Data Cart

Your data extract

0 variables
0 samples
View Cart


Enumerator's Manual
VI Population Census and V Housing Census
Ecuador, 2001

[Originally there are two different enumeration instructions: one for blocked areas and one for dispersed areas. Since the two documents are very similar in content, they are combined into one here. Differences between the original documents are indicated by comments in square-brackets. The page numbers in this document correspond to those in the original document for blocked areas.]

[Page 1 was not translated into English.]

[p. 2]

2. Basic definitions used in the Census

Census.- The population and housing census is the complete count of the inhabitants of the dwelling units of a defined territory, and of their most important characteristics.

Day of the census.- Is the calendar day (November 25) scheduled to carry out the enumeration of dwellings, households, and population.

Time of the census.- Is the beginning of the day of the census, 00:00 hours on November 25.

Types of census.- Two types of Population Census are distinguished:

De facto census, when the enumeration is done based on the place where the informant is at the time of the census. The total population will include all people present in the country at the time and date of the census, regardless of their usual place of residence.

This is the type of census that will be applied in our country, November 25, 2001.

De jure census, means enumerating each person in the geographic place of their usual residence, as well as those who may be temporarily absent, regardless of where they are at the time of the census. It includes all permanent residents.
Population census.- Is the group of operations which consist of collecting, compiling, evaluating, analyzing, and publishing or circulating in some way demographic, economic, and social data related to all of the inhabitants of a country, or a well delimited part, at a certain time.

Housing census.- Is the group of operations which consist of collecting, compiling, evaluating, analyzing, and publishing or circulating in some way a country's statistical data related to all of the living premises and to their occupants at a certain time.

[p. 3]

Building.- Is any construction or structure that can be composed of one or various dwellings, economic establishments, public or private institutions which occupy a given space. Example: houses, schools, churches, garages, stores, etc.

Dwelling.- Is a premises or place of lodging with independent access, constructed, built, transformed, or ready to be inhabited by one or more people, as long as it is not exclusively used for a different purpose at the time of the census. Also considered dwellings are mobile and improvised dwellings and places not meant for living in, but which are inhabited at the time the Census is taken, such as: barges, caves, tents, train cars, etc. A dwelling has independent access when to get to it one doesn't pass through the interior of rooms belonging to other dwellings; it can have direct access from the street or passing through common-use patios, corridors, stairs, etc.

Household.- From the point of view of the census, it is made up of the person or group of people who cook their food separately and sleep in the same dwelling.

Blocked areas.- Are the blocked centers of provincial capitals, head-towns of cantons, head-towns of parishes, and rural localities and communities.

Dispersed areas.- Are geographic areas where dwellings are not organized into blocks. A disperse area is divided into dispersed sectors that make up the enumeration areas.

Enumeration area.- Is the group of between 12 and 15 dwellings that makes up the task or charge to be completed by each enumerator on the day of the Census.

Census sector for blocked areas.- Group made up of an average of 12 Enumeration Areas and which will be supervised by the head of sector.

Census zone.- Group made up of approximately 10 census sectors and which will be supervised by the high school principal, designated the head of zone.

[The following appear in the enumeration instructions for the dispersed areas.]

Dispersed sector.- Is a reasonably-sized territory with perfectly defined limits, identified by a name and a number, that can be made up of one or various localities or communities.

The dispersed sector assigned to an enumerator can be made up of:

Part of a locality
A single, complete locality
Various complete localities
Part of a locality and various complete localities
Part of various localities
Locality.- A locality has been defined statistically as a place in a rural area that has a settlement of dwellings, whether these be dispersed or grouped, is identifiable by name, and has fairly well defined limits.

Localities can have different designations based on their geographic location in the country, such as: neighborhoods, premises (recinto), municipalities, annexes, centers, etc.

For example:

Premises el Pueblito, Chone canton
Chiroisla Commune, Aguarico canton
Warints Center, Limón canton
Guambi Neighborhood, Tababela parish, Quito canton
A hacienda, when the place is known by the name of it [the hacienda.]
Enumeration area.- Is the dispersed sector, whose workload should be covered by a single enumerator.

Duration of the enumeration.- Given the characteristics of the location of the dwellings, the enumeration in dispersed areas will have a duration of around 8 days, beginning on November 25th, 2001.

[Pages 4-15 were not translated into English.]

[p. 16]

Chapter II. Dwelling data

In this chapter information relating to the characteristics of the dwellings existing in the country is compiled.

For purposes of the census, two types of dwellings are established: private and collective.

Private dwelling.- Is a separate premises or place of lodging with independent access intended for accommodating one or more households (a household is considered a person or group of people, related or not by kinship bonds, that cooks their food separately and sleeps in the same dwelling). Also considered a private dwelling is one which, though not meant for human lodging, is occupied as such at the time the census is taken.

In this sense, a private dwelling can be: a room or bedroom, an apartment, a house or villa, a raft, a boat, a cave, etc. Take into account that in a given house or edification there can be various dwellings, and in a dwelling one or more households.

A building or any other place used for commercial, industrial, or service purposes is not a dwelling, unless in it there is some premises occupied as a place of lodging by one or more persons. In this case, the part of the building occupied by these people is a private dwelling.

Houses, "ranchos," "mediaguas," and other places used as factories, warehouses, corrals, stables, etc. for agricultural, commercial, industrial or service purposes are not private dwellings, unless there is a room, bedroom, or area in them that is used as a place of lodging by one or more people. In these cases, the part occupied as lodging by one or more people is a private dwelling.

[p. 17]

Collective dwelling.- Is a dwelling inhabited by a group of people who share it due to reasons of health, discipline, religion, etc., such as: hotels, boarding houses, barracks, hospitals, convents, retirement homes, military camps, jails, etc.

Mr. Enumerator, remember that buildings known as multi-family or condominiums are not collective dwellings. Keep in mind that these buildings are a group of private dwellings intended for housing one or various households.

[The following appear on the enumeration form for dispersed areas.]

Also considered collective dwellings are workers' shelters which, at harvest and planting time become seasonal dwellings.

In the census, all private dwellings in existence in the country --occupied with people present, occupied with people absent, unoccupied, and under construction-- will be enumerated, along with occupied collective dwellings.

Question 1.- Type of dwelling

[There is a picture of question 1 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Within private dwellings 8 types are distinguished. Identify its type and mark the corresponding box.

House or villa.- Is any permanent building made with resistant materials such as: concrete, stone, brick, adobe, cane or wood. They generally have an exclusive-use water supply and toilet facilities.

Apartment.- Group of rooms that forms part of a building of one or more floors. They are characterized by being independent and having an exclusive-use water supply and toilet facilities.

Room(s) in a boarding house.- Includes one or various rooms or bedrooms belonging to a house with a common and direct entrance from a hallway, patio, corridor or street and which, generally, doesn't have exclusive-use water or toilet facilities, these being common-use services for all of the households or dwellings.

Mediagua.- Is a building of one floor with brick, adobe, concrete block, or wood walls, and a roof made of straw, asbestos (eternit), or zinc. They have a roof sloping in only one direction and no more than two rooms or bedrooms. If there are more than two rooms or bedrooms, record it as a house or villa.

Rancho.- Are rustic buildings covered with palms, straw, or any other similar material, with walls made of cane and with a floor made of wood, cane, or dirt.

Covacha.- Is a building that uses rustic materials such as: branches, cardboard, asbestos remnants, tin, plastic, etc. with a floor of wood or dirt.

[p. 18]

Choza.- Is a building that has walls made of adobe or straw, a dirt floor and a straw roof.

Other.- Spaces adapted as a dwelling, which generally lack toilet facilities, where people live at the time of the census. These include: train cars, cargo containers, watercraft, boats, tents, caves, pavilions, barns, etc.

[There are drawings representing the last six types of private dwellings.]

In the collective dwellings 6 types are distinguished. Mark with an "x" the appropriate box. If you should have to enumerate a dwelling of this type, mark only the type of dwelling and don't ask the questions related to dwelling data, household data and data from emigrants to foreign countries. Continue with question 1 of chapter V. Identification of the people in the household: What are the first and last names of each one of the people that spent the night of November 24th to the 25th in this household?, and Chapter VI. Population data. In these cases the characteristics of the building are not of interest, but rather just those of the people that occupy these dwellings. You should not enumerate unoccupied collective dwellings.

Given that private dwellings are frequently found within collective dwellings, it is your obligation to visit these places and ensure that you are not omitting any dwelling. For example: if a boarding house has four floors, of which one floor is occupied by the owner of the residence and their family, in this case you should enumerate this dwelling separately from the collective dwelling.

[p. 19]

Question 2.- Occupancy condition of the dwelling

[There is a picture of question 2 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Beginning with this question, information is only collected for private dwellings.

Occupied with people present, box (1) is when at least one of the inhabitants that occupy the dwelling is present at the time of the enumerator's visit. If only people under 12 year of age or people who have trouble communicating are home, return when they indicate that an adult will be present.

[There is a drawing representing this occupancy condition.]

Occupied with people absent, box (2) is when the dwelling is furnished with furniture and household effects, but its inhabitants are not there at the time of conducting the enumeration. If their absence is temporary, you should return to enumerate. Otherwise, consider the enumeration activity completed in that dwelling.

[The following appear in the original enumeration form for dispersed areas.]

Find out from the neighbors if the absence is temporary and ask what time would be convenient to return and enumerate. If their absence is unknown or the dwelling's occupants will not return during the period of enumeration of the dispersed sector, mark box 2 occupied with people absent and consider the interview finished.

[There is a drawing representing this occupancy condition.]

Unoccupied is when, at the time of the census, the dwelling is uninhabited and without any type of furniture, that is, ready to be inhabited. Mark box 3 and end the enumeration activity in that household. Example: dwellings under repair, for rent, or recently constructed.

[There is a drawing representing this occupancy condition.]

Unoccupied dwellings, in the process of destruction or demolition, should not be considered.

Under construction is a dwelling in any stage of its construction and which is not inhabited at the time of the census; for these cases, you should mark box 4 and finalize the enumeration in that dwelling. If a part of this type of dwelling is occupied by the guard or caretaker, fill out a census form for an independent dwelling.

[There is a drawing representing this occupancy condition.]

[p. 20]

If you marked box 2 (permanent absence), 3 (unoccupied) or 4 (under construction), finish the enumeration activity in that dwelling.

Question 3.- Predominant materials in the dwelling

[There is a picture of question 3 from this section of the enumeration form.]

This question consists of four parts: a. Roof or covering, b. Exterior walls, c. Floor, and d. Frame or structure.

One and only one response is admissible for each part. If there is more than one material in the construction of the exterior walls, roof or covering, floor, and frame or structure, ask what the predominant material is and mark the appropriate box.

Frame or structure: Group of elements (foundations, columns, beams, concrete slates laid out in a solid way which make up the skeleton of the dwelling and which serve to support the whole (roof, walls, floor). This self-supporting structure can be made of:

Reinforced concrete.- When the columns, beams, concrete slates and foundations are made of concrete with an iron framework. In this case the entire unit is a self-supporting structure (it doesn't need walls to support the roof or floor).

Iron.- When the column and beams (the frame of the dwelling) are made with metal frames (perfiles) bolted or soldered together. Ex: Prefabricated iron structures.
[p. 21]
Masonry.- When the walls, which are generally made of bricks joined with mortar (mix: sand-cement) are used as load-bearing elements for roofs and upper floors.

Wood.- When the columns and beams (the frame of the dwelling) are made of wood of any width or type.

Other (specify).- When the structure of the dwelling is made of materials other than those in the previous categories.

Question 4.- Water supply to the dwelling

[There is a picture of question 4 from this section of the enumeration form.]

This question is made up of two parts: a. How is the water for the dwelling obtained? and b. Where does the water received come from? For each part, one and only one answer is admissible.

A.- How is the water for the dwelling obtained?

Mark box 1, by pipes inside the dwelling, if the pipes are in the interior of the dwelling and are supplied with water directly.

[There is a drawing representing this type of water supply.]

Mark box 2, by pipes outside of the dwelling but within the building, lot, or grounds, when to access the water supply one has to go out from the dwelling to another place in the building or lot, where the water faucet or tap is located.

[There is a drawing representing this type of water supply.]

[p. 22]

Mark box 3, by pipes outside the building, lot, or grounds, when to access the water supply one must travel to someplace other than the building, lot, or grounds where the dwelling is located. Example: public faucet, basin, etc.

[There is a drawing representing this type of water supply.]

Mark box 4, water not received through pipes, but rather by other means, when the dwelling is supplied with water that is not piped. Example: provided manually and directly from a river, irrigation channel, well, delivery truck, etc.

[There is a drawing representing a well.]

B.- Where does the water received come from?

Mark only one box according to the response given by the informant.

From a public network.- When there is a system for collecting, treating, and conducting the water toward the dwelling.

From a well.- When underground water is extracted by means of a pump or with a bucket, etc.

From a river, spring, irrigation ditch, or canal.- When the water comes from a natural or artificial source and is supplied manually or directly from a river, spring, irrigation channel, canal, or stream (manantial is also included in this list, but also means "spring").

From a delivery truck.- When the supply of water is by means of a (public or private) delivery truck.

Other (specify).- When the water that the dwelling uses is stored or collected in tanks or buckets directly from the rain through gutters, or is obtained in a way other than those described in the previous categories.

[There is a drawing representing a well and showing an x in box 2.]

Question 5.- How is sewage or waste water eliminated from this dwelling?

[There is a picture of question 5 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Through a public sewage network.- If the elimination of sewage or wastewater is through an underground or public drain.

[There is a drawing representing this option and showing an x in box 1.]
[p. 23]
Through a pit toilet or latrine.- If the sewage or wastewater is disposed of in a hole.

[There is a drawing representing this option and showing an x in box 2.]

Through a septic tank.- If the sewage or wastewater accumulates in a tank where the solids settle and the liquids seep into the ground.

In some other way (specify).- If the dwelling has some infrastructure for evacuating sewage or wastewater to a stream, river, or irrigation ditch that isn't connected to a public network, pit toilet, or septic tank, example: a private sewer that drains into a river or drainage ditch or spills into wasteland or into the street.

[There is a drawing representing this option and showing an x in box 4.]

Question 6.- Does the dwelling have electric light?

[There is a picture of question 6 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark yes, box (1), when the dwelling has an energy supply that comes from a public service network, cooperatives, private businesses, a system of electric lighting for the exclusive use of the dwelling, etc.

Mark no, box (2), when the dwelling doesn't have any type of electric lighting.

[There is a drawing of a man holding a candle and showing an x in box 2.]

Question 7.- Does the dwelling have telephone service?

[There is a picture of question 7 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark yes, box (1), when the dwelling has telephone service. That is, it has public domestic service of telephone lines provided by a specialized business.

[There is a drawing of a woman talking on the phone and showing an x in box 1.]

Mark no, box (2), when the dwelling doesn't have telephone service.

[p. 24]

Question 8.- How is trash eliminated from the dwelling?

[There is a picture of question 8 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark box 1 if the dwelling's trash is collected by a trash truck that removes the trash close to the dwelling on an established schedule.

Mark box 2 if the trash is thrown in a wasteland or ravine.

[There is a drawing representing this option.]

Mark box 3 if the trash is burned or buried.

Mark box 4 if the if the elimination of waste is carried out in a manner other than those previously mentioned, and specify what manner that is.

If more than one type of waste elimination is used, record the most frequently used one.

Question 9.- Not counting the kitchen or the bathroom, how many rooms or bedrooms does the dwelling have?

[There is a picture of question 9 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Room.- Is an area or space separated by permanent walls made of any material and that is intended to be used as a bedroom, living room, dining room, study, recreation room, etc.

Ask the question word for word and emphasize that the kitchen, bathroom(s), corridors, hallways and those rooms meant only for purposes other than living should be excluded. Example: garages, offices, cellars, workshops, stores, etc. Record in Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3... etc.) in the appropriate space the total number of rooms that the dwelling you are enumerating has.

[There is a cross-section of a house with two bedrooms, a dining room, kitchen and bathroom, and the numbers 03 filled in.]

When one of the rooms in the dwelling is a single space (such as is the case in modern apartments) that is used as a living room, dining room and kitchen, you should record it as a single room.

[p. 25]

Question 10.- Are there people or groups of people who cook their food separately and sleep in this dwelling?

[There is a picture of question 10 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Read the question word for word and record the response that the informant gives in the appropriate box.

Mark yes, box (1) when there are people or groups of people in the dwelling who cook their food separately and sleep in the same dwelling.

[There is a drawing showing a couple and a single man cooking separately with box 1 below the picture.]

Mark no, box (2) when all of the people that live in the dwelling don't cook their food separately and sleep in the same dwelling, which is to say that they eat from a common pot.

Question 11.- How many groups of people (households) cook their food separately and sleep in this dwelling?

[There is a picture of question 11 from this section of the enumeration form.]

From the point of view of the census, the household can be made up of one or various people who are not necessarily related and who cook their meals separately and sleep in the same dwelling. Remember that there can be more than one household in a dwelling; the determination of the number of households that lie in the dwelling you are enumerating depends on a correct understanding of this.

Record the total number of households in the dwelling that you are enumerating in Arabic numerals in the space provided. If you find only one household in the dwelling, record 1 in the appropriate space.

By the same token, if in question 10 (are there people or groups of people who cook their food separately and sleep in this dwelling?) the informant responded no, record 1 for question 11, which corresponds to a single household in the dwelling.

Otherwise, if two or more households are found within the dwelling, proceed in the following manner:

[p. 26]

Use a different form for each household, and on each of them:

Repeat chapter 1 for Geographic location,

Leave blank chapter II. Dwelling data; and,

Fill in chapters II. Household data, IV. Data from emigrants to foreign countries, V. Identification of people in the household and VI. Population data.

Below we present some of the cases of more than one household that can occur within a dwelling:

Case 1: A father, mother, and their children live in one dwelling

unit, and another child and his wife, who cook separately from the rest of the family but live in the same dwelling, reside in another bedroom of the same dwelling; in this case there are two census households in a single dwelling unit. The first household is made up of the father, mother, and the children, and the second household is composed of the married son and his wife.

[There is a drawing representing two households in a single dwelling.]

Case 2: Taking the previous example but supposing that the married son and his wife share the same food with the rest of the members of the household, this represents a single household.

[There is a drawing representing this situation.]
[p. 27]
Case 3: If 3 people live in a dwelling, each of whom eats separately and sleeps in the same dwelling, this represents three single-person households that are sharing the same dwelling unit.

[There are drawings representing this situation.]

At the end of chapter II. Dwelling data, you will find a note that indicates in detail how you should proceed according to the number of households you identified in that dwelling.

[There is a picture of the note at the end of this chapter of the enumeration form.]

Chapter III. Household data

Number of the household that you are investigating:

[There are pictures of a line item from the beginning of this chapter of the enumeration form and an enumerator filling it out.]

At the beginning of this chapter there is a box for the number of the household that you are investigating ____ of ____ ; this serves to confirm the number of households that exist in the dwelling, based on questions 10 and 11 of chapter II. Dwelling data.

In this box you should record the number of the household that is being investigated within the dwelling that is being enumerated. If there are no groups of people (households) in the dwelling who cook their food separately and sleep in the same dwelling, the household will be the same as the dwelling. In this case you should record 1 of 1.

Mr. Enumerator, if there is more than one household within the dwelling, proceed in the following manner:

[p. 28]

If in question 10, box (1) yes is marked and in question 11 of chapter II. Dwelling data you recorded 2 in Arabic numerals, in chapter III. Household data in the box that asks you for the number of the household that you are investigating ____ of ____, you should record the number 1 of 2 for the first household and 2 of 2 for the second household.

In the situation where, for the second household, the residents are not present, record in "observations" why for this household the information was not investigated with respect to chapters: III. Household data, IV. Data from emigrants to foreign countries, V. Identification of the people in the household and VI. Population data.

Question 1.- Not counting the kitchen or the bathroom, how many rooms or bedrooms does this household occupy?

[There is a picture of question 1 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Ask this question word for word and emphasize that they should not include the kitchen, corridors, hallways, bathroom(s) and those rooms meant only for purposes other than living.

If you should encounter a room or bedroom made up of a single area where they sleep, cook, and eat, record only one room.

If only one household lives in the dwelling, the information from this question should be the same as that of question 9 in chapter II. Dwelling data; and, if there is more than one household, the information from each household should be less than that recorded in question 9 of the chapter mentioned, and the sum of the number of rooms or bedrooms occupied by the households should be equal to the total recorded in question 9 chapter II. Dwelling data.

Question 2.- In this household, how many rooms and bedroom are used only for sleeping?

[There is a picture of question 2 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Record in Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3... etc.), in the space provided, the number of bedrooms that the household being enumerated has.

Record 00 for those households that have only one room which is intended for cooking, eating, sleeping or as a commercial premises, in which they sleep.

[p. 29]

For those households that have only one room or bedroom and it is used exclusively for sleeping, record 1.

Question 3.- Does this household have a room or bedroom or space exclusively for cooking?

[There is a picture of question 3 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark the yes box when the household has a room or bedroom or space exclusively for cooking, even if they also use it as a daily dining room.

Mark the no box when the kitchen is used for other purposes or when the household only has one room or bedroom or space, in which they cook, sleep, etc.

Question 4.- What is the principal fuel or energy that is used in this household for cooking?

[There is a picture of question 4 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Ask the question and immediately read all of the response options. If the informant indicates that they use two or more fuels, ask which is the one that they use more frequently, and record it.

Question 5.- The toilet facilities that the household has are:

[There is a picture of question 5 from this section of the enumeration form.]

[p. 30]

Mark box 1. toilet for the exclusive use of the household, if it is used only by the members of the household that you are investigating.

Mark box 2. toilet for the common use of various households, when the toilet facilities are used by the members of two or more households in the same dwelling and also when they are used by the households of various dwellings.

Mark box 3. latrine if the place for depositing excrement is a hole, generally covered by an outhouse.

Mark box 4. doesn't have, if the household doesn't have any of the alternatives previously mentioned.

Question 6.- The shower service that this household has is:

[There is a picture of question 6 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark box 1 if the household that you are investigating has a shower for the exclusive use of the household.

Mark box 2, for the common use of various households, if the shower is used by the members of two or more households in the same dwelling and also when it is used by the households of other dwellings.

Mark box 3, doesn't have, when the household doesn't have a shower.

Question 7.- In this household do they use part of the dwelling for some economic activity?

[There is a picture of question 7 from this section of the enumeration form.]

If two or more households live in the dwelling, the information should refer to the part of the dwelling that the household you are investigating uses.

When the dwelling that this household uses is shared in order to carry out some economic activity, mark the yes box (1) and then in the appropriate space record the principal economic activity that is carried out. Examples: weaving by hand, tailoring, shoe repair, sale and preparation of food, etc.

Examples: making fabrics of wool, "paja toquilla" [a kind of straw that comes from the toquilla tree, a species of palm] (bags, ropes, hats, etc.), tailoring, shoe repair, wood carvings, sale and preparation of food, sale of agricultural products, sale of cheeses, raising animals, hairstyling, etc.

When the dwelling is used exclusively for living, mark no, box (2).

[p. 31]

Question 8.- The dwelling that this household occupies is:

[There is a picture of question 8 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Read the responses in order and mark the box that corresponds to the response that the informant gives.

Owned.- If the dwelling belongs to one of the members of the household, whether it is totally paid or in the payment process.

Rented.- When some member of the household pays rent to live in the dwelling.

Loan-backed habitation contract (anticresis).- If there is a rental contract through which some member of the household that is renting the dwelling gives a quantity of money (capital) to the owner of the property in order to have the right to occupy the dwelling for a certain amount of time. In other words, the occupants of the dwelling are beneficiaries of the interest that this capital would generate if it were invested.

Free.- When the members of the household live in the dwelling without any cost.

For services.- When the members of the household live in the dwelling as part of the payment for services rendered. For example: the dwelling assigned to the caretaker, custodian, etc.

Other (specify).- If the members of the household lived in the dwelling under circumstances other than those previously mentioned.

Chapter IV. Data from emigrants to foreign countries

In this chapter we collect information about the number of people per census household who have left the country, for different reasons in the last five years and who have not yet returned.

Question 1.- Beginning in November of 1996 (during the past 5 years), have one or more people who were members of this household traveled to another country and not yet returned?

[There is a picture of question 1 from this section of the enumeration form.]

[p. 32]

Read the question word for word. If the informant refuses to give this information, explain that it will not be used for migratory purposes. If necessary, mention that the Statistics Law guarantees the confidentiality of the information and that it is obligatory to provide it, as established by Executive Decree No. 1087, Article 6, that literally says: "The residents of the country will provide data and information that are required on the census forms; the requested information will be strictly confidential and in no case will individual information of any kind be made known."

Mark yes, box 1, and continue with question 2 when the male [or female] head of household, or the person representing them indicates that beginning in November of 1996 (during the past 5 years), one or more people who were members of this household did travel to another country and have not yet returned.

Otherwise, mark no, box 2, and continue on to chapter V. Identification of the people in the household.

Question 2.- How many members of this household traveled?

[There is a picture of question 2 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Record in Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3... etc.) in the appropriate box the number of members of this household that traveled to another country and have not yet returned and proceed immediately to inquire about: sex, age of the person at the time they left the country, year of departure, reason for the trip, and the name of the country of destination. For those cases where the number of members of the household being investigated who traveled is more than 6 people, record the data solicited in the table in "observations" for the other people.

[p. 33]

Chapter V. Identification of the people in the household

Question 1.- What are the first and last names of each one of the people who spent the night from November 24th to the 25th in this household? Begin with the male or female head of household and then continue with the rest of the members. (Don't forget newborns and the elderly.)

[There is a picture of question 1 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Remember that in a de facto census it is important to distinguish who should be enumerated and who should not be enumerated. Imagine that at the time of the census (00:00 hours on November 25th) -which is the beginning of the census- a photo is taken of the country's inhabitants. You should enumerate only those who are present at the moment in which that photograph is taken.

Enumerate in each household:

All people who spent the night prior to the day of the census in the household, including people in domestic service, relatives or otherwise, who slept the night prior to the day of the census or who spent that night in that household.

All people who, temporarily, for some special reason (generally for work) are absent the night prior to the day of the Census, such as: telephone operators, security guards, building superintendents, on-duty soldiers, etc.

All children who were born before 00:00 hours on the day of the census.

All people who died after 00:00 hours on the day of the census.
[p. 34]

Do not enumerate:

People who usually live in the household, but who the previous evening were lodged in another house, a hotel, or another place different than their household. These people will be enumerated where they sleep the night prior to the day of the census.

Those members of the household who are admitted in a hospital or incarcerated. They will be enumerated where they slept the night prior to the day of the Census.

Those who were born after 00:00 hours on the day of the census.

Those who died before 00:00 hours on the day of the census.

Just as in the previous questions, read the question verbatim and, on the appropriate lines, record the first and last names of all the people who spent the night prior to the census in the household you are enumerating, beginning with the male or female head of household (father or mother of the family or the person who serves as the male or female head), then spouse or partner in a consensual union, unmarried children (from oldest to youngest), married children (from oldest to youngest), sons- and daughters-in-law, grandchildren, parents or parents-in-law, other relatives, other non-relatives, domestic employees, spouse and children of domestic employee. Don't forget to record newborns and the elderly. Adhere to the order of the list described in the question.

In column 2 (first and last names), in the case of newborns who don't yet have a first name, record NN and the last name. Married women will be asked their maiden name. In column 3, record the family relationship of each of the people to the head of household, and in column 4 mark each person's sex.

In the case of collective dwellings, record the name of each one of the people who spent the night prior to the census in that dwelling. In column 3, family or other relationship to the head of household, no information should be recorded.

[p. 35]

Mr. Enumerator, remember to read the box labeled important, that is found at the right side of this question, once you have finished recording all of the people who spent the night of November 24th to 25th in that household.

Note: If the number of members of the household is greater than 7, use another form. Transcribe chapter I (geographic location) from the first form. On the lines between census form no. ___ of ___, record the number of forms used in each census household or collective dwelling and proceed to continue recording in chapter V. (list of the people that spent the night prior to the day of the census in the household) on the second form the first and last names of the people, beginning with numbers 8, 9, 10, etc. Then, for each one of the people, continue the interview in chapter VI. (Population data).

Chapter VI. Population data

In this chapter, information for the VI. Population census is compiled. The unit of investigation is each of the people that are in the country at the time of the census.

Instructions for filling out chapter VI. Population data

[There is a picture of the first box in this section of the enumeration form.]

First, transcribe in the corresponding space on each sheet of the questionnaire the number of the person and the first and last names of each one of the people that you recorded during the identification of the people who spent the night of November 24th to the 25th in that household, question 1 of chapter V (Identification of the people in the household), in the order specified in that question.

If it is a private dwelling, start with the male or female head of household. Take into account that the first questionnaire is meant only for the male or female head of household or whoever represents them, this person being someone of at least 12 years of age. Continue with the rest of the people in the household, on the following sheets of the census form, where you will find the age limits of the people to whom the corresponding questions should be directed.

[p. 36]

If it is a collective dwelling, abide by the order of the list and begin with sheet 3. Cross out the previous sheet corresponding to the male or female head of household, using two lines crossed in an x. Beginning with sheet 3 on the questionnaires, for the rest of the people in the household, you will find the age limits of the people to whom the corresponding questions should be directed.

This chapter is subdivided into 5 topics:

A. General characteristics
B. Educational characteristics
C. Economic characteristics
D. Fertility and mortality characteristics. Only for women 12 years of age and older.
E. Marital or conjugal status. For people 12 years of age and older.

A. General characteristics

Question 1.- What family or other relationship do you have with the male or female head of household?

[There is a picture of question 1 from this section of the enumeration form.]

If the person being interviewed is the male or female head of household, use the first questionnaire, intended only for the male or female head of household, and mark box (0).

If it is a private dwelling, beginning with the second questionnaire, read word for word each one of the response alternatives and mark with an x the appropriate box: the alternatives go from box 1 (spouse or partner in a consensual union) to box 8 (domestic employee) depending on the kinship relationship that may exist with the male or female head of household.

[p. 37]

Mark the following under other relatives: brothers, cousins, nieces and nephews, aunts and uncles, grandparents, brothers- and sisters-in-law, stepchildren; in other words, those who have some degree of family relationship or that the male or female head of household considers as such.

Mark under other non-relatives those who don't have any kinship relationship to the male or female head of household, such as for example: friends, godparents, godchildren, etc.

If the dwelling is collective, begin with page 5 and mark box 9 (member of a collective household). Remember that in these dwellings there is no male or female head of household, and therefore there in no kinship relationship.

Keep in mind that this information is in chapter V. Identification of the people in the household; you have to transcribe the previously recorded data from columns 1 and 2 (number of the person and first and last names).

Question 2.- Are you a man or woman?

[There is a picture of question 2 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark with an x the box that corresponds to the sex of the person being investigated.

Question 3.- How old are you in completed years?

[There is a picture of question 3 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Ask this question and wait for an answer. Don't record the number of years the person is going to complete, even if [their birthday is] just one day off. Record the number of completed years on the day of the census.

It's possible that older people might not remember their exact age. Then, the enumerator will try to figure out their age by their identity card or birth certificate. If this is not possible, try to help them to calculate their age, mentioning historic dates, their age at marriage, age when they had their first child, etc. As much as possible, avoid vague statements such as: around .... years.

This question should always contain information.

Another inconvenience that you may find in some people is the tendency to state approximate ages, which leads to declaring so-called attractive ages, which generally end in 0 or 5. Insist that the information be precise. For those under 1 year or age, record 00.

[p. 38]

Question 4.- Do you have any physical, sensory, or mental disability? (Handicap)

[There is a picture of question 4 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mr. Enumerator, this question deals with identifying a handicap in the person being enumerated. As an orientation, it's important to consider the following:

Permanent disability: physical, sensory, or mental

This is a permanent difficulty in doing an activity that is considered normal, due to irreversible effects from an incurable congenital or acquired disease.

In seeing (blindness, only shadows).- Mark box 1 when the person being enumerated cannot see or can only see shadows, with one or both eyes, and therefore needs help to get by. People that use lenses because of myopia or similar diseases are excluded from this category.

In moving or using their body (paralysis, amputations).- Mark box 2 if the person in question has a physical disability manifested by an absence of or decrease in the ability to move any part of their body: legs, arms, hands, etc. For example: paralytics who can't walk or only do so with some apparatus; people who can't use their upper body due to the aftereffects of a brain hemorrhage, bone marrow injury, polio, etc.; people who can't move parts of their body because they don't have them due to amputations; people who suffer from involuntary movements of their body.

Is deaf or uses a hearing device (deafness, mute and deaf).- Mark box 3. People who can't hear or who use devices (hearing aids or sound amplifiers) to hear should be considered in this category; in general these are deaf people or those known as deaf-mutes.

Mentally retarded.- Mark box 4 when the person being enumerated has a decreased degree of intelligence due to mental retardation. In some populations these people are called "innocents," "silly ones", or "mutes" (not because of deafness). People affected by Down syndrome, microcephaly, cretinism, autism, etc. are in this group.

[p. 39]

Psychiatric illness (insanity).- Mark box 5 if the person suffers from mental disorders and, despite having a good level of intelligence, demonstrates strange behaviors that impede them from getting along with others. These people are usually referred to as being insane.

Multiple (two or more of the previous).- Mark box 6 if the person being enumerated suffers from various disabilities simultaneously, for example: deaf-blind, blind-paralytic, etc.

Other (disfigurement, internal organs).- Mark box 7 when the person being enumerated has disfiguring problems that primarily affect their esthetic appearance and which don't impede their ability to move, such as: dwarfism, noticeable scars from wounds or burns, leprosy, etc. Include people who have severe problems with their internal organs, like those whose life depends on the use or an artificial kidney (weekly dialysis).

Mark no, box (2), if the informant indicates that they don't have any permanent physical, sensory, or mental disability (handicap) and continue with question 5.

Mark unknown, box (9), in those cases where the information is being provided by a third party who doesn't know if the person being referred to has any physical, sensory, or mental disability (handicap) or not, and continue with question 5.

Question 5.- What language do you speak?

[There is a picture of question 5 from this section of the enumeration form.]

The political constitution of Ecuador, in article 1, expresses the following: Ecuador is a social democracy, sovereign, unitary, independent, democratic, pluri-cultural, and multi-ethnic; furthermore, it indicates that Spanish is the official language; Quichua, Shuar, and the other ancestral languages are for official use by indigenous peoples, in the terms that the law establishes.

Among the ancestral languages that are used in the indigenous nations and peoples are: Cha'palaa, Awapit, Achuar, A'inagae, Wayapi, Siapede, Kichwa, Shuar Chichan, Baicoca, Tsa'fiqui, Huao Terero, Paicoca, Záparo.

Read each one of the response alternatives verbatim and mark the answer given by the informant with an x.

If the answer is only Spanish, mark box 1.

If the response is only native language, mark box 2; if the informant indicates that they speak Spanish and the native language, mark box 4.

[p. 40]

For the answer options 2 (only native language) and 4 (Spanish and native language), find out what the native language is and record it in the appropriate space. Example: Cha'palaa, Awapit, Achuar, A'inagae, Wayapi, Siapede, Kichwa, Shuar Chichan, Baicoca, Tsa'fiqui, Huao Terero, Paicoca, Záparo.

Mark box 3, only foreign language, if the informant reports that the language they speak is a Foreign Language. Example: English, Portuguese, French, Italian, etc.

Mark box 5, other (specify), in the case that the informant reports that they speak Spanish and a foreign language. Example: Spanish-English, Spanish-Portuguese, Spanish-Italian, etc.

Note.- In the case of boys or girls under the age of one, leave this question blank and continue on beginning with the next question.

Question 6.- What do you consider yourself: indigenous, black (afro-Ecuadorian), mestizo, mulatto, white, or other?

[There is a picture of question 6 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Nationalities.- These are historical and political entities that make up the Ecuadorian State and that have a common identity, history, language, their own culture, that live in a specific territory, using their own institutions and traditional forms of social, economic, and political organization, and exercise of their own authority. The following nations are considered:

[p. 41]

Awa / Kichwa / Siona / Chachi / Shuar / Secoya / Epera / Achuar / Záparo / Tza'chila / Huaorani / Cofán.

Populations.- These are native groups made up of communities or centers, with cultural identities distinct from other sectors of the Ecuadorian society, governed by their own systems of social, economic, political, and legal organization. The following peoples exist: Caranqui / Quitu / Puruhá / Natabuela / Panzaleo / Cañari / Otavalo / Chivuelo / Saraguro / Cayambi / Salasaca / Manta / Huancavilca.

The new constitution establishes the recognition of the indigenous nations and peoples. For this reason, it is necessary to identify the indigenous group people belong to (articles 83, 84 political constitution of the state).

Read the categories in order and mark the box corresponding to the answer given by the informant.

Indigenous.- Is an individual who is native to the country.

Black (afro-Ecuadorian).- Is an individual with dark or black skin and/or who has some afro-Ecuadorian characteristic or origin.

Mestizo.- Is an individual born of a father and mother of different races.

Mulatto.- Is an individual born of a black man and a white woman or vice versa.

White.- Is a person who comes from the European or Caucasian race.

Other.- If the person doesn't fit into one of the previously mentioned groups.

If the informant responds Indigenous, box 1, immediately ask: What indigenous nation or indigenous people do you belong to?, and record it in the space provided.

Example:

Indigenous Nations: Awa / Kichwa / Siona / Chachi / Shuar / Secoya / Epera / Achuar / Záparo / Tza'chila / Huaorani / Cofán.

Indigenous People.- Caranqui / Quitu / Puruhá / Natabuela / Panzaleo / Cañari / Otavalo / Chivuelo / Saraguro / Cayambi / Salasaca / Manta / Huancavilca.

Question 7.- Where were you born?

[There is a picture of question 7 from this section of the enumeration form.]

[p. 42]

If the person being interviewed was born in the rural parish or head-town of the canton where they are being enumerated, mark the box in this rural parish or head-town of the canton.

If they were born in another part of the country, record the name of the rural parish or head-town of the canton, the canton, and the province. In no case should you record the names of: neighborhoods in the same city, towns, hamlets, premises (recintos), or estates in the same rural parish.

Don't confuse the term another place with another neighborhood in the same city or town which belongs to the same rural parish or head-town of the canton where the person was born. Explain that it refers to other cities or rural parishes.

Keep in mind that the information should be explicit and complete, since there are towns and rural parishes with the same name but which belong to different cantons and provinces.

Examples:

Rural parish: San Carlos
Canton: Quevedo
Province: Los Ríos

Rural parish: San Carlos
Canton: La Joya de los Sachas
Province: Orellana

Rural parish: Atahualpa
Canton: Quito
Province: Pichincha

Rural parish: Atahualpa
Canton: Ambato
Province: Tungurahua

Rural parish: Atahualpa
Canton: Santa Elena
Province: Guayas

If the informant was born abroad, record the name of the country and proceed immediately to record the year that they arrived in Ecuador, in Arabic numbers (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999... etc.)

Question 8.- Where do you usually live?

[There is a picture of question 8 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Follow the procedure from question 7 (where were you born?). The usual residence of the person is considered to be the place where they normally live the majority of the time, even though they may be absent from that household at the time of enumeration.

Don't confuse the term another place with another neighborhood in the same city or town which belongs to the same rural parish or head-town of the canton where the person usually lives. Explain that it refers to other cities or rural parishes.

[p. 43]

Question 9.- How long have you lived in the place indicated in the previous question?

[There is a picture of question 9 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Record the amount of time they have lived in the place indicated in question 8 (where do you usually live?) as the place of usual residence. If they've lived there less than a month, record "00."

If the informant indicates having always lived there, mark the corresponding box.

For boy and girls younger than 5, consider the interview concluded, and continue with the next person in the household.

Question 10.- Five years ago (in November of 1996), in what rural parish or head-town of the canton were you usually living?

[There is a picture of question 10 from this section of the enumeration form.]

If the informant states "I've always lived here," "since I was born," or "always," put an "x" in the box "in this rural parish or head-town of the canton." Otherwise, if they were living in another part of the country, record the name of the rural parish or head-town of the canton, the canton, and the province to which it belongs; if they were living in another country, record the name of the country.

[p. 44]

Record the province. That way, you will avoid confusion later on. Don't confuse the term another place with another neighborhood in the same city or town which belongs to the same rural parish or head-town of the canton where the person lived. Explain that it refers to other cities or rural parishes.

Record the name of the rural parish or head-town of the canton, the canton, and the province. If they lived abroad, record the name of the country.

[There is a drawing of a man from the U.S., with the appropriate information filled in for this question on the enumeration form.]

B. Educational characteristics

Question 11.- Do you know how to read and write?

[There is a picture of question 11 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark the appropriate box with an "x." If the person being interviewed only reads or only writes, mark box 2, no.

If the information is provided by a third party and they don't know whether the person in question knows how to read and write, mark box 9, unknown.

[There is a drawing of a man reading a book, with the yes option checked for this question on the enumeration form.]

Question 12.- Do you currently attend a regular instructional establishment? (Literacy center, primary [school], secondary [school], basic education, secondary education, post-high school cycle, post-secondary, or graduate)

[There is a picture of question 12 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Remember that this question is for all people 5 years of age and older; always ask the question and mark the appropriate box. Keep in mind that institutes, academies, centers, etc. that offer courses in beauty, dressmaking, handicrafts, by correspondence, and the like will not be considered regular instructional establishments.

[There is a drawing of a man walking into a school, and the yes box is checked for this question on the enumeration form.]

[p. 45]

Question 13.- What is the highest level of instruction that you are attending or attended?

[There is a picture of question 13 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark the box that corresponds to the highest level of education the person being interviewed is attending or attended. Keep in mind that being investigated is the level of studies according to the traditional system or the current system, which refers to the curricular reform and which is being applied in some educational establishments.

You should mark none if the person being interviewed never attended any formal educational center. In that case, move on to question 16 and continue with the interview.

Question 14.- What is the last grade, course, or highest year that you passed at the level that you indicated?

[There is a picture of question 14 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark the box of the highest grade, course, or year that the person passed at the level they indicated in question 13 (what is the highest level of instruction that you are attending or attended?). Remember that, generally, the informant will state the grade or year that they are in; what we want to know is the last year that they passed. For example: If they are in the first year of basic, mark box 00. If they are in the fourth year at the university, mark box 3.

[There is a drawing of a man holding up 3 fingers, and box 3 for this question on the enumeration form is checked.]

If the system of studies in the university is by semesters, two correspond to one year. In contrast, for those who passed or are studying in a literacy center, one level equals two years of primary. Example:

[p. 46]

If the person states that they passed the third level at a literacy center, you should mark box number 06.

For people who are in the first year of any level, mark box 00.

Conversion Table: previous or traditional system of Studies and their equivalents in the current system of studies or curricular reform

Previous or traditional system: Kindergarten
Current system or curricular reform: First Basic

Previous or traditional system: First Grade
Current system or curricular reform: Second Basic

Previous or traditional system: Second Grade
Current system or curricular reform: Third Basic

Previous or traditional system: Third Grade
Current system or curricular reform: Fourth Basic

Previous or traditional system: Fourth Grade
Current system or curricular reform: Fifth Basic

Previous or traditional system: Fifth Grade
Current system or curricular reform: Sixth Basic

Previous or traditional system: Sixth Grade
Current system or curricular reform: Seventh Basic

Previous or traditional system: First Course
Current system or curricular reform: Eighth Basic

Previous or traditional system: Second Course
Current system or curricular reform: Ninth Basic

Previous or traditional system: Third Course
Current system or curricular reform: Tenth Basic

Previous or traditional system: Fourth Course
Current system or curricular reform: First year of Secondary Education

Previous or traditional system: Fifth Course
Current system or curricular reform: Second year of Secondary Education

Previous or traditional system: Sixth Course
Current system or curricular reform: Third year of Secondary Education

Question 15.- Do you have a university degree?

[There is a picture of question 15 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Ask this question only of people who have finished their studies at the post-secondary level.

Put an x in the appropriate box. If the person being interviewed reports having obtained a degree awarded by a university or technical college, mark box 1, yes, and immediately record the name of the degree on the line provided.

[There is a drawing of a doctor, with the corresponding degree filled in for this question on the enumeration form.]

Mark box 2, no, when the person being enumerated states that they are only graduated from some school [p. 47] at a university or technical college. Mr. Enumerator, remember that graduation does not equal a university degree.

If the information is provided by third parties who don't know if the person in question has a university degree or not, mark box 9 (unknown).

C. Economic characteristics

Question 16.- Are you or were you affiliated with Social Security?

[There is a picture of question 16 from this section of the enumeration form.]

A person who at one time made and/or is making contributions to Social Security is considered affiliated. An affiliated person can be a white-collar or manual laborer in a private or public company, or a worker or person who contributes voluntarily.

In the case of a dispersed sector, keep in mind that people from the country will be affiliated with Rural Social Security.

Mark box 1, yes, when the informant indicates that they are or were affiliated with Social Security, and immediately ask if they currently contribute or not; wait for an answer and record it in the appropriate box.

Mark box 2, no, when the informant indicates that they have never been affiliated with Social Security.

Mark box 9, unknown, if the information is provided by third parties who don't know if the person in question is or was affiliated with Social Security.

Question 17.- Are you a member of a rural organization?

[There is a picture of question 17 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Mark box 1, yes, if the informant indicates that they are a member of a rural organization.

Mark box 2, no, if the informant indicates that they are not a member of any rural organization.

Mark box 3, unknown, when the information is provided by third parties who don't now if the person in question is a member or any rural organization or not.

[p. 48]

Question 18.- What did you do last week?

[There is a picture of question 18 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Read the question and all of the response options verbatim. Abide by the directions which indicate to you what question to continue with. That way you will avoid asking inopportune questions.

Just as in the rest of the questions, this one admits only one response.

Keep in mind the following definitions:

Worked (at least one hour).- This refers to any person who, during the previous week (from November 19th to the 24th) performed one or more activities, paid or otherwise, inside or outside of the house, for at least one hour. For example, helped out in a family business.

Has a job but didn't work.- When the person being enumerated has a job but, during the week of November 19th to the 24th didn't work because of vacation, sickness, a strike, bad weather, etc.

Looked for work having worked previously (unemployed).- A person who left their job, voluntarily or involuntarily, and who looked for work during the week of November 19th to the 24th.

Looked for work for the first time.- When the person has never worked before and was looking for work during the week of November 19th to the 24th.

Only household chores.- When the person being investigated performs household chores exclusively. Example: housewives who, for their work in the home, don't receive any payment. If these activities are paid, you should mark worked, code "00." Example: domestic employees who receive income for services rendered.

[p. 49]

Only student.- When the person is devoted exclusively to studying.

Only retired.- When the person receives a retirement pension for services previously rendered and during the week of November 19th to the 24th didn't perform any productive activity.

Only pensioner.- When the person doesn't perform any productive activity and receives a pension (dependent's or orphan's pension) in exchange for services previously rendered, through a relative affiliated with Social Security.

Prevented from working.- A person who, because of a physical or mental deficiency, was not working during the week of November 19th to the 24th.

Other (specify).- If the person does not fit into the previous categories.

Unknown.- When the information is provided by third parties who don't know if, during the week of November 19th to the 24th, the person in question was included in one of the previously described categories.

Keep in mind that, in the case of people who responded with categories 01 or 02, the interview continues with question 20. For those who responded with categories 03 to 10 and 99, they should go to question 19.

Question 19.- Did you perhaps perform or help to perform some activity last week, even though it might have been without pay?

[There is a picture of question 19 from this section of the enumeration form.]

This question is for those people who, in question 18 (What did you do last week?) answered with responses 03 through 10 and 99.

The objective of this question is to recover information about productive activities that some people performed and yet are not considered active; such is the case with housewives, students, and kids who don't report any productive activity because they consider them part of the household chores, given the small amount of time they take to do them or because of the little or no income they receive.

[p. 50]

Read the question with all of the examples listed after it in this way: Did you plant, harvest, raise animals for sale; wash, iron, sew others' clothing; catch fish for sale, help in service at some business, sell food, handicrafts, fruit, newspapers, clothing or other articles; care for or serve children or the elderly, cure sick people, help mothers who are not part of your household to give birth, or perform other similar activities?

[There is a drawing of a man selling meat, with box 1, yes, checked.]

If the person being interviewed reports having performed some activity, mark the yes box (1) and continue on to question 20.

If the answer is no, mark box (2). Keep in mind that: for people who are unemployed (response 03 to question 18) you should continue with question 20; for women 12 years of age and older you should skip to question 24; for men 12 years of age and older, you should skip to question 28.

For both men and women under the age of 12, consider the interview finished.

Question 20.- What was the primary occupation or job that you performed last week or the last job you had if you were unemployed?

[There is a picture of question 20 from this section of the enumeration form.]

This question is for all people who answered question 18 (what did you do last week?) with responses 01 or 02, answered yes (1) to question 19, and those people who looked for work having worked previously (unemployed) and answered no (2) in question 19.

Record in detail the nature of the work that the person performed. If the person did more than one job during the week prior to the census, ask for and record the occupation that the person considers the principal or more important activity.

Occupation: By occupation is meant the different tasks that people perform in their job, regardless of the type of economic activity of the place where they work or the position they have.

[p. 51]

When the occupation cannot be characterized by a definite name, describe the nature of the work. Example: puts on steering wheel covers, assembles cardboard boxes, etc. Avoid very general or ambiguous terms like driver, operator, helper, day laborer, or teacher; always stress that the information should be precise.

Examples:

Incomplete: Unskilled laborer
Complete: Unskilled farm worker, unskilled construction worker, unskilled quarry worker, unskilled freight worker

Incomplete: Laborer
Complete: Construction worker, carpentry worker

Incomplete: Operator
Complete: Farm machine operator, construction equipment operator, optical equipment operator, broadcasting equipment operator

Incomplete: Engineer
Complete: Civil engineer, mechanical engineer, chemical engineer, systems engineer, electrical engineer

Incomplete: Teacher
Complete: Primary school teacher, high school teacher, music teacher, post-secondary teacher

Incomplete: Seller
Complete: Pharmaceutical sales representative, department store salesperson, ticket and fare agent, grocery store clerk

Incomplete: Mechanic
Complete: Airplane motor mechanic, agricultural machinery mechanic

Incomplete: Manager
Complete: Textile industry manager, manager of cased meat marketing

Remember that what should be recorded is the occupation and not the profession. It can happen that the occupation and profession coincide, but there are also cases in which it is not like that. Examples: physicians, attorneys, architects, etc., work in their profession, however, there are cases where a physician is the administrator of a hospital, or an architect is the manager of a company. Note that in the previous examples, the occupation of the doctor is administrator and that of the architect is company manager.

[p. 52]

People who work in public organizations generally state public employee as their occupation. Ask them to describe their specific occupation. Remember that within an institution there is a variety of occupations, such as for example: executive secretaries, superintendents, physicians, financial analysts, departmental directors, statistical researchers, etc.

Question 21.- How many hours did you work last week, or the final week if you were unemployed, in the occupation indicated?

[There is a picture of question 21 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Record the number of hours worked during the week of November 19th to the 24th, or during the last week worked if the person was unemployed, in the occupation indicated in the previous question. If the information is provided in hours per day, ask how many days per week they work and make the corresponding calculation; always record the number of hours per week.

For those people who were on vacation, sick or with permission, you should record the number of hours worked during the last week that they worked.

If the person is unemployed, find out the number of hours per week they worked in their last occupation.

Question 22.- What does the place, establishment, or business where you carried out the previously indicated occupation do or what does it produce?

[There is a picture of question 22 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Record what the industry, business, estate, plot of land, institute, public office, etc. where the person carried out the occupation indicated in question 20 produces or what it does.

If the establishment performs more than one activity, record the activity that the informant carries out.

If a person has as an occupation making cheese and the place where they work is a livestock ranch within which a cheese factory operates, what you should record as the industry is cheese factory.

For those people who perform services as washerwomen or domestic employees in private homes, record private home.

[p. 53]

For people who work in public organizations, they should specify the activity that they carry out and not the name of the institution. Remember that an institution can include various industries. Record the activity in which the person carried out the occupation indicated.

For the person whose occupation is carried out in the street while walking, record peddling of (newspapers, fruits, vegetables, candy, etc….).

Avoid general and imprecise data that don't clearly indicate the industry of the establishment where the informant works.

Examples:

Incomplete: Factory
Complete: Cheese factory, clothing factory, textile factory

Incomplete: Workshop
Complete: Auto repair shop, tailor shop, dental technician's practice

Incomplete: Construction
Complete: Construction of railway lines, housing construction

Incomplete: Transportation
Complete: Trolleybus transportation, river transport of passengers

Incomplete: Education
Complete: Preschool teaching, general post-secondary teaching, secondary education

Incomplete: Domestic activities
Complete: Nanny, butler

[p. 54]

Question 23.- What was your position or status in the occupation that you indicated?

[There is a picture of question 23 from this section of the enumeration form.]

The purpose of this question is to determine the work relationship that each person has in the job, activity, or business that they indicated in question 22.

Owner.- This the person who directs their own company or business or who practices a profession or trade and has one or more paid employees. Example: factory owner, owner of a sewing shop, etc.

Active partner.- Is a person who contributes by their work or by their work and capital in a given company. Example: partner in a company who contributes capital.

Own-account.- Is a person who runs their own company or business, profession or trade, but doesn't have employees. Example: peddler, seamstress, attorney who practices his profession without a female secretary, etc.

Employee or wage-earner.- Is any person who received compensation in the form of a wage, salary, daily wage, piecework pay, for work performed.
If the person being enumerated works for the municipality or the provincial Council, mark box 3.

[There is a drawing of a street cleaner with box 3 checked.]

If the person being enumerated works in a public office, mark box 4, of the State.

If they work in a company, business, industry or other private [entity], mark box 5, of the Private Sector.
Unpaid family worker.- Is a person who performs an unpaid occupation in a family member's company, plot of land, or business. Example: the wife who works in her husband's supply store, etc., without receiving any compensation.

For people under 12, consider the interview finished.

[p. 55]

D. Fertility and mortality characteristics

Only for women 12 years or age and older

The group of questions from number 24 to number 27 should be asked of women 12 years of age and older.

These questions allow us to know the components of demographic change. When asking these questions, take special care when you interview women under 18 and single women. Explain briefly that this information is important for measuring the levels of fertility and mortality, and for that reason it is necessary to obtain it from all women 12 years of age and older.

Question 24.- How many sons and daughters born alive have you had in your whole life?

[There is a picture of question 24 from this section of the enumeration form.]

With this question we want to obtain information about all of the sons and daughters born alive, had by each woman, in her whole life. Include the sons and daughters that live with the mother, those that don't live with her, and those who have died.

Keep in mind that a son or daughter born alive is a being that, upon being born, breathed, cried, or moved, even though it may have died shortly after being born (even minutes after being born).

It is essential to emphasize that this question refers to all sons and daughters born alive, since some women (who have had various sons or daughters) tend to omit those sons or daughters who died a few hours or days after being born.

Once the person being interviewed or the head of household informs you of the total number of sons and daughters born alive, record the response in the boxes provided.

This question should always include information for women 12 years of age and older.

When they tell you that they haven't had any sons or daughters born alive, mark the box none and continue with question 28 about marital or conjugal status.

[There is a drawing of a woman pregnant with her first child, and the box for none checked.]

[p. 56]

Question 25.- How many of the sons and daughters born alive are currently alive?

[There is a picture of question 25 from this section of the enumeration form.]

From the total number of sons and daughters born alive recorded in the previous question, find out how many of those sons and daughters are currently alive.

Mark box 00 when the answer is none. Otherwise, record the number of sons and daughters who are currently alive in the appropriate boxes. You should take into account also those sons and daughters who are not living with the mother.

Keep in mind that the number of sons and daughters who are currently alive can never be greater than the number of sons and daughters recorded in question 24.

[There is a drawing of a mother holding a child and the number 01 recorded.]

Question 26.- On what date did you have your last son or daughter born alive?

[There is a picture of question 26 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Ask the question and, upon getting a response, record in the appropriate boxes the month and the year of birth of the last son or daughter born alive, even though the child may have died a short time after having been born or may be living in another place.

It's possible that the woman being interviewed will not remember the date of birth of her last son or daughter born alive; in these cases, try to help her to remember.

[There is a drawing of a mother with a child born in July of 2001. The corresponding information is filled in on the enumeration form.]

Question 27.- Is your last son or daughter born alive living?

[There is a picture of question 27 from this section of the enumeration form.]

[p. 57]

This question refers to the last son or daughter born alive. It is common for mothers to consider the last one to be the son or daughter who is living with the mother; indicate that this information refers to the son or daughter born alive, even though they may have died a short time after having been born or may be living in another place.

If the response is yes, mark box 1. Otherwise, mark box (2), no.

[There is a drawing of a crying baby, with box 1 checked.]

For all people 12 years of age and older

E. Marital or conjugal status

Question 28.- Are you currently in a consensual union, single, married, divorced, widowed or separated?

[There is a picture of question 28 from this section of the enumeration form.]

Always ask this question. In no case should you assume the marital or conjugal status of a person being enumerated. Remember that the current marital or conjugal status is being investigated. Example: If a person was married and currently is in a consensual union, mark box 1, In a consensual union, with an x.

[There is a drawing of a man wearing a ring and the box for "married" is checked.]

[Pages. 58-59 were not translated into English.]

[p. 60]

Instructions for the enumeration of collective dwellings

Collective dwellings, because of their size, are enumerated by means of a special procedure. If there are collective dwellings in your enumeration area that have not been detected beforehand, you should proceed to enumerate them, considering the following information:

a. Remember that a collective dwelling is one that is inhabited by a group of people who share it for reasons of health, discipline, religion, etc., such as: hotels, boarding houses, barracks, hospitals, convents, retirement homes, military camps, etc.

b. For the purposes of the Housing Census, the following are not investigated for collective dwellings:

Infrastructure of the buildings, chapter II.
Basic services of the dwelling, chapter II.
Household data, chapter III.
Data from emigrants to foreign countries, chapter IV.

c. For the VI Population Census, the kinship relationship of the people who live in a collective dwelling with the head of household (chapter VI, question 1) will always correspond to box 9, member of a collective household.

d. In order to collect the information for chapter VI. Population data, you should keep in mind which people you should enumerate:

Enumerate:

All people who spent the night of November 24th to the 25th in the collective dwelling.

Those who work and live in the collective dwelling and don't have a private dwelling there.
Don't enumerate:
People who work in the collective dwelling (administrators, managers, owners, employees, etc.) who are part of the census household of private dwellings in the same place that the collective dwelling is located.

All people who, due to a special reason (generally work), are in the collective dwelling on the night of November 24th to the 25th, such as: telephone operators, security guards, building superintendents, soldiers, doctors, female nurses, etc.
[p. 61]

Procedure for filling out the census form for collective dwellings

The data that should be collected on the census form are:

a. All of the data from chapter I on geographic location

b. In chapter II. Dwelling data, you should only identify and mark question 1, type of dwelling (codes 11 to 16), based on the type of collective dwelling, and jump directly to question 1 of chapter V (identification of the people in the household).

c. Begin with the second questionnaire or page 5 of the census form, since there is no male or female head of household in a collective dwelling; cross off page 3 of the first questionnaire with two lines forming an x.

For the rest of the questions, proceed according to the instructions given for private dwellings.

Once the enumeration of all the people that make up the collective dwelling is completed, continue with the enumeration in your area.

Include in your folder all of the forms used; don't forget to record the appropriate information on form PV-07 (enumeration area summary for blocked areas).

[The following appears on the enumeration instructions for the dispersed areas.]

Include in your folder all of the forms used; don't forget to record the appropriate information on form PV-11 (enumeration area summary for dispersed areas).

[Pages 62-82 were not translated into English.]