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Form number 10
French Republic
Minister of the Interior
National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies
General Population Census 1968
Manual for Enumerators

This manual is made up of two parts:
The first part gives you the general instructions for the census. You should read it carefully and know the instructions it contains perfectly.
The second part is a glossary of terms which you should consult every time that you are presented with a special situation.
Refer to the table of contents on pages 3- 5 frequently.
[p.2]

Foreword
In the middle of the month of March 1968, the General Director of the I.N.S.E.E. will not hesitate to frequently turn his thoughts toward each of the one hundred thousand census agents charged with taking inventory of the French population.
The situation ceaselessly plays a greater part in the most modern procedures, with the most powerful computers. However, without the meticulous care given to the collection of information, the most elaborate technology would be devoid of meaning. The success of the greatest statistical operation in which you are going to participate depends on you and your work.
At the beginning of the process, there is the man, the man whom you are going to count, the man who is you yourself, and the man who, at city hall, has prepared your work. In return, this great scientific inventory must serve the purpose of man, that is to say, to help him to better know the current age and to better explore and guide his future.
In this vast effort, your role is a major factor. The task that you have to accomplish assumes a meticulousness pushed to the smallest detail and a responsibility which relies on you, a responsibility you are worthy of.
This manual must serve as your guide during your work. Study it carefully. Those who have drafted it for your use have made every effort to simplify your task. Always have it with you during your rounds and refer to the glossary often. If any specific point seems obscure to you, ask for further information at city hall or consult your delegate.
The experience of the preceding census shows that French people reserve understand the importance of this operation and save a warm welcome for census agents. Without a doubt there are some rare people who will be difficult to contact. Do not be discouraged and use humor. Try to persuade them calmly and thoughtfully. If the difficulties seem insurmountable to you, refer them to city hall which will take the necessary measures.
I am grateful to you for all the efforts that you are going to put forth in order to make the census a successful national operation. In advance, I sincerely thank you.
General Director of the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies
Jean Ripert
[p.3]

Table of Contents
[Table of contents omitted]

[Pages 6 - 16 were not translated into English]
[p.17]

3. The House and the House Form
(form 4)

3.1. Definition of a "house".
As it is indicated on form 4, a house form must be filled out:
1) For all inhabited structures, no matter what kind, no matter what material, including run- down residential buildings, make- shift housing, buildings under construction but partially inhabited.
2) For all structures used as abodes, even unoccupied at the time of the census (vacant dwelling, secondary residence, for example), however, with the exception of the destroyed or dilapidated buildings which are totally incapable of being used as abodes.
3) For all groups of administrative, industrial or commercial building, even uninhabited.
Thus, in the vocabulary of the census, the word house has an extremely broad meaning which is the equivalent of "building, inhabited or not." You should therefore fill out a house form for the houses used as abodes, whether this concerns private houses (usually meaning a single dwelling) or shared buildings (always containing several dwellings). But you should not forget to fill out a house form as well for the following structures:
- groups of shacks inhabited for the purpose of temporary work sites
- huts or shelters in fact inhabited, even if these are provisionary edifices, in a bad state or not fit for living (shanty town hut, etc.)
- temporary constructed shacks in devastated cities, which are used as abodes or for professional use.
- industrial buildings (factories, warehouses, etc.)
- commercial buildings (banks, movie theaters, hotels, service stations, etc.)
- administrative buildings (city halls, courthouses, barrack, etc.)
- hospitals, clinics, hospice, sanatoriums, etc.)
- teaching establishments (schools, high schools, boarding school, etc.)
- various public buildings (post offices, train and bus stations, churches, museums, etc.).
- important public monuments, castles, etc.
You will not fill out a house form for the cases here below:
- buildings under construction not yet resided in;
- buildings in ruin or which have become impossible to live in (that means that there is no change for it to be lived in again) because of dilapidation or devastated (unless there are still people residing there at the time of the census);
- constructions little importance and not used as abodes (gardening sheds, shelters, private garages, isolated warehouses, etc.)
- trailers, Gypsy wagons, or other mobile homes.
You will not fill out a house form for a simple soccer field, but you will fill it out for a stadium with buildings (ticket booths, locker rooms, showers, etc.)
[p.18]
In the case of new buildings, you will fill out house forms:
- - if inhabited, even partially and even if they are not totally completed (1).
- if they are finished (1), even if they are not yet inhabited.

3.2. Constructions for which you must fill out a separate house form.
In some special cases (residential buildings, H.L.M. workers' housing development, twin bungalows, etc.), as well as in the case of agricultural buildings, important industrial buildings, you can determine if you must fill out one or two house forms. In this situation, it is not possible to give extremely specific rules, but here are some general instructions which will be help you to make a decision.
3.2.1. Residential buildings
The rule is to consider a residential building having a certain independence, needing its own distinct housing form as a distinct building when it has its own entrance, is not connected with the neighboring buildings through the interior, has its own electrical wiring, its own gas and water, more generally speaking, a group of services of its own (concierge, trash, distribution of mail, etc).
Thus, in the case of a workers' housing development (miner's terraced house in mining regions), you will fill out as many house forms as there are private houses; in the same way, in the case of a twin bungalow, you will fill out two house forms.
In the case of an important block of houses (like an HLM), even if there is only one common entrance on the street, with one single street number and one common garden, you will consider each portion of the block when having its own distinct entrance (either on the street or in the garden, with a yard or a private driveway) as a distinct building, and when the portions of the block have letters or numbers (stairs or building A, B, C, etc. or 1, 2, 3, etc.)
In general, you will split the important blocks into several portions, considering distinct buildings as the kind where all connections between the two portions is impossible (or exceptional) through the interior of the buildings.
The number which you will attribute to each dwelling among the dwellings of the residential building (see the third page of the district form) does not include any more than two numbers: it cannot therefore pass 99. As a result, all the 99 dwellings together will be necessarily fractioned into two (or several) portions, each being considered, from the point of view of the census, as a distinct building and counted with a distinct house form. In this case, you will not forget to indicate the location of each of these portions very carefully on the corresponding house form.
3.2.2. Agricultural buildings.
You will consider that the various agricultural buildings belonging to the same farm and gathered together in the same place (group surrounding the main house and dwelling, stables, sties, barns, etc.) make up one single residential building for which you need to establish one single house form, even if some of these buildings are on the other side of the street or path.
3.2.3. Administrative, industrial and commercial buildings
As in the case of agricultural buildings you will consider various buildings belonging to the same industrial, commercial or administrative establishments (workshops, hangars, stores, etc.) as one single building for which you will establish one single house form. Thus, for a train station and its diverse annexes (depot, signaling posts, etc) you will establish only one single house form.
[p.19]

3.3. Instructions related to the questions appearing on the house form.
Remember that the house form must be completely filled out by you and should never be given to the residents (see paragraph 2.2.1 above).
Concerning the address, refer to the instructions indicated in paragraph 2.6 etc.
For that which is from the list of dwellings, see paragraphs 4.1. and 4.2. Do not forget that only dwellings from categories 1 to 7 (see the first page of the housing form for the definition of these categories) should be recorded on this list, with the exception of the places occupied by the population counted separately or shared households.
3.3.1. Question 1: Type of building.You will check one and only one of the six boxes.
Type 1: farm, agricultural buildings. You will classify the buildings used for a farm in this section.
Type 2: Make- shift dwellings: This type of dwelling consists of shelters not meant to be used for housing or totally unfit to be lived in but nevertheless are used as abodes. This includes wagons or other immobilized vehicles, immobilized boats impossible to navigate (1), blockhouses, fortifications, shanty town shacks, houses falling into ruin, etc.
[Foot note] (1) Barges and tug boats of inland navigation will be counted by agents of navigable waters. You should only count boats which are no longer licensed.
Do not count these places unless they are lived in. In the same way, only count the dwellings within them which are occupied.
Warning: The buildings built as dwellings but which have become more or less unfit to live in as a normal abode, either through dilapidation or insufficient maintenance, must be classified in sections 5 and 6 as long as they have not fallen into ruin, even if their facility installations do no longer hold up to the modern norms for building facilities.
Type 3: Temporary structure. This means structures destined for habitation but having a temporary nature: shacks constructed from devastated dwellings, workers on a temporary building site, etc.
Types 5 and 6: The buildings which do not fit with types 1- 4 will be classified in 5 or 6 on the condition that they will be mainly used as abodes or, on the other hand, mainly for industrial, commercial or administrative use, etc. In addition, the houses which contain both one single dwelling and one single professional local (store, shop, artisan's workshop) will be classified in the type 6 category.
Do not forget to specify in as much detail as possible, the type of construction, when you check boxes 2 and 6. If you are worried by a special case, describe it at the end of question and you might want to point it out to the delegate.
3.3.2. Question 2: Principal materialsWalls: Mark one and only one of the two boxes while making an effort to specify the material or materials used.
In more of the materials explicitly numbered in section 2, you will classify the nondurable materials used for temporary structures in this section. For the buildings made of wood, wooden panels and cob, always check box 2 even if this is a durable structure (it is question 1 which will inform others on the subject of the temporary nature or durability of the structure.)
[p.20]
In a situation where two of the same kinds of materials (section 1 and 2) are used (in the case of farms or agricultural buildings, for example), check the only section corresponding to the kind of material principally employed in the building or the part of the building which is lived in.
Roof - The explanations given above for the walls are to be applied as well for the roof.
3.3.3. Question 3: Number of floor above the ground floor.For question 3a, refer to the house form.
For question 3b, count the levels situated above the ground, under the principal structure: cellars, basements, etc. The answer to this question is generally 0 or 1, or, 2 in exceptional cases.
The basement must never be counted in the answers to questions 3a or 3b.
3.3.4. Question 5: Year the construction was finished.This information is very important. You will be obtain it by questioning the owner, the concierge, the people who have lived in the house for a long time, the neighborhood or the community. Some buildings bear the year of completion engraved on the side.
For the four first sections, it often suffices to know the date of completion within a certain number of years in order to answer without it being considered an error. In the absence of direct information, you will sometimes be able to classify buildings by comparing them to others, typical with some time periods. City hall might be able to tell you if, in your district, there some important apartment building complexes constructed in well- determined time periods.
For buildings completed beginning 1919 (rubrics 5, 6 and 7) you should specify the exact year of completion.
3.3.5. Question 6: Water source for domestic use.Do not count anything but water for domestic use (especially for the kitchen) and not water used for gardening, feeding cattle, etc.
Check box 1 (public supply) or box 3 (private supply) the case where a building connected to a shared water main or box 2 (building connected by way of a pipe to a water extension) in the situation where a pipe brings water inside of a building; check box 2 or box 4 when the water must be carried in.
3.3.6. Question 9: Drainage of lavatories and household water.Check one single box among the four choice in question 9a and one single box among the two in question 9b. Do not check box 1 in either question when there is, in your district, some sewers made to receive the waste water from the lavatories and used household water. City hall must inform you of the existence and the characteristics of the sewer system.
3.3.7. Question 10: Central heatingCheck one box only for the main question. Rubric 2 corresponds especially in the case of some large modern residential buildings where the various buildings are heated by the same furnace. It also is the case for some workers' development housing centers and villas for engineers heated by the factory.
Do not forget to specify the fuel used if you have checked boxes 2, 3 or 5 of the main question.
[p. 21]

3.3.8. Question 11: Farms.
a. Definition of a farm.
You will define a farm as:

1) All kinds of earth, no matter what the land surface, with the purpose of agricultural plant or animal production, under the direction of a person practicing an agricultural profession, truck farmer, arborist, or, more generally, all other professions implying the cultivation of land;
2) All kinds of cultivated earth (with the exception of woods, moors, building land, parks and flower gardens) having one hectare of land if this is about mixed farming (workable lands, prairies, crops), or at least 20 acres if this is about specialized crops (marketable crops, fruit trees, flowers, vines, etc.) and that no matter what the main activity of the person who farms it.
3) Most often, but this is not necessarily the case, such a farm is managed by a person who will declare an agricultural profession on question 12 of his/her individual form (main profession) acting as owner/farmer, farmer, or share cropper (rubric 2 in question 14 of the individual form).

However, the management of a farm (in the larger meaning of the second paragraph above) could be a secondary occupation or secondary for the people having declared other principal occupations in question 12 of their individual form (factory workers, merchants or rural artisans, etc.). It might even happen that the person who manages such a farm declares himself without a profession (retired, retired from business, etc.).
b. Center of agricultural production
You will consider, according to the case, as the center of agricultural production of which all or only part of the buildings is found on the territory of your district and is the subject of the one (or several) house forms filled out by you. (1)
- the farmer's residence: owner (direct emphasis), farmer, sharecropper or paid manager, if he lives in the town (where his dwelling is found, among the agricultural buildings considered or, on the other hand, outside that area, provided that it is found on the territory of that town.)
- The principal agricultural building, if the farmer resides outside of the town and if, furthermore, on the territory of his/her town where he resides, the farmer does not have any agricultural building.
c. Procedure to follow
In theory, a building (or group of buildings) being the subject of a type 1 house form on question 1 (farm, agricultural buildings) is always an agricultural center (answer yes to question 11), except in the two following cases:
- the farmer lives outside the area where the agricultural buildings are found but nevertheless in the town (in your district or in another district of the town);
- the farmer resides outside the town and, on the territory of his/her town of residence, he has other agricultural buildings.
Opposite of the first of these two cases listed above, you will not forget to consider as an agricultural center (answer yes to question 11 of the corresponding house form) the farmer's dwelling (even if he declared a non- agricultural profession in question 12 of his/her individual form, or again, has declared to be without a profession or retired) who resides, in your district, outside of the area where the agricultural buildings of his farm are located, on the condition, however, that the buildings are located, all or in part, on the territory of the town.
[Footnote] (1) Remember that you should not establish a house form for a construction which is not very important: gardening shed, isolated hangar, etc.
[p.22]
A farm having its center in your district can extend onto other districts and even onto neighboring towns. The surface are which you will indicate on the house form corresponding to the center (in question 11) is the total surface area of the farm.
On the other hand, if you only find plots that are not built (1) on a farm whose center is located in another district, you do not have to do anything about this farm: it will be mentioned by the census agent of that other district, on the house form corresponding to the center.
In order to allow you to find the agricultural centers of your district without missing any of them, city hall will probably give you the list. If not, you can use the file of the farms held by city hall. In any case, you should check the indications of this list or the file and bring them up- to- date (the appearance or disappearance of farms can escape notice by city hall; the surface areas may have changed).
[Footnote] (1) This means not containing any counted building (see the footnote of the preceding page).
[p.23]

4. The dwelling and pages 1 and 4 of the housing form
(form 1)
At the time of your first visit to a building, you should take inventory of its dwellings and establish for each one housing form (form 1) for which you yourself will fill out the first page.
In some individual situations, the definition of the dwelling rests necessarily on conventions. The general census of the population has some conventions which are particular to it. They are listed below, and you should follow them well. It is you alone who will decide, by applying the rules listed below, if such and such a place, a room or a group of rooms must be considered as a distinct dwelling. You should not let the residents decide this for themselves, according to their personal bias. It is only in this way that the census of the dwellings will have the desired precision.
If the building is made up of more than one housing form, you should indicate its location inside the building in a very precise way.
4.1. General definition of dwellingsAs a general rule, by dwelling you will consider any separated and independent place used as a dwelling.
The local (a single room or a group of rooms) should be separate, that means that it must be completely closed off by walls and partitions. It should not be in contact with another place if it is not by shared parts of the building (stairs, entryways, etc.)
The local should be independent, that is to say that it should possess its own independent entrance looking out on the outside, whether directly or by the intermediary of the shared parts of the building, without it being necessary to cross through another place occupied by other people.
The local should be used as an abode. You will keep track of the current purpose of the places and not the original purpose of the structure. Thus, you will not establish any housing form for former dwellings integrally transformed into (or used as) offices, stores, workshops, etc. On the other hand, you will establish a housing form for a make- shift dwelling (type 2 building in question 1 of the house form - See 3.3.1) serving as a shelter for a person, a household or a family, in the absence of another residence.
Furthermore, you should keep track of the current arrangement of the places and not their original arrangement (at the time of their construction). For example, if two dwellings have been put together by opening a connection between them in order to make one larger apartment occupied by a single household, you will only establish one single housing form. On the other hand, you will establish two housing forms when a dwelling is divided into two independent parts (each part having its own special access, all connection between them having been cut off and each is occupied by a distinct group of people).
[p.24]
4.1.1. Important Note
It happens that two households, in the meaning that one usually gives for this term (1), live together in the same dwelling while using some shared facilities (kitchen, bathroom, etc.). In such a case, you should fill out one single form number 1 and not 2: remember that the form number one is a housing form. This rule should be observed especially in the two following cases, which are frequent:
a. When newlyweds live at their parents' home while waiting to have a personal dwelling of their own, you should fill out only one form 1 for the dwelling used by both the young couple and the parents (in order for it to be conducive to establish two forms number 1, it would be necessary that the dwelling be renovated into two parts completely separated: see above).
b. When one non- independent part of a dwelling is rented out, sublet or lent to renters, people who sublet, boarders or to other sheltered people, this part should not become the subject of a distinct housing form (the renters, people subletting, boarders, or people living there occupying rooms that are not independent, will be recorded on list A after their landlord and the people of his household).
4.1.2. Situation of the bungalow or the two- story villa (ground floor and first floor).
You will establish two dwelling forms only if the bungalow is occupied by two households living independently from each other (this is not the case, especially when the meals are eaten together).
4.2. Explanations related to the box to be filled out by the census agent, on the first page of the housing form.
You should classify each dwelling in one of the seven categories (1 to 7) appearing on the bottom of the first page of the housing form. Attentively read the explanations below which will specify the definition of a dwelling in some special cases. You will find in paragraphs 6.1 and 6.2 some explanations concerning the population counted separately and the population living in shared households.
4.2.1. Category 2: Independent rooms rented out, sublet, or leased to certain individuals.
Some dwelling sometimes have an independent annex, that is to say which has access to the outside, either directly, or by the intermediary of shared parts of the building, without it being necessary to go through places occupied by other people. This is the case, for example, for dwellings having a maid's room situated on another floor (frequently the case in the Parisian neighborhoods). If the owner of the main dwelling has such an annex for himself (in order to shelter a member of his family, a maid, etc) or if the independent room is unoccupied at the time of the census, it is not necessary to establish a distinct form number 1 for the room. If, on the other hand, the annex is rented, sublet or leased to particular people, you should establish a distinct number one form for it by checking box 2 of the category of dwelling and by adding the name of the owner of the main dwelling . (This information will possibly permit considering the main dwelling and its annex as a single unit, in some uses of the census.)
The rooms classified in category 2 should always join up to a main dwelling.
[Footnote] (1) We often mean by a household a group of people living together (for example, taking their meal together), and even more restrictive yet, a household is sometimes synonymous with a married couple.
[p.25]
4.2.2. Category 3 - Furnished rooms in a hotel, a boarding house, a furnished room, etc.
Some clients of these establishments reside there for most of the year (for example, students residing for the whole school year in a hotel room); some have no other residence (for example, young married couples not having found a place to live elsewhere).
In such cases, you will establish dwelling form for each bedroom (or possibly apartments) occupied by a household or a person living alone. You will check box 3 of the housing category and, in question 4 (page 4 of the housing form), it is box 6 which should be checked.
You will check box 3 of the category of dwelling and, in question 4 on page 4 of the dwelling form, it's box 5 which should be checked.
For people passing through in hotels, refer to paragraph 6.3.1.
Dwelling category 3 should be used only for bedrooms or furnished apartments of hotels, youth hostels, boarding houses, furnished rooms (building type 4 on question 1 of the house form). It should certainly not be used either for students living in university dorms or homes, or for workers residing in hostels (see 6.2 hereafter).
4.2.3. Temporary structure used as an abode.
This category will naturally be used for all main residences of a type 3 building (question 1 of the house form) Exceptionally, you will be about to use it for a type 1 type 5, or type 6 building, of which one part alone would be a temporary structure. If you encounter such a case describe it on the bottom of the section on page one in as much detail as possible.
4.2.4. Make- shift dwelling
This category will naturally be used for all abodes of type 2 (question 1 of the house form). You will classify as well in category 5 an impromptu shelter in an place unfit for habitation, situated inside of an ordinary building (cellar, attic, shop, barn, workshop, etc.) Specify the characteristics of the place in as much detail as possible.
4.2.5. Category 1 - Regular dwelling
This category is comprised of all the dwellings with the exception of special cases listed in categories 2 to 5, provided that they are occupied as the main residence.
When the people have several residences, their principal residence is the one in which they spend most of their time during the year.
Category 7 - Secondary residence
This category will consist of regular dwellings used as secondary residences: country houses, villas and vacation dwellings, etc.
You will classify here as well the dwellings or furnished apartments, rented or to be rented during tourist seasons in the seaside and health resorts, winter sports resorts, etc.
As it is specified in paragraph 5.1, the people who must appear in list A of the housing form are those whose dwelling is the principal residence. Therefore, you should never collect individual forms 2 for a secondary residence, even if, at the time of the census, the owners of the secondary residence are occupying it. The only exception is when these people would be absent from their regular residence during the whole operation of the census and where no one will be able to fill out their forms in their place.
[p.26]
In this case, you will consider them as people passing through and you will classify the individual forms collected in that capacity in folder number 20, while checking that there is no one written down in list A of the housing form established for this secondary residence (see 4.4.2).
4.2.7. Category 6 - Vacant dwelling
This category consists of vacant regular dwellings, meaning not occupied either as a main residence or as a secondary residence. Usually, such a dwelling is available for sale or for rent ; but it also can be neither. For example, you will check box 6 for a brand new dwelling, already attributed, but not yet occupied by its renter or its owner. In such a case, you will not establish any individual forms for the future occupants.

4.3. Explanations for the fourth page of the housing form.
For vacant dwellings and secondary residences, you yourself should fill out page 4 of the housing form (except for questions 4 to 12).
For main residences you will have to check and complete the answers provided by the inhabitants: each of the questions from 1 to 11 should receive an answer. Here are some instructions for completing those questions appearing on the housing form:
3.1 Questions 1 and 3: Characteristics and existence of the kitchen, number of rooms.The same room should never be counted at the same time in response to question 1 and in the answer to question 3. It should be counted in question 1 if it is considered a kitchen (answer Yes to question 1), and to question 3 if it is considered as a room in a dwelling.
In some dwellings, there is no separation (or there is a removable partition) between the two "rooms", (for example the dining room and the living room). In such a case, you will count it as two rooms if there is a partition and one single room if there is no partition.
The case of the dwelling consisting of one single room
It in the country that you may often encounter some regular dwellings (dwelling category 1) made up of one single room serving as a shared room, with some kitchen facilities (sink, stove, etc.). In the city, it is frequent to find some places (furnished bedrooms, for example) made up of a single room (dwelling category 1, 2 or 3).
In all these cases, you will answer 1 for question 3 (number of rooms in the dwelling) and you will check box NO (no kitchen) for question 1 ("Do you have a kitchen?").
In the case of the furnished bedroom where someone has installed a simple portable stove and where there is no sink, you will complete the answer question 6 by checking the numbered box 6 (No) and not box numbered 5.
According to the rules above, for all dwellings consisting of at least one room for living you should never have a blank response to question 3.
4.3.2 Question 4: Occupational status.Question 4 should receive one single answer among the five answer choices proposed.
Boxes 1 and 2: You are to include among the owners the people who had the structure built on credit by a construction company whether or not the payment has been met or not.
In box 1:
- the owners of a private house living there;
- the owners of the whole residential building of in which they live in one of the apartments;
[p.27]
Box 2: This category is only for residential buildings under joint ownership or owned by a company (1) For such buildings, you are to include in this category the dwellings where their joint owners live (or members of the company).
The beneficiaries to a will living on a property in joint ownership should not be classified in this category. These people should be counted in box 1.
Box 3: The people who should be included in this category are those who work and who are lodged there by their owner for free or for a fee, and for whom the dwelling is a part of their work contract binding the owner and the paid employee (that is to say that, if the person changes employers, he/she must leave that dwelling). Examples: teacher having professional accommodations, stationmaster, concierge or caretaker of a factory living within factory property, etc.
These people especially are to be excluded and classified in box 4:
- people, for example, retirees, having kept their former professional accommodation.
- renters of a dwelling belonging to their employer, but for which the dwelling is not mentioned in the work contract and which could be, as a consequence, kept when changing employer.
Box 5: You will check this box for all renters, people subletting in an unfurnished rented local, with the exception of those lodged there by their employer (box 3).
4.3.3. Question 5: Water supplyYou will check one and only one of the four boxes. Box 1 corresponds to the situation where at least one faucet provides hot water (water heater or shared supply).
4.3.4 Question 6: Gas Supply.Boxes 1 and 2 can both be checked here (dwelling connected to a public gas main but whose occupants use, at least in part, bottled gas).
Box 1 will not be checked except if the dwelling is connected through a pipe to a public distribution network (the occupants can have or not have a contract subscription at the time of the census).
4.3.5. Question 7: Sanitary facilitiesYou will only take note of facilities to the exclusive use of the occupants of the dwelling. Thus, for a hotel, you will check box 3 (not bathtub, not shower) for a shower or bathroom shared by all the furnished bedrooms of a floor (dwelling category 3).
4.3.6 Question 9: Central heating.In the case of a building containing just one dwelling, for which you will check box 5 on question 10 of the house form, you will check one of the boxes 1- 5 in question 9 of the housing form. The answer 6 to question 9 of the housing form should not be used except in the case of shared heating used in the whole building or in several dwellings of the building.
4.3.7 Question 10: Telephone.The telephone extensions installed in the rooms for professional use only (and counted in question 2 of the housing form) belonging to the dwelling should be considered as installed in the dwelling.
[Footnote] (1) In the case of a company- owned building, the actions give right to the life interest of a dwelling.
[p.28]
4.3.8 Question 11: Personal vehicleYou must check "Yes" if at least one of the inhabitants of the dwelling has a personal vehicle: in this case, you should not forget to mention the number of personal vehicles (one or several) which these people use. "Have" should be understood in the sense of "use", "to have at one's disposal" as a result, you should keep track not only of cars personally owned by one of the inhabitants of the dwelling, but company cars as well.
Company vehicles used for households for the week- ends or vacations will be included in the category of personal vehicles.

4.3.9 Consistency between the answers to questions on the house form and the dwelling form.
You will check if the answers to questions 5, 6 and 9 of the housing form are consistent with the answers to questions 6, 7 and 10 of the corresponding house form.
- if boxes 1, 2, or 3 of question 5 have been checked on at least one of the housing forms of the building, boxes 1 or 3 should have been checked on question 6 of the house form.
- if box 1 of question 6 has been checked on at least one of the housing forms for the building, box 1 should have been checked in question 7 of the house form.
- if box 6 of question 9 has been checked on at least one of the housing forms for the building, then boxes 1, 2, 3 and 5 should have been checked on question 10 of the house form.
In case there is some inconsistency, before correcting the house form you will make sure that the information in the housing forms are correct.
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5. Pages 2 and 3 of the housing form; people to be counted and individual forms 2
Generally speaking, the occupants of the main residence (dwelling categories 1- 5) should themselves fill out the lists A and B of their housing form and establish an individual form for every person written down in list A.
In order for the occupants to be counted without omission or counted twice, you should check carefully that the instructions given on top of pages 2 and 3 of the housing form have been following. On the other hand, the additional signs are given to you below in order to help you to decide in special cases.

5.1. Lists A and B of the housing form.
Only the people who normally live in the dwelling should be recorded in these lists, with the exception of people who are present there by chance at the time of the census.
After the elimination of the people explicitly listed in the front of list B, the general rule is to write down in list A all people who have the dwelling in question as their regular main residence.
For most people, the usual residence is the same thing as the home, but there can be some exceptions. Indeed, for usual residences, it is necessary to understand this as the place where one usually lives, which can be different than the legal residence.
The regular residence consists thus of a fact and not a legal situation.
You will have an individual form number 2 filled out for all people written down in list A and only for those people.
The forms of the people written down in list B will be filled out there in the place where those people normally live (1), in other words, in the following situations:
- in an establishment of the population counted separately (sick people being treated in a sanatorium, preventorium, psychiatric hospital; military people; student interns);
- or in a shared household (old people living in a retirement home, students living in a university dorm) ;
- or in another dwelling (children sent to daycare, children hired as servants, etc. ; students living in a hotel room or with certain individuals during the school year).
Military people stationed outside of the city limits as well as marines on- board war ships will be counted through the care of the Minister of Defense.
Special Cases:
a. It sometimes happens that the head of household lives in a workplace during the week (for example in a furnished bedroom) and returns to his home at the end of the week and for vacations ; in this exceptional situation, he should be counted with his family and not at his workplace.
[Footnote] (1) Even if, in exceptional cases, they are not found there at the time of the census (military on leave, student interns on vacation, etc.)
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b. Concerning sick people undergoing treatment in a care center, those who live in a sanatorium, a preventorium or a psychiatric hospital (restrictive list), should be written down in list B. People who make a trip to a regular hospital or a clinic (for example, in or to undergo an operation) or in a maternity clinic should be written down in list A. After the collection of the forms, check that there is an agreement between the individual forms filled out and list A:

5.2. Box D, on the bottom of the third page of the housing form.
This box should allow you to more easily recognize the special cases which can exist. When you pick up the housing form, systematically look to see if a person has been written down. In the affirmative, examine the situation of this person and make a decision: if the form has been filled out incorrectly, destroy it and cross out the person from list A. If, on the other hand, the person has not been written down in list A when they should have been, write him down and have that person fill out his form.

5.3 Box C, on the bottom of the third page of the housing form.
Some people will be absent from their usual residence during the entire duration of the census ; if there will be no one at their home to answer in their place, they will risk being omitted or, at the least, their form risk being incomplete or badly filled out.
If the people passing through in your district find themselves in this situation, you will have them fill out some individual forms number 2. You will file these forms in the special folder number 20 and you will give them separately to city hall now and then during the collection.
You will receive for these forms the same lump sum payment as for the others.

5.4. The case of foreigners
They should not be counted:
- Foreigners, members of a diplomatic body
- Foreign personnel of embassies living in a building who benefit from a status of extraterritoriality;
- Military people from a foreign army living in a barrack or in a camp.
- Foreigners passing through in France at the time of the census: tourists, people on a business trip;
- Foreigner workers living near the border who come regularly into France in order to work who, in the evening, return to their country.
On the other hand, you should count:
- Military or foreign government employees living in town;
- Foreigners settled in France.
You will consider people as being settled in France and, as a result, you will count (and you will count in the legal population) the same way as you do a French citizen:
1 All foreigners who study or work in France (thus, naturally, also a member of his family, if the person lives with him) with the exception however of those listed above and seasonal workers. These latter have a seasonal work contract stamped by the services of the foreign labor and a visa given them by the International Office of Immigration carrying the document " Visa for foreign workers".
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However seasonal workers coming out of a country from the Common Market (the Federal Republic of Germany, Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Holland, United Kingdom) are exempt from having a passport and of a visa and are official as soon as they have a seasonal worker contract.)
2 All foreigners who live in France, that is to say who occupy a dwelling as a main residence (1)
In case of doubt (especially in the case of foreigners living in a hotel at the time of the census and not practicing any profession), you will count foreigners settled in France, authorized to settle or likely to do so, that is to say provided with a resident's permit or a privileged permit, with a receipt of their request for a resident's permit or another sort of temporary permit authorization.

5.5 Vacant dwellings and secondary residences
For vacant dwellings and secondary residences (dwelling categories 6 and 7), lists A and B should not contain any person and no individual form should be filled out in the housing form (see above 4.2.6 and 4.2.7).

5.6 Explanations related to certain questions on the individual form.
5.6.1 Question 4: Date and place of birth.Make sure, while collecting the completed forms, that the people born outside of Metropolitan France have clearly indicated the year of their arrival in France.
In the case of people who have come to live in France many times, it is necessary to indicate the year of the first time they lived in Metropolitan France.
5.6.2. Question 6: Address.The address to indicate here is always that of the dwelling, that is to say the address which has been written down by the census agent on the housing form. It is repeated here for the case should the forms, by chance, be filed incorrectly. If you have gathered the forms for people passing through, their address should be indicated in the box on the bottom and to the right, not on question 6 (which should remain unanswered).
5.6.3 Question 7: Residence on January 1st, 1962.This question is dedicated to the study of migrations to the inside of France in the period of 1962- 1968. This information will inform researchers about the immigration of the foreigner or of the countries located outside of Metropolitan France.
Make sure that the people who were living outside of France on January 1st, 1968 have correctly indicated the year of their arrival in France. This applies as well to French citizens as well as foreigners who were living outside of Metropolitan France on January 1st, 1962.
In the situation where some people would have made several visits since 1962 in France, it will be necessary to indicate the corresponding year at the beginning of the current visit. However, you should keep track of the absences from Metropolitan France which have lasted more than 3 months.
Example: A house servant who was living in Spain on January 1st, 1962 came to work in France during the whole year of 1963. Returning to Spain at the beginning of 1964, she comes back to France in September 1966. She has spent her vacation of 1967 (August) in Spain. In this situation, answer: 1966.
[Footnote] (1) However, you will not count a foreigner who has nothing in France but a secondary residence (country home, vacation home, etc.) His secondary residence will nevertheless be counted, as pointed out in paragraph 4.2.7.
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5.6.4 Question 10: Age at the end of studiesWhat we mean by "regularly attends a scholastic university establishment (including professional or technical)" is to take classes during the normal length of the school year.
Corresponding studies constitute then, for the person concerned, his only activity, or, at least, his/her main activity.
5.6.5 Question 11: DiplomasJust as for question 11a (general education or college- level studies) as for question 11b (technical school and professional school), several boxes can be checked. Only people who really have a diploma given should check the box which refers to it, except for those who have taken the following classes, without having obtained the diploma but believe to have attained the level of the diploma.
F.P.A. = professional adult education; E.N.P. = national professional school

5.6.6. Questions 12 to 18: Professional activity.
The part of the individual form related to professional activity (questions 11 to 18) is particularly important. You should keep track of what is filled out with care and accuracy.
Question 12: Main profession.Attentively read the explanations and the examples given on the individual forms, as well as the instructions hereafter.
Examples of bad answers not to accept in any situation [left column] / Comments [right column]
1) Bad answers because they aren't specific enough.
Employee, worker, building worker, engineer, executive, director / Indicate exactly the job of the person concerned, for example: salesperson at a department store, bank employee, lathe operator, chemical engineer, plasterer, expert forester, business director.
Government employee, SNCF employee, EDF employee / For government employees and public service employees, specify the rank or the job, for example: representative of the prefecture, clerk of the PTT, second class stationmaster, driver of a diesel locomotive, EDF dispatcher.
Merchant, industrialist, farmer, entrepreneur, craftsman, administrator / Answer, for example: retail grocer, wholesaler in pharmaceutical products, masonry entrepreneur, residential building director, movie theater employee
2) Bad answers because they are incomplete.
O.S., O.P., Qualified worker, team leader, foreman / these labels indicate the situation in the professional hierarchy, but do not give any information on the individual profession of the person concerned. On the other hand, the following answers are satisfactory:
O.S. (specialized worker) in rope or yarn winding, textile mill foreman
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Question 13: People working by helping another person in their profession, while not being paid.It sometimes happens that some people - especially women - work by helping another person in his profession, without receiving a salary for it. These people will answer "yes" to question 12, even if they only work part time in these situations.
For example, this question effects the wife of a farmer who participates in the work of the farm, the wife or daughter of a merchant who spends several hours per day in the shop to ensure the sales or to operate the cash register.
Question 14: Professional status.Category 5: "Worker at home for a total of one or more businesses" does not allow for people who work at their home for their own business (artisans, sewers, stylists). This category applies on the other hand to people who do work at their home, often as they will, for the affairs of an industrial or commercial establishment who reimburses them for this. Such is the case, for example of some newspapers designers, of people working for clothing industries or performing secretarial work for the affairs of some administrations, etc.
Question 15: CertificationMake sure that the people who have declared to be salaried on question 13 specify their certification, rank or hierarchical position on questions 14a, 14b or 14c, according to the situation.
Question 16: Where do you work?This question affects each person who has declared a profession in question 11, including employees of public services, of local communities and government employees who should indicate in 16b the name of the administration which employs them.
Some people have several employers (housemaids working for several individuals). In this case, indicate the main employer (this is to say the individual where the person completes the most number of hours).
In some cases, the address of the workplace (question 16a) can coincide with that of the home (merchants especially): it is necessary nevertheless to write it down again.
Question 17: The case of the unemployed and those who are looking for work.This question concerns all people having or having not already worked, who fulfill the following conditions simultaneously:
a) do not have a job:
b) are actively looking for work.
Do not apply to these people the label "unemployed" which is sometimes judged offensive and which has a slightly different connotation.
5.6.7 Question 19: Means of transportationThis question is for all people who, born before January 1st, 1962, practice a professional activity or are currently going to school (people having declared a profession in question 12 or having answered YES to question 8). You will especially make sure that the students have not forgotten to answer this question.

5.7. Signature of the respondent
The individual form should be signed by the person who has filled out the individual form (father of the family for his children, yourself for people temporarily absent from their home, the illiterate, etc.).
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(Population counted separately, shared households, displaced people)
The people living in some communities make up what one calls the population counted separately. The list of these people appears on form number 3, under the heading: "Category of the population counted separately". Carefully read this list, which is restricted, as well as the explanations which are given to you on page 1 of this form.
In the establishment where they are living (barrack, boarding house, etc.) the people of the population counted separately (and only those), will be written down on form number 3 (in place of form number 1).
A. The people in categories 1 through 4 will always fill out side A of the individual form number 2b. Furthermore, if they have a personal residence in the city, they will fill out side B of form 2b, which will sent quickly through your city hall to the city hall of their personal residence (at their personal residence, these people will be written down on list B of the housing form and you will not fill out form number two for them.)
B. People in categories 5 and 6 will fill out individual form number 2 C.
If in your district is found an establishment of the population counted separately, it should be pointed out to you by the city hall on the corresponding district form (page 5), table 1 of form number 6). You will count this establishment according to the specific instructions which you will give to city hall and you will give to city the forms number 3, 2b or 2 C filled out and checked over, on February 22nd at the latest.
If, during your rounds, it appears to you that a community belonging to the population counted separately (like, as a general rule, for each building or group of buildings), but the corresponding population does not have to be represented.
Note: for the individual cases (barrack, teaching establishment, sanatorium, psychiatric hospital, prison, etc.) Refer to the alphabetic dictionary appearing in the third part of this manual.

6.2 Shared households
All the people living in communities, not enumerated in the population counted separately, make up those which we call shared households. A shared household is a group of people who do not live in ordinary dwellings, but live in individual establishments, individual or shared bedrooms, and often, eat their meals together, for example:
- nurses or home nurse, service personnel, etc., living in a hospital establishment public or private;
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- professors and supervisors, service personnel, etc. living in a public or private boarding house;
- The service personnel of a hotel, living in an establishment;
- the members of a religious community;
- sick people or boarders of particular establishments
- workers living in a home (for example, home for young workers);
- students living in a university dormitory or a student home;
- seniors living in a retirement home or a nursing home
For each shared household
- You yourself will fill out a shared household form (form number 1b), while paying attention to the instructions appearing on page 1 of this form;
- You will fill out an individual form number 2 for each person written down on the list for pages 2 to 4 of the shared household form.
- You will give these individual forms to the members of the shared household. Then you will pick them up in the appropriate way, explained on 2.5 page 00.
Generally speaking, the shared households that you will have to count will be pointed out to you by city hall on the district form (page 5, table 1b). However, if during your rounds, it comes to your attention (according to the instructions on form number 3) that a shared household has not been mentioned on the district form, you will make it known to city hall and you will count it in the same conditions as the others while not forgetting to write it down in table 1b.
Concerning the classification and numbering of forms number 1b and 2 of the shared household form, refer to the district form (pages 3 and 4).
For special cases, consult the glossary at the end of this manual.

6.3. Displaced people.
The itinerant populations and certain individuals in the middle of moving should be counted on a set date in or not to be omitted or questioned successively by several census agents.

6.3.1 The case of hotels, youth hostels, boarding houses, furnished houses, furnished rooms, etc.
Hotels, youth hostels, boarding houses, furnished houses, furnished rooms will be counted on February 20, 1975.
For each of these establishments which will have been pointed out to you by city hall and for those which you will have located at the time when you find out to what district you are assigned (before February 20th) or during your first round, you should carry out the following operations (1):
a. For the hospital owner (or manager) and his family:
have them fill out a housing form (form 1) and individual forms 2.
b. For the members of the staff living nowhere other than in the hotel:
Have them recorded on the housing form of the hotel owner and have them fill out the corresponding forms, since it's the general situation of all salaried staff living at their employer's.
- or, in large hotels where the personnel is numerous, consider them as making up a shared household, fill out for them a shared household form (number 1b) on which you will check box 3 on question 1, and have them fill out the corresponding number 2 individual forms.
Of course, if some members of the staff live with their family in an ordinary dwelling, you will count them in the same way you do the hotel manager and his/her family, that is to say in the normal way.
c. For the clients, you are to distinguish between these two situations:
c.1 Clients who live in the hotel for the greater part of the year (like students living for the whole school year in a hotel room or who have no other residence (such as single people living permanently in a hotel, young married couples not yet having found a place to live elsewhere, foreigners who are tenured lecturers with a visitor permit, etc.)
[Footnote] (1) In order to facilitate your contacts with the hotel owners, a memorandum explaining these operations will be addressed to them by their professional organization.
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Thus, establish a housing form 1 (dwelling category 3, check box 6 for question 4) for each bedroom (or possibly each apartment) occupied by a household or a person living alone and have them fill out the corresponding number 2 individual forms (1).
c.2. Clients passing through the nights of March 1st and March 2nd.
Make contact with the hotel owner on March 1st and ask him, while giving him the necessary forms, to have the clients passing through the night of February 20th and 21st fill out a number two form, if they are in the situation stated in box C of page 3 of the housing form number 1, that is to say that they are absent from their usual residence for the entire duration of the census (March 1st through March 30th 1968) and if there is no one at that residence to answer in their place.
Forms 2 gathered for these people will be collected in folder number 20 and given as soon as possible to city hall.
There are no forms to be established for the bedrooms reserved for clients passing through.
Note: do not have any foreigners passing through France for a short time (tourists, businessmen, etc.) fill out any individual forms. On the other hand, count the foreigners residing in France as it is indicated in paragraph 5.4.

6.3.2. Hospital establishments, clinics, maternity clinics, nursing homes.
Hospital establishments (with the exception of sanatoriums, preventoriums and psychiatric hospitals), clinics, maternity clinics, nursing homes, will be equally counted on March 1st, 1968. You will proceed with the sick as for the clients passing through in hotels (see 6.3.1. c2 above).

6.3.3 The case of traveling people.
People without any fixed home (especially nomads and "tramps") will be counted February 20th. Naturally, the people who do have a residence (traveling showmen, traveling merchants, campers), will be counted in normal situations, at this residence. You will proceed therefore in the following way:
a. Nomads and other people without a home a fixed home who are parking in your district or districts on March 1st, 1968:
- establish some number 1 forms, one per household or for single people (dwelling form 8 ; do not fill out page 4 ; for the address, indicate: "without a fixed home" ) ;
- have each person fill out an individual form
- do not establish any house form
- for the classification and numbering of the forms, refer to the district form (page 3).
b. People who have a residence:
For the people who have a residence, you will proceed as you do for people passing through hotels. If the people must be absent from their residence during the entire period from March 1st to March 23rd, and if there is no one at this residence capable of answering in their place, have the individual forms number 2 filled out that you will collect in folder number 20 and that you will give as soon as possible to city hall.
Note: Barges and tugboats of inland navigation will be counted by agents of the waterways. You will therefore have no form to fill out for the boats nor for the people who are on board. However, you will count boats which are no longer licensed. (see 3.3.1, page 31).
[Footnote] (1) You will make an exception for a head of a family who, living for one week in a hotel near the place of his work, returns regularly to his home at the end of the week and for vacations: a head of a family in this situation will be counted at his home, not in the hotel.
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6.4. Some examples of important special cases and their solutions (1).
(1) Also refer to the illustrated pictures included in this manual.
Situation #1
Mr. Dupont lives in Etampes with his family and his daughter. His son Jacques is an student boarder at the Orleans high school.
In Etampes: Jacques Dupont will be recorded in list B of his parents' housing form; there will be no individual form established for him.
In Orleans: He will be recorded on form 3 of the high school and he will fill out an individual form 2b on which side B (sent by city hall of Orleans to the one in Etampes) will be classified in the housing form of his parents.
Situation #1b
Same situation as above, but Jacques Dupont is on vacation with his parents when the census agent visits them.
Same solution as in situation #1 (the secretary of the school will fill out his form 2b).
Situation #2
Mr. Durand lives in Rambouillet. His son Pierre is a student in Paris, where he is staying in a hotel in a furnished room.
In Rambouillet: Pierre Durand will be recorded in list B of the housing form of his parents. There will be no individual form established for him.
In Paris: He will fill out a housing form 1 (dwelling category 3) and an individual form 2.
Situation #2b
Same situation as above, but Pierre Durand is living in the university dormitory instead of having a hotel room.
In Rambouillet: same solution as in situation #2.
In Paris: he will be recorded on a shared housing form 1b (shared housing category 6) and he will fill out an individual form 2.
Situation #3
Mrs. Marie Dubois (widow) who ordinarily lives in Montpellier, where she lives alone, has come to spend the months of March and April with her son Paul in Paris.
In Paris: Do not record Mrs. Marie Dubois on the housing form of her son Paul. Since she is absent from her home during the census, have her fill out an individual form 2 (while mentioning her address in Montpellier on bottom right) and file it in folder 20.
In Montpellier: The census agent will establish a housing form 1 for Mrs. Dubois's dwelling. He will record her on list A and fill out with all the information available to him an individual form 2. (Later, the city hall of Montpellier will receive the form 2 filled out in Paris, which will serve eventually to complete or correct the form filled out in Montpellier in her absence).
Note that the census agent of Montpellier should always create a form 2 in the name of Mrs. Marie Dubois, even if very incomplete, because it could be that she will not fill out in Paris.
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Mrs. Martin, who lives in Saint- Maur, has been in a maternity clinic in Paris on February 27th until March 10th (where she gave birth to Robert on February 27th).
In Saint- Maur: Mrs. martin will be counted normally at her home (list A, individual form 2) although she is absent on March 1st. Her son Robert will also be recorded on list A with an individual form 2 because he was born before March 1st.
In Paris: No record of Mrs. Martin or her son will appear on the forms of the maternity clinic. No individual form for them (because we know that M. Martin is present in Saint- Maur, where he will fill out their forms).
Note: If the child was born on March 1st or afterwards, he would not be counted.
Situation #5
Jean Aubert, single, who ordinarily lives with his parents in Troyes, has been called to arms and is serving his country in Germany.
In Troyes: Jean Aubert will be recorded in list B of the housing form of his parents. There will be no individual form established for him.
In Germany: He will be counted by his own military unit where he will fill out an individual form 2b, of which side B (sent to city hall of Troyes) will be classified in the housing form of his parents.
Situation #5b
Same case as above, but Jean Aubert is on leave at his parents' home when the census agent visits them.
Same solution as in situation 5 (the major of his unit will fill out his form 2b).
Situation #6
Mrs. Gerbois, who was living until now with her daughter in Paris, has just left for good to be in a retirement home in Nice. As a result, she is no longer a part of her daughter's household.
In Paris, at the home of her daughter: No record corresponding to Mrs. Gerbois, nor in list A, nor in list B. Do not establish an individual form for her.
In Nice: She is recorded on a shared housing form 1b with the boarders of the retirement home (shared housing category 8). She will fill out an individual form 2.
Situation #7
Mr. Dormois, representing a touring business, is away from his dwelling for the duration of the census. He is therefore absent when you present yourself at his home.
Record Mr. Dormois in list A of his housing form; establish an individual form 2 for him filled out by his wife (or the people with whom he lives). If he lives alone, the census agent will establish a form in his name and will try to fill it out with all the information that he can get from the neighbors or city hall (for example, you can find the exact civil state of Mr. Dormois on the electoral list).
Situation #8
Mr. and Mrs. Dufour, who live in Paris have placed their daughter Monique for babysitting with Mrs. Paquet in Evreux.
In Paris: Monique Dufour will be recorded in list B of the housing form of her parents. There will be no individual form established for her.
In Evreux: She will be recorded in list A of the housing form of Mrs. Paquet and her babysitter will fill out an individual form 2 for her.
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Mr. and Mrs. Godard live in Paris and have a country home in Chantilly where they spend the week- ends and vacation for part of the year.
In Paris: They will normally be counted in their main residence, even if they are absent on March 1st or during the time when the census agent comes by (list A; individual forms 2).
In Chantilly: Their country home is a secondary residence (dwelling category 7). They will not be recorded on list A or list B. There will be no individual forms for them, unless Mr. and Mrs. Godard are taking their vacation in Chantilly for the entire time of the census and there is no one in Paris who can fill out their forms. In this case, it will be necessary to collect the individual forms 2.
Situation #10
While taking a count of the rooms of Mr. Couturier's dwelling (4th floor left side), you notice that he has a bedroom for a housekeeper situated on the 8th floor). What to do in the three following situations:
a. It is occupied for Mr. Couturier's maid.
b. It is sublet to a student.
c. Usually sublet, it is found unoccupied at the time of the census, the person subletting has left and another person has not been found yet.
a. Count the bedroom on the eighth floor in with the rooms of the main dwelling on the fourth floor. Record the maid in list A of the housing form of her employers and have her fill out an individual form 2.
b. The bedroom on the eighth floor is a distinct dwelling for which you must establish a dwelling form 1. Check box 2 of the dwelling category while adding the note "Dwelling of Mr. Couturier, fourth floor, left". Record the student in list A of the housing form corresponding to his room and have him fill out an individual form 2.
c. Count the bedroom on the eighth floor along with the rooms of the main dwelling on the fourth floor. Do not establish any distinct housing form 1 for this bedroom.
Case #11
Mr. Antonioni, Italian immigrant in France for 2 months now, is a bricklayer in a public works company of Nancy where he lives in a hotel room:
a. Mr. Antonioni is single. He intends to move permanently to France.
b. Mr. Antonioni is married and intends to have his family come from Italy as soon as he can.
c. Mr. Antonioni is married, he has left his family in Italy where he intends to return after having stayed alone, one or two years in France.
Mr. Antonioni must be counted in Nancy, because in these three cases, he has a job in France at the time of the census.
In situation b, he alone should be counted and not his family, which is not yet settled in France. This is also the solution for situation c for the same reason.
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7. Checking the individual forms and the housing forms after the collection
As it is indicated in paragraph 2.4.1, you should, after the collection of the forms, and by March 30th at the latest, make a complete review of the individual forms and the housing forms that you have gathered.
The paragraphs hereafter indicate the necessary checks you should make. The gaps or errors which could appear after these controls should be filled in or corrected, even if you have to make more visits to fix them.
The completed forms that you give to city hall should, at last, be complete and perfectly readable.

7.1. Checking the individual forms.

7.1.1 Question 4: Date of birth.
Make sure there is a complete date of birth for each person. Then, make the following checks:
- a person born between 1954 and 1961: make sure that questions 7 and 8 have always received an answer.
- a person born in 1953 or before: make sure that one box and only one has been checked in question 3. Make sure that question 7 and 8 have always received an answer. Check the back of the form.

7.1.2 Question 6: Address
The address to indicate here is always the one that you have written down on the housing form. For people passing through, it is in the special box (on the bottom right of the form) where it is necessary to indicate the address of the usual residence.

7.1.3 Question 7: Residence on January 1st, 1962.
Make sure that the answer is complete. For people who were living outside of Metropolitan France on January 1st 1962 (overseas or on foreign soil), make sure that the month and year they came to France has not been forgotten.

7.1.4. Questions 8 and 9: Education.
Check that, if the box YES has been checked in question 8, that question 9 has been completely filled out.
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7.1.5 Questions 12 to 18: Professional activity.
Do not accept unspecific answers such as worker, employee, merchant, artisan, etc. (see 5.6.6).
a. If a profession has been declared in question 12:
- Make sure that one of the six boxes in question 14 has been checked, unless the box YES has not been in question 13.
- Make sure that the paid employees (answer 7 to question 14) have answered correctly to questions 15a, 15b, or 15c.
- Make sure that question 16a has always been filled out, even for people who work in an administrative service and especially for government employees.
- Make sure that the address indicated in question 16 is specific and complete, that the name or the corporate name of the industrial, commercial, administrative establishment, etc. has been provided exactly.
b. If no profession has been declared in question 12 and if the person involved was born before 1954:
Refer to questions 17 and 18 to see if there is an answer there.
If neither question 17 nor 18 have an answer, find out the true situation of the person involved and:
- if he/she has no professional activity, write the note "no profession" in question 12.
- if he/she is currently practicing a profession that he/she has failed to declare, ask him/her to answer questions 12 to 16 and 19 of the individual form.

7.1.6. Question 19: Means of transportation.
Do not forget that this question is for all people (born before January 1st, 1962) who are working or are taking classes. Check that they have all answered this question, especially young students.

7.2. Checking the housing forms.

7.2.1 Box to be filled out by the census agent (first page).
The address of the dwelling must be very specific.
If there is more than one dwelling in the building, the location of each should be very clearly indicated.
The dwelling category should always be indicated. In case of doubt on the box to check, do not hesitate to describe it in detail on bottom of the page, according to the situation.

7.2.2 Pages 2 and 3 of the housing form.
Make sure that there is agreement between the completed individual forms 2 and list A:
a. You should have an individual form 2 for every person recorded in list A.
b. If the individual forms 2 have been established for the people recorded in list B, destroy these forms.
c. Systematically examine, on the bottom and to the right of the individual forms 2, the box specially provided for recording the usual address of people passing through. When this box
[p.42]
is filled in, you will know that this form 2 is filled out for someone passing through, that the residents have forgotten to give them to you separately, contrary to the rules in box C of the housing form.
Check that these people passing through are not recorded either in list A or in list B, and gather their forms separately in folder 20.
d. Look systematically to see if a person has been recorded in box D. If this happens, decide the situation of this person, while using all the information to make your decision. If a form is filled out at all, destroy it and cross the person out off list A. If, on the other hand, the person has been recorded in list A when he/she was supposed to be, record him/her and fill out his/her form.

7.2.3 Page 4 of the housing form.
Information concerning the composition and the facilities in the dwelling are important. all the questions should have an answer. If the residents have not answered some of the questions, look for the corresponding information and complete the housing form.
For explanations related to each question, refer to paragraph 4.3 of your manual (pages 30 to 32). As for question 8, in the situation of lavatories shared by occupants of several dwellings, it is box 5 (other situations) which you have to mark.
[p.43]

Appendix

Notice to Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian- speaking people
(this text is the translation of notices in foreign languages which appear below)
By mandate on May 16th, 1967 (Journal Officiel of May 18th, 1967), the French Government has asked that the general census of the population be carried out, which takes place in all of Metropolitan France from May 1st to May 23rd, 1968.
In which cases must foreigners be counted?
In virtue of the rules in effect, a foreigner must be counted in the same way as a French citizen when:
a. Any foreigner who works or who studies in France (and naturally his/her family if they live with him/her). For example, a foreigner who has come to work or to study in France should be counted, even if he/she has left the family in his/her country, even if he/she owns a residence or if he/she plans to return after a temporary visit in France (a school year for example).
However, the Spanish the Portuguese who have a seasonal work contract issued by the services of foreign labor and a visa given by the National Bureau of Immigration bearing the notice "Visa for seasonal workers" should not be counted.
Also, the Italians who have a seasonal work contract pointed out by the services of foreign labor and bearing the notice of a signed arrival declaration by city hall or the police commissioner in their place of residence ("seasonal workers") should not be counted.
Furthermore, the border workers (who live abroad and come every day into France) should not be counted (1).
b. All foreigners who have their abode in France, that is to say who occupy a dwelling in France (except if it is a vacation or weekend home).
c. Furthermore, any foreigner authorized to settle in France or is in the process of becoming so (carrier of a visitor's card for a resident, a temporary stay authorization) should be counted, even if he/she does not practice a profession or if he/she does not study in France.
If you are in the one of the situations listed above, you should be counted and, consequently, fill out the forms which are presented to you by the census agent (or help the agent fill them out by answering his questions).

In order to assist you, here are some explanations on some of the information which will be asked of you:

I. The housing form (green form)
Page 2- List A
Indicate in this list all the people living in your dwelling, beginning with the head of the family. Do not forget to count young children.
The list must be filled out in the following way:
1st column: family name
2nd column: first name
3rd column: relationship with the head of family (for example: wife, son, maid)
[Footnote] (1) For Spanish and Italians only.
[p.44]
Page 4 - When small boxes are provided for your answer, put a cross through the one that corresponds to your situation.
Question 1: Do you have a kitchen?
[] yes
[] no
Question 3: Number of rooms (not including the kitchen).
Question 4: Are you:
[]1 Owner of the house or the building where your dwelling is found?
[]2 Owner of your dwelling in a building which has several dwellings?
[]3 Lodged there by your employer?
[]4 Lodged there for free, for example, by your parents?
[]5 Renter or subletting an unfurnished place?
[]6 Renter or subletting a furnished place, or a hotel room?

II. Individual form (white form)
A form must be filled out for each person listed on page 2 (list A) of the housing form (green form).
Here are the main questions:
Front side.

Question 1: First and last names.
Question 3: Family situation.
[]1 Single
[]2 Married
[]3 Widow(er)
[]4 Divorced

Question 4: Date and place of birth.
If you were born in a foreign country, indicate the year of your first move to France.

Question 5: Indicate your nationality in the line which begins with "Etranger".

Question 6: Precise address (the one where you are filling out the census).

Question 7: Town and department (or country) of residence on January 1st, 1962.
Question 8: Students must answer "Yes".Others must answer "No"

Question 9: Students must indicate the name of the academic institution that they attend (first line), street number and street (second line), town and department (third line).

Question 11: Do not answer this question unless you have a French diploma.

Back side.

Question 12: Specify, to the best of your ability, the main profession or activity that you currently practice.

Question 16a: Give the name (first line) of the establishment in which you work and its exact address: street and number (second line), town (third line), and department (fourth line).

Question 16c: If you do not work at the address indicated in question 16a, give the address of your usual workplace.

Place all these forms in the housing form (green) and give all of it to the census agent. Thank you.
[Pages 45 - 50 were not translated to English.]
[p.51]

Second Part
Glossary

(to consult when a special case comes up)
[p.52]
The paragraph numbers refer back to the first part "General Instructions".
In each of the cases mentioned hereafter, the general instructions concerning the establishment of the house form have not been repeated systematically. But it is well understood that you should establish a house form for building no matter what it is, lived in or not. The only exception concerns mobile homes.

[The following is a list of selected terms from the original language document. The reported terms are those for which the original language document provided some clarification.]

B
Shack, hut: see 3.3.1 Type of building: 2 or 3. For the temporary worksites shacks, see "Temporary work sites".
Boat: see the three sections below as well as "Bargemen".
War ship. You should not count anyone on board these war ships. They will be the subject of individual purposes.
Fishing boats or commercial boats.
The fishers and the sailors of the Marine Merchants will be counted in their residence eon land, of which they will be considered as temporarily absent if they have gone on board at the time of the census. It is therefore necessary to write them down in list A of the housing form number 1 of their residence and fill out individual forms number 2 for them. You should not count anyone on board the fishing boats, or the marine merchant boats.
Pleasure boat, Yacht.
Apply the procedures of 6.3.3.a if the people on board have no residence on land ; those of 6.3.3.b if the people on board have a residence on land.
[p.53]
Shanty town: 3.3.1. Type of building 2.

C
Military Camp: see "Barrack"
Campers, camping: 6.3.3
Barrack, Military quarters, military camp
The instructions which follow are valid for the Air Force and the Army, for establishments on land of the Marines, and for the firehouses of the city of Paris.
They do not apply to the following cases:
- guards, customs agents, police, C.R.S. firefighters (except in Paris), even if they are living in special barracks (see the explanations on the bottom of page 3).
The military institutions belong to the population counted separately (category 1) when:
1. The soldiers are doing their legal service ("contingent") and the military having enlisted for military service before the call- up, thus hired during the legal duration (P.D.L.)
2. The military by career living in the Barrack, with the exception of those who live with their family. As a result, you should have filled out form 3 for all of these military people and, for each of them, individual form 2b with two sides: A and B.
The military of these categories, absent at the time of the census (on leave, in transfer, on duty, hospitalized, etc.) should be written down on form number 3 of the barrack; the individual forms 2b concerning them will be established by the military authorities with the help of the information which they possess.
For the military by career (and also civilians) living with their family in normal dwellings situated inside a military enclosure, have them fill out housing forms 1 (dwelling category 1) and individual forms 2.
Note: The military by career (including mariners) living in town must be counted in normal conditions (housing forms 1 and individual forms 2).
Important notes: The soldiers of foreign army living in barracks or in camps should not be counted.
Cellar used as an abode: 4.2.5
Barge: see note from 6.3.3.
Temporary work site: 3.3.1 and 6.1 A.
The people living in the shacks of a temporary worksite belong generally to the "population counted separately" (category 4)
As a result you will establish for these people a number 3 form and the individual forms number 2b.
For all of these shacks, establish one single house form (building type 3).
[p.54]
Tramps: answer to question 17 of form number 2.
Worker's tenement: 3.1.2. and 3.3.7.
University dormitory: 6.2, 6.4 (situation #2b) and explanations from page 1 of the form number 1b.
Students, even married ones, living in a university dorm, make up shared households. You should therefore establish for them a form number 1b (shared household category 6) and have them fill out individual forms number 2. You will be able to do each bungalow, a shared household, for example.
For the staff living in the individual or shared rooms, you will make up a shared household which you will count with form 1b (shared household form, category 2) and some individual forms 2.
For the staff (director, caretaker, etc.) living in normal dwellings, you will fill out the housing forms number 1 (dwelling form 1) and some individual forms 2 in the usual circumstances.
Shared (household): 2.4.5, 2.5 and 6.2
Summer camp.
Only count the permanent staff of the institution, in the same way as you do the staff of a hospital (see this word). Do not count the children who are vacationing in the camp at the time of the census.
Religious community, convent, monastery: 6.2
Establish a form 1b (shared household category 4) and individual forms number 2.
Temporary construction for use as an abode: 3.3.1 and 4.2.3. Building type 3; dwelling category: 4.
Diplomatic body: 5.4

D
Moving out, moving in
In the case of change in the situation of people, and certainly in the case of a change of home (moving out or moving in), the date to take into consideration to complete the answer correctly is February 20th at midnight. Therefore, if you find some people who are going to move and leave your district, you must count them, because they were on the grounds of your district on February 20th.
For the people who move into in your district during the period of February 20th to March 15th you must consider them as "people passing through" and establish for them some individual forms that you will file in folder number 20 and that you will give as soon as possible to city hall.
Diplomats: 5.4.
Diplomatic (body): 5.4
[p.55]
Maids: 4.2.1 and 6.4 (situation #10).
Home (people without): 6.3.3.a.
Customs agents: see explanations on the bottom of form 3.

E
Ecole Normale: Training school for teachers and researchers
Teaching institution, school
a - Institution without a boarding school : see "Administrative, industrial, or commercial building"
b - Institution with boarders: high schools, middle schools, Primary Training School for Teachers, seminaries and all public or private teaching institutions with a boarding school.
The boarding students of these teaching institutions belong to the population counted separately in category 2.
As a result:

1) Record the boarding students on a form 3 and, for each of them, an individual form number 2b.
2) The people living in the institution in individual or shared bedrooms (supervisor of boarders, service staff, etc.) make up a shared household category 2 and should be counted with the help of a shared household form 1b and with individual forms number 2.
3) For the management (headmaster, bursar, teachers) and of the service staff (concierge) occupants in the institution of the regular dwellings, you will have them fill out housing forms 1 (dwelling category 1 and some individual forms number 2.
Note: Those students who are temporarily absent at the time of the census (on break, sick, etc.) should also be written down on form number 3 of the institution and forms number 2b should be filled out for each of them by the institution.
The commuter students or half- time boarders are counted at the place where they normally live, that is to say, in general, with their family; there is therefore nothing to establish, in what concerns, the address of the institution. Likewise, "commuting boarders" (students who, having been able to find a place in the boarding school, are living with some individuals or in a home) will not be counted in their scholastic institution but there where they are living during the school year.
[p.56]
Foreigners: 5.4, 5.6.3 and 6.4 (situation #11).
University students, high school commuter students not living with their parents.
The university and high school students not living with their parents during the school year, as well as the commuter boarders" should be counted in the place where they live during the school year, that is to say, according to the situation:
- In a hotel, a boarding house or a furnished home (see 5.1, 6.3.1.c.1 and 6.4 (situation #1, 2 and 2b).
- With an individual, in a bedroom sublet or leased: 4.1.1b, 4.2.1 and 6.1 (situation #10b)
In the home of the family of a student entering into one of the preceding cases, jot down that:
- the commuter students not living with their parents should be written down in list B on the housing form of these:
- a student on break at his parents' home at the time of the census should not be counted in list A, but in list B of the housing form of those, except if he is absent form his usual home, you should not have a individual form filled out for him.
Farm: see 3.2.2, 3.3.1 and 3.3.8

F
Farm: 3.3.2, 3.3.1 and 3.3.8
Traveling showman: 6.3.3

G
Attic garret: 4.2.4

H
Make - shift dwelling: 3.3.1 and 4.2.5
Hospital, clinic, maternity clinic, nursing home, rest home, house of convalescence, etc.: 6.3.2
Institutions of this kind are to be counted on March 1st, 1968.
[p.57]
The rules which follow are valid for all the Hospital establishments excluding:
- some sanitoriums, preventoriums: see "sanatorium".
- some psychiatric hospitals: see this word.
In a hospital, a clinic, etc. the personnel of the institution as well as the sick do not belong to the population counted separately.
As a result:
1) For the management (director, bursar, etc.) and the service staff (concierge, gardener, etc.) living in the institution in normal dwellings, establish housing forms 1 (dwelling category 1) and individual forms 2.
2) The staff members living in the community (in individual or shared rooms) inside the institution (nurses, servants, service staff) constitute a shared household of category 1 ; you should therefore count them with the help of a shared household form with individual forms number 2. Some members of the staff can belong to a religious community ; they constitute a shared household distinct from category 4: in this case, see "Religious community".
3) For the sick there can be three cases:

a. Sick people having a personal residence where someone can answer to the census agent of this residence: there is nothing to fill out in this case. See 5.1 (special cases) and 6.4 (situation #8).
b. Sick people having a residence where no one can answer for them in their absence, the census agent of this residence will have one of the individual forms number 2 filled out which will be collected in folder number 20 (6.3.2).
c. Sick people not having any other home but the hospital where they find themselves presently (incurable for example): to establish, for all of these sick people, considered as constituting a "shared household" form 1b (shared household category: 5). Then have them fill out individual forms number 2.

In some hospitals, there exist special wards which you can assimilate in sanatorium, in an asylum, a hospice, etc. If the case comes up, proceed in the following way:
Tuberculosis ward (or Phtisiology service): fill out, for the sick people in this section, a number 3 form and some individual forms 2b just as for a "sanatorium" (see this word).
Psychiatric ward: fill out, for the sick in this section, a number 3 form and some individual forms number two C as for "Psychiatric hospital" (see this word).
Senior citizens quarters (or gerontology service): fill out, for the sick people in this section, form 1b (shared household form 8) and some individual forms number 2 like for a "Old Folks Home" (see this word).
Military quarters: Generally speaking, you will not have any individual forms nor population forms counted separately from establishing for these sick people, who should be counted, (as temporary absence) through the care of their unit.
Military hospital.
1) For the civilian staff as well as the military personnel by career living in the institution (doctor, nurse, etc.) proceed as you would for the management staff or service staff of a civilian hospital (see above).
2) For the soldiers fulfilling their national duty in the hospital, have them fill out institution form number 3 of the population counted separately and some forms 2b, unless these military have already been counted by another unit.
3) For the sick, you do not have to, generally speaking, establish individual forms nor forms of the population counted separately, because they should be counted (as temporarily absent) through the care of their unit.
[p.58]
Psychiatric hospital, Insane Asylum: 6.1
The sick people undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital belong to the population counted separately.
Inversely, the personnel is not part of that group. As a result:
1) Record sick people on page 3 and establish for them some individual forms 2c.
2) For the management staff and the service staff (director, bursar, doctors, etc.) living in regular dwellings, establish housing forms 1 (dwelling category 1) and some individual forms 2.
3) For the "shared households" made up of the personnel (nurses, servants, etc.) living in individual or shared bedrooms, fill out form 1b (shared household category 1) and some individual forms 2.
Senior citizens home, retirement home.
The boarders in an old folks home (or a retirement home) belong to the population counted separately.
As a result:
1) For the management personnel (director, bursar, etc.) and the service staff (concierge, etc.) living in the establishment in regular dwellings, establish, as in normal situations, housing forms 1 (dwelling category 1) and individual forms 2.
2) For the "shared household" made up of the personnel living in the establishment in individual or shared bedrooms, but not living in ordinary dwellings (nurses, servants, service staff), establish a form 1b (shared housing category 1) and some individual forms 2. Some members of the personnel may belong to a religious community. They then constitute a separate shared household (shared household category 4; see "religious community").
3) For the "shared household" of boarders (even if living in individual rooms) establish form 1b (shared household category 8) and individual forms 2.
Hotel, Inn, boarding house, furnished house, furnished bedroom: 4.2.3 and 6.3.1 (situation #2 and 11).

I
Administrative, Industrial, or Commercial building
If dwellings exist in the building (for the director, teachers, various government employees, caretaker, concierge, etc.), proceed in the same way for each of these dwellings, that is to say to fill out a housing form 1 and some individual forms 2. In this category include city halls, prefectures, courthouses, ministries, administrative tenements, post offices, etc. as well as industrial or commercial buildings.
These are to be handled in the same way as religious buildings, monuments and historic castles, etc.
Note: No matter how many buildings there are of the building in question, there will be one single house form establish per establishment (3.1.2)
Brand new building: 3.1.
[p.59]

L
Professional local: (workshop, lawyer's or doctor's office, business, laboratory, etc.)
Whether this is the case of a professional place in an entirely commercial building or in a residential building, you will not have to establish housing form 1 for the place, even if this is a former dwelling which has been transformed. (4.1)
Dwelling in which the occupants are absent during the entire duration of the census.
If this case is about a "secondary residence" refer to that word. If, on the other, it is more about a main residence, establish housing form number 1 and individual forms 2 of the occupants as if they were present, while making all efforts to gather all the necessary information. And especially don't forget to write down the occupants in list A of the dwelling form.
Vacant dwelling: 2.2.4, 4.2.7, 4.3 and 5.5; dwelling category 6.
You yourself should fill out a dwelling form number 1, (page 1; page 4, except questions 4 and 11, while gathering information from the neighbors on the layout and the facilities of the dwelling, and classify this housing form in the house form of its building.
Obviously, no individual forms to be filled out.

M
Private home occupied by two households: 4.1. and 4.1.2.
Traveling salesmen: 6.3.3
Marines:
a) of business (Merchant Marines): see "Fishing or commercial boats"
b) of war (National Marines): see "barrack' and "Military"
[p.60]
Bargemen: see 6.2.3, note.
Shared household: 2.4.5, 2.5 and 6.2
Military: see "barracks"
In the home of a family where a soldier is fulfilling his legal service (or having enlisted in the military before the call- up date) do not have any individual form filled out but write him down on list B of the housing form of his family (even if, for example being married, he is authorized to live at his house).
If you find the soldier on leave with his family you should proceed as it is stated above, because an individual form 2b will be filled out for him in his unit, even if he is stationed outside of the country (see barrack and 4.1).
However, the soldiers on permanent leave will be counted like civilians: they will be recorded in list A of the housing form of their residence and will fill out individual form 2. They will therefore not be counted in their unit (no individual form 2b for them).
Soldiers stationed outside the Metropolitan France.
Write down the soldiers on list B of their family. Their individual forms number 2b will be filled out in their unit, through the care of the Ministry of Defense (see barrack 4.1.)

N
Nomads: 6.3.3
Daycare (Children placed in): 5.1 and 6.4 (situation #8)

O
Orphanage: see "Teaching institution".
The children who do not take any teaching courses (especially very young children) make up a shared household (shared household category: 9).
Overseas
Civilians who are traveling abroad for a short time (less than six months) are counted normally in their residence (written down in list A, with an individual form 2) If the trip lasts for more than six months, they are written down in list B, without filling out an individual form 2. You will make an exception, however, for the head of the household who has left his family (wife and kids) in France: you will record him on list A with his family and you will fill out an individual form 2 for him.
[p.61]
Bungalow: 4.1 special case.
Boarders (at the home of an individual): 4.1. special case 4.2.2.
People passing through: 4.4.2 and 6.3.
People without a fixed home: 6.3.3.
Prison
The prisoners make up part of the population counted separately (population category 6).
Inversely, the personnel of the establishment are not.
As a result:
1) Record the prisoners on page 3 and establish for them some individual forms 2c (category of the population counted separately: 6)
2) For the management staff (director, supervisors, etc.) and of service (concierge, occupant of the institution with regular dwellings, you will establish some housing forms 1 and some individual forms 2.
[p.62]

R
Tugboats of the inland navigation: see the note from 6.3.3.
Secondary residence: 2.4.4, 4.2.6, 4.3., 5.5 and 6.4 (situation #9), dwelling category 7.
You yourself should fill out a housing form 1 (page 1; page 4, except for questions 4 and 11) while gathering information possibly from neighbors about the composition and the facilities of the dwelling.
On the other hand, you will not have individual forms to fill out except for the inhabitants present at the time of your visit, answer based on the conditions stated in box C of the housing form, that is to say that they will be absent from their main residence for the whole duration of the census and if anyone cannot answer for them in their place.

S
Seasonal (workers): 4.4.4
Sanatorium.
The sick undergoing treatment in a sanatorium, a preventorium or a sanitarium makes up of the population counted separately of (category 3).
Inversely, the personnel of the establishment are not a part of that group.
As a result:
1) Record the sick on page 3 and establish an individual form 2b for each of them.
2) For the management personnel (director, bursar, etc.) and the service staff (concierge, caretaker, etc.) occupant of a normal dwelling in the institution, you will establish, in normal circumstances, one housing form 1 and some individual forms number 2.
3) The staff living in a community (individual or shared) inside of the institution (nurses, servants), service staff, etc. makes up a shared household of category 1 ; you should therefore count them by using shared household form 1b and individual forms 2.
Sublet: 4.1 Special case 4.2.2 and second part (case number 15).

T
Tourists: 6.3.1
[p.63]

V
Villa: 4.1.2, special case.

W
Train car: 3.3.1 building type 2
[Page 64 - 71 were not translated into English.]