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[p. 1]


Republic of Honduras
Treasury Department
National Statistics and Census Bureau

Enumerator's Manual

[Table of contents omitted.]

[Administrative information on pages 1-9 omitted.]

[p. 10]

Chapter III. Instructions for Obtaining and Recording Information on the Dwelling Form

I. Definition of Basic Concepts used for the Dwelling Census

1. Census Date.
The census date has been established as March 6, 1974 and all information must refer to that date.

2. Definitions
A. Dwelling. For the purposes of the census, a dwelling is any individual house, hut, shack, apartment, hostel, or tenement housing which has been constructed, made, converted or arranged to serve as lodging. This also includes a premise not intended as habitation but being used for such on the census date. Examples are a boat, train car, the dwelling of a teacher who lives in a school, of a caretaker who lives in the building he/she takes care of, the dwelling of a doorman who lives in the office, etc.

Do not include buildings which are commercial, public, industrial, etc., or mobile or improvised housing which is unoccupied on the census date.

B. Types of Dwelling. There are two types of dwellings: a) Those intended to lodge families, called "individual or family" dwellings; b) Those called "institutional dwellings."

"Individual or family" dwelling means the separate or independent premise which is intended to lodge a family or is occupied by a family, even if it is not intended for such.

"Institutional dwelling" means those premises which are structurally separate and independent and intended to lodge persons who do not live together as a family. This is the case with hotels, boarding houses, hospitals, boarding schools, family houses with five or more boarders, camps, etc. For these persons use the same form as you would for persons who live in an individual or family dwelling.

C. Building. A building is any independent structure which has one or more rooms or other spaces and is covered by a roof. It is normally bounded by exterior or dividing walls which go from the foundation to the roof. Note that questions 2, 3 and 6 refer to the building and not the dwelling. There may be one or more dwellings in a building.

[Instructions on how to fill out the census: pages 11- 12 omitted.]

Chapter IV Detailed Instructions for Filling out the Form

Numbering the Houses
There is a box for recording the form number in the top right margin of the form.

[Box omitted.]

Write the sequential number corresponding to each dwelling you visit, beginning with number 1. If, for example, you are going to enumerate the seventh dwelling on your route, then number 7 corresponds to that dwelling.

[p. 13]

Use more than one form when necessary. When there are more than nine members in the household, use the same order number which corresponds to the previous form for the same dwelling.

I. Geographic Localization

Record the following information on all the forms as you enumerate in the zone assigned to you: 1) Department (name); 2) Municipality (name); 5) Supervision area (number); 6) Zone number. The information is on the cover of your folder.

Note that the part corresponding to "Geographic Localization" requires additional information which should be investigated and recorded by the enumerator on his/her route but which does not appear on the cover of the folder. The information is: 3) Town (name); 4) Populated area (name); 7) Address of the building where the dwelling is located (avenue, street, etc.)

Take special care when recording the information you are investigating. Most of the zones in rural areas are made up of two or more populated areas, some of which do not belong to a single town and there is a tendency to repeat the name of the town and the populated area even after having moved to another place. For example: zone X is made up of the populated area El Pino, which belongs to the town of El Rosario, and the populated area El Manguito, which belongs to the town of El Jolote. The enumerator begins his/her route in El Pino, in the town of El Rosario. After having enumerated all the dwellings in that populated area the enumerator goes to El Manguito in the town of El Jolote, upon which he/she should immediately remember to change the populated area and town. If the enumerator does not do this and continues writing El Pino populated area in the town of El Rosario, all the dwellings and the population of the other populated area will be assigned to this one.

II Dwelling Information

The detailed instructions given below allow the enumerator to carry out his/her work efficiently.

Question set 1: Type of Dwelling
Keep in mind the following definitions when investigating this question set:

[p. 14]

A) Detached house (box 1). This is defined as a room or collection of rooms which has been built, renovated, adapted or arranged to house a family, and is not being wholly used for any other purpose at the time of the dwelling. It is characterized by the fact that the building is surrounded by a yard/garden or dividing walls or land which separate one house from another.
[Drawing A refers to a single house.]

Units which have a single roof for two or more connected houses are also included in this definition.
[Drawing B contains two houses connected by a single roof.]
[p. 15]
B) Hut (box 2). This is defined as a dwelling consisting of one or more rooms built of natural materials found locally. The walls are of mud, straw or cane and the roof is of straw, palm leaves or the like. It is intended to house a family as long as it is not wholly used for other purposes at the time of the census.
[Drawing C refers to a hut.]

C) Room in a hostel or tenement (box 3). This is defined as a space located in a building which was constructed, adapted or arranged for as many dwellings as there are separate rooms in the building. Each room is characterized by having a direct entrance from a hallway, courtyard, etc. This dwelling units do not have private use of water, sanitary services or bath.

One family may occupy one or more of these rooms, in which case the rooms they occupy are considered a single dwelling.
[Drawing D refers to a tenement.]
[p. 16]
D) Apartment (box 4). This is defined as a room or collection of rooms which has been built, renovated, adapted or arranged to house a family, and is not being wholly used for any other purpose at the time of the dwelling. It is characterized by the fact that it is part of a building of one or more floors and is separated from other apartments by dividing walls which go from the [ground] floor to the top floor or the roof of the building.
[Drawing E refers to an apartment.]

E) Improvised dwelling (shack) (box 5). This is defined as a temporary, independent building constructed of discarded materials and without a building plan. It is intended to serve as habitation for a family.
[Drawing F refers to an improvised dwelling].
[p. 17]
F) Premise not intended for habitation but used as a dwelling (box 6). The following dwelling units are included in this category: a) mobile units, such as those types of dwelling which can be transported (tents, boats, etc.); b) Permanent structures not intended for human habitation such as barns, garages, stalls, warehouses, etc.; c) Other units not intended for human habitations, such as natural shelters, caves, etc. When you come across this type of dwelling don't ask additional questions related to the dwelling characteristics and continue on to the inside of the form, i.e., the questions related to the population.

These types of dwellings are considered dwelling units as long as they are occupied on the census date.

Once you have assigned the dwelling unit to one of the previous categories according to the appropriate definition, mark an "X" in the appropriate box.

G) Institutional dwellings (boxes 7, 8, 9, 0, X, Y). These are buildings or lodgings intended to lodge groups of persons who live together at the time of the census for reasons of health, education, punishment or other, similar, reasons which are unrelated to living in a family household.

The following are included in this category: barracks or other military housing; hospitals; asylums and clinics; jails; penitentiaries and correctional facilities; hotels; motels; boarding houses and guest houses (family houses with more than five boarders); boarding schools; workers camps and other, similar, communities. There are special instructions for enumerating these types of dwellings at the end of this manual.

Fill in the appropriate box according to the "institutional dwelling" that you are enumerating.

After recording that a dwelling is institutional do not ask additional questions related to the dwelling characteristics and continue on to the inside of the form (resident persons in the dwelling). (Part IV)

[p. 18]

Question set 2: Predominant Material in the Building's Exterior Walls

Ask the respondent the predominant material of the exterior walls of the building in which the dwelling is located. Once you have determined the predominant material, mark an "X" in the box located next to the name of the predominant material.

Question set 3: Predominant Material in the Building's Roof

Investigate the predominant material which the roof of the building in which the dwelling is located is made of. Once you have determined the predominant material, mark an "X" in the box located next to the name of the predominant material.

Question set 4: Dwelling Status
Find out if the dwelling is: A) Occupied by persons who are present; B) Occupied by persons who are absent; C) Vacant.

The following definitions will help you mark the correct box:

A) Occupied by persons who are present. This is a dwelling which is occupied by one or more persons at the census moment. The residents may not be present because they are at work, the river, the market, etc., but they will return by the evening at the latest.

[p. 19]

In these cases, the enumerator should come back to obtain the corresponding information.

B) Occupied by persons who are absent. These are dwellings which are occupied by residents who are temporarily absent for a short period because they are on vacation, at celebrations in honor of the town's patron saint, gone for work-related travel, etc. In these cases try to get the information from neighbors, especially family members, and note it in the comments section.

C) Vacant. This is a dwelling that has no occupants. Mark the appropriate box according to the reason for the vacancy: For rent (box 3); For sale (box 4); Undergoing repair (box 5); For temporary use (box 6); Other reason (box 7); Unknown (box 9).

Enumerate persons who have two dwellings in which they spend significant amounts of time (for example, one in a town and the other in the mountains or some other place) in the dwelling where they are located at the time of the census. The other dwelling should be considered as vacant, temporary use.

Note: If the dwelling is vacant, conclude the investigation with this question.

Ask questions from number 5 on only in dwellings with present or absent occupants who were categorized in one of boxes 1-5 on question 1, type of dwelling.

Questions set 5: Predominant material in the building's floor

Ask the respondent what the predominant building material of the floor is. Once you have determined the predominant material, mark an "X" in the corresponding box.

[p. 20]

Question set 6: Year of building's construction

Ask the respondent what year the building in which the dwelling is located was built. If the respondent doesn't know or expresses doubts, ask other persons (residents of other dwellings in the buildings or neighbors) until you find someone qualified to answer.

Once you have determined the year in which the building was built, mark an "X" in the appropriate box.

Question set 7: Rooms in the dwelling
For the purposes of the census a room is a space located in a dwelling, enclosed by permanent walls which go from the ground to the ceiling, or which are at least two meters high when measured from the floor. It has enough floor space to fit a bed, i.e., is at least four meters square. Bedrooms, dining rooms, living rooms, studies, servants' rooms and other separate spaces are intended to lodge people.

Hallways, entryways and bathrooms should not be considered rooms.

A) How many rooms does the dwelling have? (Include the kitchen but not the bathroom.)

B) How many rooms are used as bedrooms? A "bedroom" is a room used mainly and normally for sleeping. If you come across dwellings composed of a single room, write bedroom also.

C) Is there a room used only for cooking? A "room for cooking" is a room equipped for preparing main meals and used exclusively for that purpose. Ask if the dwelling has a room used only for cooking. Mark an "X" in box 1 or 2 according to the answer you receive.

[p. 21]

Question set 8: Ownership status
Is the dwelling: your own, paid off in installments, rented, or inhabited for free with the authorization of the owner.

The following definitions will help you investigate this question set correctly:

Your own: This is when one of the members of the dwelling has obtained property rights through purchase, inheritance, as a gift, etc.

Paid off in installments: This is when one of the members of the household has obtained property rights by purchasing on credit and on the census date is amortizing said credit.

Rented: This is a dwelling the use of which is paid for by a certain amount of money paid as rent.

Inhabited for free with the authorization of the owner: This is when the family occupies the dwelling with the authorization of the owner, tenant, etc., and for which no rent is paid.

Other: This is when the dwelling can't be categorized in any of the previous categories (occupied without the consent of the owner).

Question set 9: Monthly rent
How much monthly rent do you pay?

Ask this question only in cases where the family occupies a dwelling which is rented, i.e. you have marked box 3 in question 8. Record the amount of the monthly rent in lempiras on the line intended for that purpose. Do not record cents.

Question set 10: Water service
The dwelling has: Water that is piped in, within the dwelling, Outside of the dwelling but on the property, off the property, Water that is not piped in: well, river, lake or spring.

A) Water that is piped in. Check off box 1 if the dwelling has piped-in water inside the dwelling.

[p. 22]

Check off box 2 if the dwelling has piped water outside the dwelling but on the property.

Check off box 3 if the dwelling's occupants get their water from a communal tap off the property, regardless of how far away. This is the case only if the communal tap is connected to public or private pipes installed by the municipality or other state entity.

If the water is given by a neighbor and is piped in, mark box 3, off the property.

B) Water that is not piped in
Mark box 4 if the occupants of the dwelling get their water from a well.

Mark box five if the occupants of a dwelling get their water from a river, lake or spring.

Mark box six, other, for dwellings that get water by means other than the five previous categories.

Question set 11: Sanitary service
What kind of sanitary service does the dwelling have?

Before checking off any of the boxes, find out if the dwelling's sanitary service is for its own exclusive use or if it is used by several households. Also, keep in mind the difference between A) "Toilet connected to a sewer"; B) "Toilet connected to a septic tank;" C) "Pour-flush latrine."

The first refers to a system for eliminating waste connects to a public sewer system.

The second refers to a system for eliminating waste connected to a septic system.

The third refers to a system for the elimination of waste where the excretions are carried away with running water or water from a bucket. A pit toilet (latrine) refers to a small construction situated over a hole.
[p. 23]
Does not have: This is when the dwelling lacks sanitary service or has a type which does not correspond to any of the previous definitions.

Mark an "X" in one of the boxes located after the different options according to the respondent's answer.

Question set 12: Lighting
What do you use for lighting?

Keep in mind the following definitions:

Public Service Electricity is lighting which is provided by a state enterprise (such as ENEE, the National Electric Energy Company; a municipality; or quasi-governmental agency.

Private Electric Service is provided by a private company [or] an individual, or with the person's own generator [motor].

If the family lights with kerosene check off box 4, for gas check off box 5; for resin wood check off 6. If the family lights with candlelight, or does not have any of the types mentioned, check off box 7 (other).

Mark an "X" in one of the boxes located next to the correct option, according to the answer you receive.

Question set 13: Fuel used for cooking
What type of fuel do you use for cooking?

Mark an "X" in the box next to the type of fuel most often used for cooking, as declared by the respondent.

Question set 14: Household goods
Do you have the following items?

Ask the question and then immediately begin listing the items from this part of the form. If the household has one or more of the items indicated on the form, mark an "X" in the boxes located after the word yes. Otherwise, mark an "X" in the box next to the word no. A box must be filled in for each item.

[p. 24]

III. Small-scale and Home-based Industry
Are any items produced for sale in this dwelling on a regular basis?

If the answer is affirmative mark an "X" in the box for "yes", and if the answer is negative mark an "X" in the box for "no".

If the answer is affirmative, write the product or products that are produced for sale in the household in space "B".

The production of the following is considered small-scale and home-based industry: bread, candy, sewing, hats, pottery, tortillas, etc.

Also note how many people work on a regular basis at the declared activity, and how many receive formal payment.

Chapter V. Instructions for Obtaining and Recording Information about Resident Persons on the Population Form

A. Standards for Defining Permanent Residents

1. Permanent Residency

For the purposes of the census, permanent resident is understood as the place in which the person has settled or plans to settle, for reasons of work, business, study or family, etc., on the census date.

2. Rules for Determining Residency
For the purposes of the census, the enumerator may encounter, in each dwelling he/she visits, several types of persons. Present persons who should be recorded on the population questionnaire; other present persons who should not be included on the aforementioned questionnaire; or absent persons who you must decide, according to the information given by the respondent, whether or not to include on the questionnaire.

[p. 25]

A) Permanent residents who are included in the dwelling (clarification of previous cases)
Those persons who sleep regularly in the dwelling and who consider it the principal seat of their family or business are considered permanent residents of the dwelling. These persons do not stop being members of the household simply because they are temporarily absent from it for reasons of illness, vacation, tourism, work, etc., given that they will return to their permanent dwelling once the circumstances that caused them to be absent from it on the date of the census have ceased.

Enumerate as members of the dwelling all present permanent residents on the census date, as well as those permanent residents who are temporarily absent. The most common case of permanent residents who are absent on the census date, but who should be included on the questionnaire, are the following:
i) Persons who are temporarily absent because they are in another place due to business travel, tourism, vacation, or because of their work (traveling salesperson, military officer, nurse, caretaker, doctor or other person). These persons generally sleep in the dwelling but were not in it on the night of the census.

ii) Persons who live or reside in the dwelling but who are absent for a more or less brief time period due to temporary illness or surgery in a hospital or clinic.

iii) Domestic servants or other employees of the dwelling who sleep the entire week in the dwelling where they work, even if they spend the weekend in their own house.

iv) Persons who are temporarily abroad for business, tourism, health, etc.

v) Persons detained temporarily for minor infractions or misdemeanors.
[p. 26]
B) Absent person who should be excluded
There are other persons who may be absent from the dwelling on the date of the census and who appear to be permanent residents, but who must be excluded because they have become members of another dwelling and may be counted twice. The following are the most common cases:
i) Persons who, because of their profession or work, reside in or are permanently stationed in an institution (soldiers, priests, monks, police officers, teachers, etc.) even though they may appear to have another permanent residence.

ii) Boarding-school students in a school which is in the same or a different location.

iii) Non boarding-school students who live and study permanently in a different location.

iv) Persons who are imprisoned or confined in a treatment center for a more or less long and undefined time period. Examples are hospitals and clinics for chronic or incurable patients (insane asylum, tubercular hospital and the like), as well as other institutions such as penitentiaries and prisons.
v) Domestic servants who do not sleep in the dwelling where they work.

vi) Person who work abroad.

vii) Children and youth in reform schools or orphanages, and the elderly or disabled in retirement/nursing homes or the like.

viii) Members of religious orders who live in convents, high-schools, parish houses or seminaries.

There may be other cases not considered here that can be likened to similar situations, but if you are unsure about how to categorize a person it is preferable to consult your supervisor.

3. Applying the Rules of Residency - Examples
The most common and important examples are the following:

[p. 27]

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Type of person
(B) Place where the person must be enumerated

Type of person: Those who reside in the dwelling, but are temporarily absent because of a business trip, vacation, tourism, work, guard or service
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they live.

Type of person: Those who reside in the dwelling, but are in the hospital or clinic because of injuries, giving birth, surgery, medical check-up, short illness
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they normally live.

Type of person: Those who are in the dwelling at the time of enumeration and who do not have another place of usual residence.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they are found.

Military Personnel:

Type of person: Those who are permanently based in a military installation.
Place where the person must be enumerated: Military collective

Type of person: Those who are based in a military installation but who live outside of it and sleep there only when they are on duty.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they live.

Officer or crewmember of a vessel:

Type of person: Those living on the vessel.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The vessel

Type of person: Those who have a place of residence on land.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling on land.

Type of person: Students living in a boarding school.
Place where the person must be enumerated: Institution or boarding school where studying.

Type of person: Students not living in a boarding school in another city or town.
Place where the person must be enumerated: Dwelling in the other city or town where studying.

Type of person: Nurses living in a hospital or clinic.
Place where the person must be enumerated: Hospital, nursing house where she is living, etc.
[p. 28]
Type of person: Those maintaining more than one place of residence, dividing time between the two.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they sleep most of the time.

Type of person: Honduran citizens who are temporarily abroad because of vacation, business travel, health, tourism, etcetera.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they normally reside in Honduras

Type of person: Those who live abroad.
Place where the person must be enumerated: Do not enumerate

Type of person: Foreigners who are in the process of establishing residence in Honduras.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where are found at the time of the Census.

Type of person: Foreign diplomats living in Honduras.
Place where the person must be enumerated: The dwelling where they normally live.

B. Enumeration Unit

Persons, or enumeration units, are classified according to whether or not they live in census dwellings according to the following concepts:

1. Persons who live in Individual or Family Dwellings

The dwelling may be inhabited by a single person, i.e., a person who provides for his/her own food and lodging needs alone. The household may also be made up of several people, i.e., two or more persons who come together to provide for their lodging and food needs. Persons who live in this type of household may be relatives (such as parents and children) or they may not be related (as in the case of two or more friends). There may also be relatives and non-relatives together (such as parents, children and an employee).

2. Persons who live in Institutional Dwellings

These are people who live in hospitals, barracks, convents, boarding schools, jails, etc., They live together for reasons of health, education, punishment, or other reasons which are different from household life.

[p. 29]

C. Using the Population Census Form
There is a single form for enumerating the population living in households and the population not living in households (institutional dwellings).

Use a single form to enumerate households of up to nine people. Use one or more additional forms when the dwelling has more than nine members.

For persons who do not live in households (institutional dwellings), use one or more forms according to the number of occupants.

D. Sections of the Form and Enumeration Order
1. Sections of the Form
The population form is divided into four sections: A) Personal and Geographic Characteristics; B) Educational Characteristics; C) Economic Characteristics; D) Fertility Characteristics.

2. Enumeration Order of Household Members
To make the enumeration easier, record the information about each member of the household in the following order:

A. Head of household
B. His/her spouse or partner
C. Single children in order of age (include newborns) with the remark made on page 2.
D. Married children and their family members
E. Other relatives (parents, uncles, siblings, etc.)
[p. 30]
F. Other non-related persons such as boarders, guests, servants, etc.

If there are more than nine people in a dwelling use one or more additional forms. Make sure to put them together, fill in the form number that corresponds to the dwelling on the additional forms, and fill out the section corresponding to "Geographic Localization" on all of the forms. Begin additional forms for each household with the second column, as the first one corresponds to the head of household, which is already on the first form.

Detailed Instructions for Filling out the Form

A) Personal and Geographic Characteristics

This section is for all residents in the dwelling. It is intended to find out information about the composition of the population according to their relationship with the head of household, sex, age, civil status, whether the mother is alive, place of birth, year of arrival in the country, nationality, and permanent residence in 1969.

Ask questions 1-9 of everyone who is enumerated, without exception and according to the detailed instructions below.

Question set 1: First and Last Name
What is the first and last name of all resident persons in the dwelling?

Note: Before asking for the first and last name of the person or persons who live in the dwelling, the enumerator should do the following job. A) Define the persons who should be included in the investigation according to the definition of permanent residence and the concept of "census date and moment"; and B) List the persons in the order indicated by the relevant instructions (enumeration order).

How to record the answer:

Record the first and last names of all members of the household, keeping in mind the interview order indicated above.
[p. 31]
Write the first and last names horizontally from left to write. Once you have recorded the compete name of all the residents in the dwelling, ask some questions that will help you discover any omissions due to a misunderstanding of the concept of permanent residency. Respondents frequently omit the elderly and children less than five years old, especially newborns. It is also common to include persons who should not be investigated and to exclude persons who should be enumerated given that this is a legal census.

Write "no name" for newborns who don't have a name.

Question set 2: What is the person's relationship to the head of the household?

Beginning with this question start filling out the information for each person vertically. Use one column for each member of the dwelling. The first column should always be used to record the head of household's information.

The relationship between the person recognized as head of household and each of the members of the household must be included. The connection may be a family relationship, a work relationship, or other.

For each member of the dwelling mark an "X" in the box which corresponds to the relationship between the person and the head of household.

Mark an "X" in the "unknown" box only if the respondent does not know the relationship between a member of the household and the head of household. These cases are obviously exceptions.

Fill in box 8, "Institutional," for all residents of an institutional dwelling.

Question set 3: Sex
Are you/is the person male or female?

Mark an "X" in the appropriate box.

Question set 4: Age
How old are you/is the person in completed years?

[p. 32]

The information to obtain for each person is the age in completed years, and not how old the person is going to be at his/her next birthday.

Keeping in mind the importance of this question set, do everything possible to obtain the age in completed years as precisely as possible. If this isn't possible, insist on getting at least an approximate age so that there is always some information about the age.

Record on the appropriate line:
A) The number of completed years for persons aged one or older
B) 00 for persons aged less than one year, including newborns

Question set 5: Are you/is the person married, co-habiting, single, divorced or widowed?

The following definitions will help you categorize each person correctly according to his/her civil or marital status.

A) Married. This is a person who has entered into matrimony, even though he/she may be separated but not divorced on the census date. Within this category the following information is of interest:

a) Married to a wife who lives in the dwelling (box 0)
b) Married to a wife who lives elsewhere (box 1)
c) Married living apart (box 2)

If a person is married but living with another person because he is separated from his legal wife, check off box 3, co-habiting with a companion who lives in the dwelling.

B) Cohabiting. This is a person (single, divorced or widowed) who lives in a consensual relationship with another person and has established a family with that person, without any legal matrimonial ties. Within this category the following information is of interest:

a) Cohabiting with a partner who lives in the dwelling (box 3)
b) Cohabiting with a partner who lives elsewhere (box 4)
c) Cohabiting living apart (box 5)
[p. 33]

Be very careful when enumerating persons who were cohabiting and are now living apart as they tend to declare themselves single. Check off box 5 for these people (co-habiting living apart).

C) Single (box 6). This is a person who has never been married and who is not cohabiting and has not cohabited.

D) Divorced (box 7). This is a person whose marriage was legally dissolved by a qualified authority. The person has not remarried and is not cohabiting.

E) Widowed (box 8). This is a person whose spouse has died. The person has not remarried and is not cohabiting.

The categories are mutually exclusive. Therefore, check off only one box according to the civil or marital status of the person being enumerated.

Question set 6: Is your/the person's mother alive?

If the mother of the person being enumerated was alive on the census date, mark an "X" in the "yes" box. If, however, the mother has died, mark an "X" in the "no" box.

There is an "unknown" box to record instances where the respondent does not know if the mother of a member of the dwelling is alive or not.

Question set 7: What municipality and department were you/was the person born in?

Keep in mind that the placement of this question may cause the respondent to confuse it with the previous question. The previous question (question set 6) investigates whether or not the enumerated person's mother is alive; this question (question set 7) seeks to discover the enumerated person's place of birth, and not the place of birth of that person's mother.

[p. 34]

Mark an "X" in the box corresponding to the word "here" if the place of birth coincides with permanent residence on the census date. Leave the spaces for municipality or department blank.

A) If the enumerated person was born in a different municipality in Honduras ask the name of the municipality where he/she was born and the name of the department the municipality is in. Write the information in the appropriate space.

B) If the enumerated person was born in another country, ask the name of the enumerated person's country of birth and write it in the appropriate space.

Question set 8: Year of arrival in the country and nationality

A) Year of arrival in the country.
For any person born abroad ask, "In what year did you/the person come to live permanently in this country."

a) Record the stated year of arrival in the country.

b) Mark an "X" in the "Unknown" box if the respondent does not know the enumerated person's year of arrival in the country.

B) Are you/is the person Honduran?
Ask any person born abroad if he/she is Honduran. Mark an "X" in the appropriate box according to the respondent's answer.

Question set 9: Permanent residency in March, 1969
Ask every person older than five (5) years of age: "In what municipality and department were you living in March, 1969?"

Mark an "X" in the box corresponding to "here" if the place of residence in March, 1969 is the same as the place of permanent residence on the date of the census. Leave the spaces for municipality and department blank.

[p. 35]

If the enumerated person was residing in a different municipality in Honduras, ask the names of the municipality and department he/she was residing in. Write the answer in the appropriate spaces.

If the person was residing abroad, ask the name of the country and record the information in the appropriate space.

B) Educational Characteristics (Only for persons aged six and older)

Do not ask any further questions about those younger than six years of age. Cross out questions 10-21 with a large X.

Questions 10-13 refer to the level of literacy and years of study the enumerated person has completed or is completing. For this reason, only ask person aged six and older these questions.

The purpose of these questions is to discover the level of education of the population in relation to its demographic, economic and social characteristics.

Question set 10: Literacy
Do you/does the person know how to read and write?

Ask if the enumerated person knows how to read and write and mark an "X" in the corresponding box.

Mark an "X" in the "unknown" box if the respondent does not know if a member of the family is literate or not.

Question set 11: Level of education
What was the last grade or year in primary or secondary school, or higher education, that you/the person successfully completed?

Note that two pieces of information are required here: a) The highest level of education; and b) The last year successfully completed at that level.

[p. 36]

The normal educational system in Guatemala has several levels: a) Primary; b) Secondary; c) Higher education

The following definitions will help you categorize the population correctly according to the above.

Primary Education. This education is intended to provide the basic elements of instruction. (grades 1-6).

Secondary Education. The purpose of this level is to provide general, or specialized, or both, types of education. The minimum requirement for students to be admitted is completion of primary education. This level of education is currently divided into basic [junior high] and high school.

Higher Education. This is instruction provided in universities and higher-level technical institutions. The minimum requirement for students to be admitted is completion of secondary education.

The form provides several boxes for recording the respondent's answer.

The "None" box, 00, is for those who have not passed any grade or are illiterate.

The spaces after the various levels of instruction, "Primary 1___," Secondary 2___," and Higher Education 3___" are for recording the highest grade or year passed.

Box 99, "Unknown," is provided for cases where the respondent is unable to provide information about a family member. For example:

a) If a person passed the third year of primary school, write 3 after "Primary 1" (Primary 1 3).
[p. 37]
b) If a person says that he/she has passed the first year of high school, find out if it was under the new system in which case write Secondary 2 4. If it was under the old system write Secondary 2 1. Do the same for all branches of secondary.

c) If a person says s/he has passed the university preparation course (CUEG) write Higher Education 3 P.

d) Remember to ask for the last grade passed and not the grade being attended.

If the person is attending the university preparation course (CUEG) write Higher Education 2 5 or 6 according to the last grade studied in secondary school

Question set 12: Major or Area of Studies
What did you/the person study in your/his/her last grade or year successfully completed?

a) If the last grade passed by the enumerated person refers to primary school, or the persons has not received any type of education, mark an "X" in the box for "None and Primary."

b) If the person has only studied at the secondary-school level, write the name of the major or area of study corresponding to what the person is studying or studied in the appropriate space.

c) If the enumerated person is studying or has studied at the level of higher education, record first the area of study or major completed in secondary school and then what the person is studying or has studied in higher education.

Ask people who have taken advanced secondary or higher education classes if they have graduated. Mark the appropriate box according to their answer.

Question set 13: Attendance at School
"Are you/is the person currently attending a primary or secondary school, or an institution of higher education?"

If the respondent states that the enumerated person is attending a primary or secondary school, or an institution of higher education, mark an "X" in box 1 the "Yes" box. Otherwise, mark an "X" in box 2, the "No" box.

[p. 38]

If the respondent does not know if the enumerated person is attending a regular school, mark an "X" in box 9, "Unknown."

C. Economic Characteristics (For persons aged ten and older)
Do not ask persons aged less than ten any more questions from the form. Cross out questions 14-21 with a large X.

The answers in question set 14 are the basis for categorizing the population aged ten and older as economically active (employed and unemployed) and economically inactive (students, domestic work (unpaid), those who live from rental or investment income, retired workers and the disabled).

The questions in this section refer to the situation in the week immediately preceding the census date (the week of February 25-March 2).

Question set 14: What did you/the person do during the week of February 25 - March 2?

Ask the questions in the order in which they appear on the form. Continue asking until you check off a box which corresponds to the principal activity performed by the person during the reference week, and according to the following instructions:

a) If you check off box 1, 2 or 3, go on to question 15-17. If the enumerated person is a woman aged 15 or older also ask questions 18-21.

b) If you check off box 4, 5, 6, 7 or 8 and the enumerated person is male, do not ask any more questions. If the enumerated person is a female aged 15 or older, do not ask questions 15-17, but do ask questions 18-21.
[p. 39]

When deciding which type of activity to choose, give preference to economic activity and then student activity before household tasks.

The following definitions will help you to decide the appropriate box to check off:

Box 1: Worked. This is a person who performed the equivalent of at least one day of paid work during the week of February 25-March 2.

Broaden the census term for "work" by including the following:

A) Paid work for another person as an employee or worker (paid) which includes:
a) Work paid by the day, or as regular pay
b) Work paid in kind (food, lodging or supplies received in place of cash payment).
c) Work paid by the piece, on commission or as tips.
d) Active duty in the armed forces.
B) Worked in his/her own business or profession, or as an independent worker (self-employed).

C) Worked without pay in a business or on a farm run by a family member (a son who works without pay in his father's store, for example) for more than 15 hours per week.

D. Worked part time i.e., any work performed in the last week on a part-time basis for which the person received payment in money.

Include in this category sewing and other work performed in the home for other persons or businesses, and for which payment in cash or kind is received. Also include the preparation of food, candy, etc. for sale.

Keep in mind that housewives, students and seniors who don't appear to work may actually perform

[p. 40]

activity that earns them money, and this is considered "work" for census purposes. Therefore, when a person answers that he/she hasn't worked, confirm that he/she has not in fact worked.

Do not consider the following as work (for census purposes):

A. Household tasks performed at home, such as housework (except work as a servant with or without pay), and jobs performed in or on one's own house, such as cutting the lawn, painting the walls, etc.

B. Unpaid volunteer work for the church, the Red Cross, or other non-profit organizations.

C. Work performed by persons who are in an institution such as a prison, sanitarium, retirement home or work farm. This does not include regular workers who are in fact performing a job.
Box 2: Had a job but did not work. This is a person who did not work during the week of February 25 - March 2, but who has a job or business from which he/she was absent for reasons of illness, bad weather, vacation, self-employed agricultural workers waiting for the sowing or harvesting season, etc.

Box 3: Looked for work. This is a person who did not have work during the week of February 25-March 2 because he/she was laid off or for other reasons; this person is looking for a new job.

Also, include in this category persons who are seeking work for the first time. These are people who have never had paid work and were taking steps to obtain a work for the first time during the week of February 25 - March 2.

Box 4: Studied. This is a person who was attending school (primary, high school or university) during the week of February 25 - March 2 as long as he/she did not perform any paid work during this period.

[p. 41]

Box 5: Performed household tasks (unpaid). This is a person who did not perform any paid work for the majority of the week of February 25 - March 2 and dedicated himself/herself exclusively to housework. Remember that domestic employees should not be included in this category, but in the "Worked" category.

Box 6: Lived off of rental or retirement income. This is a person who did not perform any paid activity during the week of February 25 - March 2, and received retirement income, a pension, or payment for services previously rendered by the person or a relative. Include in this category those persons who receive rental or other income without performing any type of paid activity.

Box 7: Disabled. This is person who cannot be categorized in any of the previous categories and who does not perform any economic activity because he/she is physically or mentally prevented from doing so.

Box 8: Other. This is a person who cannot be categorized in any of the previous categories. Include inactive persons who do not want to work.

Question set 15: What occupation, trade or type of job did you/the person perform during the week of February 25 - March 2, or in the last job that you/the person had?

Ask this question set only of those persons who answered option 1, 2 or 3 in the affirmative in question set 14. If the answer to these three options was negative, cross out the entire area related to question sets 15, 16 and 17 with a large X.

If the enumerated person states that he/she had more than one occupation, choose the principal occupation. This is the one at which the enumerated person earns the most money or spends the most time.

Write the principal occupation stated by the enumerated person in the space provided.

[p. 42]

When you write the principal occupation, use a word or phrase which describes exactly the kind of work that the enumerated person performs or used to perform. Avoid using general terms such as "worker," "employee," or "office worker" that do not provide a clear idea of the type of work performed. The following examples are provided to illustrate this point:

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Incorrect answer
(B) Correct answer

Incorrect answer: Laborer
Correct answer: Cowboy, cow milker, coffee picker, agricultural laborer, road laborer, construction laborer.

Incorrect answer: Mechanics
Correct answer: Car mechanic, dental technician, airplane mechanic.

Incorrect answer: Laborer
Correct answer: Typing, secretary, accountant, archivist.

Incorrect answer: Teacher
Correct answer: primary teacher music teacher, high school teacher, professor at an university.

Incorrect answer: Worker
Correct answer: Bricklayer, plumber, carpenter, house painter, bricklayer assistant, carpentry assistant.
[p. 43]
Incorrect answer: Weaver
Correct answer: Loom operator, hat weaver, hammock weaver.

It is important to note that a professional's job commonly corresponds to his/her profession. Nonetheless, some professionals may have performed work different from their area of specialization during the reference week. If this is the case, record the job that the person did and not the profession. For example, if a surgeon worked managing a hospital, write "Hospital director" as the principal occupation. Similarly, if a lawyer managed a textile company, write "Manager of textile company."

If the person has various occupations and cannot specify a particular one, indicate the principal one according to the definition given above.

For persons who are looking for work for the first time write "New Worker."

Question set 16: Did you/the person work for himself/herself, as a paid office worker, or as a family worker?

Keep in mind that this question set is related to question set 15 and has the following definitions:

1) Self employed with employee or worker: This is any person who has his/her own company or works for himself/herself in a profession or trade and has one or more paid workers.

Exceptions:
a) People whose only employees are domestic servants do not fall into this category.
b) A paid employee of a company of which he/she is not the owner does not fall into this category.
[p. 44]
c) A civil-service employee who has other employees under him/her does not fall into this category.

2. Self-employed without employees or workers: This is a person who works independently, does not have any paid employees, and did not employ anyone.

Self-employed without employees may count on the help of family workers and may also work alone or in partnership.

3. Paid employee. This is any person who works in exchange for pay, commission, or payment in kind.

4. Unpaid family worker. This is someone who performs unpaid labor in a family business and works for at least one-third of a normal workday. Persons who perform domestic work or occasional or random work in the business are excluded from this category.

Mark an "X" in one of the options. Mark an "X" in box 9, "Unknown" only if the respondent does not know the job category of a household member.

Question set 17: Where did you/the person work the week of February 25 - March 2, or during the last employment that you/the person had?

This is only for persons who stated an occupation (question set 15).

The ultimate goal of this question is to find out where the person performs or performed the occupation stated in question 15. To obtain information that is as exact as possible, ask the name of the principal activity of the establishment, business or office.

Write the type and name of the establishment, agricultural establishment, business or office and its principal activity in the designated space. Note the following before you fill out this question set:

A) If the person who worked during the week of February 25 -March 2 worked for the government, or if the last time he/she worked it was for the government, write the name of the office or institution and do not fill in the space for "Principal Activity." For example:

National Development Bank
Honduran Social Security Institute
Municipal Treasury
Ministry of Education
National University
Armed Forces

B) If the person worked during the week of February 25 - March 2 for a private enterprise or, if the last time he/she worked it was for a private enterprise, write the type, name and principal activity of the enterprises/establishment where the person works or last worked.

The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Name of the establishment
(B) Main activity

Name of the establishment: The Delights grocery store
Main activity: Sale of groceries.

Name of the establishment: Popular Pharmacy
Main activity: Sale of medicines.

Name of the establishment: Maya Hotel
Main activity: Lodging.

Name of the establishment: National Brewery
Main activity: Brewing beers.

Name of the establishment: Saint Joseph Farm
Main activity: Cattle breeding.

Name of the establishment: Mexico Lindo Warehouse
Main activity: Sale of clothing and related.

Name of the establishment: The Hell Nightclub
Main activity: Bar and dance hall.

Name of the establishment: D'Antoni Hospital
Main activity: Medical services.

Name of the establishment: Luis Landa School
Main activity: Primary school.

Name of the establishment: The Palm Shoe Store
Main activity: Sale of shoes.

Name of the establishment: The Craftwork Shoe Store
Main activity: Shoe manufacturing.

C) If the person worked by himself/herself during the week of February 25 - March 2, either with or without employees or a family employee, or if the last time he/she worked it was by himself/herself, write the name and the principal activity of the business. If the business does not have a name, write a horizontal line and just write the principal activity of the business.

[p. 46]

In some cases, it is impossible to determine the name of the establishment or company where the enumerated person works or worked. In these cases write in the space intended for principal activity as follows:

If the person works or worked on a farm without a name, or a name that the respondent does not remember, write Farm.

If the person works or worked in a family's house as a domestic employee, cook, nanny, washerwoman, ironer, gardener, etc., write Family house.

If the person works or worked in his/her own home as a seamstress, tailor, washerwoman, ironer, seller of fried food products, etc. write: In his/her own home.

If the persons works or worked for himself/herself in the street as a car washer, street seller, garden or courtyard cleaner, shoe shiner, etc. write In the street.

For fishermen who work or worked for themselves "at sea," write At sea.

Special cases: If a person works or worked at the same occupation for more than one establishment, business or office, for example, as an accountant who does or did the books for a factory and a department store, write the name of the business and the principal activity for which he/she receives or received the most money.

D) Fertility Characteristics (For all girls and women aged 15 and older)

If the person is a man or a girl aged less than 15, cross out question 18-21 with a large X.

The purpose of questions 18-21 is to obtain information that will allow fertility as well as important characteristics related to population growth to be studied. They are also oriented toward obtaining information for studies about the mortality level and previous mortality trends in the country's population.

To research such an important topic sufficiently requires the enumerator to be delicate and extremely clever in getting the data.

[p. 47]

Ask all girls and women aged 15 and older questions 18-21, regardless of civil status. If possible, they should be asked directly of each woman. Women forget at times to declare live-born children who died, and also those who are alive but not living with them. Keep this in mind in order to avoid omissions.

It has been noted that some enumerators assume that single women don't have children and they therefore do not ask the relevant questions. This method of proceeding is incorrect and leads to poor-quality data which cannot be used to carry out studies on population growth.

Question set 18. How many live-born children have you had?
Ask this question of all girls and women aged 15 and older, regardless of their civil status. If you think it necessary, explain to the respondent the usefulness of this question and why it is necessary to ask it even of single women.

When asking this question keep in mind the following definition:

Live Born: A live-born child is one who breathes, cries, or moves. If the child showed any of these signs of life and later died, the child is considered a live-born child and should therefore be recorded as such.

Before recording this question ask as many questions on the subject as you think necessary until you are sure that the woman has not had any live-born children.

For women who have had one or more live-born children, write the appropriate number after the word "Number _____."

If the respondent does not know if the women in question has had live-born children, write an "X" in box 99, "Unknown."

[p. 48]

For women who have not had any live-born children, write an "X" in the 00 box, "None." Do not ask questions 19-21, and cross them out with a large "X."

Question set 19. Of the live-born children :
A) How many live in this house?
B) How many live elsewhere?
C) How many have died?

Ask these questions of all girls and women aged 15 and older who have stated that they had live-born children in question 18.

Keep in mind that the total number from the information given in these three questions should be equal to the total number of live-born children that the person stated in question set 18.

If the respondent does not know if the woman in question has surviving children, write an "X" in box 99, "Unknown."

Question set 20. What was the date of birth of your last live-born child?
Ask this question of all girls and women aged 15 and older who stated that they had children in question set 18.

What was the date of birth of your last live-born child?

In the case of women who have had one or more live-born children, write the day, month and year of birth of the last live-born child.

If the respondent does not know the date of birth of the last live-born child, do everything possible to get at least the month and year, or at least the year, in which the child was born. Write an "X" in box 99, "Unknown," if the respondent doesn't know the date even after you have exhausted all possible means of obtaining it.

Question set 21. Is your last live-born child alive?
Is your last live-born child alive?

If the last live-born child is alive, write an "X" in box 1, "Yes."

[p. 49]

If the last live-born child has died, write an "X" in box 2, "No."

If the respondent doesn't know if the last live-born child of the woman in question has died or not, write an "X" in box 9, "Unknown."

Chapter VI. Institutional Dwellings

A. Instructions for Enumerating Persons Who Live in 'Institutional Dwellings'

1. Definition of persons who live in "Institutional Dwellings."
These are defined as those who live in buildings or lodgings which are structurally separate and independent and are intended to lodge groups of people who live together at the census moment for reasons of health, education, punishment or other, similar causes which are not related to household life.

The following are included in this definition: barracks or other military housing; asylums and clinics, jails, penitentiaries and reform schools; hotels, motels, boarding houses and guest houses (family houses with 5 or more lodgers); boarding school students; work camps; and other, similar institutions.

Enumerating 'persons who live in institutional dwellings' is similar to enumerating person who live in individual or family units, with the following exception: do not fill out section II, Dwelling Information, or section III, Small-scale and Home-based Industries.

2. How to Enumerate
The population in institutional dwellings is generally enumerated by special enumerators. A list of institutional dwellings for cities and municipalities has been drawn up for that purpose and institutions on that list will be removed from the regular sectors so that they may be covered independently.

[p. 50]

As for less-dense lodging places they must be covered by the regular enumerators in each sector assigned to him/her. If you do not receive instructions about this, you should enumerate as you normally would all lodging places included in your segment.

3. Permanent residence of persons who live in institutional dwellings.
Follow the detailed instructions in Chapter V to establish permanent residence of this population; they were provided for this purpose.

Establish contact with the director, administrator or person in charge of each establishment before beginning to enumerate it. This person will be very helpful in orienting your work and precisely determining:

A) The individual persons who habitually live and work in the institution;

B) The persons who live in the institution, as opposed to those who work there;

C) The persons who work in the establishment but are permanent residents elsewhere;

D) Persons other than the personnel who work in the institution but who are in the institution temporarily, either because they have a different permanent residence or because the reasons for which they are there are temporary.

E) Foreigners and Hondurans who live abroad and are not staying in the country, who are not enumerated.

Enumerate persons in groups A and B as members of the institution. Exclude persons in groups C, D, and E.

[p. 51]

A) Families within the institutional dwellings. Keep in mind special cases of families who may be living in an institutional dwelling. This is the case with persons who may live alone or with their family separate from the institutional dwelling, although they may find themselves physically within the same premises. For example, the director of a hospital or the administrator of a hotel may have independent facilities for their families within the same building or in a separate building. There may also be persons or families who, in a hotel, for example, may live independently, preparing their own food.

For such households, fill out a complete form, including parts I, II, III, and IV; for the rest of the resident persons in the institutional dwelling use another form and include only parts I and IV of the form.

B) Guest House. In the cities it is very common for families to receive guests or lodgers who pay a sum of money for food and lodging. When there are more than four such people the dwelling is no longer a family dwelling, but an institutional dwelling. If the number of such persons is four or fewer than four, the family is still considered as such, ie., they do not constitute an institutional dwelling.

C. Lodging in military institutions. For special reasons no enumerators are authorized to enumerate any military institution of any type or size. The enumeration of these locations will be done independently according to specific instructions which will be given at the appropriate time.

4. Final notes
Other instructions considered necessary for the enumeration of persons living in institutional dwellings will be given to you at the appropriate time by your supervisor. Any questions or problems that may come up in the course of your work should be directed to the same supervisor.

[p. 52]

5. List of most common institutional dwellings
The following is a list of the most common and frequently-encountered institutional dwellings:

Correctional and Penal Institutions:

-Reform schools
-Penitentiaries, prisons and penal colonies

Homes or Schools for the Disabled:

-Homes or schools for the blind
-Schools for the deaf-mute
-School for other physically incapacitated persons

Institutions for Medical Care:

-Insane asylums or psychiatric institutions
-Sanatoriums for mental illness
-Cancer hospitals
-Anti-tuberculosis hospitals
-Hospitals, clinics and sanatoriums for long-term chronic illnesses

Other Types of Institutions:

-Orphanages and homes for abandoned children
-Poorhouses
-Retirement homes
-Boarding schools and student residences
-Convents, seminaries and religious congregations
-Hotels
-Boarding houses
-Family boarding houses
-Lodging houses
-Police barracks, police guard-posts and jails for short-term prisoners (not sentenced)

General Hospitals and Clinics:

-General hospitals
-Private clinics
[p. 53]

Other Institutions:

-Ships
-Camps

Military Institutions:

-Barracks, garrisons and military posts

B. Instructions for Filling out the Form for Persons Who Live in 'Institutional Dwellings'

1. Form number.
Use the box in the upper right-hand side of the form in the same way you would to number forms for the population living in individual dwellings, i.e., write the sequential number which corresponds to the form when you arrive at the institutional dwelling.

2. Geographic localization
See page 13 of this manual

3. Dwelling information (Part II)
In this part ask only question set 1, "Type of Dwelling," (boxes 7, 8, 9, 0, X, Y) according to the type of institutional dwelling you are enumerating.

4. Information about persons living in institutional dwellings
This part is composed of the following groups: A) Personal and Geographic Characteristics; B) Educational Characteristics; C) Economic Characteristics; D) Fertility Characteristics.

Fill these items out for each person in the institutional dwelling according to the instructions on page 24 in chapter V of this manual.

Note: For obvious reasons, when you are filling out the part of the form relating to economic characteristics there are some institutional dwellings where you will fill in box 8 of question 14 for all persons residing there. This is the case, for example, with patients or those serving prison sentences. The following types of institutions are considered to be among them:

[p. 54]

A) Reform schools and prisons
B) Homes and schools for the disabled
C) Institutions for medical care
1. Insane asylums or psychiatric institutions
2. Sanatoriums for mental illness
3. Cancer hospitals
4. Anti-tuberculosis hospitals
5. Hospitals, clinics and sanatoriums for long-term chronic illnesses
D) Other types of institutions
1. Orphanages and homes for abandoned children
2. Retirement homes