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Kingdom of Greece
Ministry of Coordination
National Statistical Service of Greece (NSSG)

Census Directorate

Population-Housing-Small Family Business (L'artisanat a domicile) and Agriculture Census
of March 14th 1971

Instructions
to the Enumerators

Athens 1970

[Pages 5-7 omitted]

[p. 8]
III. The enumerator's task

6. [Omitted, on the importance of the enumerator's task]

7. Each enumerator will be working in one Census section and must do the following:

a) The census of dwellings and the distribution of the "Household Pre-census Forms" to every household, which will be carried out during March 7-13, 1971, with the data referring to March 14.

b) The census of households and all their members, and the collection of the "Household Pre-census Forms," tasks which should be completed in a single day, i.e., on Sunday, March 14.

c) [Omitted, the agricultural census, carried out during March 15-21, with data referring to March 14].

8. Detailed instructions to the enumerators on their task are to be found in this document, "Enumerators' Instructions." [Omitted, on their training].

[p. 9]

9. [Omitted]

10. [Omitted]

11. On the morning of March 7, the enumerator will begin the housing census.
The enumerator must visit, one by one, all the occupied or vacant dwellings of his census section and all the other inhabited buildings (whether or not intended for housing) during the period March 7-13. The enumerator must complete, for each of the above, Part A "A. Housing Data" of the first page of the "Household-Housing and Small Family Business Census Form" (Form P-1), through which basic housing information is collected. At the same time, the enumerator is to supply each household with a "Household pre-census form" and to instruct the householder or any other suitable member of the household on how to complete the form, by explaining the form's instructions.

12. The enumerator's visit to the dwellings of his section and the other buildings intended for housing will be carried out according to the order indicated by the List of Edifices and Buildings (Form O-3), compiled by the Head of the sector and handed out to the enumerator on the day of his arrival at his section.

The information inserted [by the Head of the sector or the Central Office] into the Form O-3 is not absolutely binding for the enumerator. Rather, it must be corrected and updated by the enumerator, according to the instructions given in paragraph 36.

[p. 10]

13. The information required to complete part A- Housing Data, on the first page of Form P-1, should be obtained from the inhabitant of the dwelling. If the dwelling is vacant, the information should be obtained from a responsible person (e.g., the owner or his relations or the best-informed next door neighbor).

Thus, on the day of the enumerator's visit to the dwellings of his section, the householder or some other suitable respondent from the household must be found in every dwelling, to provide the information required to complete the relevant questionnaire.

Via the media, the Statistical Service will have notified the populace of the enumerator's impending visit to their dwellings. But the enumerator must also inform the inhabitants of each dwelling, so that someone will be at home to provide the information.

14. [Omitted]

15. The enumerator will include each household for which a form was completed in the aggregate List of enumerated dwellings (Form K-2), according to the instructions provided (paragraph 64).

16. On March 14, the enumerator is to carry out the population census. To do so, he [or she] must again visit, one by one, the dwellings in his section and all the other occupied buildings (whether or not intended for housing), as they appear in the aggregate List (Form K-2) and in the order that they are recorded, and enumerate the households and their residents.

The population enumeration will be achieved via the completion of the "Household-Small Family Business Census Form" P-1. The first part of the form, relating to housing data, will already have been completed.

17. If two or more households reside in the same dwelling, the enumerator should complete the Form P-1 that contains the housing data only for the household with the most members. For each remaining household in the dwelling, a new form P-1 should be completed, crossing out part A of page one.

[p. 11]

18. [Omitted]

19. The enumerator will include each household for which a form was completed in the aggregate Enumerator's List (form K-3), according to the instructions of the relevant section.

20. If, in the enumeration section, there are group quarters (hotels, boarding houses, clinics, hospitals, old people's homes, police stations, etc.) with not more than 30 residents in the enumeration section, the enumerator must enumerate them according to the instructions given paragraph 211. [Omitted, how to determine which group quarters should be included in the agriculture census.]

Group quarters for which forms were completed are to be included in the aggregate Enumerator's List (form K-3).

If more than 30 persons reside in the group quarters, they should be enumerated by special enumerators, according to the instructions in paragraph 211.

21. [Omitted]

22. [Omitted]

IV. Forms to be used by the Enumerator
[Pages 11-12 and top of p. 13 omitted]

[p. 13]
B. Housing Census

I. Basic definitions useful for the Housing Census

26. Edifice: is an group of buildings or structures built on the same independent plot, having access to the street, regardless of the number of legal owners of the plot (e.g., a block of flats).
Consequently, an edifice may include one, two, or more than two buildings, e.g. a farm with a storehouse and stables on the same plot.

[p. 14]

27. Building: is each permanent and independent structure with walls and a roof, composed of one or more rooms or other space. As a rule, buildings have four (4) walls. But a permanent structure that is open on one or two sides is also considered a building, as long as it is roofed.

28. Dwelling: is defined, in general, as a place constructed to be distinct and independent, built for or converted to use as housing, or, if not intended for housing, actually used for housing during the time of the census.

Places intended for housing, but used during the time of the census for purposes other than housing, should not to be considered dwellings.

Consequently, as a dwelling may consist of:

a) An occupied or vacant dwelling, flat, room, or series of rooms.
b) An occupied hut, shed, gypsy caravan, boat, tent, hotel, collective residence, etc.
c) A storehouse, mill, cave or any other roofed place used for housing during the time of the census.

The defining element of a dwelling is its distinct and independent character. A space is considered distinct if it is surrounded by walls, fences, etc. and is covered by a roof, so that the individual or group of persons may be isolated from other persons to sleep or prepare and consume meals or be protected from the elements.

A space is considered independent if it has a direct entrance from the street, or has a common staircase, a passage or an arcade, so that the inhabitants may come and go without having to pass through the space occupied by another household.

29. Dwellings are classified as regular, irregular or collective.

30. Regular dwelling: is a permanent and independent structure, composed of at least one regular room, that is intended for use as a residence for a household.

31. Regular room: is considered a space inside the building with walls at least 2 meters high, with an area of at least 4 square meters, with a shape that can accommodate a regular bed, and that has a window or window-paned door for light to enter from the outside.

32. Irregular dwellings: the following types of [irregular] dwellings are to be included in the census.

a) Other spaces intended for housing: are structures (such as sheds and huts) built, without any formal design, out of salvaged and cheap material, which should be included if they are inhabited at the time of the census.

[p. 15]

b) Other spaces not intended for housing: are spaces such as stables, barns, mills, garages, storehouses, offices, shops and basements which are not regular dwellings and which were neither constructed for or converted to that purpose, but which were inhabited at the time of the census by one or more households.
Caves inhabited during the time of the census are included in this category.
c) Mobile home: is a type of lodging suitable for transport due to its construction (caravan or tent) or used as a mode of transport (ship, yacht, boat, barge, or rover's wagon), which was intended for housing and was inhabited at the time of the census.
Gypsies' encampments are included in this category.

33. Collective dwellings: hotels (a), collective residences (b), and temporary quarters (c) are included in this category. [omitted, detailed definitions of a, b and c].
[p. 16 and top of p. 17 omitted]

[p. 17]
IV. The dwellings to be enumerated

37. Dwellings to be included in the census:

a) All types of regular dwellings, e.g. houses, flats, one bedroom flats, villas, farms, etc., whether occupied or vacant.
b) Irregular dwellings, if they are inhabited at the time of the census (e.g., shop, shed, hut, booth, caravan, tent, or basement that was not a regular dwelling, etc.)
The aforementioned regular or irregular dwellings are to be enumerated even if they are not included in the List, and the enumerator has to add them to the list, according to the instructions in paragraph 36.

38. Dwellings not to be included in the census:

a) Regular dwellings that are uninhabited and uninhabitable.
b) Old regular dwellings that are uninhabited now and that will not be inhabited in the future due to their poor condition.
c) Regular dwellings that are under construction on March 14 1971, which are unihabited and which are not in the final stage of construction.
d) Regular dwellings that have been demolished or that are scheduled for demolition before March 14, 1971.
e) Other spaces intended for housing that are uninhabited (see paragraph 32).
f) Other spaces not intended for housing that are uninhabited (see paragraph 32).
g) Dwellings initially constructed for housing which are primarily used for other purposes (e.g., flats that used as offices, workshops, etc.)
h) Large group quarters, such as hotels, hospitals, clinics, prisons, etc.
[p.18]

39. Specialists will enumerate the dwellings:

a) Of foreign diplomats and the members of their staff, in cooperation with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
b) For regular dwellings in barracks where officers or citizen are staying, with or without their families.
c) Which are within group quarters that were classified as special census sections (e.g., the director's residence inside a hospital).

V. How the housing census form is to be completed (form P-1)

40. Information for the housing census will be recorded in the first part ("Housing Data") of the first page of Form P-1. A different Form P-1 should be completed for each dwelling. The data in the housing census refers to March 14, census day.

Housing information will be collected during March 7-13, 1971, at the same time that the enumerator distributes a pre-census form to the household. This is intended to make the enumerator's task easier.

The enumerator must visit the dwellings again on March 14, to complete the population census and to confirm whether the housing data entered earlier is consistent with conditions prevailing on March 14. For example, a regular dwelling inhabited on March 12 might be vacant on March 14, or vice versa. In such a case, the enumerator must correct the answers to questions 2 and 10 on the form, which refer to the type of dwelling and the number of households sharing the dwelling.
[P. 18 and top of p.19 omitted]

[p. 19]
The Questions on the Form

[A. Housing Data]

43. Question 1, Type of dwelling

[Omitted, question 1 is repeated]

The definitions of each type of dwelling are given in paragraphs 28-33.

[Bottom of p. 19 and top of 20 omitted]

Dwellings of types 2 through 5 [that is, dwellings other than regular dwellings] are to be enumerated only if they are inhabited. In these cases, only questions 1-10 should be completed.
Give only a single answer to question 1.

Questions 2-9 should not be completed for irregular dwellings.
[p.20]
44. Question 2, Regular dwelling is [Type of occupancy]

[Omitted, question 2 is repeated]

[p. 21]

Occupied Regular Dwellings

45. For case 1 of regular occupied dwellings select only if the dwelling is the main residence for the household.

A main residence is defined as the housing unit where the household resides for the majority of the year. As a rule, the main residence is located close to the workplaces of the household members, and it is considered by them to be the center of their professional and social activities.

The main residence is occupied:

a) If, on Saturday night to Sunday morning (March 13 to 14, 1971), one or more persons slept there or
b) Or the residence is generally occupied but the inhabitants did not sleep there from Saturday night to Sunday morning (March 13 to 14), because they were temporarily absent (e.g., on vacation, away on business, attending a party, working at night, ill, etc.).
In cases where the household uses two or more residences for more or less the same period of time, the main residence is considered to be the dwelling where they reside during the winter, with the rest to be considered vacation or secondary residences.

In cases where these residences are used at the same time by a multi-member or well-off household and the residences are located close to each other, they should be treated as a single main residence (e.g., two flats in the same apartment building or two separate dwellings on a single plot used by a single household).

46. In case 2, select this response for occupied secondary residences.
Secondary A dwelling that is used at the same time as the main residence, and which is not a vacation home, is considered a secondary residence.

The main types of secondary residences are:

a) A dwelling close to the workplace, which is either used throughout the year or during certain periods or seasons, by a member or members of the household (along with the main residence) for professional reasons (e.g., a businessowner's residence close to the business or farm, a rancher's residence far from the main residence, the summer residence of a nomadic stock farmer, etc.).
b) A residence used by the household or by a member of a household at certain periods, instead of their main residence (e.g., a residence in Athens for a household whose main residence is in the country).

47. In case 3, select this response for occupied vacation residences.
Vacation residence is a regular dwelling usually located far from the main residence of the household (e.g., on a mountain, near the sea, in a mountain or seaside villages, near a spa, etc.) and is used for relaxation or variety (during summertime or at intervals during all seasons).

[p. 22]

Secondary and vacation residences should be considered occupied if, on the night of March 13-14,1971, one or more persons were spent the night there.

Vacant Regular Dwellings

48. For the vacant dwellings, select a single answer from the five options given for the second part of question 2.
Vacant dwelling is defined as a dwelling intended for housing that is either usually vacant (e.g., due to immigration or the former inhabitants settling elsewhere) or is vacant during the census enumeration for other reasons (e.g., a recently-constructed building, a vacant house for sale or for rent, a vacation dwelling, etc.).

49. For rent or for sale refers to a dwelling that is, for either of these reasons, vacant on the day of the census enumeration.

Dwellings that are inhabited on census day but that will soon be vacant and that are advertised as being for rent or for sale should be classified as occupied, not as intended for rent or sale. Always consider vacant buildings as being for rent or for sale if they have signs advertising this fact.

If there are no such signs, then record an answer from a respondent about whether the vacant building is for rent or for sale.

50-51. [Omitted].

52. For the last option, record the any other reason why the building is vacant (e.g., recently-constructed, unoccupied farm, vacant secondary dwelling).
Pay special attention to dwellings that immigrants' acquired after departure..

These dwellings are usually used during vacations or are intended for use as housing after the immigrant returns from abroad. These cases should be included in the "other reason" category, with the notation, "immigrant's vacant dwelling."

53. For the question on the "number of regular rooms", the number of regular rooms in the dwelling, except for the kitchen, should be recorded in the spaces provided.

For this question, there must always be an answer, since it is not possible to be a regular dwelling without having at least one (1) regular room. Regular rooms are considered to be bedrooms, dining rooms, drawing-rooms, habitable basements, attics, servants' rooms, and other separate spaces used or intended for housing. Kitchens, storerooms, corridors and halls are considered to be rooms if they satisfy the conditions defining a regular room (i.e., an area of at least 4 square meters, of suitable shape and with a source of outside light).

[p. 23]

Laundries, baths and toilets are not considered to be rooms, even if they occupy a large amount of space and have a source of outside light.

Regular rooms inside the dwelling that are used for professional reasons (e.g., a workshop, storerooms for agricultural goods, etc.) are included in the number of rooms.

If the dwelling has only one regular room that simultaneously serves all needs of the household (i.e., used for sleeping, preparing meals, dining, etc.), then count this room and note, in question 3, that there is no kitchen.

54. For the last element of the question, record the number of regular rooms used exclusively for professional purposes. These rooms must only be used for professional purposes, and must not simultaneously or during certain periods be used for regular domestic purposes (e.g., for sleeping, dining, or as a drawing room, etc.).

Regular rooms are considered to be used exclusively for professional purposes if they house a workshop in operation to produce, repair, or assemble goods, or a shop supplying services (e.g., a hairdressing salon, etc.), or the office of a professional (such as a lawyer, engineer, doctor, etc.), or serve as a storage room for goods or for materials needed by a professional.

Special spaces in farms (such as cellars) that are constructed for use as storerooms (for agricultural, commercial, etc. purposes) should not be counted as regular rooms and should not be considered rooms used for professional purposes..

If there is not a regular room used for professional purposes, record an (-) in this space.

55. Question 3, Kitchen

[Omitted, question 3 is repeated]

Kitchen is a separate space, equipped and intended, since its construction or renovation, to be used for preparing the household's meals.

[p. 24]

This space must be used for the aforementioned purpose, regardless of whether it is used for other purposes as well (i.e., dining, sleeping, etc.).

The space should be considered equipped for meal preparation if there is an appliance permanently installed for this purpose (i.e., fireplace, electric or gas stove).

If a kitchen meeting the above description exists, record an answer about whether the kitchen meets the requirements laid down for a regular room.

Mark response 3b if there is no kitchen available in the dwelling.

Even if the permanently-installed facilities for cooking (e.g., gas) occupy part of a space or room intended and mainly used for other purposes, count this as a kitchen,
so long as the space is roofed, even if it is in the courtyard.

56. Question 4, Electricity

[Omitted, question 4 is repeated]

Answer "yes" if there is electricity, even if it is available for only a few hours per day, and regardless of its source.

57. Question 5, Bathing facilities

[Omitted, question 5 is repeated]

Answer "yes" if the dwelling contains a permanently-installed bath or shower and if, outside the building, there is a hydraulic installation supplying water for a flush toilet and for the household's water supply.

58. Question 6, Water supply

[Omitted, question 6 is repeated]

The question refers to the household's drinking water, regardless of its quality.

[p. 25]

Record one, and only one, answer, even if the respondents declare that "they do not have drinking water.".

The hydraulic installation (pipes and tap) must be permanent and connected to a water supply network.

A public water supply network is inspected and controlled by a department of public services.

Any other (non-public) water supply network should be classified as private.

The drinking water supply is considered to be inside the dwelling when the tap is in an interior space (e.g., in the kitchen, in another room, in a corridor, etc.) of the dwelling, not in communal space or open space in the building or in the courtyard or inside another housing unit in the building.

If the tap is outside the dwelling but inside the building (i.e., in communal space, in the courtyard, or on the building site), select response 3 or 4.

Select response 5 if the tap is on the pavement, in a public square, or otherwise away from the building.

Response 5 includes any other means of supplying water, such as.:

a) Well or spring, regardless of whether the household owns it;
b) River, rivulet or lake, without a network;
c) Cistern, collecting rainfall;
d) Cask, regardless of the original water source, etc.

59. Question 7, Toilet

[Omitted, question 7 is repeated]

Toilet refers to a space built so that sewage is directly disposed of in a sink or sewage network.

To qualify as a flush toilet, the water supply must be through pipes and the system for disposing of the sewage must be outside the dwelling.

[p. 26]

For responses 1 and 2, the relevant definitions given in paragraph 58 apply here as well.

Select response 3 (shared toilet) if the toilet is outside the dwelling but inside the building, and if it is used by households residing in one or more dwellings.

Select response 4 if the household is using a toilet outside the building or none at all.

60. Question 8, Sewage disposal system

[Omitted, question 8 is repeated]

Select only one answer.

Select response 1 if the sewage disposal system is connected to the sewage network.

Select response 2 if the sewage disposal system is a sink or other system.

Sewage in a sink refers to cases in which the sink is located away from the toilet but is connected to it by a pipe, or cases in which the sink is directly underneath the toilet, as in some agricultural areas. For the latter case, include sewage that flows directly into the sea or a river.

Select response 3 if sewage is not directed into a sink or sewage network or into a river or the sea.

61. Question 9 Ownership

[Omitted, question 9 is repeated]

[p. 27]

Select response 1 if the owner of the dwelling is an individual, such as the householder, any other member of the household, or any other person who is not a member of the household. Select response 2 if the owner is a Legal Entity of Private Law (e.g., a company, a union, etc.). Select response 3 if the owner is the State or a Legal Entity of Public Law (e.g., Municipality, University, School, Hospital, Asylum, or any other legal entity of public law).

The owner of the dwelling is the individual or legal entity that the dwelling belongs to, not the tenant who resides there and who either pays rent, is squatting, or has permission to use the dwelling without payment of rent.

62. Question 10, Number of households sharing the dwelling

The question is to be completed for all occupied dwellings, regular or not, and has two parts:

[Omitted, first part of question 10 repeated], if vacant, record zero (0).

[Omitted, second part of question 10 repeated]

If the kitchen satisfies the conditions for a regular room (question 3a), include it in the count for the number of rooms available to the household.

If the occupied dwelling is not a regular dwelling (i.e., a shed, hut, tent, inhabited shop, etc.) and it has no regular rooms, write (-) as the number of rooms.

[p. 28]

When a regular dwelling has only one regular room that is used by two households, treat this room as belonging to the household with the larger number of members (the more populous household). If the households have the same number of members, treat the room as belonging to the household that owns or rents this space, and record an (-) for the other household.

If two adjacent dwellings are used by one household simultaneously (e.g., two dwellings on the same site or bedrooms and a separate kitchen in the courtyard, which is often found in the country), complete a single dwelling form, including all the amenities and other relevant data. (For example, for two dwellings having a total of 5 regular rooms, count the number of regular rooms as 5 and include any amenities--such as water supply, electricity, etc.--in either of the two dwellings.)

Classify the person owning the joint dwelling, either via inheritance or through a gift, as the owner, and classify the subtenant as a renter.

Select the "other" category if the dwelling is occupied without permission [squatting], or if the residents are allowed to use the dwelling without payment.
[63. Omitted, the instructions on the form are repeated]

[Bottom of p. 28, p. 29, and top of p. 30 omitted]

[p. 30]
C. Population-Small Family Business Census

I. Basic Definitions
65. [Omitted, introduction on the definitions]
Household

66. A household consists of: a) two or more individuals who reside together, who share a joint budget to provide for the necessities of life, and who as a rule eat together (a multiple person household).

[p. 31]

This group may consist only of relations, or only of unrelated individuals, or a combination of both. It can include boarders but not renters.

b) Every individual who resides on his or her own in a separate dwelling or who resides with other individuals in a dwelling but who lives separately from them (i.e., does not eat with them and thus is not considered a member of their household) (a single person household).

The difference between a boarder and a renter is as follows. The boarder eats with the other members of the household and consequently is a member of their household. By contrast, the renter has only rented part of the dwelling, and so he or she comprises a distinct household.

67. If a household has more than 5 boarders, it is considered a boarding house. In such a case, the boarders should be treated as a separate single person households -if the boarder is not living with a relative- or as multiple person households- if they consist of families.

68. Servants who dwell in the same household as the people who employ them should be included as part of the household.

69. Domestics who reside outside the household are not considered members of the household.

70. House guests staying for only a short period in the household are not considered members of the household. Rather, they are considered temporary house guests.

[p. 32]

71. Members of the household are considered the relations of the householder that reside in the same dwelling even if because of their work are not eating every day with the other members of the household.

The individuals that are not related to the householder in order to be considered as members of the household must have at least one daily meal with the other members of the household otherwise are considered as a separate household.

72. Under the rules given above, the household is not always identical to the family.

The household is comprised of individuals who reside together, jointly provide for their livelihood, and, as a rule, eat together. A family, on the other hand, is comprised of individuals who are related. For instance, a pupil residing in another city for his studies is a member of his family but not a member of the household.

Even if he visits his family on the weekends, a family head who is working away from his relatives is a member of the family but not of the household. In this case, he belongs to a different household, because he does usually not reside and eat with the other members of his family (as required to satisfy the definition of household membership).

According to the above, a household is, for example,.

73. a. A single person residing on his own in a dwelling or a room, who provides for his meals, even if he eats out in a restaurant;
b. A couple;
c. A family consisting of parents and their children;
d. A family living with one or both of the parents of their respective spouses, or with only the father, or with only the mother, or with a co-resident servant;
e. A family where one or at the most five pupils are residing as boarders;
f. Two or more students or workers who rent a flat or a room together and who jointly provide for their meals, etc.

Non member of a household is considered e.g.
74. a. The householder's residing in another city because of his studies, either as a boarder of another household or a renter of a room.
b. The householder or some other member of the family which because of his work is residing in another city all the working days even if he comes back to his family on Sundays or bank holidays.
c. The children of the householder or some other member of the household serving (conscript) in the Army.
d. Family members that are studying or working abroad.

Householder

75. For purposes of the census, every household must have a householder.

[p. 33]

Householder is the individual that is a member of the household and is recognized as head by all the other members. In most cases, where the household is comprised by the parents and the unmarried children, the father is considered as the householder. Many a times as well, where married children are still residing with their parents, they consider their father as the head.

76. If the household is comprised by unrelated persons, as householder is considered the economically active individual, i.e. the man that works for profit or pay or if there is no man, the economically active woman. In the case where everyone is economically active, as householder is considered either the older man or woman. In the case where everyone is not economically active, as householder is considered the older individual.

77. Present on the census day members or non members of the household are considered all the individuals that spent the night of Saturday to Sunday, 13th to 14th of March in the household.

78. Members of the household temporarily absent are considered the individuals that are members of the household, but during the census taking happened to be absent temporarily for tourism, professional reasons, hospitalization (except sanatorium, psychiatric clinic and asylum), detention etc. Temporarily absent, in exemption, are considered sailors and fishermen traveling in ships within the Greek sea, as well as those traveling outside the Greek boundaries, independently of the period of their absence.

79. Temporarily present individuals in the household are considered the temporarily house guests, members of another household that were found in the household on the night of Saturday to Sunday, 13th to 14th of March.
Temporarily present individuals in the household are considered as well the head or other member of the family that reside during the week in another city because of their work and so is another household and during the week-end came back to their family as well as the pupil or student residing because of his studies in another city and returned on the week-end to his family (see paragraph 72).
[Bottom of p. 33 and top of p. 34 omitted]

[p. 34]
II. Which individuals are included in the census

84. As a general rule, include in the population census:

All individuals, of any age, sex, and nationality, who are located within the boundaries of Greece between midnight, Saturday, May 13, and the morning of Sunday, May 14, 1971.

85. This rule has the following specific meanings:

Include in the census all infants born before midnight (before 0 hour) on the night falling between Saturday, May 13, and Sunday, May14. Infants born after midnight should not be included in the census.

86. Include in the census all persons who passed away after midnight on the night falling between Saturday, May 13, and Sunday, May 14. Persons who passed away before midnight should not be included in the census.

87. Include in the census all individuals traveling abroad by ship or airplane after midnight on the night falling between Saturday, May 13, and Sunday, May 14.

Also include in the census all travelers arriving in Greece before midnight on the night falling between Saturday, May 13, and Sunday, May 14. Special enumerators will enumerate travelers at ports and airports.

88. Foreign diplomats and the members of foreign missions, together with their families and their servants (whether Greek or not), are to be enumerated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. [p. 35] To the enumerators visiting them they will have to declare their status or show their certificate for census participation so as to avoid duplication.
The Enumerators are to note in the List of Edifices and Buildings (Form O-3) in the respective building that dwelling is occupied by a foreign diplomat.

89. All other foreigners are to be enumerated in the same way as the Greek population, in the places where they are found (i.e., at their dwellings, in other households as house guests, in hotels, etc.).

90. Finally, include Enumerators in the census.

III. Where the present on the census taking day members and non members of the household or collective dwelling are to be enumerated

91. Every individual is to be enumerated as present in the dwelling (private or collective) or other place where he spent the night of Saturday to Sunday, 13th to 14th of May 1971.

92. Most individuals are to be enumerated at their dwellings, where they reside by themselves or with the other members of their household and their house guests. The rest are to be enumerated at the hotels, hospitals, barracks, infant homes, homes for the aged, ships etc., where they spent the night of Saturday to Sunday, 13th to 14th of May.

93. In their dwellings are to be enumerated the members of the household that spent the night of 13th to 14th of May outside the dwelling because they were working, e.g. night watch, night shift, night nurse etc., or were entertained and were to return on the morning to their dwelling. Farmers and stock-farmers that spent the night outdoors or the hut that usually is not inhabited and it were not possible for the enumerator to locate them are to be enumerated in their dwelling.

94. House guests in a household that departed on the morning of 14th March before the enumerator's visit are to be enumerated in the household where they were guests.

95. Those traveling on the night of Saturday to Sunday by car or railway and arrived at their dwellings not having being enumerated by the special enumerators at the city entrances or on the trains, are to be enumerated by the Enumerator at their dwellings.

96. Present on the census taking day members or non members of the household, i.e. all spending the night of 13th to 14th of March in the dwelling of the household are to be included in the first part of the household questionnaire included in the second and third pages of the "Household-Small Family Business and Housing Census Form" (Form P-1) indicated as "present on the census taking day members and non members of the household".
97. [Omitted, referring to the collective dwellings.]

[p. 36]
IV. How the members of the household temporarily absent are to be enumerated

98. The interpretation of the concept of the member of the household temporarily absent is given in paragraph 78. According to it, temporarily absent members of the household are considered the members of the household that for recreational reasons of professional (buying goods, signing contracts etc.) or sickness, or detention etc., are temporarily absent.

99. These individuals are to be enumerated as present at the place where they are to be found on the census taking day and as it applies, in the household, or the hotel or the hospital or the collective residence as defined before.

100. During the completion of the form for the respective household of which these individuals are members, they are to be included as well in the second part of pages 2 and 3 Form P-1 under the heading "Temporarily absent members of the household".

101. In exemption, the information on the temporarily absent householder is to inserted in the first row of the first part of the household questionnaire "Household-Small Family Business and Housing Census Form" (Form P-1) as householder absent and in the second part as temporarily absent householder.

V. How the household-small family business and housing census form is to be completed (Form P-1)

[Bottom of p. 36, page 37-39 and top of p. 40, omitted, except for the following entries on p. 39]

[. . .]

117. Completion of the household data will begin by inserting the householder data according to the definition given before.

[. . .]

119. After the householder data the personal data referring to the other members of the household present or not is to be inserted according to their kinship or relation to the householder, i.e. the householder, his spouse is to follow and then that of his unmarried children according to their age, followed by the married children and their families (in the same order), other relatives, the servants, boarders and houseguests.
[p. 40]
Special Instructions for the Completion of the Personal Data of pages 2 and 3 of the Household-Small Family Business and Housing Census Form (FORM P-1)

a. Completion of the first part of the form referring to the present members and non members of the household

Questions 1and 2, Members of the household and surname [omitted]

Question 3, Relationship to householder [omitted]

125. [omitted]

126. Kinship or relation to the householder is to be completed (see paragraph 119) as follows:

Spouse, son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, father, mother, brother, nephew, grandson, servant, boarder. The relatives following nephews are to be recorded as "other relatives". The children from the first marriage of the householder or his spouse are to be recorded as "stepsons" [or stepdaughters]. Care must be applied avoiding any vagueness.

Question 4, Guests [omitted]

128. The individual member of another household who during the census taking (specially the night of 13th to 14th March) stayed in the dwelling of the enumerated household is to be considered as temporarily houseguest.

Question 5, Sex [omitted]
[p. 41]

[Questions 6-8 omitted]
Question 9: Citizenship. If they are citizen of another country write both answers.

133. Citizenship (nationality) is ascertained by official documents. If not, the respondent's answer is inserted. Married women usually have their spouses' citizenship. The under age children have their fathers' citizenship. Greek immigrants have often double citizenship (Greek-Americans, Greek-Canadians, Greek and British citizenship etc.).

Persons "without nationality" are to be met in cases of immigrants or gypsies.

Question 10: If Greek citizen, in which Municipality or Commune is he or she registered

134. Every Greek citizen is registered in a Municipality or Commune.

Greek adult citizens, men or women, are registered in a Municipality or Commune, regardless of where they vote. If they are not registered in a Municipality or Commune, they are to be considered as citizens of the place where they voted. Those that they did not vote are considered as citizens of the Municipality or Commune of their usual residence.

[p. 42]

d. Married women might have changed their Municipality or Commune registration after their marriage by application and are registered in the Municipality or Commune where their husband is registered.

135 Minors regardless of their sex:

1) If lawful children, they have the citizenship of their father. 2) If unlawful children, they have the citizenship of their mother. 3) If children of unknown parents are considered as registered in the Municipality or Commune of the enumeration place.

[Omitted how the question is to be completed]

136. According to the above the citizenship of the adults is recorded as an answer to the relevant question and not to be ascertained by out of date official documents.

Question 11, Place of usual residence

[Omitted, as in the form]

138. [...]
As place of usual is considered the place where the household or the collective residence were living where they are members.

139. [...]
Temporarily absent members of the household for recreational or professional reasons, sickness, detention or visiting relatives are to declare as their usual place of residence that where their household resides and to which they are to return. [Examples omitted]

[p. 43]

Most temporarily absent individuals that are to declare different place of usual residence than the one they are enumerated would be clients of hotels and boarding houses, or hospitalized (apart from sanatorium, asylum, psychiatric clinic that are collective residences).

140. Students or workers living in a different city or village than that of their families are separate households or members of other households or residences where they reside as boarders and in this sense their usual place of residence is where they study or work.

[Examples omitted]

Conscripts visiting their families on leave are to declare as place of their usual residence where they serve.

141. Households having two residences (one in town and in the country) they are to declare as place of their usual residence where they spend most of their time.

142. Households residing in Communes having a winter and a summer location, they are to declare as place of their usual residence the winter location.

143. Individuals residing in collective residences are to declare the place where the collective residence is located.

144. Nomads and roving are considered to have their usual place of residence at the enumeration place.

145. [Omitted, how to insert the answers]

Question 12, Municipality or commune of residence in December 1965 [omitted]
[p. 44]

Questions 13-16, Usual occupation during the last twelve months (March 1970-February 1971)

148. Questions 13-24 should only be completed only for persons of age 10 and more.

[Omitted, definitions and instructions]

149. An individual is to be considered as working at if he has a job that provides his and the household's livelihood. That is, that the individual is working in order to profit, or for pay (salary, a day's wages, contract work) or assist in the family business even without pay apart from his livelihood as a member of the family.

150. Working individuals may be distinguished in two categories: Those that are always working at the same job and those that that are working in various jobs.

151. Usual occupation is the work that the individual is specialized or is working for the most part of the year. E.g. tailor, shoe-maker, builder, miner, loader, tobacco worker, land worker etc.

Question 13, Does he usually work?

152. Yes will be recorded for those that are usually working regardless of whether during the census taking are working or not. That is, during the census taking the enumerated may be on leave, or is unemployed, i.e. dismissed from his work and is seeking work, or sick, did not work due to the mending of the machine he were operating etc. but usually he is working. Yes will be also recorded for the individuals that have just started working. As in the case of a Gymnasium graduate that started working only a few days before. No will be recorded for those that have stopped working due to old age, illness or other reason and do not intend in the future to work, as in the case of a person that was five days age a civil servant and now a pensioner.

153. Yes will be also recorded for the managers not involved in bodily work of a small or large business, e.g. the head of a large agricultural land or the aged widow owing a small farm, for the cultivation of which two waged workers are being employed, but they do not work themselves in their land.

[p. 45]

154. Yes will be also recorded for those working seasonally (except those employed in family business without pay, see paragraph 156) as during the Christmas or Easter holidays, the cultivation or harvest, but are working for 6 or more hours per day.

155. Yes will be also recorded for those working daily for a few hours in a small family business or outside their dwelling (e.g. office or shop cleaners), as long as they are working at least 1/3 of the regular working time.

156. As working are also considered the family members assisting without pay (e.g. housewife, pupil, etc.) as long as they are systematically working in the family business. As systematic is considered the work where the individual is working for a 1/3 of the regular working time.

157. No will be recorded for the housewives, pupils and students, as long as they do not belong in the before mentioned cases, old persons no longer working, unable to work due to old age, sickness or handicap, apprentices in another business, that are working without any sort of pay since they are not usually working.

158. No will be recorded as well for those serving as conscripts or reserves and those that are under imprisonment.
Officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers are working and YES will be recorded.

159. [Omitted]

Question 14, What type of work he was doing? In what type of establishment, agricultural land, enterprise or service he was working?

[Bottom of p. 45, pages 46-47 and top of p. 48, omitted]

[p. 48]

Question 15, Occupational status

167. Employer is considered the owner of an establishment (either by himself or with partners) and is employing salaried or wage earning staff.

168. Self-employed is the one that does not employ salaried or wage earning staff apart maybe a member of his family without pay.

169. Assistant in the family business is the family member working in the family business without pay, except his livelihood.

170. Employee or wage earner is the person who for his work is having a salary or a day's wage or by contract.

The employee or wage earner that works on contract but has the materials is considered as employer (if he employs staff) or self-employed (if not employing staff).

Employee is considered as well the one working for percentages on sales but the one working for percentages on profit is considered as businessman.

[p. 49]

Question 16, Reason for not working [omitted]

[Questions 17-20 refer to the person's occupation during the previous week (7-13 March 1971) regardless of whether they usually work or not]

Questions 17-20 [omitted]

Question 17, Hours worked the previous week [omitted]

174. Those having worked Zero or less than 10 hours the previous of the census taking week must also answer whether they were "seeking work"

The enumerator must be very careful. Many working would rather prefer a different work but this does not mean that are seeking work. Job seeker is considered the person that is not working or will not have work when today has finished his work and so tomorrow is to look for work e.g. whitewasher finishing a room in a day and tomorrow is to seek work.

The worker dismissed from his work and is seeking work etc.

[p. 50]

The enumerated individual not working until the census taking day either as assistant in the family business or at all, but is seeking work is to be recorded as "young", man or woman finishing gymnasium and wishing to work.

Questions 18, Type of work and establishment of work [omitted]
Question 19, Occupational status [omitted]
Question 20, Reason for not working [omitted]

Questions 21-24, Main source of livelihood and level of education[omitted]
[p. 51]
Question 21 Main source of livelihood

179. Main source of livelihood is the basic source that the person depends on for his livelihood during a twelve month.

180. All persons over 10 years of age are to answer regardless of whether they are working or not.

181. If the enumerated individual has more than one source he is to declare the main one. His income includes not only money but goods as well, e.g. a landowner instead of rent is receiving part of the crop.

182. Source of livelihood is considered the pay for work, e.g. the salary that the enumerated is receiving for his work, a day's wages, fees, percentages on sales, tips, payment with goods etc. income that results from his economic activity.

183. Income from fortune will be considered as main source of livelihood when it is his basic source, rents, interests, dividends, rights on mines or quarries etc.

[184-185 omitted examples on pensions]

186. From the household or other person live those not mentioned before. In this category are included the minors, the non working spouse, pupils and students, unable to work, divorced women that are receiving alimonies etc.

Question 22, Knows how to read and write [omitted]

Question 23, Level of education

188. The highest degree is to be recorded [examples omitted].

[p. 52]

Question 24, Higher degree of education [omitted]

[Rest of the document was not translated into English]