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Hellenic Republic
Ministry of National Economy
General Secretariat of the National Statistical Service of Greece (NSSG)

Census Directorate Department of Population, Buildings and Housing Census
Report on the Population - Housing and the Small Family Business
(l' Artisanat á Domicile)
Census
March 17th 1991

By Minas Dogas
Head of the Department of Population, Buildings And Housing Census
Athens, July 1996

[Pages 2-15 omitted]

[ p. 15]

Chapter II


Census definitions

2.12 In order to ensure the homogeneity and the accuracy of the collected census data the following definitions were used.

2.13 Edifice: ensemble of buildings or off-hand structures built on the same independent plot, having access to the street, regardless of the number of the plot's legal owners.

2.14 Building: every permanent and independent structure having walls and roof, composed of one or more rooms or other space (i.e. of area more than 4m2).

2.15 Dwelling: was considered, in general, a place distinct and independent from [the rest of the] construction, built or converted in order to be used for housing, or if it were not intended for housing, it was used so during the census taking.

2.16 Places intended for housing, but used during the census taking on the whole for other purposes and not housing, were not considered as dwellings.

2.17 Regular dwelling: permanent and independent structures, composed of at least one regular room and intended to be used as residence of a household.

2.18 Regular room: the space inside the building that was at least 2 m high and of an area of 4 m2; and in a shape that allows for a regular bed. In this respect, regular bedrooms, dining rooms, drawing-rooms, habitable basements and attics, servants' rooms, kitchens and other separate spaces used or intended for housing were considered as rooms.

2.19 Occupied dwelling: was considered the dwelling where a household was residing on the day of the census.

2.20 Vacant dwelling: was considered the dwelling that was suitable for housing during the census taking but on the day of the census it was vacant.

2.21 Non regular dwellings: were considered:

a) Other spaces intended for housing such as huts, sheds, booths etc that were constructed with off-hand and cheap material. Only non-regular dwellings inhabited during the census were enumerated; otherwise, they were not the object of the census.
[p. 16]
b) Other spaces not intended for housing. References of this type were mostly to spaces like stables, barns, mills, garages, storehouses, offices, shops etc. that were constructed originally to cover other needs except housing. These spaces were enumerated only in the case where during the census taking they were found to be inhabited, otherwise, they were not enumerated.

2.22 Mobile home: was considered every type of lodging whose transport was possible due to its special construction, e.g. caravan, boat etc. The lodgings of this type were enumerated whenever during the census taking were found to be inhabited, as in the cases of the previous paragraph.

2.23 Collective dwellings: were considered the independent spaces with communal amenities, such as toilets, kitchens etc., intended to house a large number of individuals, such as hotels, hospitals, barracks, convents, monasteries, etc.

2.24 Household: The following were considered households:

a) Two or more individuals residing together, providing commonly for the essentials of their livelihood, eating as rule together (multiple person household). This multiple household could be composed only of relations, or only of unrelated individuals or, finally, of a combination of both cases.

b) Every individual that was residing on its own in a separate dwelling or was residing with another household in the same dwelling but was unrelated to this household, i.e. did not eat with the household so that could be considered as a member of the household, was considered as a single person household.

2.25 The individuals of the household, i.e. those residing together and eating as a rule together were considered as members of this household. In the members of the household were included those boarders and servants that were residing with the household in the same dwelling and were eating together.

2.26 House guests for a short period of time in a household were considered as temporarily house guests and not as members of the household. Individuals related to the householder residing in the same dwelling but because of the nature of their work were not eating every day with the members of the household were considered as members of the household. The unrelated individuals to the householder in order to be considered as members of the household had to take at least one meal daily with the other members of the household.

2.27 The concept of household is not always identical to the concept of family, because, basically, a household is composed of individuals residing together, taking care commonly of their livelihood and eating as a rule together, regardless of their degree of kinship. A family is composed of related persons (man and wife, children etc.).

[p. 17]

2.28 Householder. For the census, every household had to have a householder.

2.29 As householder it was considered the individual member of the household that was recognized as such by the other members of the household. Usually, the householder was economically active.

2.30 Members and non members of the household present on the census day : were considered all the individuals that spent the night of Saturday to Sunday, 16th to 17th of March 1991 in the dwelling of the household.

2.31 Members of the household temporarily absent: were considered the individuals that were members of the household, but during the census taking happened to be temporarily absent --for a short period of time- to some other place for various reasons, e.g., tourism, hospitalization etc.

2.32 Temporarily guests: were considered the members of other households that were found as house guests in the enumerated household during the census taking.

2.33 Collective residence: was considered a group of individuals living and eating together, bound together by a common objective or personal interest, under a single administration that was found, as a rule, apart from this group (e.g. foundling hospitals, orphanages, homes for the aging, barracks, penitentiaries etc.).


Individuals who were included in the census

2.34 In the population census were included all individuals of every age, sex and citizenship that were located during the census, i.e. midnight of Saturday to Sunday, 16th to 17th of March 1991, within the boundaries of Greece.

2.35 Individuals that passed away before midnight or were born after midnight of Saturday to Sunday, 16th to 17th of March 1991, were not included in the population census, but individuals that passed away after midnight or were born a few minutes before midnight were included.

2.36 Individuals living in remote areas, nomads and roving were included in the census as well as the foreign military and diplomatic personnel and their families, refugees and foreign citizens that were located in the country as seasonal workers or for other reason.

2.37 Individuals traveling by ship, airplane, railway etc. were included in the census as long as they were located within the boundaries of Greece on midnight 16th to 17th of March 1991.

[p. 18]

2.38 Consequently, individuals traveling abroad and that were outside the boundaries of Greece before midnight 16th to 17th of March 1991, as well as individuals traveling from abroad to Greece and that entered the boundaries of Greece after midnight on the same dates were not included in the census.

2.39 There is no doubt as to which individuals were to be included in the census: if one thinks it possible of taking a photograph of the Greek State at an ideal moment during the census taking: Every individual appearing on that photo had to be enumerated.

2.40 For the accurate and exact estimation of the size of the legal population of Greece, the diplomatic and military personnel and the members of their household serving abroad during the census taking were included in the census. For the same reason, any member of the enumerated household that was temporarily absent for various reasons abroad, as well as any member of the household coming back to Greece within two years from the date of the execution of the census, i.e. 17th of March 1991, were included in the census.
[Pages 19-36 omitted]

[p.37]

Chapter V


Forms

5.1 For the execution of the 1991 population etc. census the following forms were used:


Edifices and buildings enumeration forms

1. Form O-1 "List-frame of edifices and buildings"

5.2 For each census section the Head of the sector compiled a separate list of the edifices and buildings.

5.3 All the buildings, and those under construction, were included in the list regardless of their use, e.g. dwellings, shops, offices, schools, churches, public buildings, factories etc.

5.4 Buildings relating to military use, such as barracks, warehouses, factories etc. were not included in the list.

5.5 Mobile homes and other places intended for housing (sheds, huts etc.) were included in the list only when they were inhabited during its compilation or it was anticipated that they would be inhabited on the census day.

5.6 At the same time with the compilation of the list (Form O-1), the Head of the sector carried out the enumeration of the buildings (Form O-2).

5.7 The edifices list was an auxiliary form intended to help later on the work of the Enumerator, i.e. it would direct the Enumerator to the edifices where there were regular dwellings and other type of inhabited places so as to obtain complete coverage of the population census, and finally, to help the Head of the sector in checking the work of the Enumerator.

5.8 The data entered in the list-frame (Form O-1) by the Head of the sector, apart from those of the first page, were the block number, S/N of the building, the street and number or the location, the whether the building was within or outside the locality, the S/N of the building within the section, its basic use, number of floors, number of occupied and vacant regular dwellings in each building, other type of places intended or not for housing that were found to be inhabited during the compilation of the list, the distinction of whether it were a collective residence (hotel etc.), and finally, every relevant observation or elucidation.

[p.38]

2. Form O-2 "Building enumeration form"

5.9 The Form O-2 was used for the enumeration of the buildings and was compiled by the Head of the sector at the same time as Form O-1.

5.10 The buildings forms were of 4 pages, 16 pages or 32 pages having adequate pages for the listing of 10, 52 or 108 buildings, respectively.

5.11 The following data had to be completed:

a) The geographical characteristics of the building
b) Block number and S/N of the building
c) The address of the building
d) The location of the building in relation to the locality
e) The number of floors
f) The period of its construction
g) The number of regular dwellings
h) What materials were used for the construction of the building's outside walls
i) The form of its roofing (terrace, roof), and
j) The use of the building or its intended use (church, hotel, dwelling, shop etc.), distinguishing it in exclusive or mixed use.
3. Form O-3 "Aggregate list of enumerated buildings"

5.12 This aggregate list was made of the total number of buildings in a municipality or commune that the Head of the sector had enumerated.


Population census forms

5.13 For the execution of the population census the following forms were mainly used:

Form P-1 "Household and housing census form"

5.14 The household census form (Form P-1) was of 8 pages and included information on housing and the household.

5.15 The form P-1 was comprised of six sections.

5.16 The information of the first section referred to housing data, the second to data pertaining to the householder, the third to household data, the fourth to municipality or commune registration data, the fifth to the small family business (l' artisanat á domicile) data and the sixth to data for persons with special needs.

Analytically:

The first page of the form P-1 included:

[p.39]

a) The geographical characteristics- nomos, province, municipality or commune
b) The housing data- type of dwelling, characteristics of regular dwelling, amenities of regular dwelling etc. and
c) Data pertaining to the householder- surname and name of the householder, number of rooms available for the household and status of the dwelling's occupation.

5.17 The second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh page of the form P-1 included information on each member of the household, separately. This information was intended to collect data on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the enumerated households-individuals.

5.18 Finally, the eighth page of the form P-1 included data referring to the municipality or commune registration of those individuals that were temporarily absent abroad and before their departure were members of the enumerated household, data on the small family business (l' artisanat á domicile) of workshops that were operating inside the dwelling producing goods and data on the persons with special needs in the household.

5.19 The completion of form P-1 by the Enumerator was done in one phase in contrast to the Census of 1981 where it was completed in two phases.

5.20 To be more precise, at the 17th of March the Enumerator completed the Form P-1 with the information on housing, household and the other questions of the form.

5.21 This information was intended to collect data on the type of dwelling --regular or not- the characteristics of the regular dwelling --occupied, main residence, second or vacation residence, vacant (to let, to sale etc.), period of construction, number of regular rooms, total area, the amenities of the regular dwelling - i.e. whether there were kitchen, electricity, telephone, bath or shower, water supply, heating, solar boiler, toilet and sewage disposal system, the number of households sharing the dwelling, as well as the surname and name of the householders and ownership.

5.22 The other parts of the housing section relevant questions of the form P-1 were completed only when the dwelling was found to be inhabited on the census day.

5.23 The pages 2-7 of the form P-1 were divided in two (2) parts, with questions referring to the members and non members of the household.

5.24 In the first part, the Enumerator entered the data of the individuals-members and non members of the household present on the census day.

5.25 In the second part, the Enumerator entered the data of members of the household temporarily absent on the census day.

[p.40]

5.26 The questions of the pages 2-7 of the form P-1, were the same for all the individuals of the household, regardless of their sex and citizenship and included:

[1-25 omitted as in the form part C questions 1-25]

5.26 In the eighth page of form P-1 were entered the data referring to the municipality or commune registration of those individuals that were temporarily absent abroad, the small family business (l' artisanat á domicile) of workshops that were operating inside the dwelling and data on the persons with special needs.
[Pages 40-52 omitted]

[p. 53]

Chapter VIII


The Execution of the Population Census

[p. 53, paragraphs 8.1-8.7 omitted]

8.8 The edifices and buildings census was executed by the Heads of the sectors and the population and housing census by the Enumerators.

8.9 The relevant information was collected and the relevant forms completed at the places (dwellings etc.) that were enumerated.

8.10 The Heads of the sectors, using chart material as guides (charts, sketches etc.), visited one by one the edifices and buildings of his/her sector and always in cooperation with their owners completed the relevant information in the special census forms (questionnaires).

[p. 54]

8.11 On the population and housing census day, i.e. the March 17th 1991, the Enumerators, using the list-frame (Form O-1) compiled by the Head of the sector, visited and listed one by one all the dwellings-occupied and vacant- and all the inhabited places of their enumeration sections, in the order of their listing on the frame and enumerated all households and their members who spent the night of 16th to 17th of March 1991 in them.

8.12 If a dwelling was shared by more than one household the Enumerator had to complete as many Forms P-1 as the number of households sharing the dwelling. In such cases the housing data was completed in only one of the forms so as to avoid its duplication.
[Pages 54-70, omitted]

[p. 71]

Chapter XIII


The Population Census Form and the Handling of Some Special Cases

13.1 Although the census questionnaire was absolutely functional, the written explanations in every question were exceptionally instructive and the documents especially analytical, the way in which special cases were handled was considered as wanting further reference. Certainly, in this report special cases have been referred to e.g. which individuals were included in the census, paragraph 2.35 etc.

13.2 As it has been mentioned before, the same questionnaire was used for the housing and population census.

[Short description of the housing questions omitted]

The housing questions were very easily answered and no questions were arisen.

13.3 The questions referring to the present individuals, members or non members of the household were the following:

1. Surname, name, name of father
2. Sex
3. Year of birth
4. Householder and kinship or relation to the householder.

The above questions were very simple and needed no clarification.
If there was no entry in one of these questions, an answer was entered relating to the other answers of the questionnaire.

5. Is he/she a member of the household or a house guest?
[Defined as before, omitted]
6. Marital status
The answers to this question were: a) single, b) married, c) widowed, d) divorced and for those that were separated the answer married was checked. In any case, the respondent's answer was checked.
[p. 72]
7. Citizenship.
The answers of the individuals having only Greek citizenship and those without nationality were pre-coded. The answers of the individuals having Greek and other citizenship or of another country were coded during the elaboration.

8. If Greek citizen, in which Municipality or Commune is he/she registered?
Every Greek citizen is registered in a Municipality or Commune.

-Those that were not registered were considered as citizens of the place where they voted in last elections.
-Those that were not registered and did not vote were considered as citizens of the place of their usual residence.
-Lawful children have the citizenship of their parents, according to a common declaration, otherwise that of their father.
-Unlawful children have the citizenship of their mother.
-The children of parents with unknown nationality were considered as citizens of the place of their birth.
-Adopted children have the citizenship of their step parent.

9. Place of usual residence
As place of usual residence was considered the place where the household was living or the collective residence where the individual was a member.
Most individuals had no difficulty in declaring the place of their usual residence. In any case it is further clarified that:

a) In the case of individuals having two residences, e.g. in town and a vacation residence, the one that they spent most of their time was declared as place of usual residence.
b) For students and soldiers who did not live with their families, the place where they were studying or serving was declared.
c) For individuals living away from their families during the week because of their work and were visiting on weekends, the place of their work was declared as the place of their usual residence. In their family home they were enumerated as temporarily house guests.
d) Households residing in Communes having a winter and a summer location, the winter location was declared as their usual place of residence.
e) Individuals temporarily hospitalized, in prison, on vacations, declared the place of residence of their household.
f) In the same way, individuals temporarily absent abroad for a short period of time, the place of residence of their household was declared as their usual place of residence.
g) Nomads and roving were considered to have as their usual place of residence the place where they were enumerated.

10. Which Municipality, Commune or Foreign country did he/she reside in December of 1985?

11. Which Municipality, Commune or Foreign country did he/she reside in a year ago?
[p. 73]
These questions aimed at ascertaining the movements of individuals either within the Greek state, or from abroad to Greece (the return to the native country) and the residing of foreign immigrants.

The following questions (12-25) were answered only by individuals born in 1980 or before.

12. Level of education
[As in the form, omitted]

13.
[As in the form, omitted]

The question was clear and without problems. In the case of graduates of a foreign educational institution the code of the respective Greek educational institution was checked.

14. Does he/she usually work or is he/she seeking work?
Working, job seeking, other occupation

[As in the form, and why it is important to ask for the twelvemonth etc., omitted]

Every individual which for the most part of the year was occupied with some work, regardless of whether or not he/she was working during the census taking, even if the enumerated was unemployed, on leave, sick, did not work due to the mending of the machine that he/she was operating etc., answered as working. The individuals which had started working a few days before the census taking, those working in seasonal work and were occupied systematically as well as officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers (continuous occupation) of the armed forces were considered as working.

Individuals who just before the census taking had stopped working because of pension, sickness or other reason and did not have the intention or prospect of work in the future, conscripts or reserves on their military service and prisoners were considered as not working.

Seeking work answered:

[p. 74]

Every individual which for the most part of the year did not work, or was available to work and was seeking work but regardless of his/her efforts could not find work.

Individuals not belonging to one of the above mentioned cases answered "other case".

15. What was his/her occupation during the previous week (10-16 March)?
Working- [as in the form, omitted]
Individuals which left or lost their job even one day before the census taking were not considered as working.

Job seeker [as in the form, omitted]
Individuals that were ready to take offered jobs and that during the last four (4) weeks took initiatives towards finding work (applying in companies, registering in the OAED, participating in competitions, answering or placing adds, asking for the help of friends and relations etc.).

Individuals who did not work but were available and had agreed to work at a future date from the reference period were considered as seeking work as well as the individuals that were available and were trying to seek work.

If the individual did not give any of these two answers (working, seeking work) the cases 3-7, economically non active, were checked. [As in the form, omitted]
[p. 75]


16. For the individuals having answered that they were working or seeking work describe the type of work, the type of the establishment, enterprise etc., as well as their occupational status.

The type of work referred to the enumerated individual's occupation or of that he/she worked last. For those that were seeking work for the first time it was entered the word "young". The coding of the occupation was based on the 3 digits ISCO 68 [88?].

The type of establishment, enterprise etc. referred to the type of economic activity (industry branch) of the establishment where the enumerated individual was working or for those that were seeking work, of that they worked last. For those that were seeking work for the first time it was entered the word "young".

For the coding of the economic activity STAKOD was used, based on the 3 digits NACE Revision 1.

For their occupational status [answers as in the form, omitted].

17. How many hours did the working individuals work during the week 10-16 of March?
The actual sum of hours they worked was entered. It was considered that the enumerated individual had worked as many hours as he/she was present in his/her work or and outside work, regardless of whether or not during this time there were hours that he/she did not work. If the individual did not work at all or worked for less than 15 hours ... [as in the form, omitted].

18. If a job seeker, how many months was he/she seeking work?
The answers were rounded to the highest integer.
19. [As in the form, omitted]

20. [As in the form, omitted]

21. [As in the form, omitted]

22. [As in the form, omitted]

[p. 76]

23. [As in the form, omitted]

24. [As in the form, omitted]
25. Does the individual possess agricultural land?
The question was intended to locate those having to complete the agriculture census form.

13.4 The part where the temporarily absent members of the household were listed had the same questions apart from the question 5 where they were asked the place they were in and the reason of their absence.
13.5 Part D of the form [As in the form, omitted]

13 6 Part E of the form [As in the form, omitted]
13.7 In Part G, data for persons with special needs, it was listed whether or not there were any persons in the household with special needs. As persons with special needs were considered those suffering from a chronic disease (heart, cancer, kidney, rheumatism, arteriosclerosis, brain or other disease) or were handicapped for life (movement, sense, intellect, dismemberment or other handicap).
[Pages 77-95, omitted]