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[p. 1]

National Statistical Institute of Guatemala


Eleventh Population and Sixth Dwelling Census
Enumerator's Manual
2002

[Table of Contents, pages 3-5, have been removed]

[Pages 1-20 and the first half of page 21 are not translated.]

[p. 21]

Part 4:
Form FC-01, Enumerator's route control form

This form allows keeping control of the daily work, record the location and number of structures, habitation places, households, and number of persons according to the route taken in the enumeration area.

During enumeration, the supervisor will request you this form, to know how the work is being completed and/or to verify information recorded in it or in the census form (FC-02).

After you have completed enumeration in your area, you will use the form FC-01, to fill the preliminary area report -FC-03-; an, then, give both forms to the supervisor, along with the census forms filled out and the rest of the census materials.

1. Basic definitions

Structure: This is a building that is independent and structurally self-supporting. It is covered by a roof and bounded by walls, and has one or more premises inside.

Premise: This is any constructed room, place, or physical space which has been converted or is arranged for human habitation, or to be used as an economic establishment (business, services, etc.) or for other uses (church, government office, school, market, etc.).

Dwelling: This is any structurally separate and independent room, place or lodging space which was built or arranged for human habitation. It must not be in use for any other purpose at the time of the census.

[p. 22]

Dwelling characteristics:
a) Separate: It is considered separate if it is surrounded by walls and covered by a roof so that a person or group of persons is private and safe.

b) Independent: It is considered independent if it has direct access from the street, stairway, hallway or courtyard, i.e. when one can enter or leave the dwelling without going through other premises.

Dwelling use:
Individual: This is any room, place, or physical space which is structurally separate and independent and is intended to house one or more households.

Institutional: This is any room, place, or physical space which is separate and independent and in which people are subject to certain required norms of living for reasons of housing, health, work, education, religion, status as orphans, rehabilitation, etc.

Census household: This is one or several people who may or may not be in the same family and who live together under the same roof to provide for their food requirements.

A household may be made up of:

a) A person who meets his/her food and lodging requirements alone.
b) Two or more people who unite to meet their food and lodging needs. The people may or may not be related.

2. Numbering the form
In the first box on the top right margin, write the sequential number from the sheet you are using. In the second box, write the total number of sheets used in the census zone once you have completed the enumeration.

Example:
"Sheet 3 of 5"
This indicates that this form is the third of a total of five used in this census zone.

[p. 23]

3. Census code
Copy into the grid spaces the code (department, municipality, section and zone) written on the enumerator's bag of supplies. Also, write the corresponding names of the department and municipality. Verify that these codes and numbers are the same on all forms used in your work zone.

[A graphic of the census code box, located at the top of section 1 of the census form, is included here.]

4. Instructions for filling out the form

Column 01. Date of the visit (day and month).
In this column write in digits the day and month in which you visit the structure. For example, 11/28 corresponds to the twenty-eighth day of November.

Column 02. Sequential number of the structure.
Write the number of each of the structures in sequential order according to your route in the zone. This number should be written on the cartographic supplies and repeated on this form (FC-01) as many times as the number of premises within the structure or when an individual dwelling contains more than one household.

Column 03. Address and other information for locating and identifying the structure.
Write the exact address identifying location of the structure. Identify the street, avenue, apartment number or house number, zone, neighborhood, village, settlement, name of establishment, etc.

[p. 24]

In rural areas or when there is no name, write the address as the respondent gives it to you, using physical description or other information so that the structure can be easily identified in the field.

Column 04. The use of the structure
Write the code in the appropriate grid space associated with how the structure is used at the time of the census. For example:

Code 1: If the premise is an individual dwelling.
Note that there may be individual dwellings in hotels, hospital, churches, factories, schools, etc., and these should be enumerated.

Code 2: If the dwelling is an institutional dwelling (i.e. a hotel, boarding house, hospital, barracks, etc.) go to another premise or structure.

Report institutional dwellings in your enumeration area to your supervisor. Special personnel will enumerate these types of dwellings.

Code 3: If the premise has another use, such as a business, church, factory, school, etc., go to another premise or structure.

Note that there may be individual dwellings in hotels, hospital, churches, factories, schools, etc., and these should be enumerated.

[p. 25]

Column 05. Sequential number of the individual dwelling
Write in sequential order the number that corresponds to each dwelling you visit.

This number is to be repeated as many times as there are households in the individual dwelling.

Write this number in the grid space corresponding to number 2, section I of the census form, "geographic localization."

Now, fill out the form. After filling out the census form, complete form FC-01 starting from column 06 (or column 07 if there are 2 or more households) and going through column 12. Copy the appropriate information from the census form.

Column 6. The individual dwelling is:
For occupied individual dwellings copy the code filled in on question 4 of section 2 of the census form. For unoccupied dwellings, write code 4.

If there is no qualified respondent, if you did not finish the interview, or if the dwelling is inhabited by absent persons, write the date and time for another visit in columns 13-18, as appropriate.

Column 07. Household number within the individual dwelling
Copy the number written in question 3 of section 1 of the census form.

Column 08. Sequential number of the form in the zone
Copy the number you wrote in the space corresponding to "sequential number of the form in the zone" written on the top right of the census form.

[p. 26]

Column 09. Name of the head of household
Write the name of the head of the census household.

Columns 10-12. Number of persons in the household who live in this specific dwelling
In column 11 and 12 write, in digits, the total number of males and females who are permanent residents in the household being enumerated.

In column 10, write the sum of columns 11 and 12 in digits. Verify that this total is the same as what you wrote in question 3 of section 6 of the census form. If they are different, check to see if you have omitted anyone, as well as the person count and the total.

Columns 13-18. Additional visits
In cases where there is no one in the dwelling, there is no qualified respondent, or you did not finish the interview, write the date and time at which you will return for additional interviews. Leave form FC-23, "notice of additional visit," until you complete the information. When you have completed the interview, change the "individual dwelling occupation status" (column 06), if necessary.

Column 19: Household with interview
Write in the appropriate grid space:
Code 1 when the entire interview in the household has been completed.
Code 2 when there was no interview or the interview was not finished.

[p. 27]

[The page here is a reproduction of the "Verification of Enumerator's Route" form.]

[p. 28]

Part 5:
Census form (FC-02)

1. Description
The census form contains the following sections:

I. Geographic localization
II. Dwelling characteristics
III. Identifying the household
IV. Household housing status
V. International emigration
VI. Total number of persons in the household
VII. Individual characteristics

[p. 30]

2.2. Specific instructions

b) Dwelling with more than one census household
- Complete the form of the first household.
- Use a form for each census household that resides in the room.
- From the second census household, in chapter I (geographical location) enter the same data as recorded on the first registered household form (main form), and in number 3, write down the number of the household that corresponds.
- Cancel chapters II (characteristics of the dwelling) and Ill (identification of households), drawing an X throughout them, since the data of the room and the identification of households were recorded on the ballot of the first registered household.
- Continue the interview starting from chapter IV (housing situation)

c) Census household with more than ten people
- The census form allows recording the information of ten people. When the household is composed of more than ten people, use the necessary additional tickets in the following way
- Mark the box corresponding to "additional ballot" and write, in the upper right margin, the corresponding sequential number of the ballot.
- On each additional ballot, enter in chapter I. geographical location, the same data as recorded in the first ballot of the registered household.
Cancel with an X the chapters II, Ill, IV, V.
- Start registration of names and surnames, starting with person 11, in question 3 of chapter VI of the first additional ballot.
- Continue the interview in chapter VII "characteristics of persons."

[p. 31]

3. Filling out the form by section

Part 1: Geographic localization

1. Census code, area, and block
Copy the department, municipality, section and zone codes onto all the census forms you use in your area. The codes are on the tag of the enumerator's bag of census supplies. Copy the area and block codes from the cartographic materials as appropriate.

2. Dwelling number and household number
In the spaces corresponding to "sequential dwelling number" and "household number in the dwelling," write the numbers, in order, from columns 05 and 07 of form FC-01, the "verification of enumerator's route" form.

[p. 32]

[A graphic of the geographic localization section (section 1, questions 1 through 8) of the census form is included here.]

3. Name and code of the populated area
Write the complete name and code of the populated area in which the dwelling is located. Copy them from the list that you receive with your cartographic supplies. Verify the name by checking with local authorities and residents of the area. If they do not correspond, inform your supervisor.

[A graphic of question 6 from section 1 census form, "name of populated area," is included here.]

4. Type of populated area
Verify the type of populated area you are enumerating with the local authorities and neighbors. Use the list you received with your cartographic supplies as a basis.

[A graphic of question 7 from section 1 of the census form, "type of populated area," is included here.]

[p. 33]

5. Dwelling address
Write the exact address of the dwelling. Write the street, avenue, road, boulevard, beltway, house number, and municipal zone. In areas with no name, use points of reference that allow the dwelling to be located.

[A graphic of question 8 from section 1 of the census form, "dwelling address," is included here.]

Part 2: Dwelling characteristics

This section contains questions and answers for the dwelling characteristics and should only be asked of the first household (household 01) in each dwelling. For unoccupied dwellings, only fill out questions 1-4 of this section and then go to another premise.

1. Type of dwelling
Dwelling is any structurally separate and independent room, place, or lodging space which was built, renovated, or arranged for human habitation. It must not be used in its entirety for any other purpose at the time of the census.

The following are essential characteristics of a dwelling:
a) Separate: It is considered separate if it is surrounded by walls and covered by a roof, so that a person or group of persons is private and safe.

[p. 34]

b) Independent: It is considered independent if it has direct access from the street, stairway, hallway or courtyard, i.e. when one can enter or leave the dwelling without going through other premises.

[A graphic of question 1 from section 2, "type of dwelling," is included here.]

1. Types of dwellings

There are two types of dwellings: individual and collective.

1.1 Individual dwelling: This is any room, place or physical space which is structurally separate and intended to lodge one or more households. Types of individual dwellings include detached house, apartment, room in a tenement building, hut, improvised housing, and others.

Detached house: This is any separate and independent room, place, or physical space which has been built, adapted or arranged for lodging one or more households, and which is not used for any other purpose at the time of the census.

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

[p. 35]

Apartment: This is a room or collection of rooms that make up part of a building of two or more floors. It is divided from other, similar apartments by dividing walls that go from the floor to the ceiling. It is characterized by having access through a common area (hallways) and has its own water, electric, and toilet facilities.

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

Room in a tenement building: This is a room located in a site appropriate for lodging one or more households. It is characterized generally by a direct entrance through a hallway or courtyard. A household may occupy one or more rooms and this collection of rooms constitutes a single dwelling. Generally, all services (water, electricity and toilets) are shared.

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

Hut: This is a dwelling built of materials found locally (mud, straw, lepa, wood or palm leaves). It generally has a roof made of straw or palm leaves, and a dirt floor.

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

Improvised housing: This is a provisional dwelling for one or more households constructed of discarded material (plastic, cardboard, laminate, lepa).

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

[p. 36]

Other: The following are included in this category: mobile units (tents, boats, train car, etc.); as well as premises which are permanent structures not intended for human habitation, such as barns, garages, stands or stalls, warehouses, caves, etc., which are being used for human habitation at the time of the census.

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

1.2 Collective dwelling: This is any room, place or physical space which is separate and independent and in which people are subject to certain required norms of living for reasons of housing, health, work, education, religion, status as orphans, rehabilitation, etc. These premises are enumerated by special personnel.

[A graphic of option 7 from question 1 of section 2 of the census form, the "collective" category, is included here]

Hotel or boarding house: A premise in which people lodge temporarily.

Hospital or clinic: A public or private establishment, which provides medical assistance.

Boarding school: An official or private establishment where persons who are studying live permanently.

Retirement home institution or orphanage: An establishment intended for the lodging of the elderly, disabled or orphaned.

Jail or correctional establishment: An establishment intended for imprisoning people (either while awaiting trial or to fulfill a sentence), either adults or minors.

[p. 37]

Military or police establishment: Premises intended for permanently lodging members of the army or national civil police, municipal police, etc.

Other: Premises or establishments with characteristics other than the above, such as brothels and homeless shelters in which people reside permanently.

Homeless: These people typically sleep in doorways, church atriums, parks, on sidewalks, under bridges, etc. They will be enumerated by special personnel.

[A graphic of option 8 from question 1 of section 2 of the census form, the "Homeless" category, is reproduced here.]

2. Main material of the exterior walls
This information is obtained by direct observation or from the respondent.

[A graphic of question 2, from section 2 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 38]

3. Main material of the roof
This information is obtained through direct observation.

[A graphic of question 3, from section 2 of the census form, is included here.]

4. Occupation status
This refers to determining whether the dwelling is occupied or unoccupied at the time of the census.

The dwelling is considered occupied with people present if the people are present at the time of the interview.

The dwelling is considered occupied with people absent when no one is in the dwelling at the time of the visit, but the dwelling has furniture and other frequently used items. Check with the neighbors as to a possible date and time at which you may be able to conduct the interview and write it on form FC-01, "verification of enumerator's route," in the "additional visits" columns. Also, leave respective form FC-23, "notice of additional visit".

The following dwellings are considered occupied, seasonal use: country houses, beach houses, and farm-owners' houses which are only inhabited for brief periods during the year and which are empty at the time of the visit. Fill in this option and proceed to another dwelling.

[p. 39]

[A graphic of question 4, from section 2 of the census form, is included here.]

If the status of the dwelling is unoccupied and the neighbors confirm this, fill in the appropriate option and go to another dwelling.

5. Main material of the floors
Ask, "What is the main material of the floors of this dwelling?"

[A graphic of question 5, from section 2 of the census form, is included here.]

Responses that include carpeting, vinyl, plastic, or other coverings should not be accepted as the main material of the floor.

[p. 40]

Section 3: Household identification

Census household: This is one or several persons, with or without family ties, who live together under the same roof to provide for their food needs. The household may comprise of:

a) One person who meets his/her food and lodging needs alone.

b) Two or more persons who unite to meet their food and lodging needs. The persons may or may not be related, as long as they live permanently in the dwelling.

[A drawing accompanies this description.]

To identify a household or households in a dwelling, ask, "How many persons currently live in this dwelling?"

[p. 41]

[A graphic of question 1, from section 3 of the census form, is included here.]

If there is one person, this constitutes a census household. Go to section 4, "household housing status."

If there are two or more people, ask, "Do these people prepare their food separately?"

[A graphic of question 2, of section 3 of the census form, is included here.]

If the answer is negative, these people are considered a census household. Go to section 4, "household housing status."

If the answer is yes, ask, "How many groups of people prepare their food separately?"

[p. 42]

[A graphic of question 3, from section 3 of the census form, is included here.]

Write the total number of groups in the appropriate box. Each group constitutes a census household. Now go on to interview the first household (household number 01) on this form.

For the rest of the household use other forms, filling in the same codes from numbers 1 and 2 of section one, "geographic localization" from the first household's form. Also, write the corresponding household number within the dwelling. Cross out sections 2 and 3 and begin the interview with section 4, "household housing status".

Section 4: Household housing status

The information you record in this section is for each household in a dwelling.

1. Ownership status
Ask, "In what capacity does the household occupy this dwelling?"

[A graphic of question 1, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 43]

Owner: This is when one of the members of the household has acquired property rights to the dwelling by purchasing it with cash or on credit. At the time of the census, it is paid for completely or is being paid off in installments. This option includes premises received as an inheritance.

Renter: This is when one of the members of the household pays the owner or subtenant of the dwelling a certain amount of money, or a money substitute with goods or services.

Borrowed: This is when the members of the household occupy the dwelling without paying rent and with the express authorization of the owner.

Other: This is any other form of tenancy not covered by the previous options. This category includes dwellings in which a member of the household owns the structure but not the land, as in the case of squatters' settlements.

2. Water facilities
Ask, "What type of water facilities are regularly available in the household?"

[A graphic of question 2, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

- Determine whether the household has a tap for its exclusive use.

- The option "tap for several households" refers to a tap located within the dwelling which is for use by two or more households.

- The option "public tap" refers to a tap located outside the dwelling in the street or alley, on the sidewalk or in the park, and for communal use.

[p. 44]

- If the water is delivered determine if it is from a well, river, lake or spring, or a truck or barrel.

-The "other" option is for households that are supplied with water by means other than those in the previous options.

3. Availability of toilet facilities
Ask, "Does the household have toilet facilities?

[A graphic of question 3, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

If the answer is negative, go to question 6, "lighting in the household."

If the answer is yes, go to the next question.

4. Type of toilet facilities
Ask, "What kind of toilet facilities?"

[A graphic of question 4, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

Fill in the appropriate option.

[p. 45]

5. Exclusive use of toilet facilities

Ask, "Are the toilet facilities...?"

[A graphic of question 5, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

Fill in the appropriate option.

6. Lighting
Ask, "What type of lighting is normally available in the household?"

[A graphic of question 6, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

7. Total number of rooms
Ask, "how many rooms are there in the household, not including the bathroom or the kitchen?"

[A graphic of question 7, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

For the purpose of the census, a room is defined as a space located within a dwelling, enclosed by walls that go from the floor to either the roof or a height of two meters, and which has enough floor space to fit an adult-size bed.

The following are considered rooms: bedrooms, dining rooms, living rooms, rooms intended for lodging persons, rooms for domestic employees, and private study.

[p. 46]

Do not include bathrooms, hallways or corridors, garages, kitchens, or rooms used exclusively for commercial, industrial or professional purposes.

8. Bedrooms
Ask, "Of all the rooms, how many in total are used as bedrooms?"

[A graphic of question 8, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

Bedroom: This is a room normally used for sleeping.

9. Kitchen
Ask, "Does the household have a room used only for preparing meals?"

[A graphic of question 9, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

Kitchen: This is a room equipped for preparing main meals and intended only for this purpose.

10. Cooking equipment
Ask this question regardless of whether or not the household has a room used only for cooking food.

Ask, "What means does the household normally use to cook food?"

[p. 47]

[A graphic of question 10, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

11. Trash disposal
Ask, "How does the household normally dispose of its trash?"

[A graphic of question 11, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

12. Home-based employment in the dwelling
Ask, "Does any member of the household in this dwelling work making items for sale, such as furniture, clothing, crafts or food?

[A graphic of question 12, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 48]

This question is designed to obtain information from households where some type of economic activity takes place, such as activity related to the production and sale of goods and services: furniture, clothing, crafts, food, general repair workshops and grain mills.

Include the following:
Home-based employment: This includes the manufacture of items for sale as long as it takes place within the dwelling and in rooms not reserved exclusively for that purpose.

If one or more members of the household receives supplies from a factory to manufacture goods (home-based employees), and receives pay for such work, this is not considered home-based employment given that it is dependent on the aforementioned factory.

13. Disability in the household
Ask, "Is anyone in this household disabled?"

[A graphic of question 13, from section 4 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 49]

Disability: This is the restriction some persons have in hearing, seeing, speaking, learning or moving as others do. The disability may be present from birth or due to an illness or an accident.

Blindness: This is a restriction in a person's ability to see, as when the person sees nothing or less than normal even when wearing glasses.

Deafness: This is a restriction in a person's ability to hear words and sounds, or the complete inability to hear. Deaf persons generally speak with difficulty and use gestures to communicate.

Loss of or disability in upper extremities: This is a restriction in a person's ability to use his/her arms and/or hands, or a lack of one or both arms. The person has difficulty supporting him/herself and lifting things with his/her hands.

Loss of or disability in lower extremities: This is a restriction in a person's ability to use one or both legs and which prevents him/her from walking or climbing stairs. It may also be a lack of one or both legs. The person has difficulty standing up and uses crutches, orthopedic devices or a wheelchair to get around.

Mental disability: This is an intellectual ability, which is considered lower than normal and is associated with difficulty in learning and in socializing with others. People with a mental disability generally have difficulty expressing themselves and require special care. Those with Down syndrome fall into this category and are distinguished by a tongue which is disproportionately large with respect to the size of the mouth, and for this reason they keep their mouths open.

Other disability: This category includes autism, dwarfism, cerebral palsy, psychiatric illnesses, schizophrenia and epilepsy, as well as problems speaking, such as stuttering, and difficulty pronouncing words, which is a problem generally associated with deafness.

Keep in mind that this question is directed to the entire household, and so there may be more than one person with one or more disabilities.

Section 5: International emigration

Ask, "In the past ten years, has anyone from this household gone to live permanently in another country?"

[p. 50]

[A graphic of question 1, from section 5 of the census form, is reproduced here.]

This section deals with the number of persons in the household who have gone to live permanently in another country within the last 10 years.

Make it clear that you are not interested in knowing who left, but rather how many persons have left.

If the answer is positive, ask "how many women?" and "how many men?"

[Two graphics, one of question 2 and 3, from section 5 of the census form, are included here.]

If the answer indicates no person has left, go to section 6, "total number of persons in the household."

Section 6: Total number of persons in the household

The purpose in defining the following concepts is to facilitate your inquiries into the questions in this section.

1. Date and census moment
The census date is Sunday, November 24 and the census moment is at zero hours on the 24th, that is, midnight between November 23rd and November 24th, 2002. Therefore:

Children born before zero hours on November 24, 2002 should be enumerated.

[p. 51]

Children who were born after zero hours on November 22, 2002, should not be enumerated;

Persons who died after zero hours on November 24, 2002 should be enumerated;

Persons who died before zero hours on November 24, 2002 should not be enumerated;

Make sure to enumerate children born before the census moment, whether or not they are in the dwelling on the day of the interview.

2. Permanent residence
This is the geographic location where a person has already established his/her residence, or is intending to settle into, on the date of the census.

The length of time that determines permanent residency is 3 months or more. When a person has lived fewer than three months in a dwelling, but intends to stay longer than the time indicated, he/she should be considered a permanent resident of that place.

People do not stop being members of the household simply because they are temporarily absent for reasons of illness, vacation, tourism, work, etc., if they plan to return to their permanent place of residence once the circumstances which caused them to be absent on the date of the census have returned to normal.

The following are permanent residents of a dwelling. Enumerate them:

Persons who live in the premise permanently, whether or not they are family relations.

Person who are temporarily absent at the time of the enumeration due to work, health, or vacation but who live permanently in the premise.

Foreigners who have had their permanent residence in the country for three or more months, or those who have been in the country for fewer than three months but intend to stay longer.

The following are not permanent residents of a dwelling. Do not enumerate them.

Persons who are visiting the premise and who have a permanent residence elsewhere.

[p. 52]

Persons who left to live permanently in another place for reasons of schooling, work, etc.

Persons who work during the day in the dwelling, but who sleep in their own permanent residence (domestic employees, day workers, etc.).

Members of the household who, for three months or more, are completing a prison sentence or who are in prison awaiting trial.

Foreigners who are visiting with no intention of settling in the country.

Ask, "Is this dwelling the permanent residence of the people in this household?"

[A graphic of question 1, from section 6 of the census form, is included here.]

If the answer is yes, go to question 3.

If the answer is no, ask, "Where do they reside permanently?"

[A graphic of question 2, from section 6 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 53]

Write the exact address of the permanent residence on the appropriate lines. Include the name of the department and the municipality.

If the members of the household reside in another country, fill in the appropriate oval and finish the interview. Go to another dwelling or premise, as the situation dictates.

Ask, "How many persons are there in this household?"

In the appropriate spaces, write the total number of persons in the household, as well as the first and last name of each member. Begin with the head of household, who is number 1, followed by his/her spouse, single adult or minor children, other relatives and other non-relatives.

Correctly figuring out how many people are in the household will help you keep track of household members during the interview, as well as help you avoid omitting or duplicating persons in the census household when you write them down in Section VII, Individual characteristics.

[A graphic of question 3, from section 6 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 54]

Section 7: Individual characteristics

This section records individual information for a maximum of ten people - those listed in section 6, "total number of persons in the household." If there are more than ten people in the census household use as many additional forms as necessary.

[A graphic of the "individual characteristics", located at the top of section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Person number: In the grid spaces on the upper left side of the form, write the number that corresponds to the person according to the order from the list of persons in section VI. The head of household is number 1.

Name: In the appropriate space, write the name of each of the persons who make up the household according to the order in which they appear on the list in question 3 of section VI. Begin with the head of household and continue writing according to the order established.

Information supplied by respondent: This is when the person interviewed gives information about his/her own self. Fill in the appropriate oval according to the information you receive.

Questions 1-11 should be asked for all permanent residents of the household in the dwelling.

[Page 55]

1. Relationship
Ask, "What is the family or other relationship to the head of the household?"

[A graphic of question 1, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

- This is determined according to the relationship of each member to the head of household.

- Include adopted children and children born of another marriage in option 4, "stepchild."

- Fill in the appropriate oval for persons who are residents of institutional housing or homeless.

2. Sex
Ask, "Is this person male or a female?"

[A graphic of question 2, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Note that there may be names that are used by both men and women, such as Carmen, María, José, Concepción, Guadalupe, Tránsito, Inés, etc. For this reason, you should always ask this question.

[p. 56]

3. Age
Ask, "How old is the person in completed years?"

[A graphic of question 3, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Write the age in completed years in the appropriate grid spaces. If the person is less than one years old write 00, and if 98 or more write 98.

Do not under any circumstances fail to write the person's age. If the respondent does not remember, help him/her figure it out by referring to important events in the country's history.

4. Date of birth
Ask, "What is the person's date of birth?"

[A graphic of question 4, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Use digits to write the day, month, and year in the appropriate spaces. For example, January is 1, February is 2, and so on up through December, which is 12.

Example: If the respondent says that he/she was born on December 8, 1957, write 8/12/1957.

5. Place of birth
Ask, "Which municipality and department was the person born in?"

[A graphic of question 5, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 57]

If the person was born in the municipality in which the interview is taking place, only fill in the oval for "here."

If the person was born in another municipality, write the name of the municipality and the department.

If the person was not born in Guatemala, write the name of the country and the year in which he/she arrived in Guatemala.

6. Permanent residence in December 1996 (peace treaty)
Ask, "Which municipality and department was the person a permanent resident of in December 1996? (Peace treaty)"

[A graphic of question 6, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

If the person is less than 6 years old, fill in the oval for "not yet born."

If the person is older than 6 years and was living in the municipality in which the interview is taking place, fill in the oval for "here" only.

If the person was living in another municipality, write the name of the municipality and the department.

If the person was living abroad, write the name of the country.

7. Deceased mother
Ask, "Is the person's mother alive?"

[A graphic of question 7, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 58]

8. Ethnic group
Ask, "Is the person indigenous?"

[A graphic of question 8, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

It is important to respect the right of the person to identify his/her own ethnic group when determining if the person is indigenous. The answer to this question should be obtained through direct questioning and not simply through observation.

9. Membership in ethnic group
Ask, "Which ethnic group (people) is the person a member of?"

[A graphic of question 9, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

As in the preceding question, it is important to respect the right of the individual to identify the ethnic group or people he/she belongs to. The answer is not related to the language which the individual first learned to speak (maternal language) or to any other languages the respondent might know.

Questions 10 and 11 are for persons in the household aged three or older.

10. Maternal language
Belonging to a certain ethnic group does not determine the language the person first learned to speak.

[p. 59]

Ask, "What language did the person first learn to speak?"

[A graphic of question 10, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

11. Languages
Ask, "What other languages does the person speak?"

[A graphic of question 11, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Note that the person may speak several languages. If that is the case, only write down the codes for two languages, not including the maternal language recorded in the previous question.

For questions 9, 10 and 11 use the table below, which includes codes for the country's languages and ethnic groups.

It is important to note that you will need to identify the appropriate code from the list in order to write the respondent's answer to the preceding questions.

[p. 60]

[A list of codes for questions 9, 10, and 11, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

The option "other" includes membership in other ethnic groups, or languages such as English, German, Chinese, etc.

Questions 12-20 are for persons aged seven or older.

12. Literacy
Ask, "Does the person know how to read and write?"

[A graphic of question 12, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

A person who is literate knows how to read and write in a certain language.

[p. 61]

13. Level of schooling
Ask, "What was the last level and or grade that this person passed in pre-primary, primary, middle or high school, or university?"

[A graphic of question 13, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

The levels of instruction corresponds to the regular system of formal education.

The mid-level of instruction refers to secondary education (middle and high school). Higher education corresponds to university education.

The question refers to the level and/or grade passed, and not the current level or grade.

Fill in the oval corresponding to code 10 if the respondent has not passed any grade.

Fill in the oval corresponding to code 20 if the respondent has passed pre-primary.

Write in digits (from 1 to 7) the answer corresponding to grades passed in primary, middle or high school, or university. If the answer is given in semesters, calculate an average of two semesters per grade. For example, the eighth semester would correspond to the fourth grade.

14. School attendance
Ask, "Did the person attend a pre-primary, primary or secondary school, or a university, during the 2002 school year?"

[A graphic of question 14, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 62]

If the answer is yes, ask if it was a public or private institution and fill in the corresponding oval. Then go to question 16.

15. Reason for not attending school
This question is only for person aged seven to fourteen.

Ask, "What was the main reason for not attending school?"

[A graphic of question 15, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

The reference period for questions 16-20 is the week preceding the census date (from Sunday November 17 to Saturday November 23, 2002).

16. Employment the previous week
Ask, "Did the person work the week of November 17-23?"

[A graphic of question 16, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Work is:
An economic activity, paid or unpaid, for a period of at least one hour during the week preceding the census date (the reference week) where the economic activity is performed for another person as an employee or worker.

[p. 63]

These economic activities include:

Work paid daily or as a regular salary;

Work for payment in kind (in exchange for food, lodging or supplies rather than
payment in cash or salary);

Work paid for on a piecework basis, as commission, or in tips;

Active employment in the armed forces (army);

An economic activity performed in one's own business or professional endeavor or as an independent employee (self-employed);

An economic activity performed without pay in a business, or in an economic activity in a household or on a farm or agricultural enterprise run by a member of the household. Examples are a son who works in his parents' grocery store or shop, or a son who helps his parents in their agricultural work;

Any other economic activity performed during the reference period and for which payment is received in cash or kind, including sewing done in the household; cloth manufacture, arts and crafts, food or candy produced for sale, as well as work in workshops and mills set up at home.

Remember that housewives, students, children, and the elderly can perform any economic activity that produces income, in which case they should be considered workers.

The following items are not considered work:

Housework (except for domestic employees who receive wages or a salary), and maintenance work done on the dwelling by members of the household;

Unpaid community and volunteer work for the church, as fire fighters, and for other non-profit organizations.

[p. 64]

Work performed by persons confined involuntarily in institutions (prisons, sanitariums, shelters, work farms, etc.).

If the answer is affirmative (person did work in week of November 17-23), go to question 18.

17. Type of activity
Ask, "What did the person do the week of November 17th to the 23rd?"

Did not work, but has some form of employment (vacation or leave, illness, bad weather, lack of supplies, etc.): This is a person who did not work during the reference week but who has a job or a business from which he/she was absent, because of vacation time off, illness, leave of absence, bad weather, etc.

Participated in or helped with agricultural work. This person participated in or helped with the household's agricultural work during the reference week.

Made or helped prepare food products for sale (tortillas, bread, tamales, fried tortillas): This person made or helped make food products at home for sale during the reference week.

Made or helped make articles like hats, baskets, arts and crafts and furniture for sale: This person made or helped make hats, baskets, arts and crafts or furniture at home for sale.

Spun, knit or sewed, or helped to spin, knit or sew, articles for sale: This person helped spin, knit or sew articles at home for sale.

Looked for work and had worked before: This person worked previously, but during the reference week he/she was unemployed and actively seeking work.

[p. 65]

After having read the six (6) previous options, pause for a moment and wait for the respondent to answer. If necessary, read the options again. If there is no answer, read the last five (5) options.

Looked for work for the first time. This is a person who has never worked and actively looked for a job during the reference week.

Studied only. This person only attended school during the reference week.

Lived off rents or retirement income only. This person only received money during the reference week from his /her retirement or pension, investments, national money transfers or international remittances.

Worked in the household only. This person solely worked in domestic housework within his /her own dwelling, without receiving any pay or salary.

Did not work. This person did not perform any economic activity during the week prior to the census.

[A graphic of question 17, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 66]

If the answer is any of options 7-11, go to question 21.

18. Principal occupation
Ask, "What occupation, type of work or job did the person perform in this job?"

[A graphic of question 18, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

If the person has more than one occupation, write the one that provides the most income. If they pay equally, write the one he/she worked at most during the reference week.

In the corresponding space, write the main occupation, type of work or job declared by the respondent, using words to describe exactly the task he/she performs. Avoid using general terms.

Examples of occupations:

If a surgeon worked as the director of a hospital during the reference week, write: hospital director (public or private) as his/her principal occupation.

If a lawyer worked as a factory manager in a factory producing cotton fabric during the reference week, write "manager of a factory producing cotton fabrics" as his/her principal occupation.
[p. 67]

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Incorrect answer for occupation
(B) Correct answer for occupation

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Mechanic.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Automobile mechanic, technician who makes dental parts.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Secretary.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Typist who transcribes documents, secretary who writes letters and answers the phone, secretary in charge of sales files.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Construction worker.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Plumber who installs and repairs plumbing, bricklayer who prepares mortar and lays bricks, painter of interior and exterior walls.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Engineer.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Civil engineer, chemical engineer, electrical engineer.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Teacher.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Urban primary-school teacher, rural primary-school teacher, home-economics teacher, music education teacher.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Cashier.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Department-store cashier, bank cashier, factory cashier.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Agricultural worker.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Worker who plants tomatoes, worker who plants corn, worker who milks and cleans cows, worker who harvests coffee or sugarcane, etc.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Sales clerk.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Counter clerk in a fabric store, counter clerk in footwear items, counter clerk in hardware items, counter clerk in office supplies.

Incorrect answer for principal occupation: Street vendor.
Correct answer for principal occupation: Street vendor of brooms, Street vendor of candies, street vendor of several products.

[p. 68]

19. Occupational category
Ask, "What job do you perform in your principal occupation?"

[A graphic of question 19, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Employer: This person is responsible for one or more wage earners who receive payment in cash or kind for performing an economic activity.

Self-employed with premises: This person does not have an employer, but manages his/her own business, company or farm and is not responsible for paid employees. This person has premises for his/her exclusive use in which to conduct business, such as a grocery store/warehouse, a market stall, office, farm, workshop, etc.

Self-employed without premises: This person does not have an employer, but manages his/her own business, company or farm and is not responsible for paid employees. This person does not have exclusive use of a fixed place in which to conduct his/her business and normally does so in the street or outdoors. Examples are street vendors, shoeshine boys, etc.

Civil service: This is a person who earns a wage or salary from a government office. This may be either the central government, or state and local.

Private employee: This person earns a wage or salary in the private sector.

Unpaid family member: This is a person who works in a company, business, farm or agricultural enterprise owned or managed by a family member. He/she does not receive pay for his/her work.


[p. 69]

20. Branch of economic activity
Ask, "In what branch of economic activity is the factory, workshop, office or establishment where the person was or is employed?"

[A graphic of question 20, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Avoid using general terms such as factory, ranch, workshop, store, etc. when you write down the activity.

Write the establishment's branch of activity. Do not write the name of the establishment or operation, such as El Ángel Coffee Processing Plant, Las Ilusiones Factory, etc., unless it is a government institution, such as the central government, or state or local governments (IGSS, INDE, USAC, municipalities, etc.). In those cases, write the name of the entity.

The following are examples of correct/incorrect way to record responses:

[The original document includes a table below.]

[Column headings:]
(A) Incorrect answer for branch of activity
(B) Correct answer for branch of activity

Incorrect answer for branch of activity: Factory.
Correct answer for branch of activity: Shirt factory, shoe factory, chocolate factory, food-products factory, factory making traditional woven clothing, wooden furniture factory.

Incorrect answer for branch of activity: Store.
Correct answer for branch of activity: Grocery sales.

Incorrect answer for branch of activity: Workshop.
Correct answer for branch of activity: Women's dress manufacture, vehicle repair and maintenance.

Incorrect answer for branch of activity: Santa Luisa Farm.
Correct answer for branch of activity: Coffee farming, corn farming, vegetable farming, sugar cane farming, cardamom farming, tobacco farming, etc.

Incorrect answer for branch of activity: Company.
Correct answer for branch of activity: Customs-processing office, real-estate office.

[p. 70]

Question 21 is for persons aged 12 and over.

21. Current marital status
Ask, "What is the person's current marital status?"

[A graphic of question 21, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Cohabiting: This person is cohabiting with another person.

Married: This person is legally married and lives with his/her spouse, i.e. is not widowed, divorced, or separated.

Divorced or separated: This is a person whose marriage was legally dissolved or is separated from his/her spouse and has not married again and does not cohabit with anyone.

Widowed: This is a person who was married, whose spouse has died, and who has not re-married and is not cohabiting.

Single: This person has never married and is not cohabiting with anyone.

Questions 22-25 are for females aged 12 and over.

Note that they may have or have had children even if they are single or minors.

Ask these questions directly of each female. Try to make sure that they do not forget to include live-born children who have since died, those who are still alive and living elsewhere, and recently born children.

[p. 71]

22. Total number of live-born children
Ask, "How many live-born children has the person had in all?"

[A graphic of question 22, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Live-born: This is a child who breathed, cried or moved when he/she was born, even if he/she died immediately afterward and regardless of whether or not the umbilical cord had been cut or the placenta delivered.

Write the total number of children indicated by the respondent. Do not forget to include children who live elsewhere, as well as those who have died.

If the answer is "none," go to the next person (female aged 12 and over).

23. Total number of surviving children
Ask, "How many of this person's children are still alive"?

[A graphic of question 23, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Surviving: This is all those who are alive at the time of the census, regardless of whether they live with the mother or not.

Write the total number of children indicated by the respondent.

24. Date of birth of the last live-born child
Ask, "What is the date of birth of the person's last live-born child?"

[A graphic of question 24, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

[p. 72]

Write the day, month and year of birth of the last child born living. Do not forget to include those who died immediately after being born or who live elsewhere.

25. Survival of last live-born child
Ask, "Is the person's last live-born child living?"

[A graphic of question 25, from section 7 of the census form, is included here.]

Surviving children are all those who are still alive at the time of the census, regardless of whether they live with the mother.

Continue with the next person. If it is the last person on your list, conclude the interview and go to the next household or premise.

Before leaving, the household review the form and make sure you have asked all the questions and written answers for them. Also, make sure that all persons in the household are enumerated.