasah aliyah or equivalent (HBS 5 year, AMS, and public administration senior level courses (KPAA)).

Vocational high school is vocational education at the level of senior high school such as social work senior high school (SMPS), senior high school for craft industry, fine arts senior high school, senior high school of Indonesian dance (SMKI), senior high school of music, technology for development senior high school, economics senior high school (SMEA), technical senior high school (STM), agricultural technology senior high school, shipping technology senior high school, mining technology senior high school, graphic arts senior high school, physical education senior high school (SGO), teachers for special schools for children with disabilities (SGPLB), high school for Islamic educators 6 years, school for kindergarten teachers, teacher training courses (KPG), chemistry analysis high school (SMAK), school for pharmacists' assistants (SAA), school for mid-wives, school for radiology assistants.

Diploma I/II are diploma programs at an institution of higher learning for a formal education of one or two years.

Diploma III/Sarmud is a diploma program at an institution of higher learning for a formal education of three years to obtain a three-year diploma or a three-year degree (Sarjana muda). For example, Indonesian music academy, Indonesian dance academy, foreign languages academy, business management academy, chemical analyst academy, meteorology and geophysics academy.

[p. 102]

Diploma IV/S1 is a diploma program at an institution of higher learning for a formal education of four years or a bachelor's degree. The Akta IV Program is equivalent to the Diploma IV level.

S2 and S3 are post-graduate education programs (master or doctoral), specialist 1 or 2 at an institution of higher learning.

Question 618: Highest grade/class ever attended/currently attending
Use codes 1 through 7.
Explanation:

a. Those who completed the highest grade of the highest level of education attended are given code "7".
b. Those who are currently attending/have ever attended post-graduate courses for the master degree program (S2) or doctoral degree program (S3) are given code "6".
c. Those who are currently attending/have ever attended the highest grade at the graduate program S1 are given code "5".

"Completed school" means that a person has passed the final exam of the highest grade of the level of education in which he/she was enrolled either in the public or private sector and has obtained a diploma/certificate of completion. Someone who has not yet attended the highest grade of a particular level of education, but he/she has passed the final exam of that level of education is considered to have completed school.

Note: For those who are currently attending/have ever attended an education program at a university or college that uses the course credit system (SKS), the information about grade/class attended can be obtained by asking an additional question as follows: "How many credit hours have you completed?" The respondent's answer can be converted using the follow guidelines:
0 - 30 credits -- Level 1
31 - 60 credits -- Level 2
61 - 90 credits -- Level 3
91 - 120 credits -- Level 4
121 credits or more -- Level 5

Example:

[p. 103]

1. A person who is currently attending/has ever attended courses in a college or university and has completed 30, 31, and 65 credits should be coded as follows:

Number of credits completed: 30 credits
Level ever attended: 1
Level currently attending: 2

Number of credits completed: 31 credits
Level ever attended: 2
Level currently attending: 2

Number of credits completed: 65 credits
Level ever attended: 3
Level currently attending: 3

2. For someone who transfers from the academy/diploma program III to a university using a converted credit score, then the level is determined based on the converted credit score plus the credit hours obtained from the university.

Question 619: Highest diploma/completion certificate earned
Use codes 1 through 9 for highest diploma/completion certificate earned classified as follows:

No diploma/certificate is the answer for those who have no basic level education (SD/MI/or equivalent) diploma. They may have ever attended basic level education school in elementary school 5/6/7 years or equivalent [schools organized and managed by society, parents, and teachers, primary level of special schools (for children with disabilities or SLB), primary level of Moslem religious schools (Madrasah ibtidaiyah), package A1-A100 programs, Package A equivalent programs] but have not yet completed it. This includes those who have completed 3 years elementary school or equivalent.

Elementary school (SD)/MI/or equivalent is the answer for those who have completed basic level education of 5/6/7 years or equivalent (including basic level of special schools for disabled children, schools organized and managed by society, parents, and teachers, package A1-A100 programs, Madrasah ibtidaiyah).

Junior high school (SLTP)/MT/or equivalent/vocational is the answer for those who have completed a junior level education either general or vocational or equivalent (MULO, HBS 3 year, special schools for children with disabilities at junior high school level, Madrasah tsanawiyah, home economics school for girls, economics junior high school, technical junior high school, family welfare junior high school, vocational skill junior high school 4 years, farm management junior high school, agricultural junior high school, teacher's aide

[p. 104]

school, school for Islamic educators, public administration courses, school for religious court staff).

General senior high school (SMU)/MA/or equivalent is the answer for those who have completed an intermediate level general education such as senior high school, Madrasah aliyah, HBS 5 year, AMS, and public administration senior level courses (KPAA).

Vocational high school (SMK) is the answer for those who have completed vocational education at the senior high school level such as social work senior high school, senior high school for craft industry, fine arts senior high school, senior high school of Indonesian dance, senior high school of music, technology for development senior high school, economics senior high school, technical senior high school, agricultural technology senior high school, shipping technology senior high school, mining technology senior high school, graphic arts senior high school, physical education senior high school, teachers for special schools for children with disabilities, high school for Islamic educators 6 years, school for kindergarten teachers, teacher training courses, chemistry analysis high school, school for pharmacists' assistants, school for midwives, school for radiology assistants.

Diploma I/II is the answer for those who have completed a diploma program DI/DII at an institution of higher learning for a formal education. Akta I and II programs are part of the DI/DII level education program.

Diploma III/Sarjana Muda is the answer for those who have completed a three-year diploma program at an institution of higher learning for a formal education. For example Indonesian music academy, Indonesian dance academy, foreign languages academy, interior administration academy, state administration academy, business management academy, chemical analyst academy, meteorology and geophysics academy, health science academy, academy for health Inspection, military academy, etc. For universities that do not have three-year degree programs, students who are attending level 4 or 5 their highest education level completed is senior high school (SMA) or senior vocational school (SMK).

[p. 105]

Diploma IV/S1 is the answer for those who have completed a four-year education program, or D IV at a university or institution of higher learning. The Akta IV Program is equivalent to the Diploma IV level.

S2 and S3 are the answers for those who have completed a post-graduate education program at the master program (Specialist I) or doctoral program (Specialist II) at a university or an institution of higher learning.

Circle the appropriate code for the highest diploma or completion certificate earned in Q 619.

Question 620: Ability to read and write
Someone is considered able to read and write if he/she can read and write a sentence of a few simple words written in a given alphabet.

Note:

a. A blind person who can read and write Braille is classified as able to read and write Latin characters.
b. A person who was able to read and write, but now due to some handicap is no longer able to read and write, is classified as able to read and write.
c. A person who can only read but is not able to write is considered as able to read and write.

Ask: "Can you read and write Latin characters?" If the answer is "Yes/can", circle code "1". Ask also: "Can you read and write Arabic characters?" If the answer is "Yes/can", circle code "3", but if the answer is "No", circle code "4". If the respondent is able to write and read alphabets other than Latin and Arabic, circle code "6" at "Other characters" and write the name of the characters for example, Chinese characters.

[p. 106]

Question 621: Routine activity conducted outside regency/municipality
Ask the respondent "Do you normally go outside your regency/municipality for work/school/courses and return home daily?" Activities recorded for Q 621 are activities that are conducted routinely outside the regency/municipality.

Routine here does not necessarily mean that it must be done every day, but can also be done every couple of days or every three days, provided the activities are done regularly.
Circle the code that corresponds to the respondent's answer. If the answer is code 2, go to Q 626.

Question 622: Main activity conducted outside the regency/municipality
Activities here cover such activities as work, attending school, taking courses, and others (for example, looking for work, sporting event, organization activities). Ask the main activity the respondent conducts outside the regency/municipality, and circle the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

Main activity conducted is the activity that requires the most time compared to the other activities.

Most time is the longest time spent by comparing the time spent for all activities such as work, school, courses and others.

Work is an economic activity with the intention to obtain or help to obtain earnings or profits.

Attending a school is an activity of attending a formal level of education either at a basic level of education, intermediate level of education or an advanced level of education. Holidays are not included.

Taking courses is an activity to improve skills at an institution either to obtain a certificate or not, such as sewing courses, cooking courses, language courses, and others.

[p. 107]

Others for example are activities such as obtaining health services.

Question 623: Distance to place of work/school/courses/others
Ask the respondent how far it is from his/her home to the place of the activities and write in round numbers the number of kilometers. Fill in the number of kilometers in the boxes provided; the maximum distance is 995 kilometers. The distance recorded here is the distance one way, not the round-trip distance.

Question 624: Time required traveling to place of work/school/courses/others
Ask the respondent "How long does it take you to travel to the place of your activity?" Write in round numbers the number of minutes. Fill in the number of minutes in the boxes provided; the maximum is 995 minutes. The time is counted from the time the respondent leaves the house to the time he/she arrives at the place of the activity including the time waiting for public transport (for those who use public transport). Stopping by a friend/ relative's house, shopping, or other activities not related to the main activity are not included in the travel time.

Question 625: Type of transportation
Ask the respondent "What type of transportation do you use to go from home to the place of your activity?" Circle the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer, both for going "Go" and also for returning "Come home". If the respondent normally uses more than one type of transportation, ask the respondent the type of transportation the respondent used for the longest part of the trip.

Public transportation is transportation that can be used by anyone. Those who use this type of transportation usually pay a fee. Examples of public transportation are trains, public buses, pedicabs, ojek (motorcycle used to take a single passenger for a fee) and others.

[p. 108]

Shared transportation is a type of transportation used by a group of people, either for payment or not, for example, employee bus.

Private transportation is a type of transportation which can only be used by the owner of the vehicle including motorized or non-motorized vehicles.

Without transportation is going to and from the place of the activity on foot.

7.7.3 Block VI.C. Household members age 10 or older
The purpose of this block is to collect information regarding the economic activities carried out by people of working age covering questions on type of industry of main work, occupation of main work, and status/position of main work.

Question 626.a: Worked during the past week
Some important items to know in filling out this question are as follows:

During the past week means the past consecutive 7 days ending the day before the day of enumeration. For example, if the enumeration is conducted on 10 June 2005, then "During the past week" should include the dates of 3 June through 9 June 2005.

Work is an activity for the purpose of obtaining or helping to obtain earnings or profits for at least one hour during the past week. Working for one hour must be done continuously without stopping. Earnings or profits include wages/salary including all type of allowances and bonuses for workers/employees, and the earnings can be in the form of rent, interest or profit, either in cash or in kind.

Explanation:

a. To carry out an activity within the concept "Work" is to carry out an economic activity that will produce goods or services.
b. The activity of planting by someone for his own consumption is not considered as work, unless those products are his main staple food such as rice, corn, sago, wheat, and/or root plants (cassava, sweet potatoes, potatoes).
c. A household member who assists in the work of the head of the household or other household member, for example in a rice field, farm, food stall/store, etc., is considered to work even though he/she does not receive a wage/salary (unpaid worker).
d. One who engages in his/her profession using his/her professional expertise to meet the needs of the household, for example, a doctor cares for a member of the household, a construction worker repairs his own house, and a tailor sews his own clothes, is considered as working.
e. Someone who rents agricultural equipment/tools, industrial equipment, party supplies/equipment, vehicles, etc. to others is considered as working.
f. Housemaid is considered as work, either as a member of the household or not.
g. Someone who leases farm land to others as sharing cropping is considered as working if he/she is partly responsible for or participates in the management of the operation.
h. Day-workers in the agricultural or non-agricultural sector who are waiting for work are considered not working.
i. A boxer or professional singer who is practicing to improve their skills is considered as working.
j. Beggars, gamblers and thieves are not considered as working. Free-lance traffic conductors, red light street musicians (kecrek-kecrek) and the like are considered beggars.
[p. 110]

Filling in the answer: circle code 1 if the respondent answers "Yes", and go to Q 627. Circle code 2 if the respondent answers "No", and continue to Q 626.b.

Question 626.b: Temporarily not working during the past week
This question is asked if Q 626.a has code "2".

Those who are categorized as having work but temporarily not working are those have a job/business but during the past week were not working for some reason such as illness, on leave, waiting for harvest or on strike.

Those who are categorized as having work but temporarily not working are:

a. Professionals not working because of illness or waiting for the next job, such as puppeteer, masseuse, shaman and singer.
b. Permanent employee, civil servant or private sector employee, who are not working due to leave, illness, absence from work, on strike, or on temporary leave due to the company's temporary work stoppage, for example due to equipment break down, shortage of raw material, etc.
c. Farmers who are not working due to illness or waiting for the next activity such as waiting for harvest or the rains to till the rice fields.

Explanation:
One who has been accepted for work but has not yet started at the time of enumeration is not categorized as temporarily not working.

Non-professional workers, such as casual workers, casual farm workers, agricultural worker and other casual workers who temporarily do not have work during the past week are not categorized as temporarily not working. If during the past week, he/she was looking for work, he/she should be categorized as such. If during the past week, he/she had no activity at all, then he/she should be categorized as not in the labor force.

[p. 111]

Filling in the answer: circle code 1 if the respondent answers "Yes", and go to Q 627. Circle code "2" if the respondent answers "No", and continue to the next household member if this person is aged less than 60 (Q 603 less than 60) or continue to Q 630 if the respondent is age 60 years or over (Q 603 greater or equal to 60).

Question 627: Industry of main job
The way to determine whether the activity is the main job or not is as follows:

  • If the respondent during the past week has only one job, that job is considered as his/her main job.
  • If the respondent during the past week has more than one job, then the job that requires the most time is considered the main job. If the time is the same, then the job with the greatest earnings is considered the main job.

A person is considered to have more than one job if the work is carried out separately. Casual farm workers who work for several farmers are considered as having only one job.

Explanation:

1. If someone is on leave from a job and during that leave is not doing any other work, then his/her job that he/she is on leave from is the main job.

2. If someone is on leave and while on leave he/she carries out several other jobs, then one of his/her other jobs is considered his/her main job.

Example:

a. A marketing manager in a real estate company who during the past week was on leave and during that leave did not do any work; then, his/her work as real estate marketing manager is his/her main job.

[p. 112]

b. During the past week a doctor at the general hospital was on leave, and during his leave he helped his wife sell sports equipment; this doctor's main job during the past week is selling sport equipment.

c. During the past week a farmer who in addition to working on his own farm also helped plant rice in another farmer's field and received payment. This farmer is classified as having two jobs within the same field of industry, which is agriculture. The job where he spent more time is considered his main job. If the time is the same, then the job that earned the most is considered his main job.

d. If a person works in the morning to plant rice and works in the evening for a different farmer to plant vegetables, then this person is classified as having one job, that is: planting food crops.

Field of industry/work is the field of activity of the work/business/office where the person works.

The Industrial Classification used is the Indonesian Standard Industrial Classification 2000 (KBLI 2000) which no longer classifies the economic activities in Indonesia based on sector/field of activity (nine sectors), but uses category (18 categories) and major group (63 major groups).

Method of filling in the form: write the field of industry of the main job during the past week as completely as possible in order to facilitate the processing, in particular during coding at the BPS central office.

[p. 113]

Example of filling in field or work:
Incorrect

  • Agriculture
  • Gita Kencana Company
  • Transportation

Correct

  • Food crops agriculture -- grains/vegetables
  • Ready- made clothing industry/batik cloth at Gita Kencana Co.
  • Bus driver/driver for private household

[Comparison tables in the original document are not presented here]

[p. 114]

Question 628: Type of activity/occupation of main job
Type of activity is the kind of work conducted by someone or assigned to someone. The classification of type of activity/occupation used in SUPAS 2005 is based on the Indonesian "Type of activities/occupation classification (KJI)" 1982.

Method of filling in: write the type of activity/occupation of the main job as completely as possible to facilitate the processing, in particular in assigning codes at BPS. Use Indonesian terms rather than local terms (bawon, matun, etc.).

[p. 115]

Examples of writing type of activities/occupation
Examples of unclear answers

  • Farmer
  • Airline employee
  • International hotel employee
  • Shoe factory employee
  • Casual construction worker
  • Hospital employee
  • Merchant

Examples of clear answers

  • Processes/works on agricultural farm land; food crops (paddy, maize, cassava, soybean, etc.)
  • Pilot; weighs passenger luggage; airline administration
  • Provides services to hotel guests during their stay; planning, arranging and supervising housekeeping or other hotel activities
  • Prepare the shoe sole; run leather sewing machine; night watchman in shoe factory
  • Painting office buildings/private dwellings/factories; digging foundations; installing building floor tiles
  • Provides treatment and advice to hospital patients; prepares the food for the patients
  • Sells food, drinks, fruits, vegetables on the side of the road; sells household wares from house to house

Question 629: Status of employment of main job
Status of employment is the position of a person in a particular job consisting of:

a. "Own account worker" is work or business in which the person is responsible for the economic risk, that is, there is a possibility that the production costs will not be returned in this endeavor, and the person has no paid or unpaid worker. This includes endeavors that require special technology or expertise.

[p. 116]

Example:
A casual driver (no wages) who drives a vehicle owned by someone else and pays a flat rate to the owner per period of time; pedicab driver; carpenter; stone mason; electrician; masseuse, well digger; newspaper agent; ojek driver; merchant; doctor/midwife/shaman; ticket scalper; real estate broker, and others.

b. "Self-employed assisted by temporary/unpaid employee" is work or business in which the person is responsible for the risk and is assisted by an unpaid or temporary worker/staff/worker.
"Temporary worker/staff/worker" is one who is employed by another person or an institution/office/company and only receives wages based on time worked or volume produced.

Example:
1. Stall/shop owner assisted by family member/unpaid employee or assisted by others who are paid based on number of days worked.
2. Travelling salesman assisted by an unpaid employee or assisted by others who are paid whenever they work.
3. Farmer who works on farm land assisted by an unpaid worker. However, during the harvest the worker receives some of the harvest; this worker is not a permanent employee.

c. "Employer" is work or business in which the person is responsible for the risk and is assisted by at least one paid, permanent worker/staff/worker.

"A paid, permanent employee/worker/staff" is a person who is employed by another person or an institution/office/company and receives wages on a regular basis whether or not the employer has any work for him/her.

Example:
1. A shopkeeper who employs one or more permanent employees.
2. A cigarette manufacturer who employs permanent workers.

[p. 117]

d. "Regular employee/worker/staff" is someone employed by others or an institution/office/company and regularly receives wages/salary in cash or in kind. An employee who has no regular employer is considered a casual worker. Someone is considered to have a regular employer if he had the same employer (person/household) for the last month, except for the construction sector where the duration is the last three months. If the employer is an institution, there may be more than one employer.

Example:
Hendri works in the mornings as an employee of BPS and in the evenings as a permanent teacher at a school. Hendri is categorized as a regular employee/worker/staff.

e. "Casual worker in agriculture" is someone employed in agriculture by different people/employers/institutions (more than one employer during the last month) either at a household or non-household enterprise who receives payment either in cash or kind based on a daily wage or contract. Agriculture enterprises include food crops farms, plantations, forestry, animal husbandry, fishery, hunting, and agricultural services.

Employer is the person or the party who assigns the work based on agreed terms of payment.

Example of someone who is an employer:
1. A paddy farmer who employs a farm worker to process/work the rice field with daily wages.

2. A plantation entrepreneur who employs several workers to fetch coconuts with an agreed payment.
Examples of casual worker in agriculture: worker who harvests paddy; worker who tills a rice field/farm land; worker who collects sap from the rubber trees; worker who harvests shrimp from a fish pond, worker who picks coffee, coconut, clove, etc.

[p. 118]

f. "Casual worker not in agriculture" is someone employed in non-agriculture enterprises by different people/employers/institutions (more than one employer during the last month) who receives payment either in cash or kind based on a daily wage or contract. Non-agriculture enterprises are all businesses in all other sectors except agriculture.
Examples of casual worker not in agriculture: Coolies in the market, station or other places with no permanent employer; passenger recruiter for public transportation; traveling clothes washer, picker of items from trash piles, construction helper, casual parking attendants, etc.

g. "Unpaid worker" is someone who works by helping others without receiving wages/salary either in cash or in kind.

Unpaid worker consists of:
1. Household member such as a wife who helps her husband work in the rice field.
2. Relative but not a household member who helps in a food stall.
3. Non-relative and non-household member who helps weave a hat for his neighbor in a home industry.

The method of filling in: use the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

Some examples to determine the field of activities/industry, type of activities/occupation and status of employment are as follows:

1.
Andi, Eko, Nita, Hery, Toni, and Adi are employed at a shoe factory owned by Mrs. Dewi. Andi works as the raw materials buyer, Eko supervises the workers who make the shoes, Nita is a typist, Hery as a driver, Toni is a shoe maker, and Adi is an office boy. In her daily activities Mrs. Dewi is assisted by her son, Dedi, as a cashier without pay. Mrs. Dewi is the general manager of the company.

[p. 119]

[The table "Field of activity/industry, type of activity/occupation and status of employment -- for the respondents mentioned above" is not reported here]

2.
a. Nazir is a paddy farmer assisted by his wife and children.
b. Mirna makes plastic mats for sale without any help.
c. Joni is a tailor assisted by his wife Irma, and when he has a lot of sewing to be done he hires a temporary worker.
d. Hadi is the personal driver of Mrs. Pramudya and receives a salary.
e. Imron is a truck driver at an herbal medicine factory "Air Mancur" and his wife Marni is collecting firewood in the forest for sale.
f. Tomi is a casual dirt tiller who works at the Haji Ali and Haji Nawi's farm lands.
[p. 120]
g. Surti is a clothes washer who works at Mrs. Darto's, Mrs. Anggi's, and Mrs. Eko's houses.

[The table "Field of activity/industry, type of activity/occupation and status of employment -- for the respondents mentioned above" is not reported here]

[p. 121]

7.7.4 Block VI.D. Household members age 60 or older
The purpose of this block is to obtain information about the elderly population, that is, those [persons] age 60 or older. Data regarding the elderly in Indonesia are scarce, especially those that can show differences between regions. SUPAS05 will obtain data on their role and participation in socio-economic activities and their dependence on others. In order to produce good quality data, the enumerators must interview the relevant respondent when filling in this block.

Question 630: Income in cash or kind
Ask whether the respondent received income from any sources, either in cash or in kind, during the past 6 months beginning from January 2005. The sources of the income are classified into the following types: job/business, pension/social security, interest from savings/deposits, and income from share dividends/obligations/marketable securities, spouse, children/children-in-law, siblings/other relatives, and others.

"Job/business" is a source of income from wages, salaries, remuneration, and profit from work or business activities.

"Pension/social security" is a source of income received by a person as their right resulting from a regulation or contract agreement, such as a pension for former civil servants/military/police (PNS/TNI/ POLRI) and their widows, withdrawal from pension saving funds (such as Taspen and Bapertarum), pension insurance for company employees, private insurance, labor social security, temporary allowance prior to retirement, and old age benefits (JHT), etc.

"Interest on savings/deposits" is a source of income from interest on savings or deposits at a bank or other financial institution. Popular examples are Tabanas, Tahap BCA, Taplus BNI, Simpedes, Taperum, etc.

[p. 122]

"Income from share dividends/obligations/marketable securities" is a source of income from the gain from the sale and dividends from shares, obligations, or marketable securities. This also includes ownership of Reksadana certificates.

"A spouse" gives (transfers) cash or kind to his/her spouse on his/her own accord. The payment does not include funds for the daily need of the household, even though these funds may be spent for that. Funds for daily needs are for consumption and are not considered as a gift to the spouse. There is a subtle difference between transfer payments and consumption. Operationally in SUPAS05 the payment from one spouse to the other may only be applied to those who live separately, probably because the husband works far away (circular migrant).

"Children/children-in-law" give (transfer) cash or in kind to the parents/parents-in-law.

"Siblings/other relatives" give (transfer) cash or in kind to the respondent.

"Others" are sources of income from someone or some organization which cannot be classified as mentioned above.

Note: Payments (transfers) should not include loans, repayment of loans, and other payments related to commerce.

Question 631: Source of largest income
If the answer to Q 630 is that the respondent has income from several sources, more than one "Yes" code is circled, ask the respondent which source provides the largest income. Write the appropriate code from the "Yes" column of Q 630 in the box provided for Q 631 in accordance with the respondent's answer.

[p. 123]

For example, for Q 630 codes 3 and 5 are circled in the "Yes" column, and the respondent says that the largest source of income is from interest on deposits; then write code 5 in the box provided for Q 631.

Question 632: Sufficiency of income for daily needs
Ask the respondent if the funds received from all sources of income listed in Q 630 are sufficient to meet the daily needs. Circle code 1 if the respondent answers "Yes"; circle code 2 if the respondent answers "No".

Question 633: Health condition
Ask the condition of the respondent's health according to his/her opinion, that is: whether he/she feels well, well enough, or not well. Circle the code that corresponds to the respondent's answer.

Question 634: Health aids
Ask the respondent whether he/she needs and uses eyeglasses, hearing aids, and walking / mobility aids. Someone is considered to need an aid if, without it, the relevant part of the body will not be able to function normally. Someone is considered to use an aid if that person normally uses such an aid.
Answers for "need" and "use" can be given in various combinations. Someone can need and use, need but not use, not need but use, and not need and not use.

Question 635: Reason for not using
This question is only asked to those respondents who need but do not use a certain aid. Ask why the respondent doesn't use that aid, or what prevents him/her from using it.

"Cannot afford to buy" covers answers such as too expensive, needs a lot of money and time because it requires a doctor's prescription and the overall cost is too expensive for the respondent, and other reasons related to cost that are beyond the respondent's ability to pay.

[p. 124]

"Not available" covers answers such as, because the item is only sold in places too far away for the respondent to access, or there are no appropriate sizes available in the market.

"Others" cover answers such as, the item has been ordered, does not know if such an aid is available in the market, doesn't feel there is any use trying to get it (hopeless), has not had a chance to replace it, has not yet been checked by a doctor, etc.

Question 636: Needs help from others
Ask the respondent if he/she needs assistance from others to do the following: dressing, defecate / urinate, bathe, eat/drink and prepare food. Circle the appropriate code which corresponds to the respondent's answer for each activity. The questions are related not only to permanent conditions of the respondent, but also to conditions the respondent has experienced recently.

Question 637: Someone who helps
For the respondent who needs the assistance of others in the activities in Q636, ask who assists him/her. There can be more than one answer; circle the appropriate code which corresponds to the respondent's answer for each activity.

Question 638: Daily activities during the last 6 months
Ask if the respondent normally carries out activities related to hobbies and recreation such as fishing, watching TV, reading/writing, picnic/travel, sports, social activities, and housekeeping. Circle the appropriate codes which correspond to the respondent's answers.
Examples of social activities are gathering of friends/family, association meetings, parties, traditional ceremonies, ritual gatherings, religious ceremonies (including obligations to go to mosques and churches, etc.), prayer groups, community prayer groups, etc.

[p. 125]

Question 639: Activity requiring the most time during the last month
If the answer to Q 638 is that the respondent normally carries out more than one activity, ask the respondent which activity required the most time during the last month. Write the appropriate code from the "Yes" column of Q 638 in the box provided for Q 639 in accordance with the respondent's answer.

7.8 Block VII. Ever-married women age 10 or older
The questions in this block are asked only to women who have ever been married (Q 405, codes 2, 3, or 4) and are age 10 or older (Q 404 = 10).

7.8.1 Block VII.A. Marriage
Question 701: Name and serial number of household member (ART)
Write the name and serial number of the member of the household according to Columns (2) and (1) in Block IV.A.

Question 702: Month and year of first marriage
Ask the respondent the month and year of her first marriage in the Gregorian calendar. If the respondent only knows the month and year of the first marriage in another calendar, use the Age Conversion Guide to convert. Fill in the month and year of the first marriage in the space provided. If the respondent doesn't know the month and year of the first marriage, fill in code 98 for the month, but the year must be estimated in accordance with the guidelines described in Q 404.

Question 703: Age at first marriage
Ask the respondent her age at the time of her first marriage. If the month and year of her first marriage are known, estimate the age at first marriage by relating the month and year for first marriage to the month and year of her birth. As in the case of estimating age, age at first marriage is rounded down. Write the age in the space provided. Minimum age at first marriage is 10 years.

[p. 126]

Example:
Mrs. Mirna was born in January 1939. She married for the first time in May 1964. Then her age at first marriage was 25 (although in fact it was 25 years and 4 months).

Note:
Women who are pregnant outside of marriage are considered divorced (Q405 = 3); then Q703 should be filled in with the age at the time of enumeration minus the number of months of the pregnancy. If she has given birth, Q703 is filled in by calculating her age at the birth of her first child minus 9 months.

Question 704: Number of marriages
Ask the respondent how many times she has married. Marriages that are recorded here are those that are lawful marriages in accordance with state law, religion, tradition, or community recognition. In order to obtain precise answers from the respondent, care must be taken in asking this question. Write the number of marriages in accordance with the respondent's answer in the space and the box provided. Maximum number for this box is 9.

Question 705: Number of years married
Ask the respondent how long she has been married. If she has been married more than once, then the number of years of marriage is the sum of the number of years of each marriage. For women pregnant outside marriage, write code "00".

Question 706: Filter question
See Q405; if the respondent has code 2 (married), place a check symbol (X) in the box "Married" and continue to Q707. If the respondent has a code other than 2, then place a check symbol (X) in the other box to the right and go to Q708.

Question 707: Husband lives in the household
Ask the respondent if her husband lives in this household. If "Yes", circle code "1" and write the husband's serial number in the box provided and go to Q709.

[p. 127]

The husband's serial number is obtained from Block IV.A Column (1). If the respondent's answer is "No", circle code "2" and continue to Q708.

Question 708: Length of time lived without husband
Ask the respondent the number of years the respondent has lived without a husband. Write the respondent's answer in the box provided.

7.8.2 Block VII.B. Family planning
This block collects information on the use of different types of family planning (KB) devices/ methods, that is, devices/methods couples use to prevent or delay pregnancy.

Matters related to family planning may be considered private matters by the respondent, and she may be reluctant to discuss this matter. To overcome this feeling, show the respondent that you do not feel embarrassed or awkward to talk about this matter. Ask all the questions in the same way as you ask all the other questions on the form. If she is reluctant in answering any of the questions, the enumerator must assure the respondent that the same questions are being asked to all women in Indonesia.
Note that all questions about contraceptive devices/methods used by men apply to all husbands or former husbands. If the respondent has been married more than once, it does not matter which husband used which device/method.

Question 709: Ever used a family planning (FP) device/method
Circle code "1" if the respondent answers "Yes" and code "2" if the respondent answers "No".

Question 710: Type of FP device/method last used
The respondent might not always understand what you say in explaining a family planning device/method. In this case, repeat the explanation about this device/method. If she

[p. 128]

still does not understand, explain in another way or with additional information regarding that device/method.
In order for you to be able to do this, the enumerator must have knowledge regarding the family planning devices/methods and must know different names that are used by the local community for a particular device/method.

Like examples below:
Family planning devices/methods -- Popular name

  • IUD/AKDR/spiral -- loop (lup), pasang, iyut
  • Condom/FP rubber -- kapooces, selongkopan, jaswadi, raincoat, balloon, saron.
  • Female sterilization/tubectomy -- medical operation for women (MOW), pemandulan wanita, steril
  • Male sterilization/vasectomy -- medical operation for men (MOP, pemandulan pria, steril
  • Calendar method/no sex system -- tanggalan (calendar), no sex, fasting.
  • Contraceptive implant -- alwalit (acronym for: Alat KB bawah kulit or FP device under the skin)
  • Withdrawal -- tubo (metu nang jobo or release outside), semaput (unconscious.)
Female sterilization/tubectomy. There are several operations that can be performed on women that will prevent them from becoming pregnant, that is: by tying/cutting the fallopian tubes, removing the womb or ovaries. An operation to remove the womb or ovary is usually conducted because of some disease and not just to prevent pregnancy. Only those operations performed to prevent a woman from becoming pregnant ever again should be recorded here as sterilization.

Male sterilization/vasectomy is a light operation that is performed on a man with a view to prevent pregnancy.

A FP pill is a pill taken to prevent pregnancy. This FP pill must be taken regularly every day. A woman is using the FP pill if since the last menstruation she takes the FP pill every day. Those who usually take the FP pill, but forgets to take it one day, then the next day she take two FP pills at once, is still considered as using the FP pill.

[p. 129]

IUD/AKDR/spiral are small devices made of fine plastic/copper, in the form of a spiral, T, fan or other shape, placed inside the womb to prevent pregnancy. These devices can be used long term to prevent pregnancy.

Injection is a hormone injection that will slowly flow through the blood stream and is usually given every one to three months to prevent pregnancy. Injections that are given every three months are known by the name of Depo-provera, whereas injections that are given every month are known as Cyclofem. One who has been injected is considered to be using the FP device during the validity period of the injection. If the validity period of the injection has ended, and she has not been injected again, she is considered as no longer using that FP device. Therefore, the respondent is classified as using the injection method of family planning if the respondent was injected within one or three months (depending on which injection method is used) before the enumeration date.

FP implant is a device with rods that is implanted under the skin in the woman's upper arm to prevent pregnancy for one year or more. There are two kinds of implants, that is, Implanon consisting of one rod that is effective for 3 years, and Norplan consisting of six rods that is effective for 5 years. There are two types of new implants; these are Indoplan and Jadena. Both of these implants consist of two rods and are effective for 3 years. Indoplan is available throughout Indonesia whereas Jadena is available in Jakarta, Makasar, Manado, Central Java, East Java, Bali, North Sumatra and South Sumatra.

Condom is a device made from rubber shaped like a balloon which can be used by men during intercourse so that his wife/partner will not become pregnant. If the respondent has used condoms within the last 30 days before the interview, then condoms is recorded as the family planning device used. A couple is considered using a condom if the condom was used every time the couple had sexual intercourse since the last menstruation (she is protected).

Intravag/diaphragm is a family planning device (tissue) that is inserted into the vagina before intercourse. Diaphragm is a family planning device made of soft rubber that is inserted into the vagina to cover the mouth of the womb so that semen cannot enter into the womb and come in contact with the eggs.

[p. 130]

A diaphragm must be used with spermicidal jelly or cream that is used to cover the cervix to prevent the semen from meeting the eggs. A couple is considered using this device/method if the device/method was used every time the couple had sexual intercourse during the last 30 days before the interview.

Natural breastfeeding method is one of the methods to delay/prevent pregnancy by breast feeding the baby up to 6 months after birth so that the menstruation is delayed.

Calendar method is a method based on the understanding that not having sexual intercourse during certain days (the fertile period) of a woman's "monthly" cycle can be used to avoid pregnancy. This is not the same as abstinence, that is: not having intercourse for several months without considering the "monthly" cycle of the woman to avoid pregnancy. To ensure that a woman really understands, emphasize that this method is primarily used only on "certain days of the month". A woman who does not want to have intercourse on certain days (not because of monthly cycle), cannot be considered using the calendar method. Her intention of not having sexual intercourse must be because she does not want to become pregnant. A couple is considered using this method if the method was used during the 30 days before the interview. A person is considered using this method if she believes that since her last menstruation she has only had intercourse during her non-fertile period.

Withdrawal is a method used by men to prevent the semen from entering the womb, that is: by withdrawing the penis before the semen flows out. Withdrawal is the family planning method used if the couple used it during the last 30 days before the interview.

Other is the device/method used if the respondent mentions other traditional methods such as drinking herbs and massage. If so, write the name of the device/method mentioned.

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Clarification:
1. In the interview, the usage of each family planning device/method must be asked one by one completely, because each device/method has a different period of usage and effectiveness.

2. Abortion/suction/terminations is the termination of pregnancy that can be carried out by suction or other methods. Abortion is not considered a device/method of family planning. Another name that some recognize is MR (menstrual regulation).

3. If the respondent uses the calendar method and uses a condom or the withdrawal method during the fertile period, then the family planning method used is the calendar method (traditional method).

Question 711: Marital status filter question
If Q405 has code 2, place a check (X) in the box on the left and continued to the next question. If the code for Q405 is not 2, place a check (X) in the box on the right and go to Q718.

Question 712: Current usage of FP device/method
This question is asked only to women who are currently married. Circle code 1 if the respondent answers "Yes", and code 2 if she answers "No".

Question 713: FP Device/method currently used
Circle the code corresponding to the FP device/method currently used in accordance with the respondent's answer. If the respondent uses more than one device/method of contraception, then circle the code for the last device/method the respondent used. In general, the time period for the family planning device/method is 30 days. If the respondent answers that she uses the natural breast feeding method, the calendar method, withdrawal, or others go to Q718.

Question 714: Services for the last FP device/method used
Ask Q 714 to those respondents who are using devices/methods 01 through 10 in Q713. FP services can be a place or person. For example, code 11 is "Government hospital" and

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code 34 is "Friend/family". Write the name of the place mentioned by the respondent in the space provided, and circle the corresponding code. If the respondent says that she obtains the devices/methods from a friend or family, ask if she knows where that person obtained them.
The interviewer may face difficulties in determining which code must be circled for this question, because some respondents may not know the source of the services. If the respondent mentions the name of a clinic or hospital, ask if she knows if it is organized by the government or the private sector. If the respondent does not know, write the name that she mentioned in the space provided and ask the supervisor to obtain that information. Some family planning services are detailed below:

"Government hospital" is a hospital managed by the government through the Department of Health, local government, military (ABRI), Pertamina, for example, general hospital in the provinces, general hospital in the regency/municipality, army hospitals, Pertamina hospital, hospitals for special needs, and plantation hospitals.

"Private sector hospital" is a hospital that is managed by the private sector.

"Community health center (puskesmas)" is all types of community health centers including those that are managed by the Department of Health as well as the local government.

"Village maternity clinic (polindes)" is a maternity clinic managed by the government for the community and is used by midwives as a place for their services.

"Integrated services center (posyandu - Post Pelayanan Terpadu)" is a center that provides integrated services between various programs and serves as a communication forum for integrated, dynamic services between the Family Planning Program (KB), Mother and Child Health (KIA), nutrition, immunization and diarrhea prevention programs.

"Private sector clinic" is a clinic managed by the private sector.

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"Family planning field officer (PLKB)" is a government field officer (of the National Family Planning Board - BKKBN) stationed in the village with the duty, authority and responsibility to provide advice, motivation, services, evaluation and development of the National Family Planning Program and other development program activities commissioned by the local government in his area of work.

"Traveling family planning/medical team (TKBK/TMK)" is a mobile family planning facility to bring the services closer to the community by an integrated work unit and has the capacity and authority to provide simple family planning contraceptive device/method services such as the FP pill, injections, IUD and implants. Especially for contraceptive implants, the services must be carried out in the community health center (Puskesmas).

"Village family planning officer (PPKBD - Pembantu Pembina Keluarga Berencana Desa)" is a person or a group of people within the volunteer village organization who actively promote and implement the national family planning program at the village/neighborhood/RW level.

"Midwife services" is services provided by a local midwife on her own/private sector.

"Village midwife" is a midwife appointed to provide services in certain villages, usually 1 or 2 villages and provides services at any time there is a need and reports directly to the sub-district health center (puskesmas).

"Pharmacy/drugstore" is a place that sells medicines, family planning contraceptives / devices / methods, and other health-care needs.

"Store" is a place that sells various items, for example, food stall, supermarket, canteen and traditional herb stall.

If the respondent mentions the name of a place that the enumerator does not recognize, ask for further clarification. For example, "Is that general hospital managed by the government or the private sector?", or "Is Klinik Budi Asih managed by the government or private sector?" If

[p. 134]

she does not know, write the name she mentions, and ask the supervisor to check with others regarding the place that the respondent mentioned.

Question 715: Last FP device/method used
Write the month and year the respondent last used a FP device/method in the box provided.

Question 716: Payment for the last FP services
Asked the respondent whether she paid for the last FP services she received. Circle code 1 if "Yes" or code 2 if "No" and go to Q 718.

Question 717: Main reason for not using FP devices/methods
Ask the respondent why she does not want to use any FP device/method. Circle the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer. Emphasize that the main reason for not using FP devices/methods in this question is the reason at the time when she decided not to use any device/method or stopped using a FP device/method.

"Seldom/refrain from sex" is the reason if the respondent seldom has sex with her husband, for example, because he is far away.

"Menopause" is the reason if the respondent considers that she does not need to use a FP device/method because menopause has already occurred.

"Not fertile/sterile" is the reason if the respondent feels it is not necessary to use a FP device/method because she is sterile/not fertile.

"Wants as many children as possible" is the reason if the respondent wants more children.

"Respondent doesn't want to use" is the answer if the respondent disagrees with using family planning devices/methods.

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"Husband opposes use" is the answer if the respondent's husband does not permit her to use FP devices/methods.

"Others oppose use" is the reason if there are others who disagree with the respondent's use of FP devices/methods.

"Religion prohibition" is the reason if the respondent believes that according to her religion she is not allowed to use FP devices/methods.

"Doesn't know any FP devices/methods" is the reason if the respondent does not know any FP devices/methods.

"Doesn't know where to obtain FP" is the reason if the respondent does not know the place to obtain FP devices/methods.

"Health" is the reason if the respondent's health does [not] permit her to use FP devices/methods.

"Fear side effects" is the reason if the respondent fears the consequences that will arise if she used FP devices/methods.

"Lack of access/too far away" is the reason if the respondent faces difficulty in getting FP devices/methods or the devices/methods are not available at the institution, pharmacy, or shops where the respondent is allowed to obtain the FP devices/methods.

"Too expensive" is the reason if the respondent feels that there has been an increase in the cost of getting the FP devices/methods and feels that she cannot afford to purchase them.

"Uncomfortable" is the reason if the respondent feels uncomfortable when using the FP devices/methods.

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"Gain/lose weight" is the reason if the respondent fears getting heavy or thin if she uses the FP devices/methods.

"Others" are reasons that are not mentioned above.

7.8.3 Block VII.C. Fertility
Question 718: Has ever given birth
Ask the respondent if she has ever given birth. Given birth here means has given a live birth. If the answer is "No", circle code 2 and go to Q734. A live birth is the mother's own child who at the time of birth showed some sign of life, although maybe for only a short time, such as heart beat, breathing, and crying. A stillborn child (a child who at the time of birth did not show any signs of life) is not included here.

Question 719: Age at first birth
Asked the mother's age when her first child was born.

Question 720: Number of living own children who live with their mother
Read this question clearly. Own children both male and female recorded here are those who normally stay with the respondent in this household, where the interview takes place. Fill in the number of male children and the number of female children who live with the respondent. If there are only male children staying with the respondent, write "00" in the box marked "Daughter" and conversely.

Question 721: Number of living own children not living with their mother
This question is concerned with the own children, both male and female, who are not living with the respondent in this household, for example, living with other family, in a dormitory, adopted by others, or fully grown children who have left the household. The

[p. 137]

enumerator must ensure that the respondent does not include own children who have died. Children who live away from the household and their status is uncertain should be considered as still living.

Fill in the number of own, living male and female children who live in other places in the box provided. If those who live in other places are only sons, write "00" in the box marked "Daughter" and conversely.

Question 722: Number of own children who have died
Fill in the number of own children who have died (excluding stillborn) in the box provided classified by sex. If the respondent does not have any child who has died, fill in "00" in the box marked "Son" and "00" in the box marked "Daughter".

Question 723: Number of own children ever born alive
Sum all the numbers from Q720, Q721 and Q722, and write the result in Q723. The number of own children ever born alive is the number of own children ever borne alive from the first marriage to the time of the enumeration.

7.8.4 Block VII.D. Child birth history
Questions 724 through 735 is intended to obtain a complete list of all children born alive to the respondent in chronological order. Start by asking the names of all children born alive from the first child to the last child and ask for each birth whether there were twins or a single birth and circle the appropriate code.
Then return to the first child and ask Q726 through Q735. Ask the same questions for the second child, and so on. If a respondent has more than one child, explain to her that she must start with the first child, then the second child and so on until the last child. The respondent must report the children's birth dates in order regardless of whether a particular child is still living or has died. If after recording several births, it turns out that there are some errors, do not erase the

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information that has been recorded, but cross out the incorrect numbers only and renumber the entries correctly and draw arrows to indicate the correct sequence.

Question 724: Name of child
First, ask the name of the first child born and write that name on the first line. Write the name in such a manner that it can be differentiated from other names in the household that are similar. For example, if there is a child called Tarida Simarmata and another one called Topan Simarmata, write "Tarida S." and Topan S.", rather than "T. Simarmata" and "T. Simarmata".
If there is a baby who has not yet been named because he/she has just been born or died soon after he/she was born, write "Baby" as the name.

Question 725: Single or twins
Ask whether the child just referred to is a twin or not. If a single birth, circle code 1, but if a twin, circle code 2. If the respondent has twin children, note every child on a separate line. The names of twin children should be written on separate lines, and those names should be bracketed ({) on the left side.

Question 726: Sex of child
Circle a code for the sex of each child; code 1 for son and code 2 for daughter. Although usually the sex can be determined from the name, ask the respondent to specify the sex of each child, for example, by asking "Sarinah is a daughter, correct?" Don't guess the sex based on the name.

Question 727: Month and year of birth
Ask the month and year born for each child, regardless of whether the child is still living or has died. If the respondent mentions the year born, but she does not know the month, ask further information to estimate the month. Write the name of the month if the respondent does not use the Gregorian calendar, and then convert the month to the Gregorian calendar using the Age Conversion Guide in Appendix 1. For example, if she says that her daughter was born in

[p. 139]

1974, but she does not know the month, ask whether the child was born before or after Idul Fitri (Lebaran), then try to obtain the correct month. You must change the name of the month to a number, as explained previously. If after all your efforts, you cannot estimate the month, write "98" for month.
If the respondent does not know the year the child was born, you must estimate it. One way to do this is to ask the respondent if she has a record or note, for example, or a letter from someone who can certify the birth, a birth certificate, an immunization card, health card, or other records. If the respondent doesn't have such documents, ask if she knows for sure the birth dates of any of her other children; then relate the birth year of this child to that child whose birth year is known. For example, if she knows that her second child was born in 1995, and the first child was about one year old when the younger child was born, write 1994 as the birth year for the older child. The year of birth must be filled in even though it is only a best estimate.

Question 728: Birth assistant
The mother's and baby's health, among others, are determined by those who assisted at the birth. Ask the respondent who assisted her at the birth, and circle the appropriate code according to her answer. There may be more than one answer.

Question 729: Whether child is still living
Circle code "1" if the child is still alive, and continue to Q730. Otherwise circle code "2", and go to Q732.

Question 730: Age of child
This question must be answered for all children still living. A child's age must agree with the month and year of birth recorded in Q727. If there is any problem in answering this question, review the information recorded as explained for Q404.

Question 731: Children living with mother/others
This question is important to determine how many children are living separately from their mother. Circle code 1 if a child lives with his/her mother, and code "2" if a child lives in
[p. 140]
another household. If a child usually lives with his/her mother, but is temporarily away (fewer than 6 months), circle code "1".

Question 732: Age at death
For children who have died, record the age at time of death even though it may only be an estimate. The information regarding the age at death should be recorded as days, months or years. If a child died before the age of one month, circle code 1 and write the age in days (1-29). If a child died after age one month but before he/she had reached two years, circle code 2 and write the age in months (1-23). If a child was age 2 or older when he/she died, circle code 3 and write the age in years (greater or equal to 2).
For example

[The table representing the correct way to fill out the form is not reported here]

[p. 141]

Record ages in round numbers. For example, if the respondent says "four and a half months", write "04" beside "Month". If the respondent gives the answer in weeks, determine whether the age is more than one month (a little more than 4 weeks). If this is the case, the answer must be converted into months. If less than a month, then the answer must be converted into days. For example, "three weeks", write "Day: 21"; "seven weeks", write "Month: 01".

If a child died at birth, then circle code 1 (day) and fill in "00" in the boxes. If the respondent answers "one year", the enumerator must ask further to obtain the correct number of months. Usually the age of children who died at the age of 10, 11, 12, 13, or 14 months is reported by the mother in round numbers, because he/she does not know that we need the age as accurately as possible. This means the mother tends to report the age of her child who died as "one year" although in reality the child died at the age of 10 months or 13 months. Therefore, if the respondent answers "one year", ask "How many months old was (name) when he/she died? Record the answer in months.

[The table representing the correct way to fill out the form is not reported here]

[p. 142]

Remember that this is list of children ever born alive. If the respondent says that her baby was stillborn, ask whether the baby cried or showed any signs of life when born. If there were no signs of life, then this baby was not born alive and should be crossed out from the list. Don't forget to renumber the serial numbers in a case this like.

If the flow of questions is followed correctly, the enumerator should ask the question just mentioned for all children who have died. Once the enumerator has recorded the age at death, if there was a death, for the first child born alive, he should then go back to Q726 for the next child. After recording the answer to Q732 for all children born alive, then the enumerator will go to Q734.

Question 733: Any birth between two live births
This question is asked to remind the respondent about the possibility that there was a birth that she forgot to mention. Ask the respondent if there was any other live birth between any two of the births already recorded. For example, the respondent mentions the first birth occurred in 1991 and the second birth in 1994; ask the respondent whether there was any other birth that occurred between these two births. If in fact there was another birth, enter this birth at the end on the last line. Draw an arrow to show the correct sequence of this child's birth. Correct the serial numbers of the births in Q724 and then ask Q725 through Q733 for this child.

Some notes about the birth history
1. Recording the age at death, year of birth, and age of children still living. For the month in Q727, the enumerator may record the answer "Do not know" or code "98", but for the year of birth (Q727), age of children still living (Q731), and age at time of death (Q732), the enumerator must write the answers even though they are only best estimates. The answers to these questions are very important, and the enumerator must make every effort to obtain the best estimate based on the information given by the respondent.

2. Recording information for twins. If there are twins, each child must be recorded on a separate line and their names should be bracketed ({) on the left side.

3. Recording information about births when the number is more than 12. On the form there is space to record 12 live births. If there is a special case where a respondent has more than 12 live births, at the bottom of the form write "See additional sheet". For the additional sheet to record child number 13 onward, use a photocopy of page 5. Change the serial numbers 01, 02, and so on to serial numbers 13, 14, and so on. In the upper right-hand corner of the additional page write "Additional". After all children have been recorded, clip this additional sheet to Form SUPAS05-S for that respondent and make sure that these sheets are not separated.

4. Correcting the sequence of reported births. If it is found that the respondent reported an incorrect sequence for a birth, draw an arrow to indicate the correct position on the form for that birth in accordance with the date of birth and correct the serial number by crossing out the incorrect number and replacing it with the correct serial number.

5. Check for any birth between two live births. Check the date of birth of all children. If there are two children with birth dates less than 7 months apart, for example, December 1993 and June 1994, ask further to correct the error. It may be that the first birth happened earlier or the second birth happened later, or both.

Question 734: Last live birth
This question is almost the same as Q733 but was specially designed to ask whether there was still another birth after the birth of the last child reported; for example, Budi is reported to be the last child and was born in 1994. Ask whether there has been any other birth since Budi was born. If there is a birth after Budi's, add it on the last line of the birth history form.

[p. 144]

Then ask Q 725 through Q 733 for this child and correct the entries in Q 720 through Q 723. If there are no other births, circle code 2.

Question 735: Husband present during last birth
Ask whether the respondent's husband was present when the last child was born. The husband does not have to be present in the delivery room; he may be in the waiting room, for example. If "Yes", circle code 1, and if "No", circle code 2.

7.8.5 Block VII.E. List of own sisters
The death of a mother during pregnancy, childbirth, and the Nifas period is an important indicator of the health of mother and child. In this block, information will be collected regarding the death of mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and the Nifas period. The information required is about the own sisters of the respondent which will be used as a guide to estimate the level of mortality of mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and the Nifas period. Information about the death of mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and the Nifas period is not yet accurate. Researchers do not have sufficient information about this matter. Mortality estimates produced thus far do not accurately reflect the true situation. Therefore, information about the death of mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and the Nifas period is very important.

Question 736: Number of respondent's own siblings
Ask the respondent how many own siblings, male and female, where ever borne alive to the respondent's mother (including the respondent). The purpose of this question is to determine the number of children born alive to the respondent's mother, regardless of who the father was.

Question 737: Name of respondent's own sisters
Fill in the names of the respondent's own sisters, beginning with the oldest (in column 1) and so on, including those who have died. It is important to note that the respondent should not be recorded here, because information about the respondent has been recorded in other blocks.

[p. 145]

Be alert to the possibility that there may be an own sister who was born alive but died soon after birth before being given a name. In this situation, write "baby" as that sister's name. If the number of the respondent's own sisters is more than 12, use an additional sheet for this block. Clip the additional sheet to this block.

Question 738: Own sisters still living
Ask whether (name) recorded in Q 737 is still living. If so, continue to the next sister, but if she died go to Q 739. If the respondent says "Don't know", continue to the next sister.

Question 739: Year own sister died
This question and the remaining questions are asked to the respondent for each sister who has died. Ask when (name) died. Try to accurately obtain the year of death.

Question 740: Age of own sister at her death
Ask the age of (name) when she died. Filling out the answer to this question is the same as that of Q412 or Q733. If (name) died when younger than 10 years, continue to the next sister.

Question 741: Died during pregnancy or childbirth
The purpose of this question is to find out whether (name) died during pregnancy or childbirth. Ask and circle the appropriate code according to the respondent's answer. If the answer is code 1 ("Yes"), go to Q743, but if it is code 2 ("No"), continue to the next question.

Question 742: Died within in a period of 42 days after childbirth
Ask whether the death of (name) was within the period of 42 days after the end of the pregnancy which came about from childbirth, miscarriage or abortion. The period of two months

[p. 146]

(8 weeks) after the end of the pregnancy (Nifas period) is considered a critical period for mothers because her physical condition is still weak.

Circle the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer. If code 1 is circled, continue to the next question; if code 2 is circled, continue the questions for the next sister.

Question 743: Cause of death

Ask whether the death of (name) was related to difficulties during the pregnancy, childbirth or the critical period after the end of the pregnancy (Nifas period). Circle the appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

[p. 147]

Appendix 1
Age conversion guide
There are two methods of calculating age:
1. Calculate the respondent's age if date, month, and Gregorian year is known.
2. Calculate the respondent's age, if the respondent knows the information in the Islamic, Javanese, and Sundanese calendars from 1338-1426 H (Islamic) or from 1920-2005 G (Gregorian).

The respondent's knowledge about when he/she was born is quite variable. To facilitate the calculation of the respondent's age, use the following table:

No. 1
Respondent's knowledge: knows the Gregorian date, month, and year
Method used: method 1

No. 2
Respondent's knowledge: knows the Gregorian month and year
Method used: method 1

No. 3
Respondent's knowledge: knows the Islamic month and year 1338-1426 H
Method used: method 2, method 1

No. 4
Respondent's knowledge: knows the Islamic month and Gregorian year 1920-2005 G
Method used: method 2, method 1

No. 5
Respondent's knowledge: knows the date and month in the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendar and the Islamic year, 1338-1426 H
Method used: method 2, method 1

No. 6
Respondent's knowledge: knows the date and month in the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendar and the year in the Gregorian year, 1920-2005 G
Method used: method 2, method 1
Method 1
Method 1 is used to determine someone's age who knows the date, month, and year he/she was born in the Gregorian calendar. There are three steps in this method.

1. Divide the year into two periods:
Period 1 = 1 January through the date of the enumeration
Period 2 = the day after the enumeration through 31 December

[p. 148]
2. Determine whether the date born falls into period 1 or period 2.

3. Calculate the age as follows:
a. If date born is in period 1, the age = year of the enumeration minus the year born.
b. If date born is in period 2, the age = year of the enumeration minus the year born - 1.

Example:
1. Aminah was born on 26 January 1963 and the enumeration is conducted on 31 October 2002. Calculation:

  • 1 January through the date of enumeration = 1 January through 31 October. A day after the date of enumeration through 31 December = 1 November through 31 December.
  • Because 26 January is in period 1 (1 January through. 31 October), then the respondent's age = 2002 - 1963 = 39 years.
  • Thus, Aminah's age on 31 October 2002 = 39 years.

2. Siti was born on 12 December 1972 and the enumeration is conducted on 15 November 2002. Calculation:

  • 1 January through the date of enumeration = 1 January through 15 November. A day after the date of enumeration through 31 December = 16 November through 31 December.
  • Because 12 December is in period 2 (16 November through 31 December), then the respondent's age = 2002 -- 1972 - 1 = 29 years.
  • Thus, Siti's age on 15 November 2002 = 29 years.
[p. 149]
Method 2
Method 2 is used to determine someone's age who knows the date, month, and year he/she was born in the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendar. There are four steps in this method.

1. Convert the date, month and year of the respondent's birth from the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendar to the Gregorian calendar by using the Calendar Conversion Tables.

2. Carry out the three steps to calculate the age as detailed in Method 1.

Calendar conversion tables
The age conversion table consists of 2 columns. Column (1) contains the year, month and date in the Gregorian calendar and column (2) contains the month and year in the Islamic calendar. The date and month in the Gregorian calendar in column (1) is matched with the first day of the month in the Islamic calendar in column (2).

Example:
1. Andi was born on 1 Sya'ban 1366 H and the enumeration is conducted on 23 October 2002. Calculation. Calendar conversion:

  • Look for the Gregorian month in column (1) that corresponds with the Islamic month Sya'ban 1366 H in column (2).
  • The date 1 Sya'ban 1366 H corresponds with 20 June, 1947 in the Gregorian calendar in column (1).

Method 1:

  • The date 1 January through date of enumeration = 1 January through 23 October. A day after the date of enumeration through 31 December = 24 October through 31 December.
  • The date 20 June 1947 is in period 1 (1 January through 23 October); the calculation of the age is 2002 - 1947 = 55 years.
  • Thus, Andi's age on 23 October 2002 = 55 years.
[p. 150]

2. Dewi was born on 2 Zulhijah 1374 H and the enumeration is conducted on 5 November 2002.
Calculation: calendar conversion:

  • Look for the Gregorian month in column (1) that corresponds with the Islamic month Zulhijah 1374 H in column (2).
  • The date 1 Zulhijah 1374 H corresponds with 27 November 1954.
  • The date 2 Zulhijah 1374 H = 27 November + 1 = 28 November 1954.

Method 1:

  • The date 1 January through the date of enumeration = 1 January through 5 November. A day after the date of enumeration through 31 December = 6 November through 31 December.
  • The date 28 November is in period 2 (6 November through 31 December); the calculation of the age is 2002 -- 1954 - 1 = 47 years.
  • Thus, Dewi's age on 5 November 2002 = 47 years.

3. Kiki was born on 5 Rajab 1378 H and the enumeration is conducted on 25 October 2002.
Calculation. Calendar conversion:

  • Look for the Gregorian month in column (1) that corresponds with the Islamic month Rajab 1378 H in column (2).
  • The date 1 Rajab 1378 H corresponds with 11 January 1959.
  • The date 5 Rajab 1378 H = 11 January + 4 = 15 January 1959.

Method 1:

  • Period 1 = 1 January through 25 October; period 2 = 26 October through 31 December.
  • The date 15 January is in period 1; the calculation of the age is 2002 - 1959 = 43 years.
  • Thus, Kiki's age on 25 October 2002 = 43 years.
[p. 151]

4. Rian was born on 5 Ramadhan 1996 G and the enumeration is conducted on 27 November 2002. (Date and month are in the Islamic calendar, while the year is in the Gregorian calendar)
Calculation. Calendar conversion:

  • Look for the Gregorian month in 1996 in column (1) that corresponds with the Islamic month Ramadhan in column (2).
  • The date 1 Ramadhan in column (2) corresponds with the date 22 January 1996 in the Gregorian calendar in column (1).
  • The date 5 Ramadhan = 22 January + 4 = 26 January 1996

Method 1:

  • Period 1 = 1 January through 27 November; period 2 = 28 November through 31 December.
  • The date 26 January is in period 1; the calculation of the age is 2002 - 1996 = 6 years.
  • Thus, Rian's age on 27 November 2002 = 6 years.

5. Indah was born on 20 Rabiul Akhir 1375 H and the enumeration is conducted on 23 November 2002. Calculation. Calendar conversion:

  • Look for the Gregorian month in column (1) that corresponds with the Islamic month Rabiul Akhir 1375 H.
  • The date 1 Rabiul Akhir 1375 H corresponds with the date 17 November 1955.
  • The date 20 Rabiul Akhir = 17 November + 19 = 36 November.
  • Because November has only 30 days, then 36 November 1955 = 36 - 30 = 6 December 1955.

Method 1:

  • Period 1 = 1 January through 23 November; period 2 = 24 November through 31 December.
  • The date 6 December 1955 is in period 2; the calculation of the age is 2002 - 1955 -1 = 46 years.
  • Thus, Indah's age on 23 November 2002 = 46 years.
[p. 152]

The number of months in one year of the local calendars (Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese) is the same as the number of months in one year of the Gregorian calendar. The name of the months in the Islamic, Javanese and Sundanese calendars are presented in the table below:

Name of the months in Islamic, Javanese, and Sundanese calendars
Month no. 1
Islamic: Muharram
Javanese: Suro
Sundanese: Sura

Month no. 2
Islamic: Syafar
Javanese: Sapar
Sundanese: Sapar

Month no. 3
Islamic: Rabiul Awal
Javanese: Mulud
Sundanese: Mulud

Month no. 4
Islamic: Rabiul Akhir
Javanese: Bakdomulud
Sundanese: Silihmulud

Month no. 5
Islamic: Jumadil Awal
Javanese: Jumadil Awal
Sundanese: Jumadil Awal

Month no.6
Islamic: Jumadil Akhir
Javanese: Jumadil Akhir
Sundanese: Jumadil Akhir

Month no. 7
Islamic: Rajab
Javanese: Rajab
Sundanese: Rajab

Month no. 8
Islamic: Sya'ban
Javanese: Ruwah
Sundanese: Rewah

Month no. 9
Islamic: Ramadhan
Javanese: Pasa
Sundanese: Puasa

Month no. 10
Islamic: Syawal
Javanese: Sawal
Sundanese: Sawal

Month no. 11
Islamic: Zulkaidah
Javanese: Selo
Sundanese: Hapit

Month no. 12
Islamic: Zulhijah
Javanese: Besar
Sundanese: Rayagung

Before using Method 2 the following points must be noted:

  • In the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendar the number of days ranges from 29 to 30.
  • The number of days in corresponding months of the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendars is not always the same if the years are different.
  • The sequence of months in the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendars does not always correspond with the sequence of months in the Gregorian calendar.
  • Example: The months of Suro/Sura/Muharram do not always correspond with the month of January.
  • One month in the Islamic/Javanese/Sundanese calendar can fall within two consecutive months in the Gregorian calendar.

Method 1 and Method 2 are only used to determine the date, month, and year of birth in the Gregorian calendar.

[p. 153]

[The Gregorian and Islamic calendar conversion tables 1920-2005 are not reported here]

[Page 168 is blank]

[p. 169]

Appendix 2
Regional codes for migration for SUPAS05
In Form SUPAS05-S there are three variables concerning migration that need provincial and regency/municipality codes; these are place of birth (Q607), previous residence (Q609), and residence in 2000 (Q614). In order to code these variables, provincial and regency/municipality codes are provided in the following table.

Codes for the boxes provided in Q607, Q609 and Q614 are obtained from the first column in the following table. The codes consist of four numbers, where the first two numbers are the provincial codes and the last two numbers are the regency/municipality codes.

The table also provides the names and codes of the region according to the situation in 2000. This column can be used to assist the conversion resulting from the regional changes during 2000-2004. For example, in 2000, Dairi Regency in Sumatra Utara, was coded 1210, but in 2004 the regency was split into two regencies, that is Dairi Regency which is coded 1210 and Pakpak Barat Regency, which is coded 1216.

The respondent in 2000 resided in the sub-district of Kerajaan, Dairi Regency which in 2005 is part of Pakpak Barat Regency; the coding for Q614 is 1216, that is, the code of this region in 2004 (when the survey is conducted). The same method should be applied to place of birth (Q607) and place of previous residence (Q609). All the codes used at the time of enumeration should be those contained in the 2004 regional master list.

If there are cases where the respondent's answers concerning migration variables are not clear, regarding the regency/municipality where the respondent was born (or previous residence), then the supervisor/examiner must ask the enumerator to return to field to ask for clarification from the respondent. If the respondent cannot explain, then as a last resort, it is assumed that the respondent was born (or previously resided) in the "original" regency/municipality before the regency/municipality was split.

[p. 170]

[The list of administrative regions 2000-2004 is not reported here]

[p. 185]

Appendix 3
Listing of building and household -- form SUPAS05-L

[p. 186]

Appendix 4
Sample survey questionnaire -- form SUPAS05-S

[Form in English not available]