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Republic of Guinea
General Census of Population and Dwellings for 1996
Enumerator's Manual

Decree D/210 PRG/SGG of July 26, 1995
This document was printed thanks to a subsidy from the USAID

RGPH 96/Doc3

[pp. 2-4 not presented here.]

[p. 5]

1.1 What is the general census on population and dwelling (the RGPH)?

The General Census on Population and Dwellings is a statistical operation whose goal is to take a count of the population and to collect information on the individual characteristics of all people living in Guinean national territory at a given point in time.

The RGPH is thus not simply a counting of the inhabitants of a country. It is also and above all an operation of data collection on the demographic characteristics (gender, age, place of birth, marital status, nationality, religion, etc.) and socioeconomic characteristics (literacy, school attendance, economic status, profession, branch of economic activity, disability, etc.) of the population. At the same time, it allows the collection of data on certain characteristics of dwellings (how the are used, how they are supplied lighting and water, type of toilet facilities, manner of household waste disposal, disposal of sewage water, number of room occupied, etc.) in both a rural and urban setting.
[pp. 6-7 not presented here]

[p. 8]
1.4 Method of data collection
The method of data collection used is that of direct interviews of individuals in their normal dwellings. It consists of going to all of the dwellings in your census zone (zone de dénombrement, ZD) and first identifying and numbering the households and the buildings they live in, to ask questions according to the instructions received, and then to write accurately and legibly the responses gathered on the part of the questionnaire intended for this purpose.

The success of the counting depends principally on the way in which you conduct your interview to gather the desired information with citizens in their home, then record the answers you receive on the questionnaire. It is absolutely essential that you act tactfully, patiently and courteously to win the confidence of the people you interview and prompt them to answer the questions you ask accurately.
[p. 9]
Chapter 2

Territorial administrative units
The Republic of Guinea is subdivided into highly structured territorial administrative units, called the Administrative Region, the Prefecture, the Sub-prefecture, the Commune, the District and the Neighborhood (Quartier). The Administrative Region is the largest administrative division in the country. There are a total of 8 of them. They are directed by a Governor. All of the services of the state are represented at the headquarters of the Administrative Region. The Administrative Region is subdivided into Prefectures. It should, however, be pointed out that the Administrative Region of Conarky, the capital of the country, is, unlike other Regions, sub-divided into Communes, which have the standing and prerogatives of a Prefecture in terms of the organization of the data collectors.

The prefectures are territorial administrative subdivisions, which are directly dependent on the administrative region. The prefecture is directed by a prefect. There are 33 prefectures in all. Each prefecture is subdivided into a certain number of sub-prefectures, each one of which is directed by a sub-prefect. The sub-prefecture is subdivided into districts. The sub-prefecture corresponding to the headquarters of the prefecture is established in common (with the prefecture). As for the commune, it is subdivided into neighborhoods. The neighborhood or the district is the smallest administrative bodies in the country. The neighborhood is under the responsibility of a neighborhood leader, whereas the district is directed by the President of the district. The district is made up essentially of rural areas (villages, hamlets) where the great majority of the farmers live. The neighborhood is generally subdivided into sectors. The territorial administrative communities which have been kept as territorial units for the census are: the administrative region, the prefecture, the commune and the sub-prefecture. For the specific needs of the data collection process in the field, the sub-prefectures and the communes have been subdivided into homogeneous territorial units and called census zones.

In rural areas, a census area may correspond to part or all of a district, just as it can overlap 2 or 3 districts within the same prefecture. In an urban setting, the status of a census zone is also variable from one commune to the next.
[pp. 10-12 table not presented here.]

[p. 12]
Chapter III
General instructions
[pp. 13-20 not presented here.]

[p. 21]
4.5 Household questionnaire
The household questionnaire is the technical document from which you should draw inspiration for asking questions related to the different subjects studied according to the order indicated, and on which you will record your responses according to the appropriate forms.

The individual items of information related to the members of the same household should be written on the same household questionnaire if the size of the household is not greater than 9 persons. Otherwise, use the (number of) questionnaires that the size of the household requires.
[pp. 22-24 not presented here.]

[p. 25]
Chapter V

Statistical units of the census
The statistical census units of the General Census of the Population and Dwelling of the Republic of Guinea are 4 in number: the building, the household, the members of the household, and deaths in the household within the preceding 12 months. It is tempting to add live births but in fact, as the questionnaire is articulated, live births are treated as individual composed variables. Deaths in the previous 12 months are dealt with in the following chapter.

5.1 General introduction

5.1.1 Building
The building is a construction bounded by exterior walls made of masonry, earth or vegetable matter, in wood or iron, containing one or several rooms that are more or less large, covered by a roof and intended to serve as a place of residence for people or to be fitted to serve as an office, a workshop, etc. A hut (une case), a shack/shed (une barraque) a villa or a modern building are buildings.

The dwelling unit is a building or a collection of buildings used for living by a household. Equally independent apartments within the same building should be considered as distinct dwelling units if they each possess an independent entrance leading directly to either the outside or a room used collectively by the building.

The building, as the basic element of the dwelling unit, is the frame of reference in which households and individuals are identified and then interviewed to ensure that the process is exhaustive. In this aspect the building is an observational unit. It is also a study unit because the variable "dwelling occupation status" and "number of rooms inhabited by the household" are directly related to the buildings occupied by the household.

5.1.2 Household
The concept of household is defined taking into account the way in which people associate amongst themselves in order to provide individually or collectively for food and other basic needs.

Two types of households are distinguished: the ordinary household, and the collective household.

The ordinary household is composed of a collection of people, related or not, who recognize the authority of a single individual who is called "head of household," and who live under the same roof or in the same compound and take their daily meals together. The ordinary household is generally composed of the head of household, his spouse or spouses, and their unmarried children. In some rather common cases, the ordinary household can include married children of the head of household, relatives (parents, descendants, collaterals) of the head of the household, and sometimes, unrelated persons. The important fundamental criteria to respect in identifying the members of an ordinary household are that they:

1) Live under one roof or in the same compound
2) Recognize the authority of the head of household
3) Take their meals together.

It is important to emphasize that a person living alone, who provides for his/her own basic needs, i.e., food, lodging, clothing, etc., constitutes a household.

The collective household is composed of a group of persons without an a priori family relationship, who live together within a single institution for reasons of health, study, work, travel, punishment (discipline) or other. It is the institution which governs the conditions of their coexistence, taking into account its own objectives. The following institutions fall into this category:

[p. 26]

a) Boarding schools;
b) Military barracks;
c) Communal living establishments for beggars, and disabled people and their families;
d) Hotels;
e) Prisons;
f) Temporary construction sites;
g) Hospitals and other establishments;
h) Convents and other institutions; etc.

Ordinary and collective households are both a frame of reference in which people are identified and then counted; and statistical units of analysis. In effect, from the social, economic and demographic point of view it is very important to study certain characteristics of household, particularly those of households.

5.1.3 Household Member
The fundamental statistical unit of observation and study in a general census of the population and dwelling is the individual household member, who is an element of the population being studied.

In effect, the individuals to be counted are identified in ordinary households and in collective households as either residents or visitors. The totality of individual residents in Guinea constitutes the legal Guinean population.

The people considered residents are all those who usually live in the household - that is, have been living there for at least six months; or all those who have the intention of living in the household for more than six months (if they don't satisfy the first condition). Residents are categorized as "present residents" if they have spent the night preceding the enumerator's visit to the household. However, they are categorized as "absent residents" (resident absent) if they have not spent the night preceding the enumerator's visit to the household. A person who is an "absent resident" in the household should, if he/she is still present in the Republic of Guinea, be classified in another household as a "visitor."

A "visitor" is any person who has spent the night preceding the enumerator's visit to the household in the household when in fact he/she does not normally reside there. The visitor is not a member of the household as such:

Please note: the distinction between "present resident" and "absent resident" rests essentially on [the individual's] presence in the household the night preceding the enumerator's visit, and not on the presence of the individual at the moment of the census. Nonetheless, if resident persons who did not spend the night in question in the household are present at the moment of the interview, it might be recommendable not to count them as absent residents (RA) so as not to offend them. You will then register them as present residents (RP).

5.2 Methods of Identification

5.2.1 Identification of Buildings and Households.
Buildings are of course clearly identifiable constructions in the field. However, their full identification depends on the preliminary identification of households who use them to live in. This is why the identification of buildings and households is carried out simultaneously during the first phase of the census (called the identification and numbering of households and buildings phase). In fact, the household is a unit which is not directly observable in the field -- it is the buildings and households that are directly observable. This is why it is necessary to know, when you arrive at a compound (concession) or building or apartment, if on the one hand it is inhabited, and by whom; and on the other hand to find out by asking the people who live there which households are there, and, for each household, who is the head of household. Here, it is important to take into careful consideration the 3 criteria of the ordinary household. The members:
[p. 27]

a) Live under the same roof;
b) Recognize the authority of the head of household;
c) Share meals

Thus, the family relationship is not kept as a relevant criterion.

The head of household is the person who is recognized as such by the other members of the household; he is usually the one responsible for the housing occupied by the household. The head of household must be a resident. Very often, the ordinary household is constituted from the basis of a nuclear monogamous or polygamous family. In this case, the man who is the head of the family is also the head of household if all the other members of the household recognize him as such. By a series of appropriate questions you should always verify if all the people who live in the household form one and the same household. In certain areas, a household can be made up of several nuclear families or family clusters and occupy one or several buildings.

It also happens at times that the housing is not occupied by a family or related persons as described above. Your first concern is to discover, through a series of questions to the occupants, the person who is primarily responsible for the housing they occupy, the manner of their life together, notably their interpersonal relationships, their individual contribution to the rent, if they are renters, whether or not they take their meals together, etc. If the conditions are fulfilled these people form a household. If, on the contrary, these are young people who certainly live together (for example), but each one has made separate arrangements to eat at the house of a relative, an acquaintance, or someone else, or in any case away from their common housing, then 2 cases should be differentiated:

1) They share the rent and each one occupies a separate bedroom, in which case they should be considered as forming as many households as there are people;

2) They lodge with a relative or friend, and should [be enumerated] where they live.

[p. 28]

Below is a series of concrete examples which should allow you to better understand the idea of ordinary households and the subtleties they entail:

1) A woman who lives alone in a hut and provides for her basic needs herself constitutes a household. It is a single-person household of which she is the head. Let's suppose that this woman has a 23 year old unmarried son who is living elsewhere in another part of the town. Whether or not he depends financially on his mother, who is very wealthy, this son belongs to a different household from his mother. In this case it is the criterion "living under the same roof" which has prevailed.

2) Let us look at the example of Ali Badara, a very rich man who lives in a large compound with 3 of his 4 wives, their children and grandchildren. Among his infants, the eldest, Hassane is married and the father of a child and lives in the hut located right next to his father's. He of course contributes a small amount of money for his parents needs; however, for personal reasons he organizes his home as he wishes. Ali's second wife lives in a different compound from her husband where she manages a store. How many households can be counted in this example?

In this case there is one household in the first compound, that of Ali with his 3 wives and their dependent children, and a second household formed by Hassane, his wife and their child. Ali's second wife does not need to be counted in the same household as Ali. She is the head of the household wherever she lives because Ali should only be in a single household. In this example there are thus 3 distinct households with a clearly identified head of household.

3a) Three unrelated students team up to rent a house together and pay for food, water and electricity. They automatically form an ordinary household of 3 people. They should agree amongst themselves in the designation of one of them as head of household.

3b) Three unrelated students rent 3 rooms in a house, each one having his own room and arranging as necessary to meet his own food and other needs, independently of the others. In this case there are 3 separate households formed by the students who are head of their household.

Basing yourself on the building or buildings, once you have been able to correctly work out the household(s) that reside there, and in particular you have been able to identify the head(s) of household, then you are in a position to number the building(s) in question, as well as the households, and to fill out the Identification and Numbering of Households and Buildings form.

Buildings which are not dwellings need not be numbered: simply mark an «X» on the main door. Such buildings may be offices, workshops, field kitchens, stores, etc.

For all buildings used as a dwelling and inhabited, you should write a three-figure number on them: the first building will be numbered 001, the second will be numbered 002, and so on. For the same given household, the building numbers they occupy should be sequential. Thus, for example, a household which occupies 4 huts, where the head of household's hut is 008, then the 3 other dwellings must carry the following numbers, respectively: 009, 010, 011. Of course, all 4 of these huts serve as dwellings.

In an urban setting the building numbers go from 001 to «n» in a sector of the census zone. In a rural setting, the building numbers go from 001 to «n» in a town.

The numbering of ordinary and collective households is done indiscriminately with the help of a 3-figure number, in a continuous fashion in a given census zone in an urban setting or in a rural setting. The first household carries the number 001 and the last household carries the number «n» which number corresponds exactly to the number of households observed in the census zone.

[p. 29 not presented here.]

[p. 30]

5.2.2 Identification of Household Members
The identification of household members occurs during the identification and numbering of households and buildings phase. In effect, a household has a concrete existence only insofar as the head of household and the inhabited spaces occupied by the household have actually been identified. The head of household is thus the first member of the household who should be identified. He should fulfill the required criteria to be considered a "resident" (present or absent), and have a certain authority over all the other members of the household. In particular, he knows them all.

The notion of residence is defined in relation to a "household settled in a given prefecture."

In other words, if the head of household has been in the prefecture for at least 6 months, or if, the length of stay in the prefecture being less than 6 months, he proposes to stay for more than 6 months from the date of his taking up residence there, then the head of household is a resident; he should be enumerated with all the members of his household living at his current domicile if they fulfill the criteria for residency. Strictly speaking, the members of the household are resident persons (present or absent).

Visitors are of course enumerated in the household where they spent the night preceding the visit of the enumerator, but they are not considered members of the household. If they reside in Guinea, they are members of the household where they have been recognized as an absent resident.

Examples
First case: A civil-servant who has been living with his entire family for 3 years in the sub-prefecture of Colia (in the Boffa prefecture) has been visited in his new hut (case) in Tarnita, where he was assigned 2 ½ months ago. His family is in Colia and has not yet joined him in Tarnita. What should be done?
Solution: It is clear that this civil-servant is a resident identified as head of household in Tarnita. His family should be counted in Colia and not in Tarnita. The wife (if he has just one wife) is head of household in Colia, where she is counted with the other members of the family.

The man and his entire family are residents in the prefecture of Boffa. However, they are enumerated in the place where they are currently domiciled: Tarnita for the man, and Colia for the rest of his family.

Second case: A woman who lives in Tinit-oulen with her husband and their 4 children was seen at the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where she was brought 3 ½ months ago by medical evacuation. Her husband comes to visit her from time to time in the hospital. He is in Tinti-oulen on the day of the census. What should be done?

[p. 31]

The woman is counted as a "Visitor" in the collective household of the Donka Hospital in Conakry and as "absent resident" in the household of her husband in Tinti-oulen.

Third case: Mister Ali Camara is a civil-servant who has been working for just one month in Banian as a teacher. The day of the census he is in his village in the sub-prefecture of Koumbain, where his father, mother and sisters live. How should he be counted?

Solution: It is important to situate in which prefectures the sub-prefectures of Banian and Koumban and Koumban [are] located.
Banian -- Faranah.
Koumban -- Kankan.
Ali Camara should be counted as a "Visitor" in the household of his father, and as an "Absent resident" in Banian.
[p. 32]

Chapter VI
How to fill out the household questionnaire

The household questionnaire contains information related to the household and to the members of the household to be considered, and then analyzed to describe the socio-demographic and economic circumstances of the population of Guinea. In the following paragraphs the [rules] that should be followed to ask questions related to the different variables and gather the appropriate response(s) in the appropriate ways are described. Thus the rules to follow to gather the data related to the identifying characteristics of the household, the individual characteristics of the household members and the characteristics of the household are the central goal of this chapter.

6.1 Data Related to the Identifying Characteristics of the Household
The data related to the identifying characteristics of the household are presented on the first page of the household questionnaire. To gather this data, you do not need to ask a single question of the head of household, and it would in any case be useless to do so. Moreover, the head of household may be completely unaware of some of these facts. To obtain this information, you have 3 sources of information: the instructions of your controller, your census zone map and the Identification and Numbering of Households and Buildings forms.

During training the controller will acquaint you with the territorial administrative units of the Republic of Guinea that are described in chapter II of the enumerator's manual. He will tell you very clearly in which sub-prefecture/commune, which prefecture, which administrative region and which eco-geographical region (région naturelle) you will be working. At the same time he will indicate the code number to apply for each one of the variables. For all households in your census zone, this data will not change. This is why you must write the information in your rounds notebook carefully. Additionally, this data is also contained in another document that the controller will give you: the enumerator's ID card.

The second source of information is your census zone map. In this document you will find the number of your census zone, the names of the towns in your census zone arranged by district if you will be working in a rural area, or by sector number arranged by neighborhood if you work in an urban area. In both rural and urban areas it is requested that you verify that the names of the villages, neighborhoods and districts are correctly written in the documents you have been given. In case of transcription errors, you should make the necessary corrections and note them in your rounds notebook.

Finally, concerning the information relating to the building number, household number or type of household, it is in fact you yourself who have obtained this information during the numbering of households and buildings phase. Therefore, all you have to do to obtain this information is to consult the Identification and Numbering of Households and Buildings form that you have established. If a household occupies several buildings, you should, just as you have done on the Identification and Numbering of Households and Buildings form, write the numbers of the first and last inhabited buildings on the line, and the number of the first building only in the numbering grid. In this way it is possible to have all the numbers of the buildings inhabited by the household on the questionnaire.

With regard to the non-numeric variables, i.e., the following variables: eco-geographical region, administrative region, prefecture, sub-prefecture, commune, district, neighborhood, town and type of household, you should write out the information you have gathered very clearly and, in the various numbering grids, write the corresponding number code, writing one number in each box. Avoid crossing out and writing over as much as possible in the process.
[p. 33]

The type-of-household variable includes several modalities which are grouped at the numbering level into 2 broad categories:

1) Private household--1
2) Collective household--2

Thus for an ordinary household you would write: "Private household" and put a "1" in the corresponding box of the numbering grid. For a collective household you would write the name of the collective household as you have recorded it on the Identification and Numbering of Households and Buildings form, and then write "2" in the box of the numbering grid

6.2 Data Relating To Individual Characteristics of the Household Members
For practical reasons we will consider these individual characteristics column by column, for the training of enumerators is relatively fast and their base level varies widely.

Column P01: Sequence number/Rank (numéro d'ordre)
The sequence number/rank is a two-figure number assigned according to very precise rules to all people who are enumerated in the household. These rules are defined with the single goal of facilitating the listing of household members for you and the head of household, or any adult person. Thus you should be able to save time and above all enumerate all the members of the household. What, then, are these rules?

The head of household should always be the first person listed on the household questionnaire.

The information related to him is written on the first line, which will always bear the sequence number "01." It is very definitely a two-figure number; the second person enumerated will bear the number "02," and so forth.

For persons living in the household, list first the members of the household who are residents, either present resident (RP) or absent resident (RA). When you have finished recording all of the resident persons living in the household, proceed to the recording of visitors (Vi). Whatever their family relationship to the head of household, visitors are always recorded in the last place.

Residents living in the household must be recorded according to the following schema, which is made necessary by the need to enumerate everyone living in the household without omitting anyone or counting anyone twice. The usefulness of the schema lies also in the fact that it allows the head of household to list the members of his household easily. You should thus see clearly why we have chosen to proceed in this way.

1st case: The head of household is a man:

a) Head of household;
b) Unmarried children of the head of household whose mother does not live in the household;
c) First spouse of head of household;
d) Unmarried children of the head of household's first wife;
e) Second wife of the head of household;
f) Unmarried children of the head of household's second wife
g) Third wife of head of household
h) Unmarried children of the head of household's third wife;
i) Married children of the head of household followed by their spouses and children;
j) Parents of the head of household (father and/or mother of head of household);
k) Brothers and sisters of the head of household, followed, if they are married, by their spouses and children;
l) Nephews and nieces of the head of household, followed, if they are married, by their spouses and children;
m) Grandsons and granddaughters, followed, if they are married, by their spouses and their children;
n) Other relatives of the head of household;
o) Unrelated persons
[p. 34]

Please note: To record unmarried children living in the household who have at least one parent residing in the same household, always begin with the youngest and work your way up to the oldest, while still following the rules listed above as much as possible.

2nd Case: The Head of Household Is A Woman
In this case, she is of course assigned the number "01." The preceding schema is still applicable, with the only difference being that there will no longer be a first spouse, second spouse, etc. However, her husband, if she has one who lives in the house as a resident (present resident or absent resident), should be assigned the number "02."

No matter what their family relationship to the head of household, visitors should be recorded after all the resident persons of the household.

Column P02: Names and Surnames
This column heading is very clear: it indicates the recording of the names and surnames of the household members once they have been identified as such. You should write the first name and common name of the household members very clearly in the space provided for this purpose. For married women you should get their maiden name, because it is the maiden name that you should indicate in the questionnaire, preceded by their common given names. You should never write titles such as Mr., Mrs., Miss, etc.

[p. 35]

If you have difficulty spelling the names and surname of the person being enumerated, tell them so very politely and ask them for their help in spelling the name correctly.

For example, the person could spell out his names and surnames; he could show you a document on which his names and surnames are written (documents indicating civil status, driver's license, passport, national identity card, etc.) In all cases be very careful about the exact spelling of the names and surnames of household members.

Column P03: Family Relationship to Head of Household
In each ordinary household, the head of household is the reference person, the one who is the basis for the relationship of persons, either related or not, who live under the same roof or in the same compound, take their meals together and accept or recognize his/her authority. In the category "family relationship to head of household," specify the nature of the family relationship (blood ties, in-laws or marriage, adoption) or the absence of family relationship between each family member and the head of household. Obviously, the simplest case is the one where the household consists of a single person, who is the de facto head of household.

The variable called "Family relationship to head of household" is a pre-coded one for which there are 9 modalities. Thus your task is simplified insofar as family relationships are very specific and should not pose any major difficulties in understanding or interpreting them. Once the head of household has been identified, there are 8 ways to describe the family relationship between a member of the household and the head of household. If there is no family relationship with the head of household (by either blood or marriage), you would then give code 9, which means without family relationship (9=SLP, no family relationship); this person could be a friend, a colleague, someone you are helping out or a mere acquaintance that you are lodging, an apprentice, etc. In every other case, it will be a person who has a family relationship of some sort with the head of household, but you do not have the liberty to write down any response exactly as it is given, because you only have 7 possibilities available to you to indicate the nature of the relationship:
a) EP--2 Code "2" corresponds to a marriage relationship between the head of household and his or her spouse. All wives of the head of household have the code "Ep-2" in column P03: Relationship to Head of Household. If the head of household is a married woman and her husband lives in the household, he will have the code EP-2.
b)"Fl--3". Code "3" is reserved for children of the head of household, i.e., the sons and daughters of the head of household. Please note: Your brother's children or your sister's children are not your children -- they are your nephews or your nieces. Neither is an adopted child your son or your daughter. These cases should not be coded "FL-3."
c) "P/M--4" Code "4" is strictly reserved for the father and mother of the head of household. A maximum of 2 people can be assigned code "4" in a given household.
d) "F/S--5" Code "5" is reserved for brothers and sisters of the head of household; it is for persons born of the same father and/or mother as the head of household. Please note: Do not confuse brother/sister with first cousin, which is the child of your uncle or your aunt.
e) "Ne--6" Code "6" is reserved for nephews and nieces of the head of household, that is, the children of the brother, sister, or first cousin of the head of household. The head of household is their uncle or their aunt.
f) "PF--7" "PF" indicates a grandson or grand-daughter. Code "7" is thus reserved for the grandsons and granddaughters of the head of household, that is, the children of the sons or daughter of the head of household. The head of household is their grandfather or grandmother.
g) "AP--8" Code "8" groups all the other family relationships with the head of household that haven't yet been identified. They are without doubt numerous and it is impossible to list them all. For example, all family relationships by adoption and by marriage (with the exception of the relationship that joins 2 spouses) fall in the "AP-8" class. Examples are: adopted child, parents-in-law, etc. In this same category you should also put uncles, cousins, aunts, etc.

[p. 36]

To record the answer in the questionnaire based on the elements indicated above, simply circle the code number that corresponds to the information you receive. In the case of a collective household, there is not a [head of] household. In this case, the National Census Bureau has decided that you should apply code "9," "without family relationship," (sans lien de parenté) to all members of collective households. So, you should circle code "9," "SLP," for all collective households.

Column P04: Sex
Sex is one of the easiest variables of the questionnaire to obtain in most cases. In exceptional cases of young children, don't make assumptions about the name, dress or physical appearance in determining the sex of the child. Always ask the parents if you have any doubts about the sex of their child. This pre-coded variable has 2 possible modalities:

"Masc--1" for male
"Fem--2" for female
To record the answer you receive in the questionnaire, simply circle the number of the appropriate code.

Column P05: Housing Status (situation de residence)
Members of a given ordinary household can be enumerated as present residents (PR), as absent residents (RA), or as visitors (Vi). Members of a collective household should be enumerated as present resident (RP), absent resident (RA), or as visitor (Vi) by applying the same rules as those used when deciding the case of an ordinary household. Thus, in whatever type of household you find yourself, you will ask those same questions suitable for obtaining a response that should allow you to classify the members of the household in one of the following 3 categories:

[p. 37]

Present resident: RP--1
Absent: RA--2
Visitor: VI--3

To record the appropriate response in each case, you should, again, circle the corresponding code.

Column P06: Date of Birth or Age
An individual's age is a very important variable in the data analysis of the census. For this reason you should try your very best to obtain this information as accurately as possible. To do this you should try in every way possible to ensure that each individual gives you his/her date of birth, expressed as much as possible in the form of day, month and year. For example, for those who don't automatically remember the date of their birth, a national identity card, a passport, a driver's license, a vaccination form, etc., are all documents which you could resort to for information, either complete or partial, about individuals' birth dates. To record the answer in the questionnaire 2 cases should be distinguished:

a) The information related to the date of birth is complete. In this case, you know from the person whose presence you are in the day, month and year of his/her birth; for example, October 12, 1953. Convert this information to a numeric format, with the month of birth especially corresponding to an ordinal number. There are 12 months in a year, and an ordinal number is a 2-figure number from 1 to 12 (including 1 and 12), which indicates the order of the month in the year. Thus: January=01, February=02, March=03, April=04, May=05, June=06, July=07, August=08, September=09, October=10, November=11, December=12. So the 12th of October, 1953 is the same as 12/10/1953 or just 12/10/53. For the purposes of the census it is this last numerical expression of the date of birth, in which the year of birth is expressed as a function of the last 2 numbers, which should be applied. Thus, 1953=53; 1907=07; and 1996=96. A month has between 28 and 31 days. Here also, it is acceptable that the date of birth be expressed in numbers, in particular for the first 9 days of the month. Thus it is possible to fill in each of the spaces in the numbering grids reserved for the day (J), the month (M) and the year (Y) of birth. For someone born on October 12, 1953, you should record the information as follows:
/1/2/ /1/0/ /5/3/

If the information related to the date of birth is incomplete, which is generally the case of someone born around 19__ (year of only), in this case record the available information in the numbering grids as previously. Wherever the information is not available, the spaces in the corresponding numbering grid should remain empty.

[p. 38]

For all persons born in the year 1900 or earlier, for example 1896, 1892, etc., do not write anything in the space reserved for the date of birth, even if partial or complete information is available. In these cases, write "98" in the numbering grid reserved for age.

For example: an individual was born in March 1967, but no day is given; another was born around 1945, but no other information about the date is available; and a third was born around 1896. You should record the information as follows:

a) J:/_/_/ M:/0/3/ A:/_6/7/

b) J: /_/_/ M: /_/_/ A: /4/5/

c) J: /_/_/ M: /_/_/ A: /_/_/
/9/8/

Notice that the 2 spaces of the grid shown below are empty in the 2 cases where there is partial or incomplete information about the birth date when the birth date is after December 31, 1990, because this date is written in the grid space provided for that purpose.

If, however, the date of birth is prior to January 1, 1901, then simply write "98" in the grid space intended for age. You should remember this rule well.

d) In cases where, in spite of your best efforts you are not able to obtain complete or partial information related to age from the person being interviewed, you should, with his/her help or the help of a relative, estimate his/her age in complete years.

For children aged less than 10 months, write their age using 2 numbers: use 00 for 0 years old, that is, for a child of less than 1 year; use 01 for a child of 1 year; 05 for a child of 5 years, and so on.

Note: For all persons aged 98 or more or born before January 1, 1901, record the number "98" in the space in the numbering grid reserved for age. For example: for a baby of 4 months, a 9 year old individual, another aged 69, a third aged 98 and a fourth aged 103, you should write the information as follows:

[p. 39]

a) J: /_ /_ / M: /_ /_ / A: /_ /_ /
/ 0 / 0/

b) J: /_ /_ / M: /_ /_ / A: /_ /_ /
/ 0 / 9 /

c) J: /_ /_ / M: /_ /_ / A: /_ /_ /
/ 6 / 9 /

d) J: /_ /_ / M: /_ /_ / A: /_ /_ /
/ 9 / 8 /

e) J: /_ /_ / M: /_ /_ / A: /_ /_ /
/ 9 / 8 /

Note: For children younger than about 5, it is greatly desired that you get this information in the form of a birth date. You should do everything possible to help the parents give you exact information or a useful document (vaccination form, birth certificate, baptism record, etc) so that you can gather this information in the desired format.

Column P07: Place of Birth
For the purposes of the census, for "place of birth" you should indicate, for persons born in the Republic of Guinea, the prefecture that they were born in. For those [born] outside of the Republic of Guinea, you should indicate the name of their country of birth. Using a series of 2 questions, you should be able to gather the information you are looking for.

For example: "Were you born in the Republic of Guinea?" Yes/No
If the answer is "Yes," ask the following question: "In which prefecture?"
If the answer is "No," ask the following question: "In which country?"

Note: For all persons born in Conakry, write "Conakry." If the person does not know the answer, it is possible to use a written document (birth certificate, national identity card, passport, etc.) to obtain the information.

In particular, if such a document has already been presented to you during the data collection related to the date of birth, take advantage of this to take down the place of birth at the same time. Also take down the prefecture if the person was born in Guinea, or the country if he/she was born outside of Guinea. To record the answer you receive in the questionnaire, write out completely and very legibly the name of the prefecture of [ ] or the [name] of the country of birth in the space provided.

It is possible that an individual might indicate he/she was born in Guinea without being able to specify the prefecture in which he/she was born. In this case write: "Guinea" without any further details. In the same way, if an individual says he/she was born outside of Guinea without being able to specify which country of [birth], rather than leave the space blank (i.e., undeclared answer) write [country un]specified.

Note: To distinguish between Mali, a prefecture in Guinea, and Mali, the Republic of Mali, follow these specific guidelines:

a) For people born in the prefecture of Mali, write "pref. de Mali";
b) For people born in the Republic of Mali write "Rep. du Mali."
[p. 40]

Very important: Do not write anything in the 2 boxes of the numbering grid below.

Column P08: Nationality
Nationality is a legal concept, and is acquired by birth or naturalization.

Some legislation foresees cases of dual nationality. For the purposes of the census, the overriding objective is to be able to classify people living in Guinea as nationals (Guinean citizens) and foreigners (citizens of another country or without a country, that is, people without a nationality.) The enumerated person is at liberty to declare his/her nationality. In case of dual nationality the person should declare only one nationality, the nationality of his/her choice.

Ask the following question: "What is your nationality?" For Guinean citizens write "Guinean" in the appropriate space. For foreigners, those who are citizens of another country, write the declared nationality. For example, it may be necessary to write "Senegalese," "Ivorian," "Malian," "Russian," or "Ukrainian" to indicate the nationality of citizens of the respective countries of Senegal, Ivory Coast, Mali, Russia and the Ukraine. In the specific instance of citizens of Niger and Nigeria, simply write the name of the country, Niger or Nigeria, to avoid errors due to an error in the recording of the correct term.
Please note: Do not write anything in the 2 boxes of the numbering grid located below.

Column P09: Religion
Religion can be defined as the collection of beliefs and dogmas defining the relation between mankind and the sacred. For the purposes of the census, we are interested in the affiliation or non-affiliation of those enumerated with an organized group that adheres to determined religious or spiritual beliefs, especially Islam, Christianity and Animism. Ask all of the people you interview the following question:

"What religion do you practice?" or "What religion are you affiliated with?"

There are 5 possible responses:
1) The person has no religion: SRe--0
2) The person is Muslim: Mu--1
3) The person is Christian: CH--2
4) The person is Animist: AN--3
5) The person is affiliated with a religion other than the 3 preceding choices (should not be further specified): Aut--4

According to the answer you receive, circle the number of the appropriate code. In particular, if the response is "Aut--4" circle number 4. There is no need to ask for the specific religion.

Column P10: Type of major disability
One of the goals of the census is to produce statistics related to handicapped people which will serve as the government's basis in developing the nation's social policies. The central variable in determining if a person is handicapped is "Type of major disability." According to the International Classification on Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (Classification International des Déficiences, Incapacités et Handicaps (CIDIH)) of the World Health Organization, "a handicap is the disadvantage for an individual resulting from an impairment or disability which limits that individual in fulfilling/exercising what would be considered a normal role for him/her, taking into account age, sex and socio-cultural factors.

An impairment is any loss or abnormality of a structure or a psychological, physiological or anatomical function. A disability is all loss or absence, due to an impairment, of the ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being."

[p. 41]

Defined in this way, the scope of handicaps is broad, and it is for this reason that for the purposes of the census the National Census Bureau has limited it to a certain number of broad categories of the following visible disabilities: complete blindness, complete deafness, being maimed, impairment of upper limbs, impairment of lower limbs, mental impairment. For all of the handicaps not mentioned above, the National Census Bureau provides for grouping them into a single group called "Other Disabilities." Thus it is possible to distinguish between people who are "handicapped" and those who are not in a given population.

If one counts carefully, the variable "Type of major disability," has 8 modalities/possibilities. An individual can be at the same time deaf, mute and blind, for example, and display several disabilities. Thus for each possible response there is a small box [in] which you should mark an "x" if the person displays the corresponding handicap. Otherwise, do not write anything in the box. The 8 modalities/possibilities are as follows:

1) Av: Blind (completely blind)
2) So: Deaf (completely deaf)
3) Mu: Mute (completely mute)
4) IMI: Impairment in one or both upper limbs
5) IMS: Impairment in one or both lower limbs
6) DM: Mental impairment
7) Aut: Other handicap
8) SH: No handicap

Example 1:
Case of a blind person
Av X
So
IMS
IMI
MU
DM
AUT
SH
/ / /

Example 2:
Case of a person with one eye and one arm
Av
So
IMS X
IMI
MU
DM
AUT X
SH
/ / /

Example 3:
Case of a normal person
Av
So
IMS
IMI
MU
DM
AUT
SH X
/ / /

When the person being enumerated is in front of you, it is possible to see if he/she is blind, deaf, mute, disabled or not during the interview. As a result your approach and the type of questions you should ask are largely determined by the circumstances of the interview.

A very easy question, one which is perhaps a little too lengthy and might often give rise to smiles, is to ask a series of 7 questions to verify if the person being enumerated is affected or not in each of the 7 categories of handicap mentioned in the questionnaire. If all of the responses are negative, all of the corresponding boxes should remain empty, and the person is normal, so put an "x" in the box corresponding to "no handicap" (SH).

Column P11: Length of Residence
The variable "length of residence" refers to the time elapsed between the enumerated person's arrival in his/her current residence (prefecture of current residence) and the date of the census. Evidently, during this period the person in question did not stay in another prefecture or outside of the country for at least six months. Ultimately, the length of residence is the period of time denoted by the last change of residence. It may be the last change of residence from one prefecture to another in Guinea, or the last change in the country of residence, when moving from another country to Guinea, where the person settles in a specific prefecture until the date of the census. The notion of "length of residence" thus brings into play 2 places of residence, marking as it does a change in residence: the current place of residence or the last place of residence; and the previous place of residence or the next to last place of residence. A special case is that of persons enumerated without interruption since their birth in the prefecture of their birth. There is thus no change in place of residence as such. Strictly speaking, in this case the length of residence is equal to the individual in question. However, for the purposes of the census, in all cases where there has never been a change in the prefecture in which the person resides in the course of his/her lifetime, the appropriate response is "Dnaiss ___ 0", i.e., this individual has resided in the prefecture where he/she currently resides since birth. In this specific case, the prefecture where he/she currently resides is the one that should be [entered] in column P07, "place of birth" as well as in column P12, "Place of previous residence." That is the meaning of "Dnaiss." The other possible responses are numeric and express the length of stay in number of years. Those responses apply in the case where you have established that the individual being enumerated has changed his/her prefecture or country of residence. To obtain an appropriate response, keep in mind 2 variables at the same time-"Length of residence" and "Place of previous residence" and in light of this ask the following 2 questions:

[p. 43]

Since when have you lived in this prefecture?

In which prefecture in Guinea, or in which country, did you reside before moving to the prefecture where you currently reside.

To be more efficient you should first compare the place of current residence. In this way it will be easier for you to assess the answers and consequently to take the correct approach.

Column P12: Place of Previous Residence
The place of previous residence is defined with respect to the place of current residence. It refers to the prefecture or country of habitual residence before settling in the prefecture of current residence. As noted in previous paragraphs, the variables "length of" and "place of residence" are dealt with at the same time and according to the directions noted above. To record the responses you obtain in the questionnaire, write out completely and legibly the name of the prefecture or the name of the country given in the space intended for this purpose. If the length of residence is "Dnaiss--0" then write in the "Place of previous residence" column the name of the same prefecture as that carried in column P07, "Place of birth."

Please note: To distinguish Mali, the prefecture in the Republic of Guinea, and Mali the Republic of Mali, follow the specific guidelines below:
a) Write: "pref. of Mali" for prefecture of Mali
b) Write: "Rep. of Mali" for Republic of Mali
Do not write anything in the 2 [boxes] of the numbering grid located below.

Column P13: Literacy

For the purposes of the census we take literacy to mean the result of the actions of public authorities and certain private institutions which consist of teaching populations to read and write. The reference languages are very numerous because of the presence of foreigners in Guinea. The National Census Bureau has retained 4 reference languages: the national languages (LN); French (Fr); English (En) and Arabic (Ar). All other languages have been grouped [into] a single category called "other languages," whose abbreviation is (Aut). All those who do not know how to read or write are considered illiterate, and the corresponding abbreviation is "Ill." Obviously, a person [may] be able to read or write in several of the languages given above; this is why there is a small [box] across from each of the modalities where you should mark an x if the answer so requires, or else put nothing. In any case, don't write anything in the numbering grid at the bottom. It is certainly easier to ask the following 2 questions to obtain the information you want:

a) "Do you know how to read and write?"
If the answer is no, then the person is illiterate and you should put an "x" in the box "Ill" and continue to level of instruction;

If the answer is yes, then ask the following question: "in which languages?" Or else ask the individual being enumerated to list the languages he or she read and writes, and mark an "x" in the appropriate box.

[p. 44]

A. [As an] example let's look at how to deal with the following 4 cases:
a) The individual does not know how to read or write;
A
Ill X An
LN Ar
Fr Aut
/_/_/

b) The individual knows how to read and write French, English and Russian
B
Ill An X
LN Ar
Fr X Aut X

/_/_/
c) The individual knows how to read and write Arab, French and English
C
Ill An X
LN Ar X
Fr X Aut X
/_/_/

d) The individual knows how to write Chinese, Russian and German.
D
Ill An
LN Ar
Fr X Aut X
/_/_/

You should, of course, write nothing in the numbering grid at the bottom.

Column P14: Level of Education
The level of education of a given individual corresponds to the last year of studies completed, or currently being completed in the case of students who are in the highest academic cycle in the national educational system. There are 4 academic cycles, which include from 3 to 7 years of study depending on the cycle:
a) Primary education
b) Middle school education (l'enseignement secondaire du 1er)
c) [Upper/high] school education
d) Vocational Training Type A (enseignement professionel du type A)
e) Vocational Training Type B (enseignement professionel du type B)
f) Higher education

A year of studies or, more precisely, a class of studies (class d'études) corresponds to a level of teaching in a given cycle.

Note: The inclusion of an individual in the category "Vocational Type A" or Vocational Type B" is linked to the level of education he/she reached on leaving the general education system. Thus:
Write "Vocational Type A" for anyone who entered the vocational track at the middle school level (collège, secondaire 2) or before;
Write "Vocational Type B" for anyone who entered the vocational track at the upper school level (lycée, secondaire 2) or later.

To fill out column P14 you will need to ask a series of 3 questions:
a) "Have you attended an educational establishment (établissement d'enseignement scolaire), either public or private?"
If the answer is no, then write "without" below the study cycle and "0" below" years of study.
If the answer is yes, then ask the following questions from b) and c), below:

[p. 45]

b) "What is the highest academic cycle you have reached?" There are six possible answers:

1) Primary school
2) Middle school (Secondaire, 1er cycle)
3) Upper/high school (Secondaire, 2ème cycle)
4) Vocational A (Professionnel A)
5) Vocational B (Professionnel B)
6) Higher education (Supérieur)

Write out the appropriate answer completely.

c) "What is the last year of study which you attended, or which you attend now, from the academic cycles indicated above?" Write out the last year declared as follows:
-1st A, 2nd A, 3rd A, 4th A, 5thA, or 6th A if the individual has attended the primary cycle;
-7th A, 8th A, 9th A, or 10th A if the individual has attended the middle school cycle (secondaire 1er cycle, college);
-11th A, 12th A or 13th A if the individual has attended the upper/high school cycle (secondaire 2ème cycle, lycée);
-1st A, 2nd A, 3rd A, if the individual has attended vocational [school] type A or B;
-1st A, 2nd A, 3rd A, 4th A, 5th A, 6th A, 7th A, 8th A, 9th A, 10th A if the individual has attended a university or higher education establishment.

Note: For the last year of high school (la terminale), write "13th A." Remember that studies carried out in Koranic schools should not be dealt with here; rather full-fledged teaching establishments. Use the classification of cycles and years used in general or vocational teaching to gather the corresponding information for people who have studied in or are studying in an Arabic school.
Again, do not write anything in the numbering grid below.

Column P15 Individual's Status with Regard to Economic Activity Status (Situation Individuelle Par Rapport à l'Activite Economique)

Economic activity refers to productive work, i.e., paid work or remunerative labor. Thus, a mother who works hard in the fields to grow food destined for consumption by her family engages in remunerative labor; if she sells part of her agricultural production one could say that she is paid. She can buy other goods and services used to supply her family's basic needs with this money. Obviously, the salaried worker, the store keeper, the traveling salesperson, the blacksmith, etc., [all] engage in productive work or rather, economic activity. Thus, for the purposes of the census, the terms "economic activity," "profession," "occupation," and "employment" are all synonyms, since they all refer to the exercise of "productive work," "paid work," or "remunerative work".

[p. 46]

The variable "Individual's Status with Regard to Economic Activity" attempts to distinguish what they practice, whether or not they are engaged in an economic activity during the course of the given reference period related to economic activity. In the definition of modalities of this the National Census Bureau has moreover highlighted the concern with having too many details on [an] an individual case/instance where there is no exercise of an economic activity. In effect, all these cases [are] identical. Here, one of the modalities/options is presented:

a) Employed. Anyone, male or female, who has an economic activity in the course of the data reference period is "employed."
b) Unemployed. Any worker who has stopped practicing his/her economic activity and is, in the course of the data reference period, without paid or remunerative work, and is looking for a job, is "unemployed."
c) Looking for first job. Anyone, male or female, who has never had a paid or remunerative job and who is, over the course of the data reference period, looking for his/her first paying or remunerative job, is considered to be "looking for his/her first job."
d) Housewife. A "housewife" is any woman who, over the course of the data reference period has not been engaged in any economic activity, is not looking for an economic activity, has not looked for an economic activity or gone to any learning establishment, and dedicates herself exclusively to household tasks in her own household.
e) Retired. Any person, male or female, who has stopped exercising his/her economic activity and receives any type of retirement or disability pension paid by a social security administration or the state for a previous economic activity, is "retired."
f) Independent Income. This category is for any person, male or female, who does not engage in any economic activity over the course of the data reference period; is not seeking an economic activity over the course of the data reference period; draws his/her revenue and support from a guaranteed source of income (interest due on a more or less regular basis from invested funds or funds invested in farming, such as rental of land and/or buildings, certain types of capital equipment, etc.)
g) Student. Anyone registered for and attending a scholastic institution for the purpose of a general, technical or vocational education, or anyone attending a university in order to pursue and advanced degree, is a "student."
h) Other Inactive. This category groups anyone who does not engage in any economic activity, is not looking to engage in any economic activity over the course of the data reference period, and does not fall into one of the preceding categories.

How can you ask questions that will allow you to receive the appropriate answers? In the most cases proceed as follows:

[p. 47]

"Have you worked in the last 7 days?"
Or
"Have you engaged in any paid work in the last 7 days?"
Or
"Have you engaged in any remunerative activity in the last 7 days?"

a) If the answer is yes, the person is employed.
b) If the answer is no, many answers are still possible: 7 of them, to be precise.
You should then ask a series of questions, in the order given in the questionnaire, to successively verify which of the 7 answers is the correct one, unless you have good reasons for proceeding in another way.

Specific cases
1) The reference period in rural areas is one year in order to eliminate the negative effects of farmers' normal period of inactivity (dry season, off season). Thus, all individuals (man, woman, and women not attending an educational establishment) who work in agricultural, fishing, hunting or pastoral activities in this way are employed.
2) All married women who work at any economic activity during the reference period (fields, gardens, small business or micro-business, sewing, craftwork, etc.) while at the same time working in the home as a housewife in the classical sense (cooking, collecting water, gathering firewood, caring for children, etc.) should be considered employed regardless of the magnitude and regularity of her economic activity. Apply this same rule in the case of all unmarried women who have domestic responsibilities within the household while at the same time engaging in an economic activity.
3) Children aged 6-18 who regularly attend a general, technical or vocational schooling/educational establishment full time should be considered as students, even if, during the reference week, they have engaged in an economic activity.
4) Retired workers who draw a pension should be classified as employed if they have worked in an economic activity during the reference week, or in agricultural or pastoral work in the course of the year.
5) A business executive who has been relieved of his duties and is without a new appointment, and stays at home doing nothing during the reference period, is not considered unemployed if he continues to draw a salary and figure on the list of personnel: he is employed.

Given that the individual's type of economic activity is pre-coded, circle the corresponding number once you have received the appropriate response.

Warning: 1) If the answer is "employed" or "unemployed that is, if you have code number (1) or (2), ask questions related to one of the following variables: "profession or economic activity exercised," "employment status in economic activity exercised" and "branch of economic activity," which are situated in columns P16, P17 and P18, respectively.

2) If the answer is "looking for first job," "housewife," "retired," "independent income/pensioner" (rentier), "student," or "non-active other," you should have circled one of the following numbers: (3), (4), (5), (6), (7) or (8). In these cases, do not ask any questions related to the variables: "profession or economic activity exercised," and "branch of economic activity," and therefore you won't write anything in columns P16, P17, and PIS. Go directly to the variable "marital status," (column P19).

Column P16: Profession or economic activity exercised
By profession or economic activity exercised we mean:

a) "Job employed in" or position held" in the general case of a salaried employee, or;
b) "Profession engaged in" the case of a craftsman or a self-employed manual laborer, or of a professional, or;
c) "Economic activity exercised" in the fields of retail trade; artisanship; small and medium-sized businesses; transportation; agriculture; animal rearing; fishing; and the provision of services, generally for those who are self-employed or who provide the service as employer or owner.

For an employed person, ask the following question:
"In the course of the reference period, what profession did you practice or what economic activity were you engaged in?

The answer should be related to work actually completed by the person, and not to what he knows how to do, i.e., his professional training.

If the person was engaged in more than one economic activity during the reference period, ask him to tell you which he considers the most important, and write this activity in the questionnaire. However, do not write anything in the numbering grid.

For a person acknowledged as unemployed, i.e., who has worked in the past and has been without work, and searching for work, in the course of the reference period, ask the following question:

[p. 49]

"What was the last occupation, profession, position or economic activity that you engaged in before you became unemployed?"

The rules written above are useful to get the correct answer, which should be [written out] completely [in] the questionnaire. Be as strictly precise as possible when indicating the economic activity in question. For example, you should write:

"Banana planter," but never "planter."
"Primary school teacher," "secondary school teacher," "adjunct or graduate instructor," and not "teacher."
"Prefect," "Minister," "Secretary General," National Director," etc.
"Cabinet maker," "woodworker," "blacksmith," "shoemaker," "mason," "tanner," "weaver," "[dry] cleaner," but never "artisan."
"Donut seller," "peanut seller," "kola nut seller," "fish seller," "butcher," "street vendor", but never "seller/salesperson."
"Growing food crops,", rice planter, peanut planter, cattle farmer/breeder, sheep farmer/breeder, goat farmer/breeder but never write "agricultural worker," "cultivator", "breeder," "planter."
"Auto mechanic," "motorcycle mechanic," but never write "mechanic."
"Medical doctor," "lawyer," "university professor," but never write "doctor" or "teacher."
"Electrical engineer," "statistical engineer," "agricultural engineer," "civil engineer," electro-mechanical engineer," "forest resource engineer," but do not write, "engineer," "doctor in engineering," "engineering assistant," "adjunct engineer," etc.

Column P17 Status of economic activity (Situation Dans L'activité Economique)
The status of economic activity refers to the hierarchical position of the worker in the organization, production unit or economic enterprise, familial or otherwise, in which the worker is engaged or, in the case of an unemployed person, in which he was engaged.

For the purposes of the census, the National Bureau of Statistics has identified the following possible situations: independent worker, employer, salaried civil service worker, salaried worker in a joint public/private enterprise, salaried worker of a private sector enterprise, members of a producer's cooperative, apprentice, and family helper.

a) Independent worker. An independent worker is a person who is self employed in his occupation or economic activity either alone or with the help of members of his family or unpaid apprentices.

b) Employer. An employer is a person who employs salaried workers in a [company] that belongs to him. He possesses the means of production, equipment, machines, buildings, etc.

[p. 50]

c) Salaried worker. A salaried worked is connected to an employer, either public or private, by a work contract which remunerates its employee either with room and board, or in cash for the work he does. For the purposes of the census, the National Census Bureau is also interested in the type of employer, and so differentiates: salaried worker in public administration; salaried worker of a joint public/private enterprise (entreprise mixte); and salaried worker in the private sector.
i) Salaried worker in public administration.
All civil service employees and agents of the state, including contracted workers of the Administration and of public bodies are salaried workers in public administration. Salaried workers of international bodies and foreign embassies, including all those who have diplomatic status in Guinea, are classified as "SAP."

ii) Salaried worker in a joint public/private enterprise.
All workers of companies in the joint public/private and paragovernmental (parapublic) sectors are classified in this category.

iii) Salaried worker in the private sector.
All salaried workers in companies in the private sector are grouped in this category.
d) Members of a producer's cooperative. Members of cooperatives, of groupings or associations of producers, are people who participate voluntarily and actively in a communal activity related to agricultural, commercial or artisanal production. They are not salaried workers but, on the contrary, share the profits realized according to the established rules [of the cooperative].

e) Apprentice. An apprentice is a person who is learning a manual trade within the framework of an apprenticeship, either in a workshop or in the field, with a professional. He receives no remuneration, as either room and board or in cash, for the work he does.

f) Family helper. A family helper is a person, either male or female, who works in a family business) without receiving any remuneration, either [in cash or as room and board]. By "family business," a farm, a commercial concern, a craft business, etc., belonging to a member of the family, is understood.

To figure out the question(s) you should ask to obtain the status of economic activity engaged in, rely on the nature of the economic activity engaged in by the worker to see which elements should be verified. Is it a question of:

a) work done for an employer who gives you a salary in exchange?

[p. 51]

If the answer is yes, then you are dealing with a salaried employee and need to determine the status of the employer, who may be:

i) The government, the state, a local government body, (collectivité locale) an international agency or a public agency ? SAP.
ii) A joint public/private or paragovernmental enterprise (entreprise mixte ou une enterprise parapublique)? SEM
iii) A firm, company or small business ? SPr
iv) An ordinary household ? Spr

b) a job carried out by the individual on his own behalf (the firm, workshop, shop, commercial, agricultural or industrial concern (exploitation), or provision of services belongs to him)?

If the answer is yes:

1st case: the workers has hired temporary or permanent personnel who are paid based on a contract: he is an employer -- Emp.
2nd case: The worker works alone with only members of his family or unpaid apprentices: he is independent -- Ind.

c) work carried out in the framework of a producers cooperative (artisans, shopkeepers, farmers)? If the answer is yes: the worker is a member of a cooperative ? Coop.

d) manual work carried out in the framework of an apprenticeship in a workshop or in the field (sur le tas) with a qualified person, a master tradesman (un maître) so to speak, without receiving any type of remuneration in exchange? If the answer is yes, the person who carries out such manual work is an "apprentice" -- App.

e) agricultural, commercial (buying or selling), transportation or artisanal activities, or providing a service, and carried out in a family business setting without receiving any type of remuneration in exchange? If the person answers yes, the person who carries out such economic activity is "a family helper" -- Afa.

Once you have managed to obtain an appropriate answer, circle the number of the corresponding code.

Column P18: Branch of economic activity
The branch of economic activity refers to the type of economic activity engaged in by the administration, firm, company or family business, or the unit of production within which the worker carries out or carried out his/her economic activity.

[p. 52]

Thus, for example, the driver who works at the Ministry of Agriculture, the driver who works at Super Bobo, the driver who works at the International Bank of Commerce and Industry of Guinea (BICIGUI), the driver who drives a taxi and the driver who works at the Bauxite Company of Guinea are not classified in the same branch of economic activity, even though they all engage in the same economic activity or profession. Indeed:
a) The driver who works at the Ministry of Agriculture is classified in the "Public Administration" branch
b) The chauffeur who works at Super Bobo is classified in the "Business" branch
c) The driver who works at BICIGUI is classified in the "Banking" branch
d) The driver who drives a taxi is classified in the "Transportation" branch
e) The driver who works at the Bauxite Company of Guinea is classified in the "Extractive Industries" branch
f) The driver who works on an agricultural farm in Kindia is classified in the "Agriculture" branch.

Conversely, all workers of the same firm, administration or company should be classified in the same branch of activity, regardless of the profession or trade that each one carries out within this production unit. Thus, all workers of the autonomous port of Conakry are classified in the "Maritime Transportation" branch, regardless of the profession or trade that they carry out there. In the same way all workers of the Bauxite Company of Guinea (geological engineers, drivers, laborers, train conductors, cooks, accountants, electrical engineers, chemists, masons, solderers, administrative personnel, directors, etc.) are classified in the branch "Extractive Industries."

All these examples are to demonstrate for you that simply knowing the profession or trade carried out is not sufficient to determine the branch of economic activity.

Generally, the name of the firm or the company in the case of firms in the paragovernmental and private sectors contain a more or less precise indication of their principal activity. Thus, for example:
UGAR Guinean Insurance and Re-insurance Union
SBK Bauxite Company of Kindia
Makity Supermarket Retail business
SOTELGUI Telecommunication Company of Guinea
NIK New Kaloum Printing House

To avoid any errors on your part in understanding the branch of economic activity, the National Census Bureau has decided to circumvent foreseeable difficulties of this type. In the branch of economic activity column, you must mention the exact name of the body: firm, establishment, company, service, corporation, workshop, business, etc., within which the enumerated person carries out or carried out his/her economic activity

[p. 53]

This approach is very easy to apply in the general case of salaried workers in the category "SAP," "SEM," and "SPr" ; in particular, for all workers whose code in column P17 is "SAP," the branch of activity is "Public Administration."

For workers classified as independent, apprentice or family helper in column P17 "economic activity engaged in," this approach doesn't quite apply. However, the economic activity can be easily deduced from "profession or activity exercised." Thus, if masons, plumbers, building painters, building electricians, carpenters and tile layers are classified as independent workers or family help in column P17, one can deduce, without great risk of error, that they belong to the branch of activity called "buildings and public works." The same is true for registered agricultural workers and farmers, growers of food crops, rice planters, peanut planters, banana planters, tobacco planters, etc. If they are classified as independent workers, apprentices or family workers in column P17, one can deduce that they belong to the branch of activity called "agriculture." Salaried workers who do domestic work in an individual household (cook, childcare worker, guard, housework, gardener, etc.) are classified in the "domestic service" branch of activity. However, the cook of the General Manager of the BICIGUI, who is paid by that bank and not by the General Manager should be classified in the same branch of economic activity as the General Manager himself, that is, "Banking." In this case you would write BICIGUI in column P18 "Branch of Economic Activity."

All salespeople and small shop owners dealing in industrial products and goods, whether imported or not, and/or in artisanal products, and classified as independent workers or family aid in column P17, should be classified in the "Retail Business" branch of economic activity.

Manual workers and artisans, classified in column P17 as independent, family aid or apprentice, should be classified in the branch of activity that identifies with their own economic activity, even if they themselves are responsible for the sale of their products.

For all [other] people working for themselves in the production, manufacture or sale of a product, you must consider the production or manufacturing activity, and not the activity related to the sale of the product.

Note: A woman who makes and sells doughnuts is classified in the "manufacture of food products" branch, just as the baker is, generally speaking. However, the little girl who goes door-to-door in the neighborhood, or who sits on the street corner to sell the doughnuts made by her mother, is a salesperson who is classified in the "retail sale of food products" branch.

Column P19: Marital Status
The marital status of an individual is his/her status with respect to marriage. By marriage is understood any union established between a man and a woman before the state, the Church, an Imam, or concluded according to customary or traditional rules.

Thus any person declaring that he/she is married must be considered as such.

[p. 54]

For this variable, the National Census Bureau (BNR) distinguishes 6 basic modalities: single, married, co-habiting, divorced, separated and widowed.

1) A single person is anyone who has never entered into a marriage contract or a conjugal union. He/she has no spouse at the date of the census. Record this as "J Ma ____ 0."
2) A married person is any person who has been married at least once in his/her life and who, at the date of the census, has a spouse or, in the case of men, one or several spouses. Record this as "Mar_ _ _ /_ _ _/." In the box across from "Mar" indicate the number of spouses he presently has if it's a man, and if it's a woman indicate her rank in the number of spouses (i.e., 1st, 2nd, 3rd spouse of her husband).
3) Cohabitation is a consensual union in which neither party claims that they are bound by marriage. They declare themselves to be in such an arrangement.
4) A divorced person is anyone who was previously married and whose marriage was dissolved by reasons other than the death of the spouse, and who is presently without a spouse.
5) Separation is when 2 people who are bound by marriage no longer live together because of disagreement caused by a variety of reasons. It is not yet a question of divorce, properly speaking, but of a stage in married life which most often ends in divorce. Anyone in this situation is considered as separated.
6) A widow or widower, is any person who was previously married and whose marriage was dissolved following the death of the spouse, and who is currently alone without a spouse.

Please note: a polygamous man who has lost one of his wives, either through divorce or death, is still married. What changes is the number of spouses, which has decreased by one.

Ask the following question of all residents of the household aged 12 or more:

"Have you ever been married?"
a) If the answer is no, you are dealing with the case of a single person, a person who has never been married -- "J Ma--0." Circle the code "0."
b) If the answer is yes, ask for confirmation of the marriage or marriages.

"Are you still married?"
If the answer is yes, ask:
a) For men: "How many wives do you currently have?"
b) For women: "Are you the 1st, the 2nd, the 3rd . . . spouse of your current husband?

Write the number indicated in the box located across from "Mar," if the number is less than or equal to 5. If it is more than 5, write 5.

[p. 55]

If the answer is no, the person is no longer married and does not have a spouse. Ask him/her if he/she is widowed, divorced or separated and circle the number of the appropriate code.

Columns P20, P21 and P22: Questions Related To Live Births
Columns P20, P21 and P22 are related to live births. Thus the questions should be [directed to] resident women aged 12 or older. By live birth is understood all children who were born alive, that is, the product of any conception that showed any sign of life (shouting, crying, breathing, heartbeat, etc.) after complete removal from the body of the mother. Still-born children, who will not be considered here, are children who die before complete removal from the body of the mother.

In column P21, it is a question of finding out how many of the children given birth to by the mother, from her youngest [childbearing] age to the present, are still alive at the date of the census. Gather the information according to the sex of the children.

In column P22 it is now only a question of live births who have survived through the course of the most recent annual period, that is, the 12 last months preceding the date of your visit to the household. Here you should also gather the information according to the sex of the child.

One can imagine a series of well-articulated questions to cover all three columns in the following way:

1) How many children have you given birth to, from your youngest [childbearing] age up to today? How many boys? How many girls?
2) How many children are still living today? How many boys? How many girls?
3) Over the last 12 months, how many live children have you given birth to? How many boys? How many girls?

What is in question here are quantitative variables, and so you should write the numeric responses in the numbering grids provided: 2 numbers to express the number of live-born children, the number of surviving children, and the number of live-born children in the last 12 months for each sex in columns P20, P21 and P22.

6.3 Data relating to household characteristics
The data related to the characteristics of the household are all those for which you have to question the head of household directly to get the desired information (characteristics of the dwelling, deaths in the household in the preceding 12 months), and all those which effectively convey a particular aspect of the household: the summary table which gives the makeup and size of the household and the number of questionnaires used to enumerate the household.
[p. 55]

H01: Dwelling occupation status (statut d'occupation du logement)
The housing occupancy variable refers back to the way in which households use buildings for housing. There are several possible scenarios:
a) The household, or rather, the head of household, may be the "owner" of the [building] or [buildings] occupied by his household. Cases of co-ownership are easily assimilated in the "ownership" category.
b) the head of household is not the owner of the housing he occupies. In what capacity [does the owner] of the housing give lodging to the household?

i) The household pays rent in cash or in kind to the owner in exchange [for the lodging]. The household is a "normal renter."
ii) the household pays rent in cash, a part of which is reimbursed by the employer. In other words, part of the rent is paid by the renter, and another part by his employer. In this case it is said that "the rent is subsidized."
iii) the household is lodged by the employer on one of his premises/in his housing, (which is the case with high government officials or company executives), or else the household is lodged by the employer who pays the total amount of the rent to the owner of the housing (here it is a question of paying for 100% of the rent). In this case it is said that the household is "lodged for free by the employer," because the household does not contribute towards the cost of the rent.
iv) The household occupies a dwelling which a relative or friend has graciously made available. It is said that the household is "lodged by a relative or friend."

To get the information you seek, ask the following question of the head of household:
Are you the owner of the housing?
a) If the answer is "yes," simply circle code "1."
b) If the answer is "no," ask a series of questions to verify which of the other 5 possible answers is correct, and then circle the number of the corresponding code.

H02. Water supply
The fight against poverty in our country often takes the form of increasing the percentage of the population with access to potable water. In this situation, determining the means by which households obtain water is very important information for public authorities.

Here it is a question of indicating the kind (nature) of the water normally used by the households for their drinking and other household uses (dishes, cooking, laundry, bodily care, etc.).

There are 7 possible responses, the first 6 of which are very explicit: "faucet at home" (in the lodging or in the compound) and "faucet elsewhere" (outside the compound) are 2 cases that refer to running water distributed by the Guinea Water Company. "Drilling" and "developed wells" are 2 intermediate situations which fall within the framework of the village hydraulics [plan] completed by the National Service for the Development of Water Supply Points (service national d'aménagement des points d'eau), or of NGOs, and managed by the rural populations themselves. "Ordinary well" is without doubt the oldest situation, used by populations in rural zones as well as in some urban zones and zones peripheral to urban areas. "Surface water" (rivers, creeks, lakes, ponds, pools, etc.) constitute another relatively old situation used by populations to cover their water supply needs. Ask the head of household or his representative the following question: "What is the source of the water which fulfills your household's water needs in the home?"

[p. 57]

Circle the number of the code which corresponds to the answer you receive. The head of household should give only one answer. If the household's water supply comes from several different sources at once, ask the head of household to tell you which one he believes is used most often.

H03 Method of lighting
To provide for the household's domestic or personal needs at night, lighting in the household is necessary. The "method of lighting" is a variable which gives information about the principal method by which the household lights its dwelling. There are many possible situations: the household may [use] lamps or light bulbs which use "electricity;" lamps or light bulbs which use "gas;" [or] lamps which use "kerosene oil". In some cases the household may use one or many "candles;" or simply light a "wood" fire in the hut (case) in which it uses logs as lighting). Regarding this situation, ask the head of household the following question: "What type of lighting do you normally use in your lodging in the evening, when night falls? Circle the number of the code which corresponds to the answer you receive.

HO4 Cooking fuel (energie pour la cuisine)
It is common for a household to prepare its main meals itself at home. This job always includes a phase in which the food is cooked. The purpose of the variable "cooking fuel" is to inform you about the main source of energy used for this purpose. The household may use a hotplate, an oven or a stove which uses electricity taken from the public network or produced by a generator ("electricity"). The household may also use a gas hotplate or stove ("gas"), just as it may simply use a kerosene hotplate. Often, and this is the most common, the household uses "wood" or "charcoal" as fuel to ensure that it its food is cooked in the traditional way. In all these cases, by asking the following easy question you are sure to get a correct answer: "How do you normally cook food in your household?" Only one answer is accepted; circle the number of the corresponding code.
[p. 58]
H05 Type of toilet facility
Toilet facilities are the places used to satisfy man's natural needs: latrines, bathroom, toilets, etc. In this instance it is both easier and more comfortable to ask the following question: "What type of toilet facility do you have in your household" Of the 4 possible answers, only one should apply to the household. If you thus obtain this answer, circle the number of the corresponding code.

H06 [Household] Waste disposal
Daily household activity always gives rise to the creation of garbage and waste which must be gotten rid of as quickly as possible to maintain a healthy environment.

In large cities, household can use a "refuse collection" service to get rid of household waste; they can pay for a "private garbage collection" service if one is available. They can also, and this is generally recommended in certain areas, dig holes to bury the household waste; this procedure is called "burial." Or [a household can] burn the garbage to ash: this is "incineration." In many cases, the household gets rid of its household waste by piling it willy-nilly along transportation routes or throwing it into the bushes or any uninhabited space: this is "disposal in nature." Households located on waterways (rivers, creeks, etc.) and on the ocean often get rid of their household waste by throwing it either into the "waterway" or into the "ocean." These are the many solutions used by households to get rid of the household waste they create. Thus we request that you ask the following question: "What do you normally do to get rid of the household waste created by your household?" To record the answer, simply circle the number of the corresponding code.

H07/H08 Sewage disposal
Variables H07 and H08 are related to the method of sewage disposal for water for household use and water for use in toileting and washing the body, respectively. By water for household use we mean water which has been used to wash the dishes, cook food, do laundry, clean the house, etc. There are many possibilities; you should ask the question as follows: How do you normally get rid of waste water in your household:
a) waste water from domestic use
b) waste water from toilets and washing the body
Depending on the answers you receive, circle the corresponding code in each case.

H09 Number of rooms inhabited by the household
The number of rooms inhabited by the household are all the inhabitable spaces bounded by walls or partitions and the totality of which makes up a lodging, specifically, in this instance, the lodging inhabited by the [household]. A bedroom, a living or family room and a kitchen, if it is large enough to possibly place an adult-sized bed, are generally included here.

The bathrooms, the showers, the toilets and the verandas are not counted in the number of [inhabitable] rooms. A household may occupy 1, 2, 3 or several neighboring buildings to house itself or [lodge] within the same compound. In this case, the number of rooms inhabited by the household is the sum of the number of inhabited rooms in each one of these buildings.

[p. 59]

Given that the variable "number of rooms occupied by the household" is [a] quantitative variable, express the answer using 2 numbers, which you should write in the numbering grid. For example:
/_0/_5/ for 5 rooms
/_0/_1/ for 1 room
/_1/_2/ for 12 rooms

Deaths in the last 12 months
"Deaths in the last 12 months" constitutes a particular section of the questionnaire, since it is a question of a different type of data that seeks to identify the household members who have died in the preceding 12 months. You must use a great deal of tact and patience, for you are dealing with events that are painful for the household members. Nonetheless you should do everything possible so that the head of household gives you information on all the recorded deaths in the household in the last 12 months. You should also remember that this 12-month period is calculated starting from the date of your visit to the household. Thus you must make sure you manage to situate the head of household in the correct timeframe.

If the answer to the question to the head of the household is yes, put an "x" in the corresponding box and ask [additional] questions related to the sex and age of each deceased person. For sex, circle the number of the appropriate code, and record the deceased person's age at death using 2 numbers. The sequence number/rank is used to identify the information relating to a single deceased person, and also to count up the number of persons in the household who have died.

If the answer is no, put an "x" in the corresponding box and continue with the next observations.

Summary table
As its name indicates, the summary table on the first page of the questionnaire is a summary of the enumeration made of the household. You are in fact asked to go back through, quickly and without mistakes, and examine the information from the questionnaire on the following variables: sex (column P04) and housing status (column P05).

Once you have finished examining the information, verify that the total number of persons enumerated in the household corresponds with the sequence number/rank (numéro d'ordre) of the last person recorded on the questionnaire (column P01).

If the household is large, i.e., consisting of more than 9 people, two, three, four or more household questionnaire might be filled out. In this case the questionnaires should contain information related to identifying the household. However the summary table is only filled out on the first questionnaire. In the same way, all information related to the household characteristics (variables H01 to H09) and deaths in the preceding 12 months should only be contained in questionnaire number 1.

Then count the grids corresponding to the following variables, respectively: "questionnaire number in the household," and "number of questionnaires used in the household."
[pp. 60-61 are not presented here.]