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Republic of Indonesia
1985 Inter Census Population Survey (SUPAS)

Manual for enumerators

Household registration

[Table of contents and sections 1-3 are not presented here. This includes the introduction, implementation procedures, and preparation of census block sketch maps]

[pg. 10]

IV. Building numbering

A. Objective
Every building the enumerator visits must be given a serial number. In addition to begin used for location identification to facilitate the field worker's recognition of the area of responsibility, the building number is also useful in obtaining the total number of buildings and the usage of the buildings.

B. Concept and definition
1. A physical building is a shelter that has walls, floor and roof, either fixed or temporary, whether used as a living quarters or not. If a building is not used as a living quarters, but the floor area of the building is at least 10 square meters, it is considered a physical building. If the building is not used as a living quarters, but is used for a business, then it is considered a physical building and given a number even if the floor area is fewer than 10 square meters.

[pg. 11]

There are three types of physical buildings:
a. Multiple attached buildings (see figures 1 and 2)

(i) Multi-story
(ii) Single story

b. Duplex/two attached buildings (see figures 3 and 4)

(i) Multi-story
(ii) Single story

c. Single buildings (see figures 5 and 6)

(i) Single story
(ii) Multi-story

[There are drawings of buildings as examples for each of the types described]

[pg. 12]

Kitchen, bathroom, garage and others that are detached from the main building are considered part of the building

2. A census building is part or all of a physical building that has its own door for entering and exiting. Census buildings are divided into three types based on their usage:

a. Census building used as a living quarters is a census building that is used as a living quarters.

(i) Multi-living quarters is one census building that is occupied by more than one household.
(ii) Single living quarters is one census building that is occupied by only one household.

b. Census building not used as a living quarters is a census building that is not used as a living quarters but is used as a shop, hotel/restaurant, factory, school building, place for religious services, office building, meeting hall, etc.
Examples:

(i) A greenhouse is a building that is not used as a living quarters, but is used as a place to plant and grow seeds, a hatchery, for fish farming, etc.
[pg. 13]
(ii) A garage is a building not specifically used as a living quarters, but is used to shelter vehicles from the sun and rain.
(iii) An office building is a building not used as a living quarters, but is used as an office.
(iv) A storage building/silo is a building not used as a living quarters, but is used to store materials/crops before they are sold, distributed, or consumed.
(v) A barn is a building not used as a living quarters that is used to keep livestock.
(vi) A farm stand is a building not used as a living quarters that is used to sell agricultural goods and agricultural-related products.
(vii) A drying area/platform is a building not used as a living quarters that is primarily used as a place to dry agricultural products [for example, paddy, coffee, etc.]. The term "drying platform" normally means a permanent structure that is plastered with cement.
(viii) A shop/food stall is a building not used as a living quarters that is specifically used as a place to sell goods.
(ix) A row/strip of shops is a group of shops outside the market place that has at least 10 shops.

c. Mixed-use census building is a census building that is partly used as living quarters and partly used for other purposes.

Commercial building is a building that has walls and roof, either permanent or temporary, that is used for commercial/business activities.

[pg. 14]

[The rest of Section IV is not presented here. This includes the method for numbering the buildings, for filling in the building number sticker, and for pasting the building number sticker]

V. Building and household listing

A. Objective
Form L I is used to list all buildings and households in the selected census block. One set of form L I is used for one census block. The objective of form L I is to collect information on the number of buildings and households within the selected census block which will be used as the base to select sample households to be enumerated using form S.

B. Method of filling in the listing form [form L I]
1. Block I: Location identification
Points 1 - 8: Write the name of the province, regency/municipality, sub-district, village, urban/rural designation (circle one of these), enumeration area number, census block number, and sample code number given by the supervisor (PMS).

[pg. 17]

Point 9: To be completed by the supervisor (PMS).

2. Block II: Enumeration particulars
Points 1 - 3: Write the enumerator's name, date of the enumeration, and enumerator's signature.

Points 4 - 6: To be completed by the supervisor: [name], inspection date and supervisor's signature.

3. Block III: Household listing
Column (1): Serial number of the physical building
Fill in the serial number from 1 to the serial number of the last physical building in every census block.

Column (2): Serial number of the census building
In this column fill in the serial number of the census buildings starting with the number "1" up to the serial number of the last census building in the census block.

Column (3): Census building usage
Ask the usage of each census building and fill in the appropriate code in this column. If the building is used only as a living quarters, enter code "1"; if not specifically used as a living quarters (office, school, business, etc.) enter code "2"; if the census building is used for both living quarters and other purposes, enter code "3".

Columns (4) and (5): Household serial number
Fill in the serial number of each normal household in column (4) starting with the number "1" to the end, and in column 5 fill in the serial number of each institutional household starting with the number "1" up to the end; the last serial number in each column will be equal to the number of households in the census block of that type. If in one census building there are two households, give each household a separate serial number. For buildings that are not used for living quarters (for example a building specifically used for a shop), put a dash sign (-) in columns (4) and (5).

a. A normal household is an individual or a group of people who inhabit part or all of the physical or census building and usually live together and eat together from one kitchen. One kitchen means that the daily needs are managed and provided by one budget.

[pg. 18]

b. An institutional household

(i) When a number of people live in a dormitory, that is, living quarters where the management of everyday food needs is arranged by an institute or foundation (non-profit institution), for example, dormitory for nurses, student dormitory, and military/police dormitory (barracks), these dormitories are considered institutional households. Members of the military/police who live in barracks with their families and manage their everyday daily food needs by themselves are considered a normal household.
(ii) When people live in public institutions such as reformatories, prisons, orphanages, and similar institutions, these institutions are considered institutional households.
(iii) When a household has a group of ten or more individuals who lodge and eat (boarders) with the household, the group of lodgers are considered an institutional household.

Column (6): Name of head of household
Ask who is the head of household, and write that person's name clearly in this column.
Head of household is the member of the household who is responsible for the everyday needs of the household or the member who is assumed/assigned to be the head of the household. For buildings not used as living quarters, (for example a building specifically used for a shop), put a dash sign (-) [in this column].

Column (7): Number of household members
In this column record the total number of household members.

  • A household member is every person who usually resides in the household; those who are residing in the household when the listing is done as well as those who are temporarily not at home at that time are considered household members.
  • Members of the household who have already been away for 6 months or more, and those who have been away for fewer than 6 months but have the intention to move out of the household/be away for more than 6 months are not considered as members of the household.
  • Guests who have lived in the household for 6 months or more and guests who have stayed in the household for fewer than 6 months, but have the intention to stay for 6 months or more, are considered members of the household.
[pg. 19]

For buildings with no occupants, put a dash (-) in this column.

Explanation

a. A house maid/driver who lives in the employer's house is considered a member of the employer's household. On the other hand, if a housemaid/driver does not live in the employer's household, he/she is considered as a member of the household where he/she resides.
b. Someone who does not have a permanent place of residence will be recorded at the time of the enumeration.
c. A head of household who has more than one place of residence will be recorded at the place where his spouse and children reside.
d. If a husband has more than one wife, he will be enumerated in only one of those households.

Examples of filling in block III of form L I
(1) Physical building in figure 7.

  • Physical building number: 1
  • Census building number: 1 and 2
  • Census building no. 1 used as living quarters for two households
  • Census building no. 2 used for a shop
  • Name of each head of household: Amat and Anen
  • Total number of household members in each household: 4 and 5

[There is drawing representing the previous example]

[pg. 20]

(2) Physical building in figure 8.

  • Physical building number: 2
  • Census building numbers: 3 and 4
  • Census building numbers 3 and 4 used as living quarters
  • Number of households in each census building: 1
  • Names of each head of household: Tanuwijaya and The Kho Seng.
  • Number of household members in each household: 2 and 6

[There is drawing representing the previous example]

(3) Physical building in figure 9.

  • Physical building number: 3
  • Census building numbers: 5, 6, and 7
  • Census building no. 5 used as living quarters of two households
  • Census building no. 6 used for a shop
  • Census building no. 7 used as living quarters and for business
  • Names of head of each household are: Kadir, Tarji and Sudir
  • Total number of household members in each household: 3, 4 and 7
[pg. 21]

[There is drawing representing the previous example]

The information from the three above-mentioned examples will be entered in block III form L I as follows:

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form, following the three previous examples]

[pg. 22]

Block IV: Notes
This block is reserved to note any important matters that must be explained, for example, problems that were encountered during the implementation of the listing.

VI. Household information

A. Objective
Form L II is used to record all households in the selected census blocks. One form L II is used to record information from one household. The objective of form L II is to obtain information on the number of household members, [information about each member of the household regarding] sex, age, relationship to head of household, marital status, and educational status for those age 7-12; information will also be collected about family planning for married women younger than 50, and information about migration and victims of crimes.

B. Method of filling in the form [Form L II]
There are several ways to fill in Form L II; these are:

a. Write the information requested, such as in block I: Location Identification.
b. Fill in boxes in each column with numbers, check signs, zero ("0"), or by circling the appropriate code in accordance with the instructions.
1. Block I: Location identification
Points 1 - 8: Write the name of the province, regency/municipality, sub-district, village, urban/rural designation (circle one of these), enumeration area number, census block number, and sample code number given by the supervisor (PMS).

Points 9 and 10: Copy from column (4) block III on form L I [the serial number of the household] and from column (7) block III on form L I the total number of household members. The number entered in point 10 must be the same as the last serial number [as shown in column (1)] for household members whose names are recorded in column (2) of block III of form L II.

[pg. 23]

Points 11 and 12: These items should be filled in after the interview using form L II is complete.

Point 11: Write the number of household members in column (4) block III who are age 5 or older.

Point 12: Write the number of household members in column (4) block III who are age 10 or older.

2. Block II: Enumeration particulars

Points 1 - 3: Write the name of the enumerator, date of enumeration, and signature of the enumerator in the space provided.

Points 4 - 6: The supervisor will fill in the date of inspection and his/her signature.

Point 7: Write the name of the respondent who provides the information.

3. Block III: Information on household members
As mentioned earlier, one form L II is used for one household. If the number of household members exceeds the number of lines provided in block III, then another copy of form L II must be used to continue recording members of the household that have not yet been recorded. In this case it is necessary to put a note on the forms as follows:

a. Write the word "Continued" in the lower right-hand corner of block III on the first copy of form L II.
b. Write the word "Continuation" in the upper right-hand corner of block III of the second form L II.
c. Change the serial numbers of household members in column (1) block III of the second form L II beginning with the number 16 and so on.
d. After completing both forms, combine the two L II forms.
e. On the second form L II "Continuation", the information in block I and block II should be the same as the information in these blocks in the first Form L II.
[pg. 24]

Column (1): Serial number of household member
On the form the serial numbers have been preprinted from "01" through "15". Serial number "01" is reserved for the head of household. The last serial number used indicates the total number of household members.

Column (2): Name
Write the names of the household members on each line starting with the name of the head of household and continuing through the name of the last household member.

Column (3): Relationship to head of household
In this column enter the code for the relationship of every member whose name has been written in column (2) to the head of the household with serial number "01". See the codes for column (3) that are listed on the lower left side of the form.

Column (4): Age (in years)
Ask the age of each household member. Enter the age (two digits) expressed in years in the Gregorian calendar rounded downwards. The highest age that can be recorded is 98 years. If someone is age 99 or older, enter "98". Try to obtain the age of the respondent; if it is not possible to obtain the age, write "Don't know" [in Indonesian, "TT" -- Tidak Tahu].

Examples:

  • 20 years and 4 months would be entered as "20" years.
  • 4 years and 11 months would be entered as "04" years.
  • Younger than 1 year would be entered as "00" year.
  • 101 years and 10 months would be entered as "98" years.

Column (5): Sex
If the household member is male, enter code "1", if the household member is female, enter code "2".

Column (6): Marital status
In this column enter one of the codes for marital status in accordance with the respondent's answer.

See the codes for column (6) at the bottom of the page on which this question appears.
During the interview the respondents might not use the Gregorian calendar. To facilitate the conversion of the age, especially for children younger than 5, use the conversion method as shown in Appendix 7.

[pg. 25]

Columns (7) - (10):
[Persons age 7 to 12]
Information collected in these columns can provide a picture of the educational program, in particular concerning whether the schooling obligation has reached its intended goal [that all children age 7-12 should be in school].

Column (7): First of all look at column (4) "Age". If the age of the household member is 7 or older but younger than 13, put a check in this column.

Column (8): Ask whether this household member referred to above has ever been in school. If the answer is "Not yet", enter code "1" in this column. If the answer is "Already/yes", continue to the question in column (9), and put a dash (-) in column (8).

Column (9): Ask whether this child referred to above is still in school. If the answer is "Yes", enter code "1" in this column. Put a dash (-) in columns (8) and (10). If the answer is "No", continue to the question in column (10) and put a dash (-) in columns (8) and (9).

Column (10): Enter the code "1" in this column if the answer to the question in column (9) is "No" ("No longer attending school").

Examples:

  • A child who once attended grade 3 in primary school, but for some reason did not continue attending school is classified as "No longer attending school".
  • A child who completed primary school and for some reason such as the cost or for other reasons did not continue attending school is classified as "No longer attending school".

Columns (11) and (12): Married women younger than 50.

The objective of the questions in these columns is to collect information about married women of child-bearing age who participate in a family planning program.

These columns are only filled in for married women who are younger than 50.

  • "Married" is a status of those who were legally married at the time of the enumeration, either living together or separately. This includes not only those who have been certified as married by law (local custom, religion, state, etc.), but also those who live together [with a man] and are considered as wife and husband by society.
[pg. 26]
  • "Widow" is a status of those whose spouse has passed away and they have not yet remarried.
  • "Divorced" is a status of those husbands and wives who no longer live together because they are legally divorced. This includes those who say they are divorced even though they are not legally divorced. On the other hand, those who live separately and do not considered themselves divorced, are considered married; for example, a husband/wife who has been left by his/her spouse to go to some other place for education, employment, or looking for work may still be considered married.

Column (11): First, review column (4) "Age", column (5) "Sex", and column (6) "Marital status".
If the member of the household is a female (column (5) has code 2), is younger than 50 years old (column (4) is younger than 50) and is currently married (column (6) has code 2), put a check in this column.

Column (12): Ask this household member if she uses one of the methods to prevent pregnancy.

If the answer is "Yes", enter code "1" in this column.
If the answer is "No", enter code "0" in this column.

Methods to prevent pregnancy are, among others, operation, spiral [IUD], injection, pill, and condom.

Column (13): Migration
The objective of this question is to collect information about migration between villages. A person is classified as having moved if he/she has ever lived in a village other than the one in which he/she currently lives at the time of the enumeration.

Method of asking the question:
"Have you ever lived in another village before residing in this village in which you now live?"

  • If the answer is "No", enter code "1" in the box provided. If the answer is "Yes", ask whether the village where he/she lived before is still located in the same regency/municipality as the village in which he/she is currently residing.
  • If the answer is "Yes", enter code "2" in the box provided.
  • If the village is located outside the regency/municipality in which he/she now lives, enter code "3" in the box provided.
[pg. 27]

Column (14): Has ever been a victim of a crime
The objective of this question is to obtain information from the household and all members of the household who have been the victim of a crime during the past year, calculated from the month in which the household enumeration takes place. If the household enumeration is conducted in October 1985, then the period would be a one-year period from October 1984 through September 1985.

  • If the victim of the crime is a member of the household, enter code "1" on the appropriate line in column (14) for the victim whose name is written in column (2). For household members who were not the victim of any crime, fill in a zero ("0") on the appropriate lines in column (14).
  • If the household was the victim of a crime, enter code "1" on the line in column (14) corresponding to the head of household.

A crime is any act, whether intentional or unintentional, (whether it has happened or is about to happen) that causes a loss to others either physically or mentally, to their property or goods, and that is against the law and is punishable by imprisonment.

Types of crimes are as follows:

a. "Murder" is an intentional act of taking someone's life.
b. "Aggravated assault" is an intentional act to inflict bodily injury that may result in the death of the victim, or may leave the victim hurt/handicapped or in pain, or may result in the victim not being able to carry out his daily activities.
c. "Simple assault" is an intentional act to cause bodily injury that may result in a light injury to the victim, but the victim can still carry out his daily activities.
d. "Kidnapping/abduction" is an act in which the victim is carried off by force or seized and held under the power of the abductor which takes away the victim's freedom and rights.
e. "Robbery" is the act of unlawfully taking goods or livestock that belong to others for the purpose of owning this property unlawfully. This act leaves the owner totally powerless both physically and mentally.
[pg. 28]
f. "Burglary" is the act of unlawfully taking goods or livestock that belong to others for the purpose of owning this property. This crime is usually committed at night during a disaster, and usually involves breaking into a locked building/place/area.
g. "Petty theft" is the act of taking goods that belong to others for the purpose of owning those goods, but the goods are inexpensive or have a value which is not more than Rp 250.
h. "Arson" is the intentional act of maliciously setting fire to the property of others that can endanger the public or their goods/property.
i. "Destruction" is an illegal, intentional act to destroy the goods/property of others so that the goods/property can no longer be used. Goods in this case include domestic animals.
j. "Embezzlement" is the intentional, illegal act against someone else's property.
k. "Fraud" is the illegal act of lying or persuading others in matters that will result in a detriment to others.
1. "Rape" is a violent act or the threat of a violent act that forces a woman, who is not a [the] man's wife, to have sex with him.
m. "Adultery" is the act of having sex with someone who is not his/her spouse without constraint or violence.
n. "Libel" is an intentional act that destroys the honor or good name of someone by accusing, insulting, or affronting that person in writing or pictures.
o. "Narcotic drug [trafficking]" is the act of selling, having, carrying, giving, using, manufacturing, or planting illegal drugs. Narcotics include opium, morphine, heroin and marijuana. Those who have the right to possess narcotics include doctors and pharmacist with an official permit.
[pg. 29]
p. "Gambling" is an act of providing the means, facilities, and place to gamble or to participate in gambling.
q. "Other" is any illegal act that is not included in the categories mentioned above.
4. Block IV: Note
This block is provided as a place to record any important items that must be explained; for example, issues found during the enumeration, and the manner in which the issues were resolved.

C. Inspection
a. After all households in the census block assigned to the enumerator have been enumerated, the enumerator should review again all entries to be sure that each item has been correctly recorded and clearly written as explained in the guidelines in the manual.

b. Check to see if the following are all correct:

(1) The number of children age 7-12 in each household must be the same as the total number of check signs in column (7).
(2) The number of check signs in column (7) equals the sum of "1" entered in column (8), (9) and (10). [In the "Total" row at the bottom of the page, the sum of columns (8), (9), and (10) equals column (7).]
(3) The number of women (column 5 has code 2) aged younger than 50 years (entries in column (4) are 49 or younger) and currently married (column 6, code 2) is equal to the number of check signs entered in column (11).
(4) The number of one (1) and zero ("0") in column (12) is equal to the number of check signs in column (11).

Example of filling in block III of form L II:
An enumerator listed a household with the following household members and other information:

a. Aminudin Jamin , the head of the household, age 54, was born and grew up in South Bengkulu and now lives in Yogyakarta, and has never been a victim of a crime.
[pg. 30]
b. Mrs. Karsiana Aminudin is the wife of Aminudin Jamin, age 49, was born and grew up in Ujung Pandang, now lives with her husband, and uses a family planning method.
c. Farida Nuraini, their daughter, age 24, is currently married, was born in Bandung, and uses a family planning method.
d. Hermansyah is their son; age 20, unmarried, was born in Bandung.
e. Pihara Swiantini, their daughter, age 16, unmarried, was born in Bandung.
f. Anton Mulyono, a son, age 11, was born in Yogyakarta, and is still in primary school.
g. Cahyadi Budiman, son-in-law (husband of Farida), age 29, was born in [additional information about this person was not scanned or not included in the original document]
h. Patna Fiantini, granddaughter (child of Farida), age 9 months, was born in Yogyakarta.
i. Subandiyah, the mother of Mrs. Karsiana [mother-in-law of the head of household], age 69, was born in Kebumen; her husband has died.
j. Rukiah, housemaid, age 21 years, unmarried, was born in Gunung Kidul.

Block III should be filled in as shown on the next page.

[There is a picture of a correctly filled out form, following the previous example]

[pg. 35]

Enumeration of sample households

VII. Information on household members

A. Objective
The intention here is to record information about the selected household. This information includes, among others, particulars of members of the household such as age, place of birth, education, work, fertility, mortality, and family planning, and information about the household and housing conditions.

This form consists of 12 blocks, these are:

Block I: Geographic identification
Block II: Summary
Block III: Enumeration particulars
Block IV: Household structure
Block V: Household information
Block VI: Information on living quarters
Block VII: Information on household members
Block VIII: Labor force (age 10 or older)
Block IX: Ever-married women
Block X: Ever-married women younger than 55 who ever gave birth
Block XI: Currently married women younger than 50
Block XII: Information on health
B. Procedures for filling in the form [form S]
1. Guidelines for filling in form S
Before beginning the enumeration it is important to know that there are two ways of filling in form S.

The first method is to circle the code(s) corresponding to the respondent's answer. The second method is to write the respondent's answer in the space provided on the questionnaire.

a. Circling codes
Circle the code or codes matching the respondent's answer or answers. Circle the codes correctly and clearly; do not circle the codes in such a manner that it is unclear exactly which code or codes are intended. If a mistake is made in circling a code, do not erase the mistake, but put an X on the incorrect circle, and then circle the correct code.

[pg. 36]

Example: 1

[There is a picture showing examples of how to circle the options, when these are correct or incorrect]

b. Write the words/numbers in the space provided.
Write the words/numbers clearly in the space provided. For words, use block letters and write legibly, and for numbers use the usual numbers (not roman numerals) and write clearly so that it is easy to distinguish one number from another.

c. Usage of form S
Begin the interview with the sample household by asking the questions about the household as an entity. General information about the household is contained in block VII, information about members of the household 10 years or older is in block VIII, and information about ever-married women is in block IX. Begin recording the information about the member of the household with serial number "01" (head of household) [in block VII. A], which is located on the page to the right of the page containing block IV.

[pg. 37]

Example:

[There is a picture showing cases of information correctly or incorrectly written in the form]

2. Method of filling in the form

a. Block I: Geographic identification

Points 1- 4: Write the name of the province, regency/municipality, sub-district and village. Provincial and regency/municipality codes should be written in the boxes provided.

Point 5: Urban/rural classification

Points 6-8: The enumeration area, census block number and sample code number are copied from Form L I, Block I, point 6-8.

Point 9: Sample serial number

Point 10: Serial number of the selected household

b. Block II: Summary
These items should be filled in after the interview using Form S is complete.

Point 1: Total number of household members
This should be the same as the last serial number used to record a member of the household in column (1), block IV of form S.

Point 2: Total number of household members age 5 or older
Count the number of household members in column (5), block IV of form S age 5 or older]

[pg. 39]

[Point 3:] Count the number of household members in column (5) Block IV age 10 or older

Point 4: Total number of births
Sum all the births to members of the household who were recorded as code "1" for Q.9 and Q.20 in block X.

Point 5: Record the number of dead babies who were born after 30 June, 1984. Fill in the sum of all baby deaths experienced in the household, that is, by summing the number of 2s in Q.11 and Q.22 Block X, for which Q.9 and Q.20 have code 1.

Point 6: Total number of deaths
Fill in the total number of deaths from 30 June, 1984 up to the date of the enumeration; this is the total number of members of the household who died as recorded in Q.1 block XII.B.

c. Block III: Enumeration particulars
Points 1 - 3: Write the name of the enumerator, date of enumeration and the enumerator's signature.

Point 2: Date of enumeration
Write the two-digit day and two-digit month of the enumeration in the boxes provided for each.

Example: The enumeration was conducted on 26 October, 1985; write this as follows:

[There is a picture showing a correctly filled-out form]

Points 4 - 6: Write the name of the supervisor, date of inspection, and the supervisor's signature.

Point 7: Name of respondent who provided the information
The information/answers may be collected from every household member in accordance with the type of information to be collected, but the name in point 7 is the name of the person who is responsible and really knows about the situation in this household.

[pg. 40]

VIII. List of household members

A. Block IV: List of household members

1. Objectives:

a. To record all members of this household; be sure no one is omitted.
b. To count all members of the household who will be interviewed in blocks VII through XI.

To fill in this block it is better to interview the head of household who is expected to know all about the members of his household.

2. Method of filling in the form:
Column (1): Serial numbers of household members
On the form the serial numbers have been preprinted from "01" to "15". If the number of household members exceeds the number of lines provided, add a new form S. Write the word "Continued" in the upper right-hand corner of the cover page of the first form S and write the word "Continuation" in the upper right-hand corner of the cover page of the additional form S. Copy the geographic identification information from the first form S to the second form S. Change the serial numbers of household members in column (1) block IV of the second form S starting with the number "16" and so on.

Column (2): Name of household members
Write the names of all household members with each name on a separate line starting with the name of the head of household, spouse, unmarried children, married children, children-in-law, grandchildren, etc. After all names have been recorded, read all the names one by one and ask whether there is any member of the household who has been left out, such as a newborn baby, a member who is temporarily away, or a housemaid. If anyone has been left out, add that person's name to the list of household members.

Column (3): Relationship to head of household
Ask the relationship of each member of the household and fill in column (3). The first household member is always the head of the household.

a. "Head of household" is the member of the household who is responsible for the everyday needs of the household or the member who is assumed/assigned to be the head of the household.
[pg. 41]
b. "Wife/husband" is the spouse of the head of household.
c. "Child" includes own child, stepchild, or adopted child of the head of household.
d. "Daughter/son in-law" is the spouse of an own child, stepchild or adopted child.
e. "Grandchild" is the child of an own child, stepchild, or adopted child.
f. "Parent/parent in-law" is the father/mother of the head of household or the father/mother of the spouse of the head of household.
g. "Other relative" is any other person related to the head of household or the spouse of the head of household; for example: sister/brother, nephew/niece, aunt, uncle, in-laws, grandfather, grandmother, etc.
h. "Housemaid" is someone who works as a maid and lives in the household and receives wages/salary either in cash or in-kind.
i. "Others" are those who have no relation to the head of household or the spouse of the head of household, such as guests, friends, boarders (lodgers in the household), etc.

Column (4): Sex
Fill in the code for sex for each member of the household. Enter code "1" for male and code "2" for female.

Column (5): Age (in years)
Ask the age of each member of the household and enter it in column (5). Age is written in years according to the Gregorian calendar rounded downwards.

If the age is younger than 1 year, enter "0". If the respondent does not know his exact age, try to estimate his age by relating his age to important local or national events to obtain a better estimate. To facilitate the estimation, use the conversion tables in appendix 7/8.

[pg. 42]

Some important events are:

  • Proclamation of independence RI (1945)
  • First general election (1955)
  • Communist rebellion of 30 September 1965 (G.30.S. PKI 1965)

Column (6): Marital status
Ask the marital status of each household member and enter the appropriate code, "1" through "4", in column (6).

  • "Married" is the status of those who were legally married at the time of the enumeration, either living together or separately. This includes not only those who have been certified as married by law (local custom, religion, state, etc.), but also those who live together and are considered as husband and wife by society.
  • "Widow" is the status of those whose spouse passed away and they have not yet remarried.
  • "Divorced" is the status of those husbands and wives who no longer live together because they are legally divorced. This includes those who say they are divorced even though they are not legally divorced. On the other hand, those who live separately and do not consider themselves divorced, are considered married; for example, a husband/wife who has been left by his/her spouse to go to some other place for education, employment, or to look for work may still considered himself/herself married.

Column (7): Check sign
Enter a check sign for women who are currently married, widowed, or divorced, that is, those who have a code 2 in column (4) and code 2, 3 or 4 in column (6).

IX. Information on household and living quarters

Questions in blocks V and VI should be asked to the head of household. Household information is collected here to obtain economic indicators for this household. In block VI information on the living quarters will be collected including, among others, construction materials used in the living quarters, facilities available in the living quarters, size of the living quarters and ownership status.

[pg. 43]

A. Block V: Household information

Question 1: Source of income for this household. Ask: "What was the source of income for this household during the past year?" Circle one of the codes in accordance with the respondent's answer, and transfer the code into the box provided. If code 1 is circled, go to Q.4.

  • Agricultural sector: This includes all households whose source of income/livelihood depends solely on working in the agricultural sector or as an agricultural worker; some examples are farmers of food crops or commercial crops, those in animal husbandry or fishery, or those who work as a laborer in agriculture, animal husbandry or fisheries.
  • Non-agricultural sector: This includes all households whose source of income/livelihood does not depend on working in agriculture. The source of income/livelihood is from mining and quarrying; manufacturing industries; electricity, gas and water; building/construction; wholesale and retail trade and restaurants and hotels; transportation, storage, and communication; financial and, insurance; rental of buildings and property; and business, community, and social services. Examples: government official/civil servant, military personnel, bank personnel, drivers of commercial vehicles, merchants, teachers, workers.
  • Mixed sources with agriculture as the main source: A household that has several sources of income/livelihood, but the majority of the earnings come from the agricultural sector is recorded in this category. Example: Mr. Dadang's household consists of 6 people, that is, Mr. Dadang, his wife, 3 children and 1 cousin. Mr. Dadang works as a custodian at a movie theater, but he also works for Mr. Harja as a laborer in fish processing. His eldest child works as a coconut farmer, while his wife is a food seller. The main source of income for this household comes from the earnings of the eldest child. This household has income from the entertainment industry, agriculture, and manufacturing industry, but the main source of income is from the agricultural sector.
[pg. 44]
  • Mixed sources with agriculture not the main source: A household that has several sources of income/livelihood, but the main source of livelihood is not from the agricultural sector, but from building/construction, commerce, transportation, etc., is recorded in this category.

Question 2: Does this household own farmland. Circle one of the codes in accordance with respondent's answer.

Ownership of land means that the land, according to the law or recognized by local community, is owned by one of the members of the household. Ownership of land includes land that has been inherited, purchased or received as a gift.

If someone owns land, but at the time of the enumeration the land is being rented by someone else, is used for crop sharing, or is being used by another party (another household), this household should be recorded as owning farmland. On the other hand, if a household rents land from others, is using land for crop sharing, or receives part of the harvest from others (another household), then this household should be recorded as not owning farmland.

If the answer to this question is code 2, then go to Q.4.

Question 3: Size of farmland owned
Write the size of the land owned in the space provided in hectares (rounded to the nearest hundredth of a hectare).

Example: Mr. Amin owns a rice field which has an area of 0.75 Ha. One year ago he bought dry land with area of 0.50 Ha. In order to plant a fruit orchard, he rented Mr. Tukul's land that has an area of 1.5 Ha. Since he does not have enough workers to work the rice field, he asked Mr. Hasnawi to work on the rice field on a crop-sharing basis. From the information given above, the calculation of the size of the farmland owned by Mr. Amin would be as follows:

Rice field 0.75 Ha
Dry land 0.50 Ha
Total 1.25 Ha
[pg. 45]

In this case, the land that is rented from Mr. Tukul of 1.5 Ha is not considered as farmland owned by Mr. Amin. However, the rice field of 0.75 Ha that Mr. Hasnawi works with a crop-sharing agreement remains the farmland owned by Mr. Amin.

Question 4: What is the average monthly expenditure of your household?
Fill in the amount in Rupiah in the space provided, and then transfer the amount to the boxes by writing the amount in thousands of Rupiah after rounding up.

Explanation:
Expenditures for household consumption are divided into two types: Expenditures for food and expenditures for non-food items, regardless of the source. Expenditure for food consumption is calculated for the past month. Expenditure for non-food items is calculated for the past year, and then the monthly average of the non-food expenditure is calculated by dividing the expenditure for the year by 12.

The average monthly expenditure of the household that is entered in Q.4 is the expenditure for food for the past month added to the average monthly non-food expenditure.

B. Block VI: Living quarters
Method of filling in the form: unless different instructions are given, record the answers to the questions in this block by circling one of the codes in accordance with the respondent's answer and then write the code in the box provided.

Question 1: Type of physical building
The concept of a physical building is explained in chapter IV of this manual.

Question 2: Number of census buildings in the physical building
Fill in the number of census buildings as seen by the enumerator when conducting the interview in the space provided, and then copy that number into the box to the right of the question.

Question 3: Number of households in the census building
Enter the number of households in the space provided, and then copy that number into the box to the right of the question.

[pg. 46]

Question 4: Status of ownership of the living quarters

  • "Self-owned" means that the living quarters are legally owned by the head of household or one of the other members of the household.
  • "Lease" means that the head or one of the members of the household has a contract agreement with the owner of the living quarters for a certain length of time, for example, one or two years. The payment is normally paid in advance or in installments, which are agreed upon by both parties. At the end of the contract period, the household members must move out unless both parties agree to extend the lease or sign a new agreement.
  • "Rental" means that one of the members of the household who occupies the living quarters signs a rental agreement and pays rent regularly and continuously without a time limit.
  • "Rent-purchase" means that rent is paid over a period of time and at some future point in time the renter will own the property.
  • "Official housing" means the living quarters are provided by a government or private institution; there may be a rent payment, a rent-purchase arrangement or the household may live rent free.
  • "Other" means that the ownership status of the household occupying the living quarters cannot be classified into one of above-mentioned categories; some example of answers that would be classified as other are rent-free and cooperative ownership.

Note: Ownership status must be seen from the point of view of the household members who live in the living quarters.

Example: Household (A) occupies rent free a living quarters that has been rented by another household (B) from property owner (C); the status of ownership of household A is "Other" [not "Rental"].

If the answer is code 2 through 6, skip Q.5 and go to Q.6. If the answer is "Self-owned", code 1, continue to Q.5.

[pg. 47]

Question 5: Status of ownership of the land for the living quarters
Ownership of the land is only asked if the living quarters are self-owned.

1. Has property right (hak milik): a member of the household legally owns the land indefinitely and can be inherited by another party or transferred to another party. This land can be used for any purpose.
2. Right to build (hak guna bangunan): a member of the household legally has the right to construct a building on the land and use it for a maximum of 20 years (can be extended for an additional 30 years for a maximum of 50 years). This right can be inherited by others or transferred to another party.
3. Right to use (hak pakai): a member of the household legally has the right to use the land for a shorter duration (approximately 10 years). This land can be used to construct a building.
4. Other is the status of the ownership of the land that cannot be classified into any of the above-mentioned categories.

Question 6, 7 and 8: The type of construction materials used for the roof, walls and floor is asked in these questions. If more than one type of material is used for any of these, the material used for the majority of the area of the roof, walls, and floor is the one to be recorded. For multi-story buildings, the roof is the top-most cover of the highest story of the building (outside), whereas walls and floor are those found in the census unit where the living quarters of the household is located.

The roof is the top-most cover of a building, so that the people living under the roof will be sheltered from sun, rain, etc.

Look at the walls of the respondent's living quarters. A wall is the outside boundary/divider with another building or the exterior of the building. The interior walls which divide the living quarters into rooms are not considered.

Question 9: Floor area
Fill in the floor area occupied by the household in square meters rounded to the nearest integer.

Floor area is the total area of each living space under the roof that the household occupies and uses for its daily needs. Based on this concept, those buildings that are not used for the daily needs of the household such as barns and grain storage areas are not included in the calculation of the floor area of the living quarters. On the other hand, for multi-story buildings, the floor areas of all levels used by the household must be included in the calculation of floor area of the living quarters.

[pg. 48]

Question 10: Area of building and yard [lot]
Fill in the area in square meters rounded to the nearest integer.

The area of the building and surrounding yard is the sum of the area of the building plot and the surroundings (yard) which are usually enclosed by a fence.

Question 11: Source of lighting
The main source of lighting used in the living quarters is recorded here. Electricity is not limited to electricity supplied by the state electric company (PT. PLN), but also includes electricity that is generated by diesels/generators that utilize gasoline or diesel fuel, and also electricity from rural electrification.

For lighting whose source is fuel [pumped lamps], such as petromax, aladdin lamps and the like, circle code 2; for other kerosene lamps (such as lamps with wicks teplok, sentir, pelita and the like), circle code "3". If more than one type of lighting is used, record the type that produces the greatest amount of light (smallest code).

Ask: "For lighting in this household, are you using electricity, kerosene or others?"

Question 12: Source of fuel for cooking
If more than one of fuel type is used for cooking, ask the type of fuel used the most by the household for their daily cooking needs.

Question 13 and 15: Source of drinking water and water for bathing/washing
The information collected here is the source of the water. If a household gets its water from a spring, but the water is channeled into the house, then the water source is a spring.

  • "Piped water" is water from a drinking water company (either private sector or government) including water that is obtained from an electric/diesel pump.
  • "Pumped water" is water obtained from the source using a hand pump.
[pg. 49]
  • "Well" is the type of water source where the water is obtained by using a bucket or pail.
  • "Spring" is water that comes out from the earth by itself.
  • "River" is water that comes from a river.
  • "Rainwater" is water that is collected into some type of container while it is raining.
  • "Other" is any source of water that cannot be categorized into any the sources given above, such as water from a lake/dam.

The way to ask this question is:
"Where do you obtain your water for drinking and water for bathing/washing for the daily needs of this household?"

If the answer to Q.13 is code 2 or 3, continue to Q.14. For all other codes, skip Q.14 and go to Q.15.

Question 14: If pumped water or well is the source of water for the household, ask the distance from the well to the closest sewage disposal.

Fill in the distance in meters in whole numbers. "Distance" is the shortest distance from the water source to the place for the sewage disposal, regardless of whether that sewage disposal place is owned by the household or is the property of others.

Question 16: Bathing facilities

  • "Private bathroom" is a place to bathe that is used specifically by members of this household, although sometimes it may be used by boarders.
  • "Shared bathroom" is a bathroom that is used by members of several specific households.
  • "Public bathroom" is a bathroom that can be used by anyone and is not limited to certain households.
  • "Other" is recorded for places to bathe that cannot be classified into one of the categories mentioned above; these are usually in an open site and frequently are not specifically constructed for bathing (bathing in a river, lake, wellspring, well, etc.).

[pg. 50]

Question 17: Toilet facilities

  • "Private toilet with septic tank" is a toilet facility used by only one household with a sewer line from the toilet so that the waste will go to a place that is waterproof and has a seepage channel (septic tank).
  • "Private toilet without septic tank" is a toilet facility used by only one household with a sewer line to another place such as a river, pool, etc. or without a sewer line but directly to the waste site.
  • "Public toilet/shared toilet/other" are toilets that cannot be classified as any of the above.

[There is a picture showing a toilet with a septic tank]

Question 18: Possession of household items
If the respondent answers ["Yes" to] more than one item, count the number of codes circled, and write the sum of the codes in the box provided.

Ask: "Does this household possess a cupboard/display cabinet/buffet, stove, bicycle, radio/cassette player, TV?"

[pg. 51]

This is the end of the interview of the household as a whole; continue the interview by asking information on individuals starting with the head of household. Open form S on the page opposite block IV for the household member with serial number "01".

X. Information on household members

A. Block VII: General information on household members
1. The objective of this block is to record information on items such as sex, age, schooling status, and activities conducted during the past week for every household member, starting with the member with serial number "01" and continuing to the last household member.

2. Method of filling out the form
Circle one of the codes corresponding to the respondent's answer, and then write the code in the box on the right.

B. Block VII. A: Persons of all ages

Questions in this block are asked to all members of the household

Name and serial number of household members
Write the name and serial number of the household member exactly as written in block IV columns (1) and (2).

Question 1: Relation to head to household
This concept regarding relationship was covered [in the explanation of block IV] in chapter VIII.

[It was chapter V that was incorrectly mentioned in the original document without any reference to the block number]

Question 2: Sex

Question 3: Age
The method of obtaining the information on age was explained in block IV [of chapter VIII].

[pg. 52]

Question 4: Marital status
The explanation regarding marital status was also explained in block IV [of chapter VIII].

Question 5: Religion
If a respondent does not embrace one of the five religions listed, circle code 6 ("Other") and write the respondent's answer in the space provided.

Question 6: Citizenship
Circle the code in accordance with the respondent's answer.

  • "Indonesian citizens" are those who are descendants of native Indonesians and those who are descendants of non-Indonesians who have obtained Indonesian citizenship.
  • "Citizens of the People's Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, and those who are stateless", that is, those who do not have any citizenship, who in general are Chinese.
  • "Other foreign citizens" are those who are citizens of countries other than Indonesia, PRC, and Taiwan.

Question 7: Place of birth
Fill in the name of the province and regency/municipality of the respondent's place of birth. Province/regency/municipality of the place of birth is the province/regency/municipality of the mother's place of residence at the time the respondent was born. For example, a mother resides in Bandung (West Java); she gives birth to a child in Solo. If the mother and child return to Bandung (West Java) in fewer than 6 months, then the child's place of birth should be recorded as Bandung (West Java). However, if the child remains in Solo for 6 months or more, then the child's place of birth should be recorded as Solo (Central Java).

If there has been a change in the name of the province/regency/municipality, then the recorded place of birth should be the name of the area at the time of the enumeration. For example, A was born in Cakung sub-district, Bekasi regency, province of West Java. Because of the expansion of DKI Jakarta [DKI Jakarta is the special capital region Jakarta and is a city/province], at the time of the enumeration, Cakung sub-district is included as part of DKI Jakarta. Thus, the place of birth of A is the province DKI Jakarta, not West Java.

[pg. 53]

Fill in the code of the province as shown in the table that appears below block IV on the questionnaire. Leave boxes 30 and 31 blank.

Question 8: Ever lived in another regency/municipality
The intention here is to learn if the respondent has ever lived in another regency/municipality other than the one in which he/she now resides; the respondent would have had to live in the other regency/municipality with an intention of staying there (usually for at least 6 months or more).

Question 9: Length of time lived in current regency/municipality
Fill in the length of time in years, rounded downward, that the respondent has lived in the current regency/municipality.

Question 10: Previous residence
Fill in the name of the province and regency/municipality of residence prior to the respondent's current residence.

Example: A has lived in Pekalongan regency for 2 years. Before that, he lived in Sleman regency (special province of Yogyakarta) for 1 year, and before living in Sleman, he lived in East Java for 3 years. The answer for Q.10 is Sleman regency (special province of Yogyakarta) and the answer for Q.9 is 2 years.

Question 11: Reason for moving
The objective of Q.11 is to collect information on migration between regencies/municipalities and is asked to those who have ever moved beyond the boundary of the current regency/municipality. If the respondent has moved several times before taking up his/her residence in the current regency/municipality, ask the reason for the last move. A person has ever moved if:

1. Place of birth and the current place of residence are different or the answer to Q.7 is not the same as the current place of residence.
2. Place of birth and the current place of residence are the same, but the respondent's age is greater than the length of time the respondent has lived in the current place of residence, or the answer to Q.7 is the same as the current place of residence, but the answer for Q.3 ["Age"] is greater than the answer for Q.9.
3. Previous place of residence is not the same as the current place of residence, or the answer to Q.10 is not the same as the current place of residence.

For respondents who have never moved across the regency/municipality border, that is, the answer for Q.8 is code 2 [never lived in another regency/municipality] or if the answer for Q.7 [place of birth] is the same as the current place of residence, then skip Q.10 and Q.11, and go to Q.12.

Circle one of the codes 1 through 4 corresponding to the respondent's main reason for moving.

  • "Transmigration" is the reason given by someone who moves to a transmigration location, either with government assistance or through his/her own efforts.
  • "Employment" is the reason given by someone who moves to a new place for some reason related to his job/work, such as searching for work, his/her job was transferred, or he/she changed job.
  • "Education" is the reason given by someone who has moved to a new place to continue his/her education in the new place.
  • "Other" is the reason for someone moving that cannot be categorized into one of the three categories given above.

Question 12: Lives with own mother
If the respondent does not live with his/her own mother (code 2), go to the questions in block VII.B. If the respondent's answer is "Yes" [code 1], record the serial number of the respondent's own mother in Q.13.

Question 13: Serial number of own mother

If respondent is younger than 5, the interview with this respondent ends here. If the respondent is age 5 or older, continue the interview with the questions in block VII.B.

C. Block VII.B: Persons age 5 or older

Question 1: Place of residence in October 1980
Enter the name of the province and regency/municipality of the respondent's residence in October 1980, that is, at the time the 1980 Population Census was conducted.

Question 2: School attendance status

  • "No/not (yet) in school"; this is the status of those who have never attended school, those who have attended or completed kindergarten, but never continued to primary school.
[pg. 55]
  • "Currently attending school": this is the status of those who are currently enrolled in primary school, junior high school or high school.
  • "No longer in school": this is the status of those who have attended primary school, junior high school or high school, but at the time of the enumeration were no longer in school.
  • If the answer to this question is code "1", then Q. 3 and Q.4 do not need to be asked. Go to Q.5 and circle code "1".

Question 3: Highest educational level ever attended
The highest educational level ever attended is the highest level of schooling [primary, junior high school, etc.] that the respondent ever attended or is currently attending regardless of whether that level has been completed or not.

Example:

1. Someone has completed high school and at the time of the enumeration is attending the Banking Academy, level II; the highest educational level ever attended is academy.
2. Someone has completed high school and at the time of the enumeration is not attending any school; the highest educational level ever attended is high school.
3. Someone has completed high school and at the time of the enumeration is attending a diploma I/II program; the highest educational level ever attended is diploma I/II.
4. Someone has completed high school and at the time of the enumeration is attending a diploma II program; the highest educational level ever attended is diploma I/II.
5. Someone has completed high school and at the time of the enumeration is attending a diploma III program; the highest educational level ever attended is academy/diploma III.
6. Someone has completed high school and at the time of the enumeration is attending a diploma IV program; the highest educational level ever attended is university/diploma IV.

Question 4: Highest grade/class ever attended/currently attended
If the respondent has completed the highest class of the highest educational level ever attended circle code "8".

Explanation:
a. Those who completed primary, junior high school or high school, circle code "8".

[pg. 56]

b. Those who completed a bachelor's degree and are now studying in a master degree program, circle code "6".
c. Those who completed a bachelor's degree and are now studying in a doctoral program (Ph.D.), circle code "7".
d. Those who are currently obtaining a diploma I program, circle code "1". If the person has completed the program, circle code "8".
e. Those who are currently obtaining a diploma II program, circle code "2". If the person has completed the program, circle code "8".

Note:
For the person who is currently attending a program at a university that uses the credit system (semester credit unit), information about grade/class attended can be obtained by asking the additional question as follows: "How many credits have you obtained up to the present time?"
As a guide, use the following:

  • Level I: up to 30 credits; Level II: up to 60 credits; Level III: up to 90 credits; Level IV: up to 120 credits; Level V: up to 150 credits

If the respondent has 57 credits, then he/she is currently in class/level II.

Question 5: Highest educational level completed
If the answer to Q.2 is code 1, then the response that should be circled for Q.5 is code "1" ("Never attended/not yet attended").

The highest educational level completed is defined as follows:

a. "Never attended/not yet attended" means those who have never attended school or have not yet attended school; this includes those who have completed kindergarten, but have not continued to the primary school.

b. "Less than primary school" includes those who have ever attended primary school but who have not or have not yet completed a primary school of 5, 6 or 7 years, special primary level education schools, Madrasah Ibtidaiyah, schools organized and managed by society, parents, and teachers, package A1 -- A100 programs, pioneer project development primary school, Indonesian primary schools (abroad). Those who have completed a three-year primary school program or equivalent are considered to have not yet completed primary school.
[pg. 57]
c. Completed primary school means the respondent has completed primary school of 5, 6 or 7 years, special primary level education schools, Madrasah Ibtidaiyah, schools organized and managed by society, parents, and teachers, package A1 -- A100 programs, pioneer project development primary school, or Indonesian primary schools (abroad).

d. Completed general junior high general means the respondent has completed a general junior level education such as junior high school, MULO, HBS 3 years, special schools for children with disabilities at junior high school level, Madrasah Tsanawiyah, junior high pioneer project development school, junior high Indonesian school (abroad), and junior high school for sports.

e. Completed junior high vocational school means the respondent has completed a vocational junior level education such as home economics school for girls, economics junior high school, technical junior high school, family welfare junior high school, vocational skill junior high school of 4 years, farm management junior high school, agricultural junior high school, teacher's aide school, school for Islamic educators of 4 years, public administration courses, school for religious court staff, junior high nursing school, Madrasah Diniyah Tsanawiyah, or other junior vocational schools.

f. Completed general senior high school means the respondent has completed an intermediate level general education such as senior high school, Madrasah Aliyah, HBS of 5 years, AMS, senior high preparatory development school, senior high pioneer project development school, Indonesian high school (abroad), and senior high school for sports.

g. Senior high vocational school means the respondent has completed vocational education at the senior high school level, such as: home economics technology high school, social work senior high school, senior high school for craft industry, fine arts senior high school, senior high school of Indonesian dance, senior high school of music, technology for development senior high school, family welfare senior high school, economics senior high school, technical senior high school, agricultural technology senior high school, shipping technology senior high school, flight technology senior high school, graphic arts senior high school, physical education senior high school, teachers for special schools for children with disabilities, junior high teachers training school, senior high school for Islamic educators of 6 years, senior high school for kindergarten teachers, teacher training courses, chemistry analysis high school, school for pharmacists' assistants, school for mid-wives, school for radiology assistants, public administration senior level courses (KPAA), Madrasah Diniyah Aliyah, senior high business courses, senior high nurses school, pharmacy senior high school, textile technology senior high school, senior high school for glass, electrical, and metal instruments, agricultural senior high school, agricultural management senior high school, animal husbandry senior high school, fish farming senior high school, forestry senior high school, nutrition senior high school, merchant marine senior high school, train technology senior high school.

[pg. 58]

h. Diploma I/II means the respondent has completed a diploma program DI/DII at an institution of higher learning

i. Academy/Diploma III means the respondent has completed a diploma program academy/DIII program or has obtained an associate degree in an institution of higher learning. In institutions which do not confer the associate degree, for students who are attending levels 4 or 5, their highest education level completed is senior high school or senior vocational school.

j. University means the respondent has completed a program in an institution of higher learning such as bachelor degree, master degree, doctoral degree, diploma IV, Akta IV and V, or specialist I and II.

Question 6: Ability to read and write
Someone is considered able to read and write if he/she can read and write a sentence of a few simple words written in a given alphabet. If the respondent can read/write Latin and other alphabets, circle code "1" ("Latin alphabet").

Note:

a. A blind person who can read and write Braille is classified as able to read and write Latin characters.
b. A person who was able to read and write, but now due to some handicap is no longer able to read and write, is classified as able to read and write.
c. A person who can only read but is not able to write is classified as not able to read and write.

[pg. 59]

If the respondent is younger than 10, the interview ends here. If the respondent is age 10 or older, continue the interview with questions in block VII.C.

D. Block VII. C: Persons age 10 or older

Question 1: What were your activities during the past week? Circle one of the codes "1" through "5" in accordance with the respondent's answer. If the answer is code "1", continue the interview with the questions in block VIII.

  • "During the past week" is the period of 7 consecutive days that ends the day before the day of the enumeration. For example, the enumeration is conducted on 20 October, then the past week means the period beginning 13 October and continuing through 19 October.
  • Activities cover work, attending school, homemaking and others (for example, actively looking for work, sports, recreation, etc.).
  • "Main activity" is the activity that requires the most time compared to the other activities of the respondent.
  • "Most of the time" is the longest time spent by comparing the time spent for all activities such as work, school, homemaking and others (actively looking for work, engaged in sports, handicapped, too old to work, very ill). Time used for relaxation, sleep and play are not considered when comparing amounts of time spent for activities.
  • "Work" is an economic activity with the intention to obtain or help to obtain earnings or profits for at least one hour during the past week. Work for at least one hour must be work that is done continuously, without a break, for one hour or more. Earnings and profits cover wages/salaries including all allowances, bonuses and other earnings such as rent, interest, and profit in both cash and in kind.
[pg. 60]

Explanation:
a. Those activities that produce grains (rice, corn, sorghum) and/or crops (cassava, parsnips, sweet potatoes, taro, potatoes), which are consumed by those who produce them, are considered work.

Those activities that produce something other than grains or crops, which are used by those who produce them such as clothes sewn by the person for his/her own use, painting for themselves, cooking for one's own family, and fishing as a hobby, are not considered work.

b. A household member who assists in the work of the head of household or other household member, for example in a rice field, farm, food stall/store, etc., is considered to be working even though he/she does not receive a wage/salary.

c. Someone who rents agricultural equipment/tools, industrial equipment, party supplies/equipment, vehicles, etc., to others is considered to be working.

d. A housemaid is considered to work, whether or not she/he is a member of the employer's household.

e. Prisoners who carry out activities such as planting, furniture making, etc. are not considered to be working.

f. Someone who leases farm land to others in a crop-sharing arrangement is considered to be working if he/she is partly responsible for or participates in the management of the operation.

  • "School" is the activity of someone who attends a formal school from the primary level up to an institution of higher education, including those who might be on vacation from school. If besides attending school a respondent also works, the respondent's activity will be categorized depending on which activity he/she does most of the time.
  • "Homemaking" is the activity of someone who manages the household or assists in managing the household without receiving a wage/salary.
Example: The activities of a housewife or children who assist in managing the household are considered to be homemaking. On the other hand, the activity of a maid who manages the household is classified as work because he/she receives a wage/salary.
[pg. 61]
  • Unable to conduct any activity is the classification of those who because of their physical situation are not able to conduct any activity (physically handicapped, elderly, mentally handicapped, etc.).
  • Other is the classification of the activities other than work, school, and homemaking.

Question 2: Did you work at least one hour during the past week?

If the answer is "Yes" (code 1), go directly to the questions in block VIII.

Question 3: Do you have a job/business but were temporarily not working during the past week?

If the answer is "Yes", code 1, go directly to the questions in block VIII.

"Have a job, but temporarily not working" means the respondent has a job but during the past week did not work for reasons such as illness, on leave, awaiting harvest, or on strike. Included in this category are those who have been accepted for work but during the past week had not yet started working.

Example:
Those classified as having a job, but temporarily not working are:

a. Professionals not working because of illness or waiting for the next job, such as puppeteer, masseuse, shaman and singer.
b. Permanent employee, civil servant or private sector employee who are not working due to leave, illness, absence from work, on strike, or on temporary leave due to the company's temporary work stoppage, for example due to equipment break down, shortage of raw material, etc.
c. Farmers who are not working due to illness or waiting for the next activity, such as waiting for harvest or the rains to till the rice fields.

[pg. 62]

Question 4: Have you ever worked previously?

Question 5: Were you looking for work during the past week?

If the answer is "Yes" (code "1"), go directly to question 11 [length of time looking for work] in block VIII; if the answer is "No" (code "2"), go directly to question 14 [reasons for not looking for work] in block VIII.

"Looking for work" is the activity of those who were looking for a job.

Explanation:
The activity of looking for work is not limited to the period of the past week, but can include those activities conducted earlier than a week ago; also included as looking for work are those who are waiting for replies to their applications. Thus, those who have sent applications are also in the category of looking for work.

Those classified as looking for work here are:

a. Those who never worked and are now making an effort to find work.
b. Those who ever worked, but for some reason had stopped working and are now looking for work.

XI. Labor force
Block VIII: Labor force (Persons age 10 or older)

A. Objective
The objective here is to collect information about the labor force such as type of activity/industry of the place of work/business/office, type and status of employment, number of hours spent working at the primary occupation as well as at any additional occupation(s), etc.

B. Filling in the form
Question 1: Total number of hours spent working at all jobs during the past week.
- The intention here is to obtain the number of hours per day spent on all work by the respondent during the past week.

[The rest of the instructions for Question 1 are missing.]

[pg. 65]

Question 2: Type of main work
[Part of the instructions for Question 2 are missing]

The following is a table showing examples of type of main work, and how to record them correctly [table]:
[Column headings:]
(A) Examples of unclear answers
(B) Examples of clear answers

Unclear: a. Farmer
Clear: a. Processes/works on agricultural farm land; food crops (paddy, maize, cassava, soybean, etc.)

Unclear: b. Airline employee
Clear: b. Pilot; weighs passenger luggage; airline administration

Unclear: c. International hotel employee
Clear: c. Provides services to hotel guests during their stay; planning, arranging and supervising housekeeping or other hotel activities

Unclear: d. Shoe factory employee
Clear: d. Prepares the shoe sole; runs leather sewing machine; night watchman in shoe factory

Unclear: e. Casual construction worker
Clear: e. Painting office buildings/private dwellings/factories; digging foundations; installing building floor tiles

Unclear: f. Hospital employee
Clear: f. Provides treatment and advice to hospital patients; prepares the food for the patients

Unclear: g. Merchant
Clear: g. Sells food, drinks, fruits, vegetables on the side of the road; sells household wares from house to house

Question 3: Status of employment of main job
Status of employment is the position of a person in a particular job.

[pg. 66]

Status of employment is differentiated as follows:
a. "Self-employed" is work or business in which the person is responsible for the economic risk, and in this effort he/she does not employ any family workers and other workers.
Example:

a. Pedicab driver who drives his pedicab at his own risk.
b. Taxi driver who drives a car at his own risk.
c. Coolies in a market, station or other public places without a specific employer.

b. "Self-employed assisted by family workers or temporary workers" is work or business in which the person is responsible for the risk and is assisted by unpaid family workers or temporary workers.

  • Temporary worker/staff is one who is employed by another person or an institution/office/company and only receives wages based on time worked or volume produced.

Example:

a. Stall/shop owner assisted by family members/unpaid employees or assisted by others who are paid based on number of days worked.
b. Travelling salesman assisted by an unpaid employee or assisted by others who are paid only when they work.
c. Farmer who works on farm land assisted by family workers. However, during the harvest the worker may receive some of the harvest (harvest shared or halved, etc.); this worker is not considered a permanent employee. The farmer is classified as self-employed assisted by family worker/temporary worker.

c. "Employer" is work or business in which the person is responsible for the risk and employs at least one paid, permanent worker.

[pg. 67]

"Paid, permanent employee" is a person who is employed by another person or an institution/office/company and receives wages/salary on a regular basis whether or not the employer has any work for him/her.

Example:

a. A shopkeeper who employs one or more permanent employees.
b. Shoe merchant who employs permanent workers.

d. "Employee/worker" is someone employed by others or an institution/office/company and regularly receives wages/salary in cash or in kind.

e. "Family worker" is someone who works by helping others without receiving wages/salary either in cash or in kind.

Explanation:
Family worker can be:

i. A member of the household of the person he/she assists.
ii. Not a member of the household of the person he/she assists.
iii. Not a member of the household and not a family member of the person he/she assists.

Example:

  • Wife who assists her husband in the rice field.
  • A sibling/other relative who helps serve in a food stall.
  • A neighbor who helps weaving hats as a home industry.

Question 4: Number of hours worked during the past week at the primary occupation.
Filled in the number of hours the respondent worked during the past week at the primary occupation.

Question 5: Type of activity/field of industry of the place of work/business/office.
Write clearly and completely the type of activity/field of industry of the place of work/business/office of the primary occupation; to facilitate in the coding:

[pg. 68]

Type of activity/field of industry of the place of work/business/office is the field of activities of the place of work/business/company/institution where someone works.

Type of activity/field of industry of the place of work/business/office:
a. "Agriculture covers food crops, commercial crops, animal production, forestry, fishery and hunting, including agricultural services".

(i) "Food crop agriculture" is the activity/field of industry of carrying out the planting, cultivation, seedling, weeding, and maintaining food crops.
Examples of food crops:
  • Grains: rice, corn, wheat, sorghum, and other grains.
  • Roots: cassava, sweet potatoes, potatoes, and other roots.
  • Nuts: peanuts, soy bean, monk beans, and other types of nuts.
  • Vegetables: spinach, water spinach, mustard greens, cabbage, squash, carrots, scallions, celery, cucumber, eggplant, radish.
  • Fruits: banana, papaya, mango, rambutan, rose apple, orange, avocado, sapodilla, durian, zalacca palm fruit, mangosteen, apple, pineapple.
(ii) "Other agriculture" is the activity/field of industry of carrying out the planting, cultivation, seedling, weeding, and maintaining of other plants. Other agricultural plants are differentiated into plantation crops and non-plantation crops.

Examples of plantation crops: tobacco, tea, eucalyptus, coffee, chocolate, palm oil, pepper, nutmeg, vanilla, kapok, quinine, clove, sugar cane, agave, and rubber.
Non-plantation crops include: orchids, jasmine, roses, flowers, and other decorative plants.
[pg. 69]
(iii) "Animal production" is the activity/field of industry in which livestock and small farm animals, poultry, bees, silkworms are produced and includes the breeding of these animals.
  • Livestock includes: cows, dairy cows, buffalo, and horse.
  • Small farm animals include: goat, sheep, pig, and rabbit.
  • Poultry includes: chickens, ducks, geese, quail, pigeons, and turkeys.
(iv) "Support services for agricultural and animal production" is the activity/field of industry that covers soil processing, fertilization, seed spreading, weeding/spraying/pest eradication, harvest/ picking, pruning, sorting and grading of agricultural products, peeling/shelling/grinding, packing, irrigation management, rental of agricultural tools with their operator, services for animal health, shearing of livestock, grass collecting for animal food, and livestock caretaking; all activities are carried out on a contract basis.

(v) "Forestry and logging" is the activity/field of industry that covers forestry enterprises, harvesting forest products, logging, including forest services to meet the needs of forest management which are carried out on a contract basis.

"Forest enterprise" is the activity/field of industry that covers re- planting, trans-planting and cultivation efforts and moving different types of plants for example teak, pines, mahogany, sandalwood, and others.

"Harvesting forest products" is the activity/field of industry that covers activities such as collecting resin, rubber sap, rattan, bark, foliage, flowers, roots, honey, bird nests, and charcoal making.

"Logging" is the activity/field of industry that covers cutting the forest wood to produce raw logs or planks from bamboo and various types of wood (types of wood: meranti, pulai, keruing, meramin, kayu besi, kayu hitam).
[pg. 70]
(vi) "Hunting/catching wild animals/catching and breeding wildlife" is the activity/field of industry that covers hunting/catching wild animals, catching and breeding wildlife, for example, snakes, crocodile, and others.

(vii) "Ocean/sea fishing" is the activity/field of industry that covers the capture and extraction of marine products such as fish, prawn, crab, mussels, pearls, seaweed, coral, jellyfish and others. This category also includes support services of marine fishery on the basis of contracts for services such as sorting, grading, and preparation of marine products for auction.

(viii) "Fish farming" is the activity/field of industry that covers the breeding, fish nursery, capture of fish/prawn either in brackish or fresh water environments. This category also includes support services of fish farming on the basis of contracts for services such as sorting and grading of fish farm products, maintenance and improvements of fish ponds, pest eradication, fertilizing, and management of water irrigation systems for fish farming.

b. "Mining and quarrying" is the activity/field of industry that covers the extraction of coal, petroleum, and gas, metal ore, stone, clay, sand, salt, other minerals, chemicals and fertilizers materials, gypsum, asphalt, and limestone.

c. "Manufacturing/crafting (including industry services)" is the activity/field of industry that covers the processing of raw materials into intermediate/finished goods; the process changes the form of the goods from those with a lower value to those with a higher value.

d. "Electricity, gas and water"

(i) "Electricity" is the activity/field of industry that covers electric power generation and operation and distribution network of electricity to sell to households, industry and for other commercial uses.
[pg. 71]
(ii) "Gas, steam, and hot water" is the activity/field of industry that covers the production and distribution of gas, steam and hot water for household, industry and other commercial uses.
(iii) "Water treatment, supply and distribution" is the activity/field of industry that covers the water collection, treatment, and distribution to households, industry, and other commercial uses.

e. "Construction" is the activity/effort of industry that covers building/improving/demolishing buildings/houses, roads and bridges, railroads and rail bridges, tunnels, dams and canals, airport runways, dock and ports, parking lots, sport fields, electric power generation stations, power transmission and distribution facilities, and communication network facilities. Also included here is the installation of pumps, drilling of wells, etc.

f. "Trade" is the activity/field of industry that covers buying and selling of goods or services; also included in this category are restaurants, cafes, catering, railway food services, cafeterias, canteens, food stalls, and accommodation facilities (hotels, motels, hostels and inns).

g. "Transportation, storage, and communication"

(i) "Transportation" is the activity/field of industry that covers the transport of goods or people by land, sea, river, lake, canal, and air. Also included in this category are transport services, packing and shipping of goods, and travel agencies.
(ii) "Storage" is the activity/field of industry that covers the storage with all the required facilities such as cold storage for goods that require refrigeration, bonded warehousing.
(iii) "Communication" is the activity/field of industry that covers public communication services such as post, telephone, telex or radio.
[pg. 72]

h. "Financial institutions, insurance, real estate activities, and related services"

(i) "Financial institution" is the activity/field of industry that covers banking both those managed by the government as well as the private sector such as foreign exchange banks, shipping banks, lending banks as well as banks that provide services to other banks including fund transfers and investments (deposits, checks, money orders, and the like).
Also included in this category are pawn shops, security transactions, stock exchanges, money changers, and savings and loans institutions.
(ii) "Insurance" is the activity/field of industry that provides life and health insurance, insurance for shipping accidents, goods/property, and marketable securities. Also included in this category are insurance services, insurance agents, insurance consultants, and pension funds.
(iii) "Real estate activity" is the activity/field of industry that covers rental, purchase, and sale of real property, real estate brokers, agents and managers who manage the buying, selling, and appraising of buildings/land on a service contract basis. This category includes legal, accounting, architectural, data processing and tabulation, market research services, building services, and services for the rental of machines and equipment. Rental of machinery and tools for agriculture and construction with the operators are included in the agricultural and construction industry categories respectively.

i. "Social and personal services" is the activity/field of industry that covers institutions such as legislative bodies, governments, defense and security, international agencies and other agencies. In this category are also services for education, health, hygiene, entertainment and culture, social welfare carried out by the government or the private sector. Personal and household services include private tutoring, shaman, laundries, barbers, repair services, doctors in private practice, midwives, welders, beauty salons, masseuses, photography studios, maids, etc.

[pg. 73]

j. "Other" is any activity/field of industry that cannot be classified into one of the fields above (items a through i) or that is unclear or has not yet been defined.

Example: Field of industry, occupation, and status of employment

1. Wagino, Yanto, Fenty, Anton, Diman, and Ramli are employees of a shoe factory owned by Firman. Wagino works as the materials buyer; Yanto is the supervisor of those who make the shoes; Fenty is a typist, Anton is a driver, Diman is a shoe maker, and Ramli is an office boy. In this enterprise Firman is assisted by his child Firdaus who works as the treasurer. Firman doubles as the manager of the company. The industry, type of work, and status of work for each individual are shown below:

2. Madun is a rice farmer who is assisted by his wife and child. Mrs. Siti makes mats to sell by herself. Sutoyo is a private driver for Mrs. Prayogo. Marred does sewing and is helped by her spouse and when necessary hires someone else to help. Tarnin is a driver at a factory producing local herb drinks (jamu). Mami looks for wood in the forest by himself which he later sells.
[pg. 74]

The following is a table showing the information that should be recorded for example 1 [table]:
[Column headings:]
(A) Name
(B) Field of industry
(C) Occupation
(D) Status of employment

Name: Firman
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Manager of a shoe factory
Status of employment: Employer with permanent employees

Name: Firdaus
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Treasurer
Status of employment: Family worker

Name: Wagino
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Buys raw materials
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Yanto
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Supervisor
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Fenty
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Typist
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Anton
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Driver
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Diman
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Shoe maker
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Ramli
Field of industry: Shoe manufacturing
Occupation: Office boy
Status of employment: Employee

The following is a table showing the information that should be recorded for example 2 [table]:
[Column headings:]
(A) Name
(B) Field of industry
(C) Occupation
(D) Status of employment

Name: Madun
Field of industry: Rice farming
Occupation: Rice farmer
Status of employment: Self-employed assisted by family workers

Name: Mrs. Siti
Field of industry: Mat making
Occupation: Mat maker
Status of employment: Self employed

Name: Sutoyo
Field of industry: Personal services
Occupation: Driver
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Marred
Field of industry: Personal services (tailor)
Occupation: Seamstress
Status of employment: Self-employed assisted by family workers and temporary workers

Name: Tarnin
Field of industry: Herb medicine manufacturing
Occupation: Driver
Status of employment: Employee

Name: Mami
Field of industry: Forestry
Occupation: Collects wood from the forest
Status of employment: Self-employed

Questions 6 - 8: These questions concern any additional jobs the respondent might have. An additional job is any other job, besides the primary occupation, the respondent has to earn or help to earn additional income.

Question 6: Did you have any additional work?
If the answer is "No" (code 2), go to Q.10 block VIII.

Question 7: Number of hours of additional work during the past week.
Ask and fill in the number of hours worked during the past week at the additional job mentioned above. The enumerator must be aware that the number of hours answered for question 1 should be equal to or greater than the number of hours answered for Q.4 plus Q.7 in block VIII.

Question 8: Describe the type of activity/field of industry of the place/business/office of the additional work. Record the answer for this question in the same manner as in Q.5 block VIII, only here it is the activity/field of industry for the additional job.

[Pages 75 and 76 are missing in the original document. The rest of chapter XI on labor force and the beginning of chapter XII on ever-married women information intend to represent the missing information]

Question 9: Did you do any other work other than the primary work and the additional work you mentioned earlier? Circle the appropriate code and then write that code in the box to the right.

Question 10: This question asks if the respondent was looking for work during the past week. If the answer is "Yes", circle code 1, write the code in the box to the right, and then continue with the next question. If the answer is "No", circle code "2", write the code in the box to the right, and then go to Q. 14.

Questions 11 -- 14: These questions ask the respondent about his/her search for work.

Question 11: Length of time respondent has been looking for work. The answer should be written in months in the space provided and in the boxes to the right.

Question 12: This question asks whether the respondent was looking for full-time or part-time work during the past week. Circle the appropriate code and write the code number in the box to the right.

Question 13: Kinds of efforts made during the past week to look for work. The respondent may give more than one answer to this question. Circle the appropriate codes corresponding to the answers given and then calculate the sum of the codes circled; write the sum in the boxes to the right, and then go to Q.16.

Question 14: Reasons for not looking for work. Circle the appropriate code and then write that code in the box to the right.

Question 15: This question asks the respondent if he/she is willing to accept any type of work. Circle the appropriate code and then write that code in the box to the right.

Question 16: The respondent is asked whether or not he/she worked during the past year. If the answer is "Yes", circle code 1, write the code in the box to the right and then continue to question 17. If the answer is "No", circle code "2", write the code in the box to the right; this is the end of the interview in this block. If the respondent meets the criteria for the questions in block IX [for ever-married women], continue the interview with the questions in block IX. If the respondent does not meet the criteria, then the interview with this respondent ends here.

Question 17: For those who worked during the past year, the enumerator should ask them the type of activity/field of industry in which he/she worked during the past year. The enumerator should write the description as clearly and completely as possible and should record the answer for this question in the same manner as in Q.5 block VIII, only here it is the activity/field of industry for the job during the past year.

XII. Information on ever-married women

A. Objective
The purpose of the questions in this block is to obtain information about number of marriages, age at first marriage and the number of children born alive, the number who have died and the number who are still living.]

[pg. 77]

A respondent who meets the requirement to be interviewed in block IX is determined by the information given in block IV of form S; even if a respondent meets the requirement to be interviewed in block IX, she may not meet the requirements to be interviewed in block X or block XI. Questions in block X are only asked to those respondents who have ever given birth and are younger than 55, and questions in block XI are only asked if a woman is currently married and younger than 50.

Fill in the form: In general the answer is record by circling a code and writing the code in a box to the right. For certain questions the code can be directly written in the box without circling any code.

B. Block IX: Ever-married women

Questions in this block are only asked to women who have ever been married.

Questions in this block are only asked to ever-married women, that is those who are currently married, widowed, or divorced, in order to obtain information on the number of children born alive, the number of children still living, and the number of children who have died.

Before conducting the interview for this block, write the name and serial number of the member of the household in the upper left-hand corner of the page; this should be the same as the name and serial number contained in block IV columns (1) and (2). If possible, the interview should be conducted with the relevant respondent. If the respondent is not available on the first visit, try to arrange to meet the relevant respondent at another time.

Question 1: Number of marriages
In order to obtain the exact number of times the respondent has been married, the enumerator must be careful in asking the questions.

[pg. 78]

Example:

a. For a woman who is currently married, ask "How many times have you been married including your current marriage?"
b. For a woman who is divorced, ask "How many times have you been married including the marriage that has most recently ended in a divorce?"
c. For a woman who is a widow, ask "How many times have you been married including the marriage to your husband who died?"

Question 2: Month and year of first marriage
For a woman who is currently married, ask whether her present marriage is her first marriage. If the answer is "Yes", ask the month and year of her marriage. If the answer is "No", ask the month and year of her first marriage.

Enter the month and year of the first marriage in the space provided for the answer to Q.2. If respondent cannot give the month and year of her first marriage, the enumerator must estimate the date by relating the month and year of her first marriage to important local or national events as used to estimate age when the age is not known.

Question 3: Age at first marriage
If, after making every effort, the enumerator cannot determine the month and year of first marriage, then ask the age of the respondent when she married for the first time. The enumerator may be able to determine the month and year of first marriage, by relating the age when first married to the month and year of her birth.

[Pages 79 and 80 are missing in the original document. Instructions for question 4 and the initial instructions for question 5 intend to represent the missing information]

[Question 4: Number of children born alive
This question asks all ever-married women to detail the number of male children born alive, from all marriages, who are still living in the household and those who live elsewhere. Also, the respondent is asked for the number of female children born alive, from all marriages, who are still living in the household and those who live elsewhere. By adding the numbers in each of the columns just filled in, the enumerator will obtain the total number of female children born alive and the total number of male children born alive. By adding the figures in each row, the enumerator will obtain the total number of children born alive and still living in the household, the total number of children born alive and currently living elsewhere, and the total number of children born alive. These three row totals are to be entered in the total column for each row as well as in the boxes to the right of each row.

Next, the enumerator asks the respondent for the number of male children who were born alive but have died and the number of female children who were born alive but have died. The enumerator will calculate the row total to obtain the total number of children born alive but have died; this row total should be written in the space provided for the total and then entered in the boxes to the right.

Finally, the enumerator will calculate the total of the male column and the total of the female column and the total of the male plus female columns to obtain the total number of children born alive. This total is then written in the column to the right.

Question 5: [The last question in this section asks the respondent's age when she gave birth to her first child born alive]

[pg. 81]

If during her lifetime the respondent has only ever given birth to a stillborn baby, then this question should be blank and a dash sign (-) should be entered in the box provided. Ask the respondent her age when she gave birth for the first time. If the respondent has only been married once, ask how long she had been married at the time she gave birth for the first time. With this information calculate her age at the time she gave birth for the first time.
The enumerator must pay attention to the fact that if the respondent has been married several times, the first time she gave birth may not always have occurred during the first marriage. In order to get the correct answer from the respondent, the enumerator must be diligent in asking the questions, especially if the respondent is an older woman, because she may have difficulty remembering.

Write the age of the respondent when she first gave birth in the space provided and in box on the right. As was the case for Q.3, the age recorded in this question is rounded downwards.

Example: Someone marries at age 15. Her first child is born 2 years after she married. Thus the age at first birth is (15 + 2) years = 17 years.

C. Block X: Women who ever gave birth and are younger than 55
The questions in this block are only to be asked to women who ever gave birth, that is, the entry for Q.4c in block IX (male + female) is at least 1, and the age of the women is younger than 55. If a woman has never given birth and she is currently married, block X should not be filled in and the interview should continue with the questions in block XI on family planning [if her age is younger than 50].

The objective of this block is to obtain information about all live births and deaths that occurred during the period between 30 June, 1984 and the date of the interview. To obtain this information several indirect questions will be asked to improve the flow of the interview.

[pg. 82]

Therefore, questions in this block must be asked to all women who have ever given birth regardless of whether or not the last child born alive was born in the time period mentioned above. By following the flow of these questions, it will be clear from the answers whether the births and deaths are in the time period 30 June, 1984 to the date of the interview.

The period between Idul Fitri [Islamic holiday] (30 June, 1984) and October 1985 is about 16 months; during this period there could be more than one birth and death [in a household]. The questions are designed in such a manner that all occurrences can be covered. For each respondent, space is provided to record two births and two deaths and there is space in case twins need to be recorded for each. For every household, three pages have been provided for block IX through block XI.

If the answer to Q4.C in block IX is 1 or more, questions in block X must be asked.

To obtain the number of children who were born alive and the number of children who died between Idul Fitri 1984 and October 1985, the interview is concentrated on the last live birth, that is, the last child born with signs of life -- although at the time of the interview that child may have already died. First of all, confirm who the child being referred to is by asking questions 2 - 4. From question 5 onward the interview is directed towards obtaining information about this child.

If after giving birth to this child, the respondent was again pregnant, asked if that pregnancy ended in a miscarriage, live birth, or a stillbirth. If in fact there was a live birth as a result of that pregnancy, then the name of the last child born alive mentioned earlier is not correct and the name of correct last child born alive should be recorded in the space provided in Q.6. Thereafter, the enumerator must ask various questions about this child to determine if this child is still alive at the time of the interview. If the pregnancy ended in a stillbirth, the enumerator must determine with certainty that the baby was really born without any sign of life. If that child was stillborn, then the last child already mentioned [answer to Q.1] is correct. If the child was born alive and then died, then the last child born previously recorded in answer to Q1 is incorrect. The correct last child born alive is the one resulting from the series of questions Q.2 - Q.4. This child's name should be recorded in the space provided for Q.6.

[pg. 83]

If the last child was born prior to the time of the interview, there is a chance that there was another birth during the time period of concern. To cover such a situation, Q.13 - Q.23 should be asked. At the beginning, ask the respondent whether she had a pregnancy before the pregnancy that resulted in the birth of the last child born alive. If the answer is "Yes", ask whether the latter pregnancy ended in a miscarriage, live birth or a stillbirth. If that child was born alive ask Q.16 - Q.23 to determine if the birth occurred during the specified time period, and whether the child is still living at the time of the interview. If the pregnancy ended in a stillbirth, then the interview for block X is finished and the enumerator should continue the interview with questions in block XI.

Question 1: What is the name of your last child born alive? Write the name of respondent's last child born alive. If more than one child was born, write the names of all children born, even if there were more than two.

Questions 2 -- 4: Ask to confirm if the child whose name was recorded in Q.1 was truly the last child born alive. This child whose name was just recorded may still be alive or may have already died at the time of the interview. The name of the correct last child born alive is recorded in the space provided for Q.6.

Question 2: After the birth of this last child just mentioned, were you ever pregnant again? It is the pregnancy after the last child recorded in Q.1 that is recorded here

  • No means that from the time of the last live birth until the time of the interview the respondent did not have another pregnancy.
[pg. 84]
  • "Currently pregnant" means that at the time of the interview the respondent is currently pregnant.
  • "Miscarriage" means that the respondent had a pregnancy after the birth of the last child, but that pregnancy resulted in a miscarriage before the pregnancy reached 7 months.
  • "Live birth" (has been explained at block IX).
  • "Stillbirth" (has been explained at block IX).

If the code for the respondent's answer is 1 - 3, go to Q.5 to continue the interview and copy the name of the child or children from Q.1 into the space provided for Q.6.

If the answer is code 4, also go to Q.5 to continue the interview, but [for Q. 6] record the name of the child who was born after the child mentioned in Q.1; if the birth was not a single birth, record the names of all children born. In this case the answer for Q.1 will not be the same as that for Q.6.

If the answer is code 5, continue the interview with the next question [Q.3]

Question 3: Length (in months) of the pregnancy
Circle code 1 or 2 in accordance with the respondent's answer, and then write the code just circled in the box provided to the right.

If the answer is "younger than 7 months" (code 1), go to Q.5 in the same block and copy the name of the child contained in Q.1 in the space provided for Q.6. If the answer is "7 months or more" (code 2), continue to the next question (Q.4).

Question 4: Did the baby just mentioned show any signs of life (breathe/cry) at birth?

Question 5: Was this single or multiple births?

[pg. 85]
[There is a picture showing a correctly filled-out form]

Question 6: Name of child
The answer for this question can be the same, but can also be different from the name given in Q.1, depending on the answers to Q.2 - Q.4; the various possibilities are:

a. If Q.2 is code 1-3, the name in Q.6 must be the same as the name in Q.1.
b. If Q.2 is code 4, the name in Q.6 must be different from the name in Q.1.
c. If Q.2 is code 5 and Q.3 is code 1, the name in Q.6 must be the same as the name in Q.1
d. If Q.2 is code 5 and Q.3 is code 2, Q.4 must have an entry.
e. If Q.2 is code 5, Q.3 is code 2, and Q.4 is code 1, then the name in Q.6 must be different from the name in Q.1.
f. If Q.2 is code 5, Q.3 is code 2, and Q.4 is code 2, then the name in Q.6 must be the same as the name in Q.1.

As in the case of Q.1, if there were multiple births, the name of each child must be written one by one in the space provided. Fill in code 1 in the box on the right if the name of the child written in Q.1 is the same as that written in Q.6. If the name in Q.1 is different from that in Q.6 enter code 2 in the box provided.

[There is a picture showing a correctly filled-out form]

[pg. 86]

Although the last live birth might have been more than two babies, the births recorded in this form are only the first two births since such events are quite rare. It must be noted that for all births recorded here, there must have been some sign of life at the time of birth.

Question 7: Sex
If the last child born alive is a single birth, circle code 1 or 2 [for sex of the child] in accordance with [the respondent's answer]. If there were multiple births, then the code for sex does not need to be circled, but write the code for the sex of each child in the box to the right corresponding to the name of the child written in the space for the answer to Q.6. The answers for Q.7 - Q.12 should be recorded in a similar manner.

Question 8: When was the child mentioned above born?
Write the month and year of birth of each child born. Both the year and the month are recorded using two digits. The first set of boxes is used to record the month, and the set of two boxes below are used to record the year of birth.

Example: Twins are born in May 1984; this would be recorded as shown below.

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

Question 9: Was the child mentioned above born after Idul Fitri 1404 H [the year in the Islamic calendar] (30 June 1984)?
Ask the respondent if on Idul Fitri 1984 the child had already been born and had been able to enjoy the special holiday or if the respondent was still pregnant on Idul Fitri. Make every attempt to help the respondent recall the day of Idul Fitri 1984, to facilitate her recollection of whether the child had really been born at that time.

[pg. 87]

Question 10: Does this child just mentioned still live in this household?
If the answer is "Yes" (code 1), write the child's name in the space provided, and write the serial number of this child as it appears in Block IV column 1. Go to Q.13 to continue the interview.
If the answer is "No" (code 2), write "00" in the boxes to the right, and then continue the interview with the next question (Q.11).

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

Question 11: Is the child mentioned above still living?
If the answer is "Yes", circle code 1 and write "1" in the box to the right, and then go to Q.13 to continue the interview. If the answer is "No", circle code 2, and write "2" in the box to the right. Then continue the interview with Q.12.

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

[pg. 88]

Question 12: Age at death
If the child was not part of a multiple birth, ask the age when he/she died; write the answer in the boxes in the column to the right. If it was twins who died, write the age at time of death for each child in the columns/boxes provided.

If a child died before reaching one month (30 days), write the age in days in the boxes provided. Use the first box for the tens digit and the second box [to the right of the first box] for the units digit. If the child was older than one month when he/she died, write the age in months in the boxes provided. The highest age than can be recorded here is "98". Thus, if a child died when he/she was 8 years and 6 months old which would be (8 x 12) + 6 = 102 months, the age would be rounded down to "98". Rounding is always downwards. Therefore, if a child died when he/she was 80 days old, the age would be recorded as 80/30 = 2.7 [months] which becomes 2 when it is rounded down and would be recorded as "02" in the boxes provided.

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

Question 13: Were you ever pregnant before the pregnancy with the child mentioned in Q.6.?
In Q.13 ask whether the respondent was ever pregnant before the pregnancy with the last child mentioned in Q.6. Circle one of answer codes "1"-"4" in accordance with the respondent's answer. Explanations of the answer codes for Q.13 are the same as those for the answers for Q.2.

Caution:
If the answer is code 1 or 2 continue the interview with questions in block XI, and if the answer is code 3, go to Q.16 [in block X]. If the answer is code 4, continue the interview with Q.14. Write the answer code in the box in the column to the right.

[pg. 89]

Question 14: Length (in months) of the pregnancy
Circle code "1" if the answer is "Younger than 7 months" and go to the questions in block XI. If the answer is code 2, continue to the next question (Q.15).

Question 15: Did this baby show any signs of life (breathe/cry)?
If the answer is "No" (code "2"), go to block XI, and if the answer is code "1", continue to the next question.

Questions 14 and 15 have the same purpose as Q.3 and Q.4, that is, to ascertain whether the pregnancy before that of the last child born alive ended in a live birth. Q.14 and Q.15 must be left blank if Q.13 has codes "1", "2" or "3".

Question 16: Was this a single birth or multiple births?
The method of filling in the answer for Q.16 is the same as that of Q.5.

Question 17: Name of this child
There will be an answer for Q.17 if the answer for Q.13 is code "3" ("Yes, live birth") or if Q.15 is code "1". Please note that Q.15 will have an entry only if Q.13 is code 4 and Q.14 is code "2". If there were multiple births, write the name of each child in the corresponding columns provided. Fill in code "1" in the box provided if the child's name recorded in Q.1 is the same as that recorded in Q.17, and enter code "2" if the name in Q.1 is different from that in Q.17.

Question 18: Sex
If there was a single child born, circle code "1" or "2" in accordance with the situation. If twins were born, write the code for the sex of each child in the box to the right corresponding to name that is written on the line above the boxes for the previous question. The answers for Q.19 - Q.23 will be recorded in a similar manner.

[pg. 90]

Question 19: When was this child born?
Write the month and year of birth of each child born. Both the year and the month are recorded using two digits. The first set of boxes is used to record the month, and the set of two boxes below those boxes are used to record the year of birth.

Examples: Twins are born in May 1984; this would be recorded as shown below:
[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

Question 20: Was the child mentioned above born after Idul Fitri 1404 H (30 June 1984)?
Ask the respondent if on Idul Fitri 1984 the child had already been born and had been able to enjoy the special holiday or if the respondent was still pregnant on Idul Fitri. As in Q.9, make every attempt to help the respondent recall the day of Idul Fitri 1984, to facilitate her recollection of whether the child had really been born at that time.

Question 21: Does this child just mentioned still live in this household?
As in Q.10, if the answer is "Yes" (code "1"), write the child's name in the space provided, and write the serial number of this child as it appears in block IV column 1. Then continue the interview with the questions in block XI. If the answer is "No" (code 2), write "00" in the boxes to the right, and then continue the interview with the next question (Q.22).

[pg. 91]

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

Question 22: Is the child just mentioned still living?
If the answer is code 1 ("Yes"), write "1" in box on the right, and continue the interview with the questions in block XI. If the answer is "No", write "2" in the box on the right and continue the interview with Q.23.

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

Question 23: Age of the child when he/she died?
If there was a single child who has died, ask the age of the child when he/she died; then write the answer in the boxes in the column to the right. If twins [or multiples] died, write the age of each in the boxes provided. If it was a single child who died, ask the age when he/she died and write the answer in the boxes in the column to the right. If it was twins who died, write the age at time of death for each child in the columns/boxes provided.

[pg. 92]

If a child died before reaching the age of one month (30 days), write the age in days in the boxes provided using the first box [86] for the ten's digit and the second box [87] for the unit's digit. If the child was older than one month when he/she died, write the age in months in the boxes provided. The highest age than can be recorded here is "98". Thus, if a child died when he/she was 10 years old which would be 120 months, the age at death would be recorded as "98". Rounding is always downwards. If a child died when he/she was 24 days old, record the age at death as "24" in boxes numbered 86 and 87. If a child died when he/she was 100 days old, the age would be recorded as 100/30 = 3.3 which becomes 3 when it is rounded down and would be recorded as "03" in boxes numbered 88 and 89.

[There is a picture of a correctly filled-out form]

D. Block XI: For married women who are younger than 50
The objective of the questions in this block is to collect information on family planning from women who are currently married and who are less than 50 years old. If possible, the interview should be conducted with the woman whose information is to be collected.

Question 1: Family planning method currently used
Record the answer by circling the code in accordance with the respondent's answer and write the code number in the box to the right.

Ask the respondent: "Do you currently use a family planning method?"

[pg. 93]

If the answer is "Yes", ask which method she currently uses; then go to Q.3.
If the answer is "No", circle code 8 and write "8" in the box to the right; then continue with Q.2.

Explanation:

  • Female sterilization/tubectomy is an operation performed on women to prevent them from becoming pregnant by tying/cutting the fallopian tubes, or by removing the womb or ovaries.
  • Male sterilization/vasectomy is an operation performed on a man to tie or cut the duct that carries the sperm for impregnation.
  • AKDR/IUD are small devices made of fine plastic/copper in the form of a spiral, T, fan and other shapes, placed inside the womb to prevent pregnancy.
  • Injection is a type of injection given every three months or some other definite period of time to prevent pregnancy.
  • Contraceptive pill is a pill that a woman takes to prevent pregnancy.
  • Condom is a device made from rubber used by men during sex to prevent pregnancy.
  • Other is any other method/device that has not been mentioned above.
Attention:
For family planning devices such as condoms and the like which are used from time to time, the period of usage is the last time used when the respondent had sex. For the contraceptive pill, if not taken for 2 days or more, the woman will not have been protected.

Question 2: Have ever used a family planning method
If in Q.1 the respondent said that she is not currently using a family planning method, ask if she has ever used a family planning method. Circle the code in accordance with the respondent's answer and write that code in the box on the right. Continue the interview with Q. 3 if the answer to Q. 2 is "Yes". If the answer is "No", the interview with this respondent is finished. Continue with the next member of the household.

[pg. 94]

Question 3: Source of the family planning method/services
Ask the respondent who is currently using or has ever used a family planning method/service (codes "1"-"7" in Q.1 or code 1 in Q.2) where she obtains the family planning method/service used.
After completing this question, the interview with this respondent is complete. Continue the interview with the questions in the following block [block XII] with this respondent or another respondent depending on the situation.

[pg. 95]

XIII. Information on health

A. Objective

1. To collect information on the birth and health of children who were born after Idut Fitri 1404 H (30 June, 1984) up to the time of the interview.
2. To collect information on the death and causes of death that occurred during the period after Idul Fitri 1404 H (30 June, 1984) until now.

Information on births and deaths collected here are only those that occur to members of this household; therefore the principle used is de jure. Information about a baby who is in the household (recorded in block IV of form S) is not necessarily recorded in block XII; on the contrary for a baby who is not in the household, it may be necessary to record his/her information in this block. To record or not record information about someone in Block XII depends upon whether the birth/death event of the person in question was a member of the household.

An example is shown in the table below. In case 3 the child of the respondent is not a member of the household, but the mother is. In this case the child was born when the mother was a member of the household. Information about this child is recorded through the mother in block X and also in block XII. While in case 4.b, the child has died but the mother is still a member of the household. This child was born when the mother was not a member of this household. Information about this child is collected in block X through the mother, but is not covered in block XII.A. Because the child was a member of the household when he/she died, the information about the death of the child is recorded in block XII.B. On the other hand, in case 6, both the child and the mother are no longer in the household selected in the sample even though when the child was born, he/she was a member of the household. In this case because the mother is no longer a member of the household, block X is not filled in, but information about the birth of the child should be collected in block XII.A are far as possible.

[pg. 96]

The following is a table showing when to fill block X, XII.A, and XII.B [table]:
[Column headings:]
(A) Case number
(B) Child
(C) Mother
(D) Place of bith
(E) Block X
(F) Block XII.A
(G) Block XII.B

Case number: 1
Child: Present
Mother: Present
Place of birth: In the household
Block X: Yes
Block XII.A: Yes
Block XII.B: -

Case number: 2
Child: Present
Mother: Not present (moved)
Place of bith: In the household
Block X: Yes
Block XII.A: Yes
Block XII.B: -

Case number: 3
Child: Not present (moved)
Mother: Present
Place of birth: In the household
Block X: Yes
Block XII.A: Yes
Block XII.B: -

Case number: 4a
Child: Not present (died)
Mother: Present
Place of birth: In the household
Block X: Yes
Block XII.A: Yes
Block XII.B: Yes

Case number: 4b
Child: Not present (died)
Mother: Present
Place of birth: Outside the household
Block X: Yes
Block XII.A: No
Block XII.B: Yes

Case number: 5a
Child: Not present (died)
Mother: Not present (moved)
Place of birth: In the household
Block X: No
Block XII.A: Yes
Block XII.B: Yes

Case number: 5b
Child: Not present (died)
Mother: Not present (moved)
Place of birth: Outside the household
Block X: No
Block XII.A: No
Block XII.B: Yes

Case number: 6
Child: Not present (moved)
Mother: Not present (moved)
Place of birth: In the household
Block X: No
Block XII.A: Yes
Block XII.B: -

Case number: 7
Child: Present (arrived)
Mother: Present (arrived)
Place of birth: Outside the household
Block X: Yes
Block XII.A: No
Block XII.B: No

Block XII of the questionnaire is organized to record three birth events and three death events that might occur in the household during the 16-month period from 30 June, 1984 to the date of the interview. Each column is used to record one birth or one death. If in fact there are more than three events, the enumerator must request an additional sheet from his supervisor.

B. Block XII. A: Births after 30 June 1984
The method of filling in the answers to questions in this block is to write the answer codes in the appropriate boxes provided.

Question 1: Name and household member serial number of the child
Write the name and serial number of the household member who was born after Idul Fitri 1404 H (30 June, 1984) in the column and box to the right. If the child has died, the name is still recorded and a dash sign (-) is entered in the box on the right where the serial number of the child would be entered if the child were still alive.

Question 2: Is the child still living?
Ask if the child, whose name has just been written in Q.1, is still living?

Enter code 1 if the child is still living, and code 2 if the child has died. Write the code in the appropriate box to the right.

[pg. 97]

Question 3: Length of time child breast fed
Ask how long the mother breast fed this child (breast fed by child's own mother). The answer should be recorded in months rounded down in the appropriate box to the right. If the child has not been breast fed, enter "98" in the appropriate boxes. If the information about breast feeding cannot be obtained, write "99" in the appropriate boxes to the right.

Question 4: Birth assistant
Enter the code in the box provided to record a birth assistant for each birth.

Question 5: Did this child receive a vaccination/immunization?
Ask whether this child has received any vaccinations. If the answer is "Yes", write code 1 in the appropriate box to the right and continue with the next question. If the answer is "No", write code 2 in the box to the right and go to question 7.

Question 6: Type of vaccination/immunization given
Q.6 is asked if the answer to Q.5 is "Yes" (code "1"). There can be more than one answer to this question. Circle the codes in accordance with the respondent's answers. The number entered in the boxes to the right is the total of all the codes of the respondent's answers. For example, a child received vaccinations for DPT (code "2") and polio (code "4"); then the number "06" (that is, 2 + 4 = 6) is written in the boxes to the right

  • BCG = Bacillus calmet geurin
This vaccination is given as an injection in the upper arm to a baby, child or adult to prevent tuberculosis. There is usually a scar left at the place where the injection was made (BCG-Scar). BCG is usually given to a baby without testing for tuberculosis beforehand.
[pg. 98]
  • DPT = Diphtheria pertussis tetanus
This vaccination is given by injection to a baby on the thigh to prevent diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus. This injection is given after the baby is 3 months old and is repeated 3 (three) times with an interval of one month between each injection (DPT1, DPT2 and DPT3).
  • Polio vaccination is a vaccination given after a baby is 3 months old and is given more than once with a six-week interval. The vaccine is in the form of 3 liquid drops given directly into the mouth of the baby, or [for older children/adults] a tablet to be swallowed.
  • Measles vaccination is an injection given only once on the thigh or buttocks to prevent measles and is given to a baby between the ages of 9 - 12 months.

Question 7: Reasons child not vaccinated/immunized
Q.7 is asked if the answer to Q.5 is "No" (code 2). Write one of the appropriate codes in the box to the right in accordance with the respondent's answer.

C. Block XII. B: Deaths after 30 June 1984
All deaths that occurred after 30 June, 1984 (Idul Fitri) up to the day of the enumeration are recorded in this block. Note that deaths are not limited to just deaths of babies and children, but include deaths of adults as well.

Question 1: Name
Write the name of the household member who died after 30 June, 1984 in the column provided. For a baby who died before he/she was named, just write "Baby" in the space provided.

Question 2: Sex
Write the code in accordance with the respondent's answer in the box provided.

[pg. 99]

Question 3: Relationship to the head of household
Codes for the relationship to the head of household are as follows:

[] 1 Head of household
[] 2 Spouse
[] 3 Child
[] 4 Son/daughter-in-law
[] 5 Grandchild
[] 6 Parents/parents-in-law
[] 7 Other family
[] 8 Maid
[] 9 Other

Question 4: Month and year of death
Ask when the person whose name was mentioned in Q.1 died.

Example: Sita died in September 1984

[There is a picture showing a correctly filled-out form]

Question 5: Age at death
For a baby who died before reaching the age 1 year, write the age at death in months. For example, an 8 month old baby dies; write "08" in the box. For one who died after the age of 1 year, write the age at death in years. For someone who died at the age of 98 years or older, write the number "98" [in the box].

[pg. 100]

Example: In a household during the period between 30 June, 1984 and time of the enumeration there have been 2 deaths: Amin died when he was 8 months old and Abu died at the age of 100 years and 10 months.

[There is a picture showing a correctly filled-out form]

Question 6: Causes of death

Write the answer code [in the box to the right] in accordance with the respondent's answer. For answer codes "1"-"4", there may be more than one answer. The number written in the box is the sum of all the codes circled for this question. For example, the answers to Q.6 are "Fever" and "Convulsion"; write the number 5 in the box (that is, 1 + 4). If the answer is code 8, 9 or 0, there can only be one answer; write the appropriate answer code [in the box].

[pg. 101]

XIV. Census block summary

A. Objective
Form RBS is used to make a block census summary based on results of the sample enumeration with the following objectives:

1. To facilitate record-keeping of the selected sample households. Several columns of block III of this form are used to copy the information of the household with the circled serial number in block III of form L I.
2. To facilitate the preparation of a summary of the total population and vital events that occurred during the period between Idul Fitri1984 and the date of the enumeration. This information provides a quick count of the number of births, deaths and infant deaths.

One form RBS is used for one census block and must be completed by the enumerator after the completion of the enumeration using form S for all selected households in each census block assigned to him/her.

B. Method of filling in the form [form RBS]

Before starting to fill in form RBS, all form S questionnaires for the selected households in the selected census blocks should be arranged according to the serial numbers of the households from lowest to highest; the household serial number is located in point 9 in block I of form S. Each line of block III of Form RBS is used to record information about one household. The household information needed for this form is copied from the information in block III of form L I and block II of form S.

After completing form RBS check all entries again and correct any mistakes before submitting this form to the supervisor (PMS).

1. Block I: Location identification

Points 1 - 8: Write the name and code (wherever the boxes are available) of the province, regency/municipality, sub-district, village, urban/rural designation, enumeration area number, census block number, and sample code number from the corresponding points in block I of form L I and form S.

[pg. 102]

Point 9: Total number of sample households is obtained from the last serial number of column (1) block III [of form RBS].

Point 10: Total number of members of the sample households is obtained from the last line (the total line at the bottom of the page) of column (6) block III [of form RBS].

2. Block II: Enumeration particulars
This block is filled in after form RBS has been completed but before it has been submitted to the Supervisor (PMS).

Points 1 - 3: Write the name of the enumerator, date of filling in Form RBS, and signature in the space provided.

Points 4 - 6: The Supervisor writes his/her name, date of inspection, and his/her signature.
3. Block III: Selected households enumerated using form S

Column (1): Sample serial number. This serial number starts from 01 up to the highest number in accordance with the number of households selected in the given census block.

Columns (2) -- (5): Copied from block III of form L I.

Column (2): Serial number of the household. Fill in serial number of the household that is circled in column (4) block III of form L I.

Column (3): Serial number of the physical building. Write the serial number of the physical building of the household mentioned in column (2) [form RBS] by copying from column (1) block III of form L I.

Column (4): Serial number of the census building. Write the census building number of the household mentioned in column (2) [form RBS] by copying from column (2) Block III of Form L I.

Column (5): Name of head of household. Copy from column (6) block III of form L I.

Columns (6) - (9): Copied from block I of form S.

[pg. 103]

Column (6): Total number of household members is copied from point 1 block II of form S for the given household.

Column (7): Number of birth events copied from point 4 block II of form S for the given household.

Column (8): Number of infant deaths copied from point 5 block II of form S for the given household.

Column (9): Number of deaths copied from Point 6 Block II of Form S for the given household.

After all columns have been completed for all sample households in the selected census block, total the entries in Columns (6) - (9) and fill in the total in the space provided at the bottom of the page.

Before submitting the work to the supervisor, carefully check again the completeness of the form and the completeness of all entries in all forms. Gather all forms for each census block. Each set of forms will consist of:

1. One sheet of census block sketch
2. One set of form L I
3. A number of forms L II in accordance with the number of households in the selected census block
4. Several sets of form S
5. One set of form RBS

[Appendices are not presented here. This includes an example case to fill the enumeration forms, filled out enumeration forms, instructions for conversion from the local calendar to the Gregorian calendar, and copies of blank enumeration forms]