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Republic of Indonesia
Intercensal Population Survey 1976
Manual for Enumerators
Phase II
Central Bureau of Statistics
Jakarta

[The table of contents and message from the director general in the original document are not presented here.]

Main task and enumerator guideline

Phase II

1. Enumerated household
The Phase II enumerator will do the enumeration in selected households. The selection of the households for Phase II will be made by the supervisor. The numbers of the households selected will be circled on the form SUPAS 1.2, which will be obtained from Phase I household listing. The enumerator must then copy the building number, the household number, the name of head of household and identifying characteristics for all selected households for which he will be responsible. A blank copy of form SUPAS 1.2 should be used for this. The number of household members should not be copied onto this form.

2. Time of the enumeration
a. The enumerator will immediately begin the enumeration as soon as Phase I is completed for the Cluster selected for Phase II and the supervisor has selected the sample of households. The household listing in Phase I will be conducted first for the clusters.

b. Every enumerator will be assigned one cluster to enumerate which will contain more or less 100 selected households.

c. The amount of time required for the enumeration in Phase II is about 30 days.

d. The completed forms should be reviewed before they are delivered to the supervisor. If upon review the enumerator, [the supervisor] finds that a form is not complete or there are some mistakes, he should immediately make the necessary corrections and if necessary he should revisit the relevant household.

3. List of forms and their use
a. Form SUPAS II.1.
This form is used for the enumeration in Phase II for the selected households. One form SUPAS II.1 is used for one household.

b. SUPAS II.2. (Diagram of question sequence for part D).
This diagram shows the question sequence of the interview for filling in part D on form SUPAS II.1. This shows the sequence from one question to the next and which questions should be skipped. The diagram for questions on the pages in part B has been printed on the side of the relevant pages.

c. Form SUPAS II.3. (Use of national and local events).
This list is used as a guide to help determine age. This list must always be carried by the enumerator when conducting the enumeration. Each time the enumerator finds difficulties in getting the respondent's age, he can use this list to assist the respondent in determining his/her age.

d. Guidelines for enumerators SUPAS II.P. (Guidelines for filling in form SUPAS II.1.).
This book contains explanations about filling in the forms and the concepts and definition of questions that are asked in form SUPAS II.1.

e. Form SUPAS ISIC / ISCO (Occupation and field of activities).
This form contains a description of the occupation and field of activities from ISIC (International Standard Industrial Classification) and ISCO (International Standard Classification of Occupation). This form is used as a guide for filling in the form SUPAS II.1 part D (Economic Activity).

f. SUPAS I.1. (Map cluster).

The Map cluster is used as a guide in finding the household selected for enumeration using form SUPAS II.1. On the map the existing building numbers in the cluster are shown. To find the location of a selected household look for the building number of the household.

4. Other information.

As soon as several SUPAS II.1 forms have been completed, deliver these to your supervisor so that he/she can quickly check them.

If any difficulties are encountered in the enumeration, ask the supervisor for guidance or assistance.

The enumerator should be careful when arranging a time to meet the respondent so that he/she arrives on time to meet the respondent.

[Pages 1-2 indicating guidelines for filling in the form in the original document are not presented here.]

[p.3]

Part A, B and C.
To obtain the answers to these sections, ask the head of household or some other household member who knows the situation in the household. If there are still any difficulties encountered in obtaining the required information regarding, for example, age, education, etc., ask these questions directly to the person whose information is needed.

Part D and E.
Part D asks for information regarding, for example, field of activity, type of job, etc. Part E asks for information on fertility and knowledge of family planning. The respondent for this fertility information should be ever-married women, while questions about family planning are only asked to women who are currently married and are age 50 or younger. These questions must be asked directly to those who are age 10 or older. If the enumerator is not able to meet this person on his first visit, then he may postpone the interview to another day when he can meet this particular person who meets the criteria. If after many attempts to meet this person, the enumerator has not been able to meet him/her, and the enumerator's deadline for completing the interview is near, the enumerator may ask this question to the head of household or some other person who knows the intended respondent well. If this situation arises, the enumerator should make a note on the form of the name of the person he could not meet and the name of the person who gave the information about that person to him.

IV. Method of completing the SUPAS form

1. Urban/rural areas.
1.1. Concept and definition
Villages that are classified as URBAN or villages that are classified as RURAL are detailed in the sample list provided by the Central Bureau of Statistics. Every enumerator, supervisor, CBS regional offices level II and I will receive a copy of the sample list indicating whether the area assigned to the enumerator is urban or rural, the names of the villages and the number of the cluster.
[An example of the sample list and method for completing the form on the original document are not presented here.]

[p.4]

2. Household
2.1. Concept and definition
Households are classified as Normal Households and Institutional Households.

2.1.1 Normal household
a. A normal household is a group of individuals who inhabit part of or all of a building and in general eat together from one kitchen (normal extended household). This household usually consists of husband, wife and children. They may also have other relatives or a maid living with them. People who board and eat together with them are also considered members of the household.

[p.5]

Several students or workers who occupy one living quarter (dormitory), if the number is fewer than 10 people, although they may eat separately, should be classified as a normal household. If the number of people is 10 or more, the unit should be classified as an institutional household.

b. Sometime a household consists of only one person who inhabits some of or all of a building and manages the needs of the household by himself (normal single household).

2.1.2. Institutional household.
An institutional household is a group of people who live in a dormitory, hotel, hospital, prison, etc. This is a residence that was founded and arranged by an employer or a foundation (non-profit institution)/organization either by the government or the private sector. A residence that has been organized by an individual can be considered a dormitory, and when it accommodates 10 or more people, it is classified as an institutional household.

Institutional households can be classified into three (3) groups:

1. Permanent dormitory (usually for bachelors), either civil or military.
2. Hospital (for mental patients, leprosy, sanatorium), prison or the like where in general those living there will stay for a long time.
3. Hotel, motel, general hospital, maternity hospital, etc. where in general those staying there will stay only a few days.
Instructions:
1. In this survey only normal households will be enumerated.
2. Persons in institutional households will not be enumerated in this survey.
3. Managers and housekeepers of institutional households and their relatives are considered living in normal households and they will be enumerated in this survey.
4. Residents who have lodged for 6 months or more and manage their household needs by themselves will be classified as normal households that will be enumerated in this survey.

Location identification.
This location identification section should be filled in before conducting the interview, that is, by copying from the sample list, except for items 7 - 10, which can be filled in when conducting the interview.

Points 1, 2, 3 and 4
Write the name of the province, regency/municipality (strike out the one not needed), and its domain number, sub-district and village or an area of the same level as village according to these instructions. (The names can be seen from the sample list). These names should be written out completely and may not be abbreviated.

Point 5
Enter the cluster number chosen for this survey in point 6.

Point 6
Enter the census block number where the selected household to be interviewed is located in 7.

[p.6]

Points 7, 8, and 9
Numbers and addresses of the households can be obtained from form SUPAS I.1; enter the building serial number, household number and address in points 7, 8 and 9. If there is a mistake/change in the address of the household interviewed, make the necessary changes. This will make it easier if the interviewer must make a return visit or if another interview is to be conducted based on this survey.

Point 10:
The number of household members will be filled in after question A1 is asked.

Explanation about the interview.
Information obtained from the beginning to the end of the interview for one household will be written in this part.

1. An interview number _ _ _

An interview might not be finished with one visit. Several questions require direct questioning of the person(s) concerned. Therefore another visit may be required to finish the interview. In addition, to prevent the respondent from becoming bored because the interview is too long, the enumerator can stop the interview temporarily and agree on another time with the respondent to complete the interview. To complete the interview with one household, therefore, may require more than one visit. Below are explanations about the interview: 1, 2, 3, etc. If after the third visit the interview is still not finished, then there are probably some problems or difficulties so the interviewer should report to his supervisor for further guidance or perhaps have the supervisor accompany him to the household to complete the interview.

Method of filling in the questionnaire:
1. Enter the information from the first interview in column 1, from the second interview in column 2 and so on. If the interview is finished in one visit, then column 2 and so on won't be needed and won't be filled in. If the interview requires more than one visit, then the information from the second interview will be entered in column 2 and so on.

2. Date:
Date of the first interview/visit should be entered in column 1, second interview/visit in column 2 and so on. If the interview cannot be completed after three visits, report to the supervisor, and the date of the fourth visit placed in column 4.

3. Time the enumeration begins:

4. Time the enumeration is completed:
For the first interview write the time the interview started in point 3, and the time the interview was completed in point 4, in column 1. If a second visit is needed, write the start and ending times of the second interview in column 2, and so on for additional visits. The times for starting and stopping the interview must include an indication of whether the time was morning or afternoon; therefore, 4:00 in the afternoon would be written 16.00 and 6.30 in the afternoon would be written 18.30, etc.

[p.7]

5. Name of the enumerator:
Write the name of the enumerator for the first visit, second, and so on. Other visits can be conducted by another enumerator using form SUPAS II.1 mentioned earlier who can continue the interview. Write the interviewer's name in the appropriate column.

6. Signature of the enumerator.
The enumerator must sign at each interview conducted.

7. Results:
Results of each interview/visit should be coded as detailed below.

Complete:
This means the interview is complete for all household members in this household.

Promise to complete the interview
If after the first, second, or additional visit/interview the interview is not yet finished for a particular household, the respondent promises to continue the interview at another day/time.

Institutional household:
If a building that is visited that is on form I is really an institutional household and the enumerator will not be able to interview even one household there, then he will not be able to enumerate these households using form II.

Address not a residence
If a visit to the address obtained from form I shows that there is no household/residence in that building, then the address/ building is classified as not a residence; for example: the building could be used by a school, mosque, warehouse or some other building other than a residence.

Address cannot be found
If the enumerator after making every effort to find the address from form I cannot find a building with that address, then the interview cannot be conducted.

No one at home
If the enumerator visits a household where he is to conduct an interview, but no one in that household is at home, then the enumerator must return another time to attempt to conduct the interview.

Empty house
This is a residence/address that should be enumerated using form II, but in reality the house is empty/not occupied by anyone.

[p.8]

Respondent not able to answer:
If when the enumerator visits a household to conduct an interview using form II, the respondent is not able to answer the questions, for example the respondent is ill, mentally disturbed or unfit to answer questions, etc., and there is no other means of obtaining the information about the household, then the interview cannot be conducted.

Other:
Any situation that occurs at the time of the enumeration/visit other than those described above.

Method of filling in the questionnaire:
- Fill in code 1 in column 1; if the interview is complete at the end of the first visit
- Fill in code 2 in column 2, if the interview was not completed at the end of the first visit and the respondent promises to complete the interview another day/time. The enumerator can continued the interview another day/time.
- Fill in code 3, if the designated address was in reality an institutional household.
- Fill in code 4, if the address was not a residence (for example mosque, school, etc.) and there is no household on the premises and an interview cannot be conducted.

[Instructions for the enumerator in the original document are not presented here]

[p.9]

A. Demographic characteristics
Ask the head of household.

Column (1): Serial number
The serial number begins at 1 and continues to the last individual in the list; the last serial number will equal the number of people who reside in this household.

Column (2) Name

Concept and definition:
- Members of a household are every person who resides together in the household. The usual household members are the head of household, wife, children, grandchildren, parents-in-law, other relatives. Other people who are not relatives, for example, people who board in the household, such as the housemaid who stays and eats with the family are considered members of the household.

- Members of the household who are temporarily away are considered as members of the household; if they have been away continuously for 6 months or more and have never returned, then they should not be considered members of the household.

- Visitors and other people who are staying temporarily in the household are not members of the household. If the guests/visitors have been staying continuously in the household for 6 month or more, then they are considered members of the household.

Method of filling in the form.
To get best possible results, ask the question like this:

A1 "What are the names of all members of this household?"

Then write the names of all household members. The names of all household members currently residing in this household along with those who are temporarily away should be noted here. In writing the names of household members from the first serial number to the last, the household members should be listed in accordance with the family formation as follows

Head of household
Wife
Unmarried children beginning with the eldest one
Children that have married
Daughter/son-in-law
Grandchildren
Parents
Parents-in-law
Others
Maids

After these household members have been listed, to make certain whether or not there are any household members who are temporarily away, ask:

"Among the people who usually live here (are household members), are there any who are temporarily traveling or away who have not yet been listed here?"

If the answer is 'Yes", then ask:

"How long has he/she been away from this household?"
[p.10]

If away for fewer than 6 months, he/she should be listed as a member of this household, but if he/she has been away continuously for 6 months or more, then he/she is not considered a member of this household and shouldn't be listed on this form.

After the names of all the household members named by the respondent have been recorded on the form, to avoid the possibility of leaving a household member off the list, read the names written on the list in front of the respondent and then ask:

"Besides these people, are there any other members of this household who have not yet been listed, for example; a small child, an infant who was just born, a household member who is traveling, anyone else who boards in this household or anyone else such as a housemaid?

If there is anyone else in the household, write that person's name on the list of household members in this column. Otherwise, continue with the remaining questions.

Column (3) Gender.
Ask question A2 about the gender of each person listed on the form. The enumerator may not determine the gender by himself based on what he thinks the gender should be. He must ask the respondent about the gender of every household member.

Column (4), (5), (6) and (7) Date of birth
Ask the date of birth for every person listed on the form in column (2) and record the answers. Month and year of birth can be written according to the Christian calendar or the Islamic/Javanese calendar depending on the respondent's answer. If the Christian calendar is used write two digits for the number of the month and two digits for the last two digits of the year. For example:

January 01, 1964: write "64"
February 02, 1954: write "54"
November 11, 1902: write "02"
December 12, etc.
Method of filling in the form
- If the answer is the month and year in the Christian calendar, then fill in the month in column (4) and the year in column (6).

- If the answer is the month in the Islamic calendar and the year in the Christian calendar, write the month in column (5) and the year in column (6) and so on.

- If the birth month is not known and the answer is only the birth year, then write the birth year only in column (6) or (7).

- If both the month and year of birth are unknown, then directly ask the age and put that number in column (8).

Column (8) Age
Based on the information in columns (4) through (7), that is, the month and year of birth, the age of the person in question can be calculated, and that number should be put in column (8). Write the age in terms of years only and rounded it downward. If the month and/or the year of someone's birth are unknown, try to get some information about his age. If it is difficult to get any information about his age, try to help the respondent by

- Asking his age when some important events occurred, for example, his age when he married,

[p.11]

age when his first child was born, etc. Based on this information, the enumerator must estimate the age of the person now.

- Ask the age of the person in question when important national or local events occurred by utilizing form SUPAS II.3. In SUPAS II.3 some important events, both national and local, have been noted. By knowing a person's age at the time of one of these particular events, the enumerator can easily calculate that person's age today.
Example: If it is estimated that a person's age is about thirty years, then estimate his age by referring to events more or less 30 years ago. In SUPAS II.3 the Independence Day of Indonesia (August 17, 1945) is noted. Ask the person his age at the time of that event. If the answer, for example, is 3 years old, then calculate his age as follows:

In form SUPAS II.3 the independence event occurred 30 years ago.

If at that time his age was 3 years, then his age now would be 30 years + 3 years = 33 years old.

If the age can be obtained directly, ask the age or an estimate, don't write the month and birth year. The month and birth year cannot be calculated from the estimate of the age. The month and year of birth can only be written if known by the respondent.

Column (9) Marital status

Concept and definitions

An unmarried person is a person who has not yet been legally married either in a civil or traditional marriage ceremony.

Married:
a) Persons who are bound in marriage with a wife or husband through a civil or traditional marriage ceremony and now are living together or separated for less than three months.
b) A man and a woman who have been together as husband and wife for a long time but have never conducted a marriage ceremony but are considered married.
Widow: a woman whose husband has died and has not married again

Widower: a man whose wife has died and has not married again.

Divorced: those husbands and wives who have divorced or separated from one another, [whose spouses] are still living, and have not married again.

Married living separately: those who are still married, but who have been living separately for 3 (three) or more consecutive months.
Method of filling in the form
The way to fill in the answers to the question should be as follows:

[p.12]

A5 "Is (mention name of household member) unmarried, married or ever married?"

a. If the answer is unmarried, fill in code "1"
b. If the answer is married (still married), ask whether he/she is now living together with his/her wife/husband.

- If still living with wife/husband, fill in code "2"
- If living apart from wife/husband asks how long they have been separated.
- If not yet 3 months, they will still be considered married, so fill in code "2"
- If separated for 3 month or more, then they will be considered married living separately, so fill in code "5".

c. If the answered is ever married, then ask "Are they divorced and is the former spouse still living?"

- If they are divorced and spouse is alive fill in code "4" (divorced)
- If divorced and spouse has died, then: widow (woman) or widower (man)
Fill in code "3".

Column (10) Code transferred from D1

The code in this column will be transferred from question D1. For the moment do not fill in a code in this column; later after the codes for D1 are filled in, transfer those to column (10).

Page 02 [of the enumeration form.]
Column (1) Serial number

This is the serial number of the people listed in the household on the cover page. This serial number shows the order in which a particular member of the household was listed in column 2 on the cover page; information about each of these household members will be collected using the questions at the top of each column on the following pages.

Column (2) Relation to head of household

To get this information, determine in advance who is the head of household. Afterwards ask the relation of each household member to the head.

Method of filling in
First, ask who is the head of household with the following question:

"Who among the people listed here is the head of this household?"

If this has been answered, then write "head of household" in this column beside the serial number of the person mentioned. Afterwards ask the relation of each person to the head of household. Write the relation to the head of household completely for each person.

Column (3) Code for relation to head of household

The relationship of every household member to the head of household is in column (2). In column (3) write the code for the relationship to head of household for each household member.

[p.13]

Concept and definition

- Household head (code 1) is the person responsible or considered responsible for the household.
- Wife of the head of household (code 2)
- Child (code 3) is the natural child of the head of household.
- Stepchild/foster child (code 4) is the stepchild or a child adopted by the household head either legally or not.
- Grandchild (code 5) is the grandchild of the head of household.
- Parent (code 6) is the father or mother of the head of household.
- Parent-in-law (code 7) is the father or mother of the wife of the head of household.
- Daughter/son-in-law (code 8) is the wife of the son or husband of the daughter of the head of household.
- Other relative (code 9) is a relative of the head of household or the wife of the head of household. For example, a niece or nephew, sister or brother, grandparents, brother/sister-in-law, etc.
- Housemaid and others (code 0) is a housemaid or another person who lives in the household as a member of the household but who is not related to the head of household.
Method of filling in the form:
Fill in relation to head of household codes in this column. The relation to head of household is written in column (2).

Column (4) Religion
Ask the question as follows:

A7 "Which religion/beliefs are embraced by each member of this household?"

It is possible that members of a household have different religions. If necessary this question can be asked to each member of the household.

Explanation: "Other Christians" are Christian religions other than Catholic or Protestant. "Other religions" are those that are not listed among the seven religions for this question.

Column (5), (6), (7) Education

For the question in column (5), ask the question as follows:

"Is (mention name of household member) now still attending school?"

Here "still attending school" means attending at a particular school and not just taking a course. If the answer is

"Still attending school", fill in code Y
Otherwise, fill in code T ["No", T is for Tidak in Indonesian].

[p.14]

Column (6) Present/last school attended

Concept and definitions
What is intended here is as school attendance is studying in a particular public or private school and not just taking courses.

1. No schooling/not yet in school

2. Elementary school for 5/6 years or equivalent, for example Ibtidaiyah

3. Secondary general school
S.L.P. Umum, S.M.P, Madrasah Tsanawiyah, H.B.S. 3 years, M.U.L.O. etc.

4. Secondary vocational school
S.L.P. Kejuruan; S.G.B., S.K.P., S.T., SMEP, PGA, etc.

5. Senior general high school
S.L.A. Umum, S.M.A., Madrasah Aliyah, MBS 5 year, AMS, etc.

6. Senior vocational high school
S.L.A. Kejuruan, S.G.A., S.G.K.P., S.G.T.K., S.T.M., S.M.E.A., S.K.M.A., S.P.M.A., etc.

7. Academy, for example; A.P.I, A.I.P., A.B.A., Academy Koperasi, etc.

8. University.
University/faculty or college; for example: Fakultas Kedokteran (medical school), Fakultas Ekonomi (school of economics), Fakultas Hukum (law school), Fakulas Publistlk (school of communications), P.T.I.K. (police academy), P.T.H.M. (college of military law), etc.
Method of filling in the form:
If the code in column (5) is "Y", this means the person is still attending school. Ask the following question: "What school are you attending now?"

Fill in the code for the respondent's answer, and then ask which class or level and then fill in column (6).

If the code in column (5) is "T" (not attending school), then ask:
"What is the highest level of school you ever attended?"
"And what was the highest grade/class attended?"

Fill in the school code in column (6) and grade/class attended in column (7). If the respondent graduated from the school mentioned in column (6), then enter code 8 in column (7).

Column (8) Ability to read and write
Concept and Definitions.

The intention here is [to identify]:

- Those who can read and write simple letters/sentences in any alphabet.
[p.15]
- Blind people who can read and write Braille characters.
- People who are disabled but before the disability could read and write, but later because of the disability could not read and write.

One who can read only but cannot write or vice versa should be classified as "Cannot read and write".

Method of filling in the form:
These questions should only be asked to those who are not currently in school or are now attending or have ever attended elementary school (column 7 codes "1" or "2"). The way to ask this question is as follows:

"Can (mention name of household member) read and write the Roman alphabet?"
If the answer is "Yes", fill in code "1".
If the answer is "'No", ask the following question:

"Can (mention name of household member) read and write other alphabets: for example, Arabic, Japanese, Chinese, Sanskrit, Braille, etc.?"

If the answer is "Yes", fill in code "2".
If the answer is "'No", fill in code "3" (cannot read and write any letters).

Thus only one of the codes can be entered in column (8) because those who have answered that they can read and write the Roman alphabet will not be asked if they can read and write any other alphabet.

Page 03 [of the enumeration form.]

Column (2) through (5) Mother's status
The intention here is to ask about the birth mother of the relevant people.

Column (2) Mother's status
Here we want to know where the birth mother resides or if she has died.
Does the birth mother live in the household, that is, the birth mother and her children reside together in the same household?
Does the birth mother reside outside the household in which her children reside?

Method of filling in the form:
The way to ask the question is as follows:

"Is this person's (asked for each household member) mother living in this household, in another household, or has she died?"

Enter a code depending on the answer of the respondent.
If the birth mother does not reside in this household and it is unknown whether or not she has died, circle code 4 (don't know).
If the birth mother resides in this household, enter code 1 in column 2, and then ask:
"Who among the people in this list is this person's mother?"

[p.16]

Enter the serial number of the mother for each member of the household.

Column (4)
Here we want to know whether this person is the eldest child of his/her mother, so ask:

"Are you this mother's first child?" Fill in code "Y", and directly ask the question for column (6).

If "No" enter code "T", and then ask the question in column (5).

Column (5) "Do you have an older brother or sister who is still living?"

Fill in the code according to the respondent's answer.

Columns (6) and (7) Father's status
Like the questions above asking about the status of the mother, now we ask about the birth father's status.

Column (6): Ask:
"Is this person's (asked for each household member) father living in this household, in another household, or has he died?"
Fill in the code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

Column (7) Serial number of the father
If the father resides in this household (column (6) code 1), then ask which among the people in this list is this person's father? Enter the serial number of the father for each member of the household.

Page 04 [of the enumeration form.]

Column (2) Place of birth
Place of birth place is the place where someone is born. Usually the place of birth of a person is the place where the person's mother resided when the person was born.
Ask the question as follows:

"Where was (mention name of household member) born?"

Then ask and write down the name of the regency/municipality where the person in question was born. If born in a regency, strike out "Kod" in column (3). Conversely, if born in a municipality, strike out "Kab".

Column (4) doesn't need to be filled in:

- If someone is born abroad, then write the name of the country where he/she was born.
- If one is born while on a trip aboard a ship from another country, then the place of birth will be the country whose flag the ship flies.

Migration
To know about the migration in the past 5 years, ask the place of residence 5 years ago. Of course, this question will only be asked to those who are age 5 or older. Place of residence means that the relevant person has

[p.17]

ever lived in a place. If a person travels and stays in a place fewer than 6 months, it is not considered that he has resided in that place. If that person in question in a place officially even though for fewer than 6 months, then it would be considered that he had resided there. To stay officially means that he had prepared a change of address letter, for example, and has already registered himself with the local authorities as a resident.

Method of filling in the form
Ask the question about residence as follows:

"Did you live in this regency/municipality 5 years ago?"

If the enumeration is taking place in February 1976, then 5 years ago would have been February 1971. If the question is still not clear to the respondent, then explain as follows:

"Did you live in this regency/municipality in February 1971?"

Fill in the code for the respondent's answer in column (5).

Columns (6) through (12)
If the answer for column (5) is "Y", then 5 years ago the person lived in this regency / municipality and the questions for column (6) through (12) do not need to be asked; go directly to page 5 (in the original text the page number mentioned here is 4, but that is incorrect).
If answer for column (5) is T, 5 years ago this person lived in a different regency/municipality so ask where he lived 5 years ago beginning with question Al7a and put the answers in columns (6) through (12).

Column (6)
Village of residence 5 years ago. Write as completely as possible the name of the village mentioned.

Column (7)
Determine if the village mentioned is city, town of or a rural area. Enter the code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

Column (8) Name of sub-district
Write the name of the sub-district as completely as possible.

Column (9) Regency/municipality
Ask the name of the regency/municipality where the person lived 5 years ago.

Column (10)
Do not forget to ask if the place he lived 5 years ago (in column 9) was a regency or a municipality, and strike out whichever is not applicable.

Column (11)The code for this column will be filled in by C.B.S

Column (12) Reason for migration
Concept and definitions
Reasons for moving to the current place of residence are categorized below:

1. Looking for work: a person who changes his residence because he was looking for work.

[p.18]

2. Job relocation: a person moves because his job/activity was relocated to this place.

3. Other job-related reasons for moving other than 1 and 2: for example, a person leaves his job, etc.

4. Attending school: a person's move is made for educational purposes, moves to a new school, continues his education, leaves school, etc.

5. Marriage: for example, joins husband/wife because of he/she has married.

6. Relatives/family moved and he/she had to move with them: a child moves with his parents, a wife/husband moves with his spouse, a child moves with his grandparents, etc.

7. Returned to his family's home: moves because he returns home, for example, after returning from abroad, retired, elderly, etc.

8. Other: other reasons that do not include any of the above reasons such as security reasons, economic reasons, etc.

The way to ask the question is as follows:
"What was your reason for moving to this place?", "Was it because (mention a few reasons such as those given above)?"

Write the code in the column in accordance with the respondent's answer.
This column can only contain one code so only accept the main reason for moving.

B. Household economic status:

B1. Source of household income

Concept and definitions:
Household income is the income from all household members, income from the household head, children and other household members.

Source of household income is all income from all efforts of the household, including earnings from work by all household members, pensions, rent, interest from investments, etc.

Agriculture:
Agriculture covers all work on the land (rice and other crop production), plantations, fisheries (fresh water or sea), forestry, animal husbandry.

Non-agriculture: This covers areas not already mentioned, such as: commerce, manufacturing, employee of a state/private enterprise, government employee, member of the military, etc.

Mixture: Source of household income is from agriculture and other areas.

Ask the question as follows:
"Is the source of income of this household from agriculture, non-agriculture, or a mixture?"
[p.19]
If the answer is "Agriculture" circle code "1".
If the answer is "Non-agriculture" circle code "2" and directly go to question B3
If answer is "Mixture", then ask "Which area is your primary source of income?"
If "Agriculture" is the primary source, circle code "3".
If "Non-agriculture" is the primary source, circle code 4.
If the source of household income is non-agriculture, skip question B2.

B2. a) Area of land controlled

The size of the land that the respondent controls is the area that he/she works himself. The land can be either owned by him or rented from someone else by means of rental, crop sharing, etc. Land that the respondent owns but rents to others should not be included as land controlled by the respondent.

Fill in the land area in hectares (use 2 decimal places).

b) Livestock owned
Ask the question this way: "Does this household own any of following livestock?" Mention the types of livestock from the list one by one, and if the respondent answers "Yes" for a type of livestock, ask how many of that type he has and write that number beside that type of livestock on the questionnaire.

c) Agricultural equipment owned
Ask the respondent which agricultural equipment is used by this household. [Ask] one by one according to the list on the questionnaire. If the household owns any of the equipment, circle code "Y". Otherwise circle code "T".

B3. Household needs
This is the amount the household needs for example for food, clothes, electricity/rent/water, television/radio, other purchases for the household, school fees/tuition, etc.
Ask the question as follows:

"How much is needed on average by this household for one month?" Try to get the respondent to itemize the amount needed each month for the above-mentioned items and then calculate the sum. If it is difficult for the respondent to answer, ask him to estimate the needs of the household for food for a week or on a daily basis. For clothing and purchases of furniture and other household items, ask him to estimate the amount needed on average for a year, and then calculate the average needed for one month.

B4. and B5. Type of construction materials used for walls and floors

This question refers to the respondent's living quarters and it is concerned with the entire residence, which may be all or part of a building that is utilized by the household for its residence. Circle the one code that is appropriate for the construction material used for the walls and floors of the residence of this household. If the material used for the wall or the floor consists of more than one type, then select the material type that has been used most. If the different material types have been used about the same, then select the material type of greater value.

B6. Lighting
The way to ask this question is as follows:

"What type of lighting does this household use?" Circle the one appropriate code corresponding to the respondent's answer. Electricity that is produced

[p.20]

by a generator that uses gasoline or diesel fuel is also considered electricity. Therefore, electricity is not limited to just electricity produced by the electric company. If the household has more than one source of lighting, record the lighting source used most, that is, the lighting source that lights the largest area.

B7. Type of living quarter
Concept and definitions:

A single family is a single housing structure that is occupied by an individual or by his household for residence only.

Combined residence and business: one housing structure which is used for both a residence and for some business activity such as a food stall or some other type of business.

Separate room within a house: A separate room/space within a housing structure which uses the same entrance. The person who occupies this room/space is a separate household from that which occupies the remainder of the house.

Separate room in a building: This is one room/space located in a house or building which is not a residence.

Shared living quarters: This is one house where two or more people live together where there are no partitions between the residences within that building (there is one kitchen and one living room to receive guests that are used by everyone).

Row housing units: Partitioning of a housing structure so that each person/household has a separate entrance.

Other: Any type other than those mentioned above.

[Schematics illustrating the different types of living quarters in the document are not presented here.]

[p.21]

B8 a) Source of water for bathing/washing
Ask the question as follows:

"What is the source of the water you use for bathing and washing?"

Circle only one code according to the respondent's answer. If more than one source is used for bathing/washing, choose the one that is used the most.

b). Location of the outlet of water for bathing/washing
Ask the question like this:

"Where is the outlet of your water for bathing/washing?" Circle only one code.

B9 a) Drinking water source

b) Location of the outlet of drinking water

Ask about drinking water that is used in the household in the same way as in questions for B8 a) and b) above.

B10 Households furnishings
Ask about household items that are written in the list.
The enumerator can also look around in order to see the household situation; for example, if the household is located in a village it may not be necessary to ask about a car, refrigerator, or television.

Circle "Y" if the household has an item, otherwise circle "T".

C. Health

Cl. Difficulty seeing
"Difficulty seeing" means that a person has difficulty seeing when walking during the daylight hours, and that person must be helped by others; for example: their sight might be blurred, hazy, unable to distinguish things, etc.

Ask the question as follows:
"Is there anyone in this household who has difficulty seeing and needs someone to help him/her when walking during the daylight hours?"
Circle the code according to the respondent's answer.

C2. Death
Ask about any deaths during the past two years (2 years before the enumeration).
Ask the question like this:
a). "Has any member of this household died in the past two years, that is, from February 1974 until yesterday?"

[p.22]

In order to emphasize that the death of anyone who had been a member of this household is being sought, mention that even if the household member had been traveling and died elsewhere, that would still be considered the death of a member of this household.

If the answer is "Yes" there was a death, then all questions below about death pertain to the person who died.

b). Ask about the person who died as follows:

  • Name of the person who died.
  • Deceased person's relation to the head of household.
  • Gender: Enter a code corresponding to the respondent's answer Male: "L"; Female: "P".
  • ["L" for Laki laki and "P" for Perempuan in Indonesian]
  • Age: Enter the age of the person when he/she died.
  • Month and year of death: this can be written as month/year of the Christian calendar, the Islamic/Javanese calendar or some other calendar.

D. Economic activity

Questions for all columns in this section should only be asked to household members age 10 or older. For household members younger than 10, these columns should not be filled in at all.

Activity during the past week
What is intended by activity during the past week is whether the respondent was engaged in any economic activity during the past week.

Page 07 [of the enumeration form.]
Column (2)
The main activity that the respondent engaged in during the past week is the one he was engaged in the most or the longest during the past week.

Concept and definition
A. What is classified as "Working" is:
- Those who were engaged in an activity for the purpose of obtaining or helping obtain income or profit.

B. What is classified as "Temporarily not working" is:
- Those who usually are engaged in an activity but temporarily are not working and not conducting any other activity.
For example:

a. Permanent worker, public/private sector worker who is currently not working because he is on leave, sick, on strike, on leave of absence, company had a temporary stoppage, bad weather etc.
b. Farmers who till the farmland who are not working because of reasons like those in [section] A above and are waiting to continue their work.
c. People who are usually self-employed in a professional field but who are not working because of reasons given in [sections] A and B.
Example:
a. A farmer is waiting for the harvest or waiting for the rain to till the rice field.
b. Barber, doctor, puppeteer, etc. who are waiting for work.

C. Those classified as "Looking for work":

1. Those who never worked and are currently looking for work.
2. Those who worked in the past, but because of certain circumstances have stopped working/been fired and are now looking for work.
[p.23]
3. Those who been released from their current assignment and will be called to return or not, but are actively looking for work.
4. Those are now working but are also looking for work.

D. What is intended by "Housekeeper" are persons who manage a household/help to manage a household without being paid a salary.

E. "School" means those are attending school.

F. Those who "Did not find work".

G. "Other": Those who are not engaged in any activity such as A through E, for example, because they are too old to work, are paralyzed, retarded, etc., do not have any activity or their only activity is a hobby.

Filling in the form
Ask the question about main activity engaged in during the past week as follows:

D1 "What usual activity were you engaged in during the past week?"

If someone had more than one activity, for example: Working and doing household work, working and then doing household work or on leave, etc., then the enumerator should ask which activity is the main activity. The activity that required the longest time during the past week is the main activity.

Column (3) Main activity during the past week
Column (2) records those who had a main activity during the past week. For those whose main activity was not work, ask if they did any work for at least 1 (one) hour during the past week.

Filling in the form
If in column (2) the main activity during the past week is not work (column 2 is not code 1), then ask:

"During the past week did you work at least 1 (one) hour?"

Thus, maybe the main activity was going to school, but a week ago he worked at least 1 (one) hour, then he is classified as worked during the past week. Fill in code "Y", if he answered "Yes" he worked at least 1 (one) hour during the past week, and code "T" if the person did not work at all during the past week.

For those who worked or who ever worked during the past week (D1 code 1 or D2 code Y).

Primary activity during the past week
For those who worked or ever worked during the past week, the first thing to investigate is the primary activity. If during the past week someone, besides engaging in his primary activity also engages in a side line or additional work, the investigation here is only concerned with the main activity whereas the side line or additional work will be asked about later. For those whose main activity was not work but had ever worked (at least 1 hour), then the work they did for at least 1 hour will be considered their main activity. What will be asked here is occupation, field of work, status, place of work, and duration of the work during the past week.

Activity during the past week
What is intended by activity during the past week is whether the respondent was engaged in any economic activity during the past week.

Page 07 [of the enumeration form.]

Column (2)
The main activity that the respondent engaged in during the past week is the one he was engaged in the most or the longest during the past week.

Concept and definition
A. What is classified as "Working" is:
- Those who were engaged in an activity for the purpose of obtaining or helping obtain income or profit.

B. What is classified as "Temporarily not working" is:
- Those who usually are engaged in an activity but temporarily are not working and not conducting any other activity.
For example:

a. Permanent worker, public/private sector worker who is currently not working because he is on leave, sick, on strike, on leave of absence, company had a temporary stoppage, bad weather etc.
b. Farmers who till the farmland who are not working because of reasons like those in [section] A above and are waiting to continue their work.
c. People who are usually self-employed in a professional field but who are not working because of reasons given in [sections] A and B.
Example:
a. A farmer is waiting for the harvest or waiting for the rain to till the rice field.
b. Barber, doctor, puppeteer, etc. who are waiting for work.

C. Those classified as "Looking for work":

1. Those who never worked and are currently looking for work.
2. Those who worked in the past, but because of certain circumstances they have stopped working/been fired and are now looking for work.
[p.23]
3. Those who been released from their current assignment and will be called to return or not, but are actively looking for work.
4. Those are now working but are also looking for work.

D. What is intended by "Housekeeper" are persons who manage a household/help to manage a household without being paid a salary.

E. "School" means those are attending school.

F. Those who "Did not find work".

G. "Other": Those who are not engaged in any activity such as A through E, for example, because they are too old to work, are paralyzed, retarded, etc., do not have any activity or their only activity is a hobby.

Filling in the form
Ask the question about main activity engaged in during the past week as follows:

D1 "What usual activity were you engaged in during the past week?"

If someone had more than one activity, for example: Working and doing household work, working and then doing household work or on leave, etc., then the enumerator should ask which activity is the main activity. The activity that required the longest time during the past week is the main activity.

Column (3) main activity during the past week
Column (2) those records who had a main activity during the past week. For those whose main activity was not work, ask if they did any work for at least 1 (one) hour during the past week.

Filling in the form.
If in column (2) the main activity during the past week is not work (column 2 is not code 1), then ask:

"During the past week did you work at least 1 (one) hour?"

Thus, maybe the main activity was going to school, but a week ago he worked at least 1 (one) hour, then he is classified as worked during the past week. Fill in code "Y", if he answered "Yes" he worked at least 1 (one) hour during the past week, and code "T" if the person did not work at all during the past week.

For those who worked or who ever worked during the past week (D1 code 1 or D2 code Y).

Primary activity during the past week
For those who worked or ever worked during the past week, the first thing to investigate is the primary activity. If during the past week someone, besides engaging in his primary activity also engages in a side line or additional work, the investigation here is only concerned with the main activity whereas the side line or additional work will be asked about later. For those whose main activity was not work but had ever worked (at least 1 hour), then the work they did for at least 1 hour will be considered their main activity. What will be asked here is occupation, field of work, status, place of work, and duration of the work during the past week.

Column (4) type of activity/occupation
What is intended here is the type of work done by those who worked or ever worked during the past week.
For example:

Medical doctor, dentist, veterinarian, pharmacist, dietician, expert in some field
[p.24]
Health and food services.
Statistician, mathematician.
Legal expert, lawyer, prosecutor, judge.
Professor/lecturer, high school teachers, etc.
Designer, draftsman, mechanical engineer, civil engineer.
Author, critic
Clerk, expert telex operator, telephone operator.
Merchant, singer, newsboy, kiosk seller.
Housemaid, female servant, houseboy.
Barber, hair stylist, makeup artist.
Farmer
Farm worker.
Baker, cake maker, candy maker, etc.
Dressmaker, tailor, etc.
Cobbler, cobbler's assistant, shoe repairer.
Carpenter, furniture maker, window hanger/glazier, etc.
Filling in the form
If a person's main activity is work or ever worked (D1 code "1" or D2 code "Y"), then ask:
"How many kinds of jobs did you engage in during the past week?" If only a single type of job was engaged in, then that job is referred to as the primary job. If he engaged in more than one type of job, then ask for which job during the past week did he spend the longest amount of time; the job on which he spent the longest amount of time is considered the primary job. Ask the question as follows:
"What was the type of work you did for your primary job during the past week?"
Write the respondent's answer as completely as possible like the examples given above. Thus, for example, for worker don't just write worker, but what type of worker, such as loads, unloads, and carries goods, construction worker, farm worker, etc. For teachers, give details such as elementary school teacher, middle school teacher, lecturer, headmaster, etc.

Do not fill in the code for column (5); it will be filled in at C.B.S.

Column (6) Field of industry/activity.
What is intended here is the field of industry/activity of the job/work/business/institution where someone worked or ever worked during the past week.

Example:

Agriculture, plantation, animal husbandry, forestry, etc.
Coal mining, oil and gas exploration, etc.
Food processing, clothing industry, furniture maker, paper maker, etc.
Electricity, gas, steam, water purification.
Construction.
Wholesale, retail merchandising, restaurant, coffee shop, hotel, motel, etc.
Land transport, water transport, air transport, communications.
Financial institutions, insurance, real estate and service industry.
Government and the military, social and community services.
Tourist and entertainment services, individual services, etc.
Filling in the form
The way to ask the question should be as follows:

"What is the field of activity of the place/office/business in which you worked?"

Write the respondent's answer as completely as possible like the examples given above. Thus, in this column

[p.25]

do not just write the name of the company, but the field of industry/activity and also the corporate name.

Do not fill in the code for column (7); it will be filled in at C.B.S.

Column (8) Status
Status is the position a person has in carrying out his job. Status is categorized as follows:

Self-employed without workers: The intention here is those who carry out their work/effort at their own risk without any paid workers or are only assisted by unpaid household members.
Example:

Store owner, food stall owner who serves his customers by himself and a household member.
Tradesman who does not have any paid assistant.
People who have agreed to work together, but each one works on his own, and does not have paid workers.
Farmer who farms alone or is helped by his household members.
Barber who works alone.
Solderer who works by himself.
Private teachers, lawyer, doctor who work alone.
Pedicab driver who works alone.
Cab or bus driver who works alone.
Self-employed with workers (employer): This is someone who is assisted by one or more paid workers in carrying out his work.
Example:

Owner of a store, food stall, restaurant, etc. who is assisted by one or more paid employees.
Farmers who use one or more paid workers to till the land or maintain the crops.
Owner of a company, factory who has one or more paid employees.
Laborer/employee: This is someone who works for a wage or salary either in cash or in kind.
Example:

Public servant, employee of state /private sector enterprises.
Employee of hotel, store, restaurant etc.
Housemaid who is paid.
Farm worker who is paid to help till the fields/help with crops.
Driver who is employed by a company or office to drive a vehicle
Unpaid family worker: This is a household member who helps one of the other household members in conducting his business without being paid.
Example:

Children who help serve customers at their parent's kiosk/food stall.
Wife who helps her husband in his store, etc.
Filling in the form:
For those who work, ask their position in their primary job as follows:
"What is your position in your primary job mentioned earlier? Are you self-employed without workers, self-employed with workers (employer), a laborer/employee, or a family worker?"
Fill in the code corresponding to the respondent's answer.
[p.26]

Column (9) Household enterprises
Concept and definition
A household enterprise is any activity that satisfies the following criteria:
1. An economic activity that produces goods or services.
2. The activity can be classified as traditional or modern.
3. The result/product from some or all of the activity is sold or exchanged.
4. The place of the activity can be fixed or not and can be inside the household property or outside.
5. Maximum number of permanent workers is 4 (four) people and at least half of these are unpaid family workers.

Example: The wife and children of the head of household serves customers of her husband's food stall/shop.
Farming that is carried out by household members with occasional help from temporary workers.
Filling in the form
Ask the question as follows:

"Is your work mentioned earlier a household enterprise?"

Investigate the respondent's answer to be sure if it can be classified as a household enterprise according to the concept stated above. Pay attention to whether the worker(s) in this activity are paid or unpaid family workers. Those employed in a business that fulfills the definitions stated above are workers in a household enterprise.

Column (10) Number of hours worked during the past week
The number of hours worked is counted/calculated from the time a person starts working until he finishes. Sunday is not counted as a work day. Thus, determine the total number of hours the person actually worked at his job each day during the past week. For housemaids who continuously work in the household, consider that the number of hours worked per day on average is 12 hours.

Filling in the form
Ask the question as follows:

"How many hours did you work at your primary job during the past week?"

Begin counting/calculating the hours worked during the days of the past week. If the enumeration is conducted for example on a Wednesday, then a week ago means the previous Tuesday, Monday, Sunday, Saturday, Friday, Thursday and Wednesday. Count/calculate the number of hours he worked on each of those days and sum up those hours. Fill in the total number of hours in this column.

Additional work during the past week
Previously it was stated that if a person works at more than one job, then the primary occupation is asked in part A; the other job that is considered a side line or additional work will be asked about here.

Page 08 [of the enumeration form.]

Column (2) Additional work
Those who must be asked here are:
1. Those who usually work (have a primary activity) (D1 code "1")
2. Those who have ever worked (D2 code "Y") who besides having a primary activity also have a side line/additional work.

Filling in the form
The way to ask about additional work is as follows:

[p.27]

D8 "Did you also have additional work in the past week?"

Enter code Y for "Yes" or code T for "No".

"Yes" means the respondent had additional work, so ask the question for column (3).
"No" means the respondent has no additional work so go directly to question D10, column (4), unless question D1 has code "3", then go directly to question D11.

For those who have additional work ask: "How many kinds of additional work did you engage in during the past week?"

Fill in to the number of kinds of additional work.

Looking for work
Questions about looking for work should be asked to both those who work and those who are not working, but those who looked for work during the past week (D1 code "3") shouldn't be asked this question. Looking for work here means the respondent has ever made some effort to find work.
For example: Applied for work, contacted friends, etc.

Column (4)
Filling in the form
Ask the question as follows:

D10 "Did you also look for work?"

Fill in the code for the respondent's answer.
If the answer is "Yes", then directly ask the questions for columns (5) and (6).
If the answer is "No ", then directly go to the question for column (7); if D1 is code "1" or "2", go directly to D14.

Column (5) looking for work
This column is used to get information about those looking for work (D1 code 3 or D1O code Y).

Ask for question for column (5):

D11 "How many months have you been looking for work?"

What is the length of time he/she has been trying to find work? Fill in the number of months.

Column (6)
Question for column (6):

D12 "What efforts did you make to look for work?"

Circle the codes corresponding to the respondent's answer. There may be more than one code depending on how many things the respondent did to find work.

Column (7) Appropriate work
This question is asked to everyone who does not work and is not looking for work. Possibility because of some situation, the person was not looking for work but if there were some appropriate job available for him he would accept it.

Ask the question as follows

"If there is an appropriate job available, would you accept it?" Enter the code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

Page 09 [of the enumeration form.]
Column (2) Usual activity during the past year
Like the questions concerning activity during the past week, these questions are concerned with usual activity during the past year: What activity were you engaged in during the past year.

[p.28]

Activities a year ago are detailed as follows:

Working
Looking for work
Housekeeping
Attending school
Could not find work
Other.

This question is to be asked to those who are age 10 or older. Concept and definition for each activity are the same as those on pages 22 and 23.

Column (3) Ever worked
This column is used to investigate if a person ever work at least 2 (two) months (60 days) during the past year.
This is only asked to those whose primary activity is not working during the past year (Column 2, not code 1).

Ask the question as follows:

"During the past year did you ever work at least 2 months or 60 days?"

Fill in code "Y" or "T".

Columns (4) through (9) are used for explanations about work. People who worked or ever worked during the past year have column 2 code "1" or column 3 code "Y".

Column (4) Occupation
The explanation of this concept is the same as that on pages 23 and 24 this book.

Column (6) Field of industry
The explanation of this concept is the same as that on pages 24 and 25.

Columns (8) and (9)
The explanation of this concept is the same as that on pages 25 and 26.
To fill in columns (7) and (6) write the answer as completely as possible. If the occupation or field of industry during the past one year is the same as that during the past week, write "Same" in column 6.

Column (10) Average monthly wage/salary
Ask the question about wage/salary only to people who worked during the past year or ever worked during the past year with job status of laborer/employee.

An average monthly wage/salary is the amount on average the person receives in one month. This is the gross wage/salary plus any other subsidies, salary in kind, etc.

Ask the question as follows:

"What is your average monthly wage/salary including other allowances?"

Write the number in thousands of rupiah.

Page 09 [of the enumeration form.]

Column (2) Usual activity during the past year
Like the questions concerning activity during the past week, these questions are concerned with usual activity during the past year: What activity were you engaged in during the past year.

[p.28]

Activities a year ago are detailed as follows:

Working
Looking for work
Housekeeping
Attending school
Could not find work
Other

This question is to be asked to those who are age 10 or older. Concept and definition for each activity are the same as those on pages 22 and 23.

Column (3) Ever worked
This column is used to investigate if someone ever work at least 2 (two) months (60 days) during the past year.
This is only asked to those whose primary activity is not working during the past year (Column 2, not code 1).

Ask the question as follows:

"During the past year did you ever work at least 2 months or 60 days?"

Fill in code "Y" or "T".

Columns (4) through (9) are used for explanations about work. People who worked or ever worked during the past year have column 2 code "1" or column 3 code "Y".

Column (4) Occupation
The explanation of this concept is the same as that on pages 23 and 24 this book.

Column (6) Field of industry
The explanation of this concept is the same as that on pages 24 and 25.

Columns (8) and (9)
The explanation of this concept is the same as that on pages 25 and 26.
To fill in columns (7) and (6) write the answer as completely as possible. If the occupation or field of industry during the past one year is the same as that during the past week, write "Same" in column 6.

Column (10) Average monthly wage/salary
Ask the question about wage/salary only to people who worked during the past year or ever worked during the past year with job status of laborer/employee.

An average monthly wage/salary is the amount on average the person receives in one month. This is the gross wage/salary plus any other subsidies, salary in kind, etc.

Ask the question as follows:

"What is your average monthly wage/salary including other allowances?"

Write the number in thousands of rupiah.

E. Information on mother's fertility
Ask these questions to women who have ever been married, that is, currently married, widowed or divorced

This part of the questionnaire contains questions about marriage (how many times married), number of children, and some questions about family planning.

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Page 10 [of the enumeration form.]

Column (2) Number of marriages
- For women who are currently married ask:
"Is this your first marriage?"

- For women who are widowed or divorced ask:
"Was your last marriage your first marriage?" Fill in the code in accordance with the respondent's answer.
Yes: "Y"
No: "T"

- If "Yes" then directly ask the questions for columns (4) through (7), question E3a.
- If not the first marriage, ask the question for column (3).

Column (3)

Only ask this question to those who were married more than once ("No" in column (2)).

Ask the question as follows:
- For married women:
"Which number is this marriage?"

- For widowed/divorced women:
"Which number was your last marriage?"
Fill in the number of times married and directly ask question E3b for columns (4) through (7).

Columns (4) through (7) Month and year of first marriage
- If a woman has only been married once (column(2) code "Y"), then ask:

E3a "In which month and year did you and your husband marry?"

- If a woman has been married more than once, then ask:

E3b "In which month and year did you marry your first husband?" Fill in the month and year according to the Christian calendar or the Islamic/Javanese calendar.

Column (8) Age at first marriage
Age at marriage (the first marriage for those married more than once). Make sure to calculate the age by considering the month and year of birth/current age and the month and year of first marriage.
For example: The respondent was born in 1952, so she is now 23 years old. The year she was married (first marriage) was 1969, so her age when she first married should be 17 years old. Suppose the respondent answers 19 year as the age she first married; this is not correct so all of the information about age and birth must be checked and corrected until everything agrees. If it happened like this, then the respondent must be asked again her age, year of her marriage (first), and her age when she married (first marriage).

Page 11 [of the enumeration form.] Children ever born
Concept and definitions
Below is the schematic concerning pregnancy to be used to clarify what is meant by the first four questions (E5, E6, E7 and E8):

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[A schematic illustrating questions E5, E6, E7 and E8 in the original document is not presented here]

Live birth means a birth that is accompanied by signs of life such as a baby's cry, baby's breathing, heartbeat and other signs of life even if only for a few seconds/moment. Sufficient attention must be given to this question, because often when a baby is born alive but only lives for a few seconds, minutes, hours or days, they are not mentioned by the respondent; it is as if the baby didn't exist or she forgot to mention the baby because he only lived a few moments. This kind of birth is important and must be included in the total number of live births (born alive and then died).

There are two possibilities for a live birth; that is, the child has died (by the time of the enumeration) or is still alive (at the time of the enumeration).

A child still alive is any child who was born alive and is still living (at the time of the enumeration) with his mother (lives in this household) or somewhere else (lives with a sibling, uncle, grandparent, attends school elsewhere or works elsewhere).

Do not ask about an interrupted pregnancy in this survey as no further information is needed at this time.

Column (2) Total number of children born
This is the total number of children that were born alive to the mother (exclude stillborn or miscarried babies).

As the question as follows:

"How many children did you give birth to that were born alive?"

Enter the number of children that were born alive according to the concept explained above.

Column (2) Children who live here
These are children who live here with their mother as a member of this household.
Ask the question as follows:

"How many of the children that you gave birth to are now living here with you?"

Fill in the number of children according to the respondent's answer.

Column (4) Children who live elsewhere
"Do any of your children that you gave birth to live elsewhere?" If the respondent answers "Yes", then ask: "How many?" Children who live elsewhere are children the respondent has given birth to who do not live with her in this household but elsewhere as mentioned in the examples above.
Fill in to the number of children according to the respondent's answer.

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Column (5) Children who have died
Look at the schematic on pregnancy for help with this question. Babies who only lived for a few moments and then died are included here. In asking about this, take care not to cause the sad memory to return to the mother.

Then check that column (2) equals columns (3) + (4) + (5). If they are not the same, make corrections by asking the mother again

Remember to ask about live births only

Column (6) through (11): The questions for these columns are special ones that are asked about the last baby born (born alive) and only asked to women who have ever given birth (column (2) not 0).

Column (6) through (9) Month and year of birth of last child

"What was the month and year of the birth of your last child?"

Fill in the answer from the respondent using the Christian calendar or the Islamic.

Column (10) Gender of last child
Fill in the appropriate code.

Column (11) Status of last child

"Is your last baby still living or has he/she died?"

Fill in the code corresponding to the respondent's answer.

Column (12) Additional children
For additional children, only ask to those women who are currently married (A5 code "2" or "5") and are age 50 or younger.

There are three possible questions:
- For a woman who has had a child and is not pregnant, ask:

"Do you want to have another child?"

- For a woman who has had a child and is currently pregnant, ask:

"Do you still want additional children besides the one you are now expecting?"

- For a woman who has not yet given birth to a child, ask:

"Do you want to have a child?"

Fill in the respondent's answer:
"Yes" or "No".

- If the answer is not "Yes" or not "No" fill in code "L" (Other) [lainnya in Indonesian] according to the answers: "Don't know", "It's up to God", etc.

Page 12 [of the enumeration form.]

Questions E13 through E19 are questions about family planning and are asked only to women who are currently married and are age 50 or younger

Column (2) Ever heard about birth control
Birth control is a means of preventing or regulating pregnancies. It can refer to either the Government's Family Planning Program or some other program that prevents or regulates pregnancies. A person for example may not have ever heard the words "family planning", but knows a means of preventing or regulating pregnancies, for example, through massages or other traditional practices. The person in the example just given would be considered has having ever heard.

[p.32]

Filling in the form:

Ask the question as follows:
"Now we would like to ask you about a different matter. Have you ever heard about birth control?"

Fill in the code:

If ever heard, with "Y"
If never heard, with "T"

For those who have never heard (code "T"), don't ask any further questions; end the questioning here.

For those who ever heard about birth control, ask the following questions

Column (3) For those who have ever hear about birth control.
Ask about the ways to regulate pregnancies that the respondent knows about. The methods are not limited only to those methods from the Government Family Planning Program (IUD, pill, condom, etc.) but may also include other ways that can be used to prevent or regulate pregnancy.
For example: Jamu, a traditional drink, or other similar recipes, massage and other traditional methods.

Ask the question as follows:
"Do you know any methods to regulate pregnancies?"

Column (4) Known methods to regulate pregnancy if the woman knows about these methods (column 3 code "Y")
If the respondent answers that she knows methods to regulate pregnancies, then ask:

"Which methods do you know?"

Here all methods that she knows should be mentioned. After a respondent has mentioned several methods, asks her if there any others that she knows.

"Are there any other methods that you know?"

In this way all the methods that she knows will be mentioned.

The enumerator should not ever mention the name of any method or explain a method that was not mentioned by the respondent, but should try to get the respondent to recall any other methods that she knows by asking the following:

"Are there any other methods that you know?"
- Circle the code for each method that the respondent knows.

- More than one code can be circled since all methods that the respondent knows should be circled.

Column (5) Methods to regulate pregnancy ever used
If the respondent knows methods to regulate pregnancies (column (3) code "Y"), ask:

"Have you ever used any method to regulate a pregnancy?"

Methods ever used are not limited to those used by the woman only, but may also be any method used by her husband.

- If the respondent or her husband has ever used a method, fill in code "Y" and then ask

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the questions for the remaining columns.

- If the respondent never used or answered "No", then fill in code "T" and end the family planning questions here.

Column (6) Methods ever used
This question is only asked to those respondents who ever used a method to regulate a pregnancy.

Ask the question like this:

"Which methods have you or your husband ever used to regulate pregnancy?"

Circle codes for those methods that the respondent ever used.

Column (7) Method currently used
This question is asked to a woman/husband who ever used a family planning method.

"Do you or your husband currently use a method to regulate pregnancy?"

Column (8). If the respondent currently uses a method, ask:

"Which method do you or your husband currently use?"

Circle the method now used.

Enumerator's notes
This page is used for the enumerator to make notes about the respondent's situation.

Respondent for parts D and E.
It has been specified that for completing Parts D and E the enumerator must directly ask the questions to the relevant person. To do that the enumerator must try to meet the person and directly interview her. If after all reasonable attempts to meet the person have failed and the enumeration period (time) provided for the enumerator to complete the interviews is almost finished, the enumerator can interview another person who can provided the information such as the head of household or another person who is closer. If this happens:

Column (2) Write the name of the person who gave the needed information about the person to be interviewed.

Column (3) Write the relation to the head of household of the person who gave the information.

Respondent for parts A, B, and C
As was the case above, if the enumerator is forced to have someone other than the head of household answer the questions in parts A, B and C (for example his wife, his child, or other person), write the name of the person and that person's relation to the head of household who answered these questions in the box provided.

Other note:
This part is reserved for making any other necessary notes about anything that must be explained about how this questionnaire was filled in or any other explanatory notes.