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Enumerator's Manual
V Population Census and IV Housing Census
November 25, 1990

Republic of Ecuador
National Institute of Statistics and Census
Enumerator Manual; Populated [Blocked] areas

Letter to the users of this manual

Ecuadorian student:

This manual is one of the instruments that will permit you to achieve success in one of the most valuable experience and most agreeable memories for a student: being an enumerator of a census; This is said by someone who did the same task as a 6th year student in 1962; they were different times, another organization, another training process, but the end-- now that I understand it-- was the same: to have at this date the socio-demographic information and fundamental economic information of the country as the most separated level possible to be able to project our planning into the next decade.

You have the opportunity to participate in the last census of the century, of the millennium, and as such, be able to tell future generations that at such a young age you had contributed directly in the building of the Ecuador that you saw arrive in 2000.

April, 1990

Cordially,

Guadencio Zurita Herrera
General Director of INEC

The Census is the job of all Ecuadorians.

I. General aspects

1. Importance of the Census

2. Basic definitions

Census: This is the inventory of the resources and characteristics of a territory defined in a given moment. The resources can be human, economic, agricultural, etc.

Census moment: This is the beginning of the census day, twelve o'clock midnight (00h00), on November 25, 1990.

Day of the census: This is the calendar day (Sunday, November 25, 1990), indicated for carrying out the enumeration of dwellings, households, and population that exists in the national territory.

Population census: This is the process that consists in compiling, elaborating, analyzing, and publishing the demographic, economic, and social data related to all of the inhabitants of a country, in a given moment.

Census class: There are two types of population census: the de facto with the characteristic that the persons are enumerated in place where they are found at the census moment and the de jure which consists of enumerating each person in the geographic place where they usually live. The 1990 census is a de facto census.

Household: From the point of view of the census, the household consists of the person or the group of people that eat out of the same pot and sleep in the same dwelling.

Census dwelling: This is the process that consists of compiling, elaborating, analyzing, and publishing the data that relates to the characteristics of all of the dwellings in a country, determined on a specific date.

Dwelling: This is the space of housing quarters with an independent entry, constructed, built, transformed or conditioned to be inhabited by one or more persons, as long as it is not being completely used for a different purpose. Dwellings are also the mobile or improvised housings and spaces not designated as living quarters that are inhabited in the moment that the census is taken, such as: boats, caves, tents, wagons, etc. (A dwelling has independent entry when you do not pass through the inside of rooms of other dwellings to get to the dwelling; direct access can be from the street, or passing through common use patios, corridors, stairways, etc.).

Urban areas: Urban areas are identified as the provincial capitals, county seats, parish seats, and rural centers with urban characteristics.

Census area: This is the area or workload that should be completed by each enumerator on the census day.

Census sector in the populated areas: The set of an average of ten census areas (a.e.). The sector is supervised by a professor called section leader.

Census zone: The set made up of about ten census sectors. Supervised by the rector of the school, called zone leader.

District: Area of supervision, made up of six census zones.

II. Obligations and responsibilities of the enumerator of urban areas.

The census enumerator is the person who will have the responsibility of collecting the data in dwellings in the assigned census area, using the census form that should be complete with a visit to each dwelling. Each enumerator will be under the responsibility of section leader who will respond for the work assignment.

The functions that the enumerator should complete in the census are:

a. Enumerate each and every on of the dwelling in the census area.
b. Enumerate all of the persons in the dwellings of his/her census area.
c. Obtain complete and correct data.

To achieve these objects, the enumerator on the urban areas will try to understand the content of this manual very well.

Mr. Enumerator, your work will involve the following stages:

1. Before the census:

a. Attend the training course, study the present manual and follow the instructions that you received.
b. Walk through your route in advance to become familiar with your enumerator area.

2. On the census day;

a. Present yourself at the center of operations of your zone promptly at 7 am, wearing your uniform and with your school identification card and this manual.
b. Receive and check the folder that contains the census materials (see page 5 and 6). This material will be distributed by your section leader.
c. Put on your enumerator identifier before the first interview.
d. Start the interview from the beginning, shown in form CA-04 (Map of census area).
e. Politely request the required data from the head of household or the representative of the head of household.
f. Follow through with the instructions that your given and report any problems with your assignment to you r section leader
g. Carry out the visits in order, in such a manner that you cover all of the dwellings that are in your assigned enumeration area.

2.1 After the interview:

a. When you finish each interview and before you leave the household, check the information on the census form carefully. Remember that this is your opportunity to complete any omission and correct any error.
b. Complete the household population summary, found on the lower right section of the first page of the census form.
c. Write your name and last name; census date and name of the institution, private school or public school that you attend.
d. After you have checked the form and verified the information, copy the respective data on the form PV-07 (summary of the census area of the urban centers).
e. Transcribe the order number of the dwelling on the number 10 of geographical location on the form to the Census label and place it on the entry door of the dwelling, in a safe and visible place, out of reach of children.

3. After the census:

a. Carefully check the materials used, make sure that you have covered all of the dwellings that are in your census area. If you did not enumerate any dwelling because there were only children in the dwelling, or because the persons were not home, remember that you must return to enumerate that dwelling; also, revise form PV-07, Summary of the Census Area of the urban centers, and make sure that all of the information about dwellings and households has been transcribed.
b. Personally turn in to your section leader, on the same day when you complete the census, the revised and signed census forms, the PV-07 form, the map of the census area, the CA-04 form (appendix), the left over forms and the folder.

III. Prohibitions for the enumerator

The enumerator should not:

a. Quit the census job.
b. Carry out any other activity during the census.
c. Argue or create any problematic discussions with the informers.
d. Ask any questions that are not related to the census.
e. Share or alter any of the data that is provided to you, which is punishable by law if you commit this fault.
f. Do your work with the assistance of another enumerator.
g. Keep the census material after the census.
h. Leave the completed census forms in a place where unauthorized persons can access them.

IV. Obligatory nature and confidentiality of the data

To alleviate the fear that some informants feel, believing that the information will be sued for purposes of taxation, conscription, police, etc., it is necessary to mention that the Law of Statistics guarantees confidentiality of the information and establish the obligation to provide the information, according to the Executive Decree number 3598, extended on December 30, 1987, in which article 6 textually states that: "the inhabitants of the country will provide the data and information that are required on the census forms, the information will be strictly confidential, and in no case, will individual information of any type be made public." The information is published in global terms, only for statistical purposes.

In addition, to protect the confidentiality of the information, the interview should be carried out privately, without the presence of persons outside of the census household that is being interviewed.

V. Documents and materials that are used by the enumerator

The basic documents and materials that will be used by the enumerator of the urban areas on the census day are:

1. Enumerator manual.
2. A map that clearly identifies the Census area that the enumerator will work, called CA-04 Form. (Figure 1)
3. Census forms, enough of them to cover the census area. (Figure 2)
4. A summary sheet of the Census Area of the urban areas, also called PV-07 form. (Figure 3)
5. An identifying tag that you should wear so that you can be identified on the census day as an "enumerator." (Figure 4)
6. Dwelling stickers enumerated. This sticker will be placed on the entry door of the dwelling in a visible spot to indicate that the dwelling has been enumerated. (Figure 5)
7. A pencil
8. A census folder; this folder will be used to store and protect the census material.

VI. Census organization

The census area can be made up of various set-ups, such as: part of a block, a block or several continuous blocks.

Type 1. The census area is part of a block.

This situation occurs when a block, due to the number of dwellings, should form two or more census areas. The following cases can occur:

Case 1: That the census area is part of a building
If your census area is formed of part of a building (figures 6 and 7), of one or various floors, you should cover the census from a starting point, which is marked on your map as an asterisk "*"; the map will also show the floor number, the number of the apartment or room, and the name of the head of household (where necessary). Start in order, from left to right, floor by floor. Do not forget to investigate all of the entry doors, since it is possible that there are one-room dwellings.

Case 2. That the census area is a complete building.

In the apartment buildings (figure 9), carry out the census route starting on the lowest floor which, for the convenience of the census, will be numbered as the first, even if this is the sub-floor, lower level, etc.

For the household census, move clockwise. Once you have finished the enumeration of the first floor, continue with the second, moving left to right as shown on the map (figure 8) and in the same manner with all of the floors in your census areas.

In the buildings that have one or more floors distributed in one or more patios, and with only one entry (figure 11), start the interviews from left to right on the first patio, go around the patios until you have come back to the starting point shown in the map (figure 10), form CA-04 (annex).

In the buildings made up of 2 or more patios with independent entryways (figure 13), enumerate the dwellings of each patio separately, following the route recommendations given in the map (figure 12) form CA-04 (annex).

Case 3. That the census area is made up of several buildings.

If your census area is made up of more than one building (Figure 15). In the map the starting point and ending point are marked; be careful to enumerate the dwellings in your area, follow the recommendations that are shown in the map (Figure 14). Do not forget to find out if there are more dwellings that are not easy to see. You should always finish one building before continuing with the next, until you have finished your census area.

Type 2. The census area is one block.

In this case, all of the dwellings on the block will be part of the census area; start the enumeration from the starting point, continue in the direction indicated by the arrows as shown in figure 16, 17, and 18. Verify the existence of the dwellings in the center of the block; always continue to the right until you come back to the starting point.

Type 3. The census area is a group of several blocks.

If your census area is a group of several blocks (Figures 19 and 20), this means that all of the dwellings found in this group make up a census area. In this case, the enumeration is carried out block by block, starting at the indicated starting point on the map (CA-04 form, annex) for each block, going from one dwelling to the next moving only toward the right, never from one side of the street to the other, finishing one block before starting another.

When you fill in geographic location on the form, write the correct block number that corresponds to the block, which you should get from the map that shows the dwelling that you are investigating. Register the dwelling separately, according to the blocks they belong to.

VII. Getting to know the census area

[This part was not translated into English. It includes instructions for walking through the route before the census day]

VIII. Behavior of the enumerator while taking the census

[This part was not translated into English. It includes instructions for carrying on the census conversation: introduce yourself, who to talk to, be polite, what to do if someone refuses to answer the census questions, etc.]

IX. Description of the content of the census form and instructions for completing the form.

1. Description of the form

The census form is the instrument for collecting the required information; it deals with different topics, each of which is contained in a chapter as described below:

Chapter I. Geographic location- In this chapter you verify aspects related to the geographic location of the dwelling.

Chapter II. Dwelling- This chapter requests information about the general characteristics of the dwelling.

Chapter III. Household identification- This chapter tries to identify the number of households in the dwelling.

Chapter IV. Information about the household- This chapter includes questions to determine the services available to the household.

Chapter V. Population- In this chapter you receive information about the characteristics of the population.

2. How to write the data in the census form.

Always use a pencil, if you need to make corrections, erase, do not cross off, and write in the correct information. There are 3 ways to take down the data:

1. Making an X in the correct box.

2. Writing the number.

3. Printing the answer in the corresponding spaces.

In general, all of the questions about dwelling, household, and population have categories of answers that are exclusive, so you should mark only one answer; however, there are cases where some of the questions have 2 or 3 parts and each part should have an answer.

In the question number 13 of population, the possible categories of answers are grouped with brackets ({ }), always observe the note that indicates with which question you should continue.

The questions: 6 of household data; 14 and 19 on population, in the respective categories of answers there are arrows marked on the page ? or ? that indicate the question that follows.

3. How to fill in the census form for the V Population Census and the IV Dwelling Census, 1990.

The census form, as was previously stated, is designed to obtain information in 5 chapters that refer to:

I. Geographic location
II. Dwelling
III. Household identification
IV. Household information
V. Population

The first four chapters are on the first page, and on the interior pages and the back page, the Chapter 5 Population. The form has space for the information about 9 persons.

Below you will find the necessary instructions for correctly filling in each chapter; in addition, there are examples which will help you better understand the instructions.

Chapter I. Geographic location

This chapter contains 11 questions, the information for numbers 1 to 9 should be transcribed from the folder you will be given with census materials onto all of the forms that you use in your census area.

If your census area contains more than one block, you will be given a map for each block. Be careful to copy the number of the block from the map that the dwelling you are investigating belongs to, register the number of the blocks separately from the dwellings that belong to each of the assigned blocks.

The block number that is identified in number 8 corresponds to an ascending number assigned by the INEC for census purposes. Do not confuse this number with the block number assigned by the municipality as part of the household address.

[Note: the following is the translation of the figure shown on the form]

I. Geographic location
1. _ _ Province
2. _ _ Canton
3. ____ City or Parish capital
4. _ _ Rural parish
5. ____ Locality
6._ _ _ Zone
7_ _ _ Section number
8. _ _ Block number
9. _ _ Census area number

In number 10, Order number of the dwelling, write the number that corresponds to each dwelling that you visit, following an ascending and consecutive order (1, 2, 3, ..., etc.) as you visit the households. Write 1 for the first, 2 for the second, and continue the numeration until you complete the visits to all of the dwellings in your census area.

In number 11, Household address, ask the name of the street and the number. If there is no street name, write down where the street leads to and more details that can help find the dwelling again later. If necessary, specify the number of the lot, block, patio, floor, apartment or any element that helps locate the dwelling.

10. _____ Order number of the dwelling
11. Address of the dwelling:
_____ Street and number
_____ Lot number ___ Block ____Patio number
_____ Floor number ____Apartment number
_____ Other identification
_____ Road or highway

If there are more than nine persons in the household, do not forget to transcribe the entire chapter on geographic location on all of the forms that you use for this household.

In all cases, each form should have information about the geographic location.

Chapter II. Dwelling

In this chapter, you collect the information that refers to the characteristics of the dwellings in the country.

For the purposes of the census, we establish two types of dwelling: individual and collective.

Individual dwelling: A separate and independent housing unit which houses one or various households (the households are formed by one or more persons, related or not, who eat out of the same pot and sleep in the same dwelling). An individual dwelling is also a dwelling that is not designated for housing persons, but is occupied as a dwelling at the time of the census.

In this sense, an individual dwelling can be: a room, an apartment, a house, a raft, a boat, etc. Take into account that various dwellings can exist in one building.

A building or any other place used for commercial, industrial, or services is not a dwelling unless there is a part of it being used to house one or more persons. In this case, the part of the building being occupied is considered an individual dwelling.

Collective dwelling: This is a dwelling that is inhabited by a group of persons who share the dwelling for reasons of health, discipline, religion, etc, such as hotel, residences, barracks, hospitals, convents, homes for the elderly, etc.

Question 1: Type of dwelling:

In the individual dwellings, there are 8 types; identify the type and mark the corresponding box.

1. House or villa -- This is all permanent construction made of resistant materials such as: reinforced concrete, stone, brick, adobe, cane or wood. Generally the dwelling has water service and sanitary services for the exclusive use of the dwelling.

2. Apartment -- A set of rooms that are part of a building with one or more floors. It is characterized as independent; it has water service and exclusive sanitary service.

3. Room in a boarding house -- This is comprised of one or various rooms that are part of a house, with a shared entry and a direct entry from a hallway, patio, corridor, or street, and that generally does not have exclusive water or sanitary service, these services being shared by all of the households.

4. Single-roof dwelling (mediagua) -- This is a construction with only of floor, walls made of brick, adobe, cinder block or wood, with a roof made of tile, asbestos sheeting, or zinc. It has only one flat roof surface set at an angle and no more than two rooms. If it has more than two rooms, it should be registered as a house of villa.

5. Ranch house -- This is rustic construction covered with palm, straw, or another similar material, with cane walls and wood, cane or dirt floor.

6. Shack -- This is a construction that uses waste materials such as: branches, cardboard boxes, asbestos sheeting scraps, cans, plastics, etc. with wood or dirt floor.

7. Hut -- This is a construction with adobe or straw walls, dirt floors, and straw roof.

8. Other -- These are improvised dwelling that were not built for dwellings such as: boats, rafts, wagons, tents, dressing rooms, etc. that are inhabited at the time of the census.

II. Dwelling
1. Type of dwelling
Individual
[ ] 01 House or villa
[ ] 02 Apartment
[ ] 03 Room in a boarding house
[ ] 04 Single-roof dwelling
[ ] 05 Ranch house
[ ] 06 Shack
[ ] 07 Hut
[ ] 08 Other
Collective
[ ] 11 Hotel, pension, or residence
[ ] 12 Military or police barracks
[ ] 13 Jail
[ ] 14 Hospital, clinic, etc.
[ ] 15 Convent or religious institution
[ ] 16 Other
If the dwelling is collective, continue with chapter V population.

In the category collective dwelling, there are six types, mark the corresponding box with an X. Because of their size, some collective dwellings are enumerated by special enumerators. But if you have to enumerate a dwelling of this type, only mark type of dwelling, and do not ask the rest of the questions that refer to the dwelling or household, continue with the population questions. Do not enumerate the collective dwellings if they are unoccupied.

Given that it is common to find individual dwellings inside a collective dwelling, it is your obligation to visit these places and make sure that you have not omitted any dwellings. For example, if a residence has four floors, and one of them is occupied by the owner of the residence and his/her family, in this case, you should enumerate this individual dwelling separate from the collective dwelling.

Question 2. Condition of occupancy of the dwelling

Starting with this question the information collected is only for individual dwellings.

A dwelling is considered "occupied with persons present", box 1, when at least one of the inhabitants of the dwelling is present at the time of the enumerator visit. If only persons under the age of 12 are present, return when they tell you an adult will be present.

A dwelling is considered "occupied with persons absent", box 2, when the dwelling is equipped with furniture and household goods and the inhabitants are not present at the moment of taking the census. If the absence is temporary, you should return to complete the census.

For the buildings under construction, visit and verify if any part is inhabited; if this is the case, enumerate the same as an occupied individual dwelling.

A dwelling is considered "unoccupied", box 3, if the dwelling is empty and ready to be inhabited. For example: dwellings being repaired, for rent, or recently built. The unoccupied dwellings, those in the process of destruction or demolition should not be considered.

If you marked box 2 (in definite absence) or 3 (unoccupied), consider the interview finished.

2. Condition of occupancy
[ ] 01 Occupied with persons present
[ ] 02 Occupied with persons absent
[ ] 03 Unoccupied

Question 3. Predominant materials of the dwelling

This question has three parts: A) roof or covering, B) exterior walls, C) floor.

Each category can be answered with one and only one answer. If the construction has walls, roof, or floor made of more than one material, mark the predominant material.

3. Predominant materials of the dwelling

A. Roof or covering
[ ] 01 Reinforced concrete
[ ] 02 Asbestos or similar (example: eternit asbestos sheeting)
[ ] 03 Zinc
[ ] 04 Tile
[ ] 05 Straw or similar
[ ] 06 Other materials

B. Exterior walls
[ ] 01 Reinforced concrete, brick, or cinder block
[ ] 02 Adobe or adobe bricks
[ ] 03 Wood
[ ] 04 Covered cane or mud-packed cane or wood
[ ] 05 Cane, not covered
[ ] 06 Other materials

C. Floors
[ ] 01 Boards
[ ] 02 Parquet, tile or vinyl
[ ] 03 Brick or cement
[ ] 04 Cane
[ ] 05 Dirt
[ ] 06 Other materials

Question 4. Water service in the dwelling

This question has two parts: A) What is the water service system?, B) What is the normal means of water service?, and like the above question, only one answer can be accepted.

A. What is the water system?

Mark box 1, for piped water inside the dwelling, is the pipes are in the interior of the dwelling and the dwelling has direct access to the water.

Mark box 2, piped water outside the dwelling, but inside the building, plot or land, when to get water, the persons must leave the dwelling to the building or lot where there are water faucets of spigots.

Mark box 3, for piped water outside the plot or land, when to get water, it is necessary to go someplace to get water from a source other than the plot or land where the dwelling is located.

Mark box 4, no piped water, when the dwelling gets water that is not piped. For example: manual water supply or directly from a river, irrigation ditch, well, or delivery truck, etc.

B. What is the normal water supply system?

1. Public water system -- when there is system for collecting, treating, and distributing water to the dwelling.

2. Well -- when the dwelling extracts subterranean water with a pump or bucket, etc.

3. River, water fall, irrigation ditch, or channel -- when the water supply in manual or direct from a river, water fall, irrigation ditch, or channel.

4. Delivery truck -- when the water supply is from a delivery truck (public or private).

5. Other -- when the water supply is a different method from the above mentioned, for example: rain water.

Mark only one box in each section according to the answer from the informant.

4. Water supply
A. What is the water system?
[ ] 1 Piped water inside the dwelling
[ ] 2 Piped water outside the dwelling, but inside the building, plot or land
[ ] 3 Piped water outside the plot or land
[ ] 4 No piped water
B. What is the normal water supply system?
[ ] 1 Public water system
[ ] 2 Well
[ ] 3 River, water fall, irrigation ditch, or channel
[ ] 4 Delivery truck
[ ] 5 Other

Question 5: What is the system for removing waste water from the dwelling?

1. Connected to a public drain system -- if the removal of the waste waters is through a subterranean public sewer system.

2. Septic tank -- If the waste water is eliminated in a pit.

3. Other form -- If the dwelling has infrastructure for removing waste water that is not connected to the public network or a septic tank, for example: private sewer that empties into a river or irrigation ditch.

4. None -- If the dwelling does not have any of the above mentioned systems for eliminating waste water, for example: dumping the water in empty land or in the street.

5. What is the system for removing waste water from the dwelling?
[ ] 1 Connected to a public drain system
[ ] 2 Septic tank
[ ] 3 Other form (specify) _____
[ ] 4 None

Question 6. Does the dwelling have electrical service?

Mark yes, box 1, when the dwelling has electric energy provided by a public network, cooperative, private companies, a private system for the exclusive use of the dwelling, etc.

Mark no, box 2, when the dwelling does not have electrical energy.

6. Does the dwelling have electrical service?
[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No

Question 7. Does the dwelling have telephone service?

This question, like the previous one, is self-explanatory.

7. Does the dwelling have telephone service?
[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No

Question 8. What is the system for trash removal for the dwelling?

Mark box 1, if the trash from the dwelling is picked up by a collection truck.

Mark box 2, if the trash is thrown in a lot or ditch.

Mark box 3, if the trash is burnt or buried.

Mark box 4, if the trash removal is a form that is different from those listed above, for example: if the trash is thrown in a river, etc.

If the dwelling uses more than one trash removal system, note the one that is most frequently used.

Question 8. What is the system for trash removal for the dwelling?
[ ] 1 Collection truck
[ ] 2 A lot or ditch
[ ] 3 Burnt or buried
[ ] 4 Other method (specify) _____

Question 9. How many rooms are there in the dwelling? Do not include kitchen or bathroom.

A room is the space or bedroom separated by fixed walls of any material and that is used as a bedroom, living room, dining room, study, recreation, etc.

Ask the question in the textual form and immediately indicate that this excludes the kitchen, bathroom(s), corridors, hallways, and the rooms that are totally destined for uses other than habitation. For example: garages, offices, storage areas, workshops, stores, etc. Write the total numbers of rooms in the dwelling that you are enumerating in Arabic numbers in the corresponding space.

In the case that you find one room in which the inhabitants sleep, cook, and eat, register the dwelling as one room only.

9. How many rooms are there in the dwelling? (Do not include kitchen or bathroom)
_____ Number

Question 10. Household is understood to be one person or a group of persons that eat from the same pot and sleep in the same dwelling. How many households are there in this dwelling?

In this question, determining the number of households that live in the dwelling that you are investigating depends on the concept of household and its correct understanding.

From the point of view of the census, the household can be made up of one person or various persons that are not necessarily related. Remember that in a dwelling, there can be more than one household.

Having identified the dwelling unit and its corresponding type (question 1), whether it is a boarding room, apartment, etc, and having taken the information for the rest of the questions about the dwelling characteristics of the dwelling, continue by identifying form of cohabitation of the persons in the dwelling.

In the margin any type of dwelling (question 1), you may find the following cases:

Case 1. This is a dwelling unit inhabited by the father, mother, and children and in one bedroom of the dwelling; another son lives with his wife. They cook independently from the rest of the family; in this case, there are two households in the same dwelling unit; the first is made up of the father, the mother, and the children; the second is formed by the married son and his wife.

[Illustration: shows two tables, two sleeping quarters]

Case 2. Taking the example above, but with the case that the married son and his wife share the food with the rest of the members of the household, this would be only one household.

[Illustration: shows one tables, two sleeping quarters]

Case 3. If the dwelling is inhabited by 3 students, where each one eats separately, this is considered three households with one person in each, sharing one dwelling.

[Illustration: One dwelling, three households]

At the end of the Dwelling chapter, there are notes that detail how you should continue, based on the number of households that you identified. Always read these notes and follow the indicated procedure.

If it is one household, use a form in which you register all of the information that refers to the 5 chapters that you must investigate.

If there is more than one household, you should proceed in the following manner:

a. For the first household, take the information for all of the chapters.

b. For the rest of the households:

  • Use a different form for each household.
  • In all of the forms (according to the number of households), transcribe the whole "geographic location" chapter.
  • Do not take the information for Chapter II, "dwelling" because the characteristics listed here are the same for all of the households, so you should cross off the section with a diagonal line.
  • Take the information for Chapters III, IV, and V for each household. The correct location of the forms used in each household and dwelling unit depends on this information.

Before continuing, read the 'important' note.

Important

Use one form per household.
1. When there is only one household in the dwelling, complete all of the chapters on this form.
2. If there is more than one household, proceed in the following manner:

a) For the first of the households complete all of the chapters on the form.
b) For the remaining households repeat chapter I (geographic location), do not repeat chapter II (dwelling) and complete the rest of the form.

Chapter III. Household Identification

With this chapter the ascending order of the number of households is established; identify the head of household and the presence or absence of the persons that form the household.

Order number of the household in the dwelling:

There are four boxes: numbered 1 through 4, if there is one household in the dwelling, always mark 1. When there are 2 households or more, in the respective forms mark 1 for the first household, two for the second, 3 for the third, and 4 in the case of four households or more.

Name of the head of household.

Ask for and write down the name and last name of the head of household in the corresponding space.

Is any member of household present?

In the households where the persons are present, mark the yes box (1). In the case that the information is provided by third persons and the members of the household are absent, mark box 2.

If there is nobody present from the second household or more, in the corresponding forms, transcribe the: geographic location" chapter and ask for information for chapter III, "identification of the household". (Once this information has been collected, conclude the interview). This is only manner to establish the existence of two households or more in the processing stage of the information.

It is possible that all of the information for the second or more households can be provided by the head of the first household. In these cases, write the name of the person who gave the information in the observations section and in chapter III, is any member of the household present, mark box 2, no.

III. Household identification

Order number of the household in the dwelling:

[ ] 1; [ ] 2; [ ] 3; [ ] 4 and more

_____ Name and last name of the head of household:
Is any member of the household present?

[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No

Chapter IV. Information about the household

The information in this chapter is about the availability of services in the household.

If the dwelling is shared by 2 or more households, take special care that the information you take refers only to the household you are investigating.

Question 1. In this household, how many rooms are used only for sleeping?

Write the in Arabic numbers, in the corresponding space, the quantity of bedrooms available to the household that you are enumerating. Write 00 in those households that have only one room that is used for cooking, eating, sleeping, and the business spaces in which people sleep.

IV. Household information
1. In this household, how many rooms are used only for sleeping?
_____ Number

Question 2. Does this household an exclusive room for cooking?

Mark the box "yes" when the household has a room that is used only for cooking, even if it used as an everyday dining room also.

Mark the box "no" when the kitchen is used for other purposes, and when the dwelling has only one room.

If the kitchen is shared by 2 households or more, be sure to mark the box 2 "no", even if the room is only used for cooking.

2. Occupancy condition of the dwelling
[ ] 1 Occupied with persons present
[ ] 2 Occupied with persons absent
[ ] 3 Unoccupied

Question 3. What is the principal fuel or energy that is used in this household for cooking?

Ask the question and immediately read all of the categories of the answer. If the informant indicates that the household uses two fuels or more, ask which fuel they use most frequently and write this as the answer.

3. What is the principal fuel or energy that is used in this household for cooking?
[ ] 1 Natural gas
[ ] 2 Firewood or charcoal
[ ] 3 Kérex (kerosene)
[ ] 4 Gasoline
[ ] 5 Electricity
[ ] 6 Other
[ ] 7 None (they do not cook)

Question 4. What sanitary service is available to the household?

Mark box 1, toilet for the exclusive use of the household, if it used only by the members of the household that you are interviewing.

Mark box 2, toilet for the shared use of various households, when the service is used by members of more two or more households.

Mark box 3, latrine, if the place for depositing excrement is a hole, generally covered with a small structure.

Mark box 4, none, if the household does not have any of the above mentioned services.

Question 4. What sanitary service is available to the household?
[ ] 1 Toilet for the exclusive use of the household
[ ] 2 Toilet for the shared use of various households
[ ] 3 Latrine
[ ] 4 None

Question 5. What bathing service is available to the household?

Mark box 1, if the household that you are investigating has a shower for exclusive use of the household.

Mark box 2, shared use with various households, when the shower is used by members of two or more households in a dwelling unit, and also when it is used by the households of various dwelling units.

Mark box 3, none, when the household does not have a shower.

Question 5. What bathing service is available to the household?
[ ] 1 Shower for exclusive use of the household
[ ] 2 Shared use with various households
[ ] 3 None

Question 6. In this household, is part of the dwelling used for any economic activity?

When the dwelling that this household uses is shared for any economic activity, mark the box Yes and then in the corresponding space, write the principal activity that is carried out. For example: hand knitting, clothing production, shoe repair, manufacture of porcelain figurines, sale of medications, bazaar, preparation and sale of food, etc.

When the dwelling is used exclusively for habitation, mark "no".

Question 6. In this household, is part of the dwelling used for any economic activity?
[ ] 1 Yes
_____ Principal activity (specify)

[ ] 2 No

Question 7. What is the condition of ownership of the dwelling for this household?

Read the categories in order and mark the box that corresponds to the answer that the informant gives.

Owned. If the dwelling belongs to the members of the household, whether it is completely paid for or they are making payments.

Rented, when they pay rent to inhabit the dwelling.

Free, when the dwelling is inhabited at no cost to the residents.

For services, when the dwelling is inhabited as part of payment for services rendered, for example: the dwelling assigned to the caretaker, concierge, etc.

Other, if the dwelling is inhabited in circumstances other than the above mentioned. For example: use of property in payment of a debt (antichresis), or rent for payment of debt, etc.

Question 7. What is the condition for occupancy of the dwelling for this household?
[ ] 1 Owned
[ ] 2 Rented
[ ] 3 Free
[ ] 4 For services
[ ] 5 Other (For example: use of property in payment of a debt)

Question 8. What language do the members of the household speak to each other?

This question can have only one answer. In the case that more than one language is spoken in the household, write the one that the members of the household use to speak to each other. If the answer is a native language, box 1, or foreign language, box 3, do not forget to ask what language they speak.

What language do the members of the household speak to each other?
[ ] 1 Native language (specify) _____
[ ] 2 Spanish
[ ] 3 Foreign language (specify) _____

Population Summary

This summary should be completed after you have taken the information from each and every one of the members that make up the household (Chapter V. Population).

After you have revised the form, write the number of men, the number of women and the total number of persons, which should coincide with the total number of members of this household.

If the household has used more than one form, the Population Summary should be noted on the first form.

Remember to complete this summary after you have concluded the interview.

Summary of the household population.

_____Number of men
_____Number of women
_____Total

Observations

On these observation lines, write any additional information, for example: additional information about the dwelling, household and population that will help clarify the interview information.

_____

Chapter V. Population

In this chapter, you collect the information for the Population Census. The investigation unit is each of the persons that are in the national territory in the census moment.

Remember, it is a factual census; it is important that you distinguish those who should be enumerated and those who should not be enumerated. Consider that the census moment, which is the beginning of the census day, is like taking a photograph of the inhabitants of the country. You should enumerate only the persons that are present at the moment that the photograph is taken.

Who should be enumerated in each household?

[Illustration with a stork on the left side of a clock, and the words 'all of the children who were born before 00h00 on the 25th'; a coffin on the right side of a clock with the words 'all of the persons who died after 00h00 on the 25th.]

Before November 25, all of the children who were born before 00:00 on the 25th. After November 25, all of the persons who died after 00:00 on the 25th.

All of the persons who spent the night before the day of the census, including household servants, relatives or non-relatives, that slept or spent the night in the household.

All of the persons who occasionally, for a special reason are absent the night before the census day, for example: telephone operators, watchmen, doormen, members of the military on duty, etc.

All of the children who were born before midnight on the census day.

All of the persons who died after midnight on the census day.

The following should not be enumerated:

[Illustration: on the left a coffin and the words 'the persons who died before this time'; in the middle a clock; on the right a stork and the words 'children who were born before this time']

The persons that usually live in the household, but were staying in another house or a hotel the night before the census day.

The members of the household that are interred in hospitals or prisons, because they will be enumerated in the place where they slept the night before the census.

Those who were born after midnight on the census day.

Those who died before midnight on the census day.

Instructions for completing the chapter V, population

The questions about population are found on the inside and on the back of the form. You should write the information about all of the members of the household that slept in the household on the night before the census.

Use one form per household and one column per person.

When there are more than 9 persons in the household, in the additional forms transcribe the geographic location and cross out chapter II, dwelling, by drawing a line through it; transcribe chapter III, household Identification, and cross out chapter IV, household information. In chapter V, population, cross out the first column (first person), which is for the head of household, with a vertical line and continue with numbering of the persons as shown in the example.

This chapter is divided into 5 topics.

A. General characteristics: for all persons.

B. Educational characteristics: for all persons who are 6 years old or more.

C. Economic characteristics: for all persons who are 8 years old or more.

D. Fertility and mortality characteristics: only for women who are 15 years old or more.

E. Civil or marital status: for all persons 12 years old or more.

Each of these topics is explained below.

A. General characteristics

The following 8 questions are for all persons.

Question 1. What is the name and the last name of each of the persons that spent the night from the 24th to the 25th of November in this household?

In the same manner as the questions above, read the question word-for-word and in the first line above each column, in the horizontal space, write the name and last name (in this order) of each of the persons who spent the night before the census in the household that you are investigating. Write the names in order, starting with the head of household, then the spouse, unmarried children (from oldest to youngest), married children (from oldest to youngest), sons-in-law and daughters- in-law, grandchildren, parents or parents-in-law, other relatives, other non-relatives, domestic employees, spouse and children of domestic employees. Do not forget to lest the newborns (before midnight) and the elderly.

In the case of newborns that do not have a name yet, write NN and the last name.

Begin with the head of household and continue with the rest of the members of the family (do not forget newborns and the elderly). For married women, ask for their maiden name and write it on the form.

This is the only question in chapter V, population, where you write the information in horizontal form.

From question 2 to 23, write the information vertically, person by person.

Question 1. What is the name and last name of each of the persons who spent the night from the 24th to the 25th of November in this household?
____ Name
____ Last name

Question 2. What is your relationship to the head of household?

Read word-for-word all of the choices and mark with an X the box that corresponds to the answer that you are given. If the person being interviewed is the head of household, mark the box 0, head of household and do not ask this question.

Register other persons: brothers/sisters, cousins, uncles/aunts, grandparents; which would be those persons who have some relationship to the head of household.

Write the other non-relatives, which are those who do not any relationship to the head of household, such as friends, godparents, godchildren, etc.

Mark box 8, domestic employee, when the employee spent the night in the household on the night before the census.

If there are two or more families in the household, who share food and make up a census household, pay attention to the relationship to the head of household.

In the case of collective households, cross this question off with a horizontal line, remember that there is no head of household, and do not investigate the relationships.

What is your relationship to the head of household?
[] 1 Spouse
[] 2 Son or daughter
[] 3 Son-in-law or daughter-in-law
[] 4 Grandson or granddaughter
[] 5 Parents or parents-in-law
[] 6 Other relatives
[] 7 Other non-relatives
[] 8 Domestic servants

Question 3: Are you a man or woman?

Mark with an X the box that corresponds to the sex of the person being interviewed.

Question 4. How old is the person? (In years completed)

Ask the question and wait for the answer, do not write the year that they will complete even if it is only a few days or a few months away; write the number of years that were completed on the day of the census.

It is possible that elderly persons may not remember their exact age, in this case, the enumerator should try to verify the age with the national identification card or birth certificate. If this is not possible, try to help them figure out their age, mentioning historic dates, age at marriage, age at the birth of first child, etc. Where possible, avoid writing vague answers such as "about ... years old".

Another problem that you might encounter is that some people will give approximate ages, for example, those that end in 0 or 5. Insist that the person give precise information.

For persons less than one year old, write 00.

How old are you? Write the age at the last birthday. For those under 1 year old, write 00.
_____ Years completed

Question 5. Where was he/she born?

If the person interviewed was born in the city or rural parish where he/she is being enumerated, make an X in the box "here",

If he/she was born in another place in the country, write the name of the rural parish or city and province. Under no conditions should you write the name of: communities, localities, areas or ranches of the same rural parish or city.

Be sure to write explicit and complete information, since there are areas and rural parishes that have the same name, but that belong to different municipalities or provinces.

For example:

Rural parish: Atahualpa
Municipality: Quito
Province: Pichincha

Rural parish: Atahualpa
Municipality: Ambato
Province: Tungurahua

Rural parish: Atahualpa
Municipality: Santa Elena
Province: Cuayas

If the person was born in another country, write the name of the country.

Where was he/she born?
[ ] 00 Here
In another part of the country
___ Rural parish or county seat
___ Province
In another country
___ Name of the country
[ ] 99 Don't know

Question 6. Where does the person usually live?

Follow the directions given for the previous question (5).

Where does he/she usually live?
[ ] 00 Here
In another part of the country
___ Rural parish or county seat
___ Province
In another country
___ Name of the country
[ ] 99 Don't know

Question 7. In what rural parish or city did he/she usually live five years ago (in November, 1985)?

If the person being interviewed indicates "always lived here", "since birth", "always", etc., mark the box "Here" with an X. If, on the other hand, the person lived in another part of the country, write the name of the rural parish or the city and province that the city is in; if the person lived in another country, write the name of the country.

Write the name of the province to avoid future confusions.

Do not confuse "another place" with another area of the same city or localities that belong tot he same rural parish where they lived. Explain that the question is concerned with other cities or rural parishes.

For children less than 4 years old, write the usual place of residence declared by the mother, and if she is absent, write the residence declared by the head of household.

In what rural parish or city did the person usually live five years ago (in November 1985)?

If the place of residence five years ago is the same as where the person is enumerated, mark the box "here". Otherwise, if the person lived in another part of the country, write the name of the rural parish or the city and province that the city is in; if the person lived in another country, write the name of the country.

[ ] 00 Here
In another part of the country
___ Rural parish or county seat
___ Province
In another country
___ Name of the country
[ ] 99 Don't know

Question 8. Is the person's mother still alive?

When you ask this question, you should mention the name of the person from whom you are collecting information. For example:

If the information is being collected from the head of household: Jose Perez, and you are requesting information about his wife, Maria Leon, when you ask the question you should ask "Is the mother of Maria Leon still alive?" This will avoid confusions in the data collection.

Is the mother of _____ still alive? Mark the corresponding box.
[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No
[ ] 9 Don't know

For persons under six years old, the interview is complete.

B. Educational characteristics.

Questions 9 to 12 are for all persons 6 years old or more.

Question 9. Does he/she know how to read and write?

Mark the corresponding box with an X. If he/she can only read or only write, mark box 2 (no).

Does he/she know how to read and write? If he/she can only read or only write, mark the box "no".
[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No

Question 10. Does he/she currently attend a regular educational center? (Literacy center, elementary, secondary, university, or post-graduate).

No matter what the person's age, always ask the question and mark the corresponding box.

Take into account that courses such as: beauty, artisan, sewing, correspondence courses and similar courses will not be considered.

Does he/she currently attend a regular educational center? (Literacy center, elementary, secondary, university, or post-graduate).
[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No
[ ] 9 Don't know.

Question 11. What is the highest level of education that he/she attends or attended?

Mark the box that corresponds to the highest level to which the person attends or attended.

You should mark 'none' if the person being interviewed has not attended a formal educational center.

What is the highest level that you attend or attended? Mark the corresponding box.
[ ] 0 None
[ ] 1 Literacy center
[ ] 2 Elementary
[ ] 3 Secondary
[ ] 4 University
[ ] 5 Post-graduate
[ ] 9 Don't know

Question 12. What is the last grade or highest year that he/she completed in the indicated level?

Write the name of the grade, course of year that the person has passed in the level that the person indicated in the previous question. Take into account that, generally, the person answers the grade that he/she is currently attending and what the question asks is the last grade passed. For example, if he/she is attending second year of the university, write 1.

If the educational system in the university is a semester system, two semesters correspond to one year. On the other hand, for persons who passed or are studying in a literacy center, one year is the equivalent of two years of elementary school.

For example:

The person finished the third level of a literacy center, you should mark box 6.

For persons who are attending the first year of any level, mark box "0".

What is the highest grade, course or year that you have passed in this level? Mark the corresponding box.
[ ] 0
[ ] 1
[ ] 2
[ ] 3
[ ] 4
[ ] 5
[ ] 6
[ ] 7
[ ] 9 Don't know

For persons less than 8 years old, the interview is complete.

C. Economic characteristics

Questions 13 to 18 are for all persons 8 years old or more.

Question 13. What did he/she do last week?

Read the question and all of the categories of answers. Observe instructions that tell you how to continue, this way you will avoid asking unnecessary questions.

Just like the other questions, there can only be one answer.

Pay attention to the following definitions:

"Did you work?" refers to all persons that carried out one or more activities during the week of the 19th to the 24th of November, whether they were paid or not, in the home or outside the home, for at least one hour.

"Do you have a job but did not work?", when the person has a job but in the week of the 19th to the 24 of November he/she did not work because of vacations, illness, strike, bad weather, etc.

"Looked for work, having worked before (unemployed)", is the person who left his/her job, voluntarily or involuntarily, and was looking for work in the week of the 19th to the 24th of November.

"Looked for work for the first time?", when the person has never held a job and in the week of the 19th to the 24th of November the person was seeking employment.

"Only housework?", when the person being interviewed only did domestic household tasks. If this was a paid job, you should mark "worked", code "0".

"Only studied?", when the person only went to school.

"Only retired?", when the person receives a retirement pension for services provided previously and the week from the 19th to the 24th of November, the person did not carry out any productive activity.

"Only pensioner?', when the person did not carry out any productive activity and receives a pension (charity, orphan) for services previously provided by a relative affiliated with Social Security.

Take into account that for women (and only for them) 15 years old or more, you must investigate chapter D, fertility and mortality characteristics, questions 19-22.

Last week, did you carry out or help carry out any activity that was paid or unpaid? For example, did you plant, harvest, care for animals that would be sold; prepare textiles to sell; wash, iron or sew clothing for someone else? Did you help attend any business; sell food, artisan goods, fruit, newspapers or other goods? Did you take care of or watch children or elderly persons or carry any similar tasks?
[ ] 1 Yes. Continue with question 15.
[ ] 2 No. For women, continue with question 19; for men, continue with question 23.

Question 15. What was your principal occupation or work that you did during last week or the last work you did before becoming unemployed?

This question is for all of the persons who answered 0, 1, or 2 in question 13 or 1 in question 14.

Carefully write the nature of the work that the person did; if they had more than one occupation in the week before the census, ask the person who he/she considers most important and write this answer.

When the occupation cannot be written with a precise term, describe the nature of the work. For example: install steering wheel covers, assemble cardboard boxes, etc. Avoid general or ambiguous terms like driver, operator, assistant, writer, professor. Always insist that the person give precise information.

Examples:
Incomplete: Laborer
Complete: Agricultural laborer, Construction laborer, Quarry laborer

Incomplete: Worker
Complete: Construction worker, Carpentry worker, Carpentry assistant

Incomplete: Operator
Complete: Agricultural operator, Construction machinery operator

Incomplete: Engineer
Complete: Civil engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Chemical Engineer

Pay attention to note the occupation and not the profession. It is possible for the occupation and profession to be different, but there are also cases where they are the same. For example: doctors, lawyers, architects, etc. work in their profession. However, there are cases where a doctor is an administrator of a hospital or an architect is the manager of a company.

Observe that in the last two examples, the occupation of the doctor is administrator and the occupation of the architect is manager of a company.

The persons who work in public entities generally declare their occupation to be public employee. Ask that they detail their specific occupation, remembering that in an institution there are varieties of occupations; for example: executive secretaries, concierges, doctors, financial analysts, department directors, statistical investigators, etc.

What was the principal occupation or work that you carried out during the past week or the last time you worked before you became unemployed? For example, elementary school professor, agricultural laborer, food vendor, laundress, etc.)
_____

Question 16. How many hours did you work at this activity last week?

Write the number of hours worked during the week of the 19th to the 24th of November, in the occupation listed in the previous question. If the information is provided in daily hours, ask how many days he/she works in a week and calculate the hours, writing the hours for the week.

For those persons who were on vacation, ill or off work with permission, write the number of hours worked in the last week when he/she worked.

If the person is unemployed, find out the number of hours worked in the last employment.

How many hours did you work last week in the indicated occupation?
_ _ _ Number of hours

Question 17. What is the main activity or main product of the business or establishment where you worked at the above activity?

Write the main product or the main activity of the industry, business, ranch, plot of land, institution, public office, etc. where he/she worked at the occupation listed in question 15.

If the business has more than one activity, write the main activity where the person worked.

If a person has the occupation "make cheese" and the place where he/she works is a cattle ranch where cheese is produced, the activity of the person that you should register is Cheese Factory.

For persons who provide services as laundresses or household employees, write Private Home.

For persons who work in public entities, you should write the activity that the person does and not the name of the institution; remember that one institution can cover many activities; write the activity where the person worked.

For the person who works on the street moving from place to place, for activity write Sale of ____ traveling.

Avoid general and imprecise data that do not clearly indicate the type of activity of the business where the person works.

Answers:
Incomplete: Factory
Complete: Cheese factory, Clothing factory, Textile factory

Incomplete: Workshop
Complete: Automobile repair shop, Tailor workshop, Dental mechanic workshop

What is the main activity or main product of the business or establishment where you worked at the above activity? For example: elementary education, industrial textile production, traveling sales, cattle, etc.
_____

Question 18. What was the position or job category of the work indicated?

The goal of this question is to understand the labor relationship that each person has in his/her work, activity or business that he/she indicated in question 15.

Owner- this is the person who manages his/her own company or business or practices a profession or occupation and has one or more paid employees. For example: factory owner, owner of a clothing workshop, etc.

Investment partner- This is a person who contributes with work or capital or with work and capital, in a specific business. For example: partner in a company where he/she provides capital.

Self-employed- This is the person who works in his/her own company or business, profession or occupation, but without employees. For example: traveling salesman, seamstress, lawyer who practices his/her profession without a secretary, etc.

Employee or worker- All persons who receive payment for labor in the form of hourly salary, monthly salary, daily pay, or piece work wages.

If the person being enumerated works for the municipality or Provincial government, mark box 3.

If the person being enumerated provides services in a public office, mark box 4.

If the person works in a company, business, industry or other private enterprise, mark box 5.

Unpaid family worker- This is the person who works without pay in a company, land plot, or family business. For example: the spouse who works in the grocery store owned by her spouse, etc.

What was the position or job category of the work indicated?
Read the possible answers in order and when you receive and answer, mark the corresponding box.
[ ] 1 Owner or active partner
[ ] 2 Self-employed
Employee or salaried worker:
[ ] 3 of the municipality or provincial council
[ ] 4 of the State
[ ] 5 of the private sector
[ ] 6 Unpaid family worker
[ ] 9 Don't know

D. Fertility and mortality characteristics

Questions 19 to 22 are only for women 15 years old or more.

These questions show components of demographic change. When you ask these questions, pay special attention when you interview unmarried women, briefly explain that this information is important to measure the fertility and infant mortality rates, which is why it is important to get this information from all women who are 15 years old or more.

Question 19. What is the total number of live children you have given birth to?

With this question, the goal is to obtain information about all of the sons and daughters who were born alive, born to each woman during their lifetime, including those who live with the woman, those who do not live with the mother and those who have died. Take into account that a child born alive is one that took a breath after birth, cried, or moved, even if the child died soon after being born.

It is indispensable that you emphasize that the question refers to all of the children born alive, since some women (who have had several children), tend to omit the children who died a few hours or days after being born.

After you are sure that you have the total number of children born alive, write the number in the corresponding space.

When they tell you that they have not had any children who were born alive, mark the box None and continue with question 23 about civil or married state.

This question should always have an answer for women 15 years old or more.

[ ] 00 None. Continue with question 28
_____ Number
[ ] 99 Don't know

Question 20. How many of these children that were born alive are still living?

Of the total number of children born alive registered in the previous question, find out how many are currently alive?

Mark the box 0 when the answer is "none". Otherwise, in the corresponding space write the number of children who are currently alive. you should also consider those children who are not living with the mother.

How many are currently alive?
[ ] 00 None
_____ Number
[ ] 99 Don't know

Question 21. On what date was the last son or daughter born alive?

Ask this question; write the month and the year of the birth of the last child born alive. Emphasize that the question is about the last child born alive, even if this child died or is living elsewhere.

It is possible that the interviewee does not remember the date of birth, in these cases try to help her remember, asking her age at the birth of the child, or is the child is present, he/she can tell you if he/she is over 5 years old.

On what date did you have your last child who was born alive?
_____ Month
19___ Year

Question 22. Is the last son or daughter that was born alive still living?

This question refers to the last child who was born alive, even if the child is not present. It is common that the mothers consider that the last child is the child that is still alive or still with the mother; explain that the information refers to the last child, even if the child died soon after birth or is not present.

Is the last son or daughter that was born alive still living?
[ ] 1 Yes
[ ] 2 No
[ ] 9 Don't know

E. Civil or married status

Question 23. Currently, are you: in a consensual union, single, married, divorced, widowed, or separated?

This question is the last question on the form and is for all persons 14 years old or more.

Always ask the question, under no condition should you suppose the civil or marital status of the persons being enumerated. Remember that you are finding out the current civil or marital status. For example: if a person was married and currently is in a consensual union, mark an X in box 1, consensual union.

Currently, are you: in a consensual union, single, married, divorced, widowed, or separated?
Mark only one box.
[ ] 1 In a consensual union
[ ] 2 Single
[ ] 3 Married
[ ] 4 Divorced
[ ] 5 Widowed
[ ] 6 Separated
[ ] 9 Don't know

Checking the form.

Before you leave the household and as soon as you complete the interview with all of the persons that make up the household. Check the information carefully and be sure that there are no contractions or omissions.

This is the last opportunity to verify that you have performed a complete interview, that you have included all of the members of the household without omitting children or the elderly. Proceed to completing the population summary (first page of the form). Count the number of men, women, and the total.

Remember to complete this summary as soon as you have completed the interview.
Summary of household population
_____ Number of men
_____ Number of women
_____ Total

If you have used two or more forms to enumerate this household, revise the following:

That the data for geographic location and chapter III Identification of the household are transcribed on all of the forms used.

In the box on the lower right-hand corner of the first page of the forms, write your name and last name, date of the enumeration, name of the institution, private school or public school that you attend.

_____ Name of the enumerator
_____ Date of enumeration
_____ Private or public school
_____ Name of the section leader or jurisdiction boss
_____ Date of reception

Transcribe the order number of the household (number 10) of geographic location on the "enumerated" label. Place the label on the entry door of the dwelling, in a place that is secure and visible, out of the reach of children.

Thank the people in the household for the information provided and say goodbye courteously.

Instructions for enumerating collective dwellings

Collective dwellings, because of their size, are enumerated with a special procedure. Initially, they are listed in the pre-census stage and generally they are enumerated by personnel designated by the dwellings themselves or the INEC. When there are collective dwellings in an enumeration area that have not been detected in the pre-census stage, you should proceed to enumerate them, so you should consider the following aspects:

a. For the objective of the dwelling census, in collective dwellings you should not investigate:

Infrastructure of the buildings.
Household identification, since there is no head of household.
Household information (basic services that are available)

b. For the population census, do not investigate the relationship to the head of household (question 2).

c. To collect the information for chapter V, population, you should take into account which persons you should enumerate.

Should be enumerated:

All persons who spent the night in the collective dwelling the night of the 24th to the 25th of November, except those persons who were there for transitory circumstances, who should be enumerated in their private homes.

Those who work and live in the collective dwelling, but do not have a private dwelling inside the same.

Transients, residents or interns of the collective dwelling.

Should not be enumerated:

Persons who work in the collective dwelling (administrators, managers, owners, employees, etc.) who form part of census households in private dwellings.

Procedure for completing the census form

The information that should be collected for the census form is:

All of the information for chapter I, geographic location.

In chapter II, dwelling, you should only identify and mark the answer in question 1. Type of dwelling (code 11 to 16) and continue directly with chapter V population.

In chapter V population, nullify question 2 (what is the relationship to the head of household), since this category is not taken into account for collective dwellings.

For the rest of the questions, continue according to the instructions given for individual dwellings.

Once you have finished the enumeration of all of the persons that make up the collective dwelling, continue with the enumeration of your area.

In the folder, include all of the forms that you used, do not forget to register the respective information in the summary form for the enumeration area.

Operative structure of the National Institute of Statistics and Censuses for the execution of the V Population Census and the IV Dwelling Census.

General Director
Project Director
Director of Operations
Sub-director of Coastal Operations
North Region Boss
Central Region Boss
South Region Boss

Provincial Boss
Municipal Boss

District Boss
Parish Boss
Zone Boss
Sector Boss
Enumerator of Disperse areas
Enumerator of Populated areas

The objective of decentralizing the information collection, the National Statistic and Census Institute has 1 Sub-director of Operations and 3 regional offices, with bosses who are responsible for directing the activities of carrying out the census in the provinces that are the responsibility of each jurisdiction, in this manner:

Sub-Director of Coastal Operations- With headquarters in Guayaquil, includes Guayas, Manabí, Los Ríos, El Oro, and Galápagos provinces.

Northern Region- With headquarters in Quito, includes Carchí, Imbabura, Pichincha, Esmeraldas, Napo and Sucumbios provinces.

Central Region- With headquarters in Ambato, includes Cotopaxi, Tungurahua, Bolívar, Chimborazo and Pastaza provinces.

Southern Region- With headquarters in Cuenca, includes Cañar, Azuay, Loja, Zamora, Chinchipe and Morona Santiago.

Provincial, municipal, and parish offices have their headquarters in their respective capitals.

The provincial capitals, municipal and parish centers are made up of populated areas and disperse areas, which include the respective peripheries.

The populated areas are divided into zones, sectors, and census areas.

The Parish centers, since they are populated and for census operational reasons are considered urban areas.

The census area is made up of a determined number of dwellings. The sector is made up of approximately 10 census areas, on average, and the zone is made up of 10 Sections.

[Page 56 of the enumerator instructions is a copy of a sample form --block map-- that has been completed. It is not translated into English.]

Instructions for completing form PV-07

Summary of the census area for the populated areas (for enumerator use)

Before the census, transcribe all of the information that is shown on the front of the census folder to the top right-hand section of this form (numbers 1 to 9), which corresponds to the geographic location.

When you complete the interview of each dwelling, according to the order of the visits, write all of the required information in the columns on the form.

Column 1. Block number

At the time of the interview, write the number that corresponds to the block where the dwelling is located.

Column 2. Dwelling number, in order of the visit

From chapter I, number 10 of each of the census forms, copy the number that is assigned to the census dwelling in order.

Column 3. Order number of the households in the dwelling

Transcribe the information from each census form, from chapter III, household identification, for example: if the dwelling has more than one household, complete this part of the form as shown:
[See the original-- there are three columns. Column 1 is block number; Column 2 is dwelling number; Column 3 is household number]

Column 4. Names and last names of the head of household

In this column write the name and last name of each and every one of the heads of household counted in chapter III household identification, the complete list will be consistent with the total number of households in your census area.

Columns 5 and 6. Households occupied with (persons present or persons absent)

In these columns mark the information from chapter III household identification (first page of the census form) with an X; boxes 1 (yes) or 2 (no) and the reference to the presence or absence of the persons of the household.

Column 7. Unoccupied dwellings.

Mark the answer with an X: yes if question 2 of chapter II dwelling has box 3 marked (unoccupied).

Column 8. Collective dwellings

Mark this box with an X if the type of dwelling (first question of chapter II, dwelling), has one of the boxes 11-16 marked.

Columns 9, 10, and 11. Number of persons enumerated in the household.

From the first page of the census form, transcribe the information from the household population summary box (number of men, women, total.)

Column 12. Observations

Write any detail that will help clear up any special situation, for example: the informants resist giving information; there are no adults in the household to give information, etc.

Once you have completed the interviews from your census area, continue with obtaining the subtotal and total of the census area in columns 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8, which refer to households, private dwellings and collective dwellings; and from number 9 to 11, the number of persons enumerated in the households.

At the bottom of the page you will find some instructions for completing columns 5, 6, 7, and 8 that refer to households, private dwellings and collective dwellings respectively.

Before checking the information, write your names and last names, the name of the school or institution, and signature, in the respective lines.

Note: Remember that once you have completed the form, you should include it in the census folder together with the census material and turn it into your sector boss.

Recommendations:

Write with clear handwriting and print.
Check and verify that the information is consistent.
Include form PV-07 in the census folder that you turn in.

[The next two pages of the enumeration instructions are copies of the forms. They are not translated into English, since they contain the same information translated above.]