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Interviewer's Manual
IX National Population and Housing Census 2010
National Office of Statistics
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

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Presentation

The Office of National Statistics (ONE) presents the Interviewer's Manual for the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010 of the Dominican Republic, which details the activities that the Interviewer must perform during the census collection.

The role of the Interviewer in the census process is fundamental, since he/she is responsible for collecting the data. Therefore, knowledge of the inherent processes and concepts for the census is extremely important for him/her, having a manual in which he/she can constantly refer back to whenever he/she needs in order to perform his/her responsibilities properly is the objective of this manual.

The present manual is primarily directed to the Interviewer, although it should be known by other people responsible for the operational structure of the census, as well as any or all people that directly or indirectly participate in the census process.

[Pages 4- 6, Table of Contents omitted]

Introduction

The Interviewer is the chosen person responsible for the most important activity of the census, which consists of obtaining information of all housing structures, households and persons; therefore this job is of great importance to the success of the census. Therefore, the present document has been prepared and is thus called Interviewer's Manual; its goal is to establish the procedures and organization that the Interviewer should follow in order to perform his/her activities and tasks satisfactorily.

Chapter 1 contains a series of basic definitions of interest to the Interviewer. These definitions provide a general overview that includes some aspects that every person working in the process should know for the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010.

Chapter 2 describes the aspects related to your position in the census as well as your relations to other entities in the census process. Additionally, this chapter lays out the functions and activities that should be performed as an important employee of the census.

Chapter 3 defines the basic concepts that will be used in the census, which the Interviewer must learn and master. Chapter 4 explains in short terms the technique of how the interviewing process should be conducted and it makes recommendations as to achieve an effective interview.

Chapter 5 describes the tool used to collect the census data, in other words everything that is related to the survey's structure, questions and concepts. Also, this chapter details the general and specific instructions on how to fill out the survey.

Chapters 6 and 7 explain the activities that the Interviewer should accomplish before the census, along with the operational procedures that should be taken into account before and during the census data collection.

Finally, Appendix 1 is a glossary of basic terms used through the manual which helps the Interviewer gain a better understanding of its content and the tools used. In addition, Appendix 2 contains the control forms that the Interviewer must fill in.

The Interviewer's Manual is an obligatory reference tool, and should be used and carried with you during the census collection data.

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1. Basic elements related to the census

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2. The interviewer

The Interviewer is the person responsible of important task of requesting, obtaining and collecting data from all households, homes and people that comprise the different areas of the country. Therefore the success of the census depends upon the engagement and quality of work of each Interviewer.

2.1 Interviewer's position within the census structure

The Interviewer hierarchically depends on the Supervisor, who is his/her immediate superior. His /her position is the last level within the Census structure. However, even if his/her position is at the bottom of the structure, the Interviewer is the most important employee for the census, because, he/she has the task of collecting housing and household's data. Therefore his /her responsibility is to conduct the activities within a Census segment assigned to him/her, strictly following the guidelines he/she will receive.

The Supervisor continues the work of the different tasks to assure the covering of the segment as well as the quality of the census in that area where each Interviewer works. Additionally, the Supervisor should solve any problems or concerns that might come up while conducting the fieldwork. Therefore, the Interviewer should maintain a good relationship with his/her Supervisor as well as other Interviewers of the work team, in order to guarantee the best development of his/her work.

2.2 Interviewer's relation to other instances of the census structure

In the pyramid shown in Diagram 1, the Interviewer depends on the Supervisor. The Supervisor is under the responsibilities of the Head of Areas, who in turn, is dependent of the Head of Census for Municipalities. This last one is dependent on the Head for Provinces, who in turn, depends on the Census and Survey Management of the Office of National Statistics. This one branch is the one in charge of carrying out the Census project.

2.3 Interviewer's responsibilities

Within the general structure of the census project, the Interviewer is the person that carries out the tasks of collecting data of the housing and households of his/her assigned segment. In this sense, in order to perform in an efficiently and productively manner, it is necessary that the tasks the Interviewer performs follow the established guidelines and in addition, performs a series basic tasks.

2.3.1 Interviewer's functions

The main function of the Interviewer is to visit all the households (for private and collective use) to gather quality information from each of them, including each home within them, as well as all the residents that permanently live there.

As an Interviewer, you should fulfill specific tasks and activities that will contribute to your main function, this are:

1. Actively participate in your training.

2. Tour your assigned area with your Supervisor and fill the form CNPV-03: Verification of the Census Area/Segment

3. Fill in the control forms that correspond to your assigned area/segment.

4. Conduct your daily work following the established guidelines and procedures, which will guarantee the covering of the area and quality of the census data collected, and if it is the case, you should comply with the regulations of the Office of National Statistics (ONE).

5. Accomplish all the tasks needed on your working day.

6. Safeguard and use correctly all the documents and materials assigned to you for the work.

7. Inform your Supervisor of your daily work progress, and seek advice if you have any problems or concerns while working on the field.

8. When the interview ends, you should let the residents know that your Supervisor could stop by the household at any time.

9. Turn in all completed surveys to your Supervisor at the end of your work day and inform the Supervisor about any pending households due to the absence of its residents.

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2.3.2 Interviewer's activities

Similarly to the activities of other employees of the process of the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010, the Interviewer should perform the following activities:

1. Receive from the Supervisor the assigned census area which corresponds to where the Interviewer will work during the census, including the surveys and materials that are needed to perform the work.

2. Tour the assigned area (accompanied by the Supervisor) to get familiar with the place and make sure that you can accurately identify the field and in order to fill in the form CNPV-03: Verification of the Census Area/Segment.

3. Identify, mark and establish the cartography of the area and the order in which you will cover its entirety.

4. Locate the first residence where you will start to continue in the order established (you should always begin in the northeast corner).

5. Identify the name of the street where you are conducting interviews, in case that there is no name, make sure to ask the residents of the street how is it called.

6. Introduce yourself and ask to talk to the appropriate informant.

7. Record the information of the geographical location in the survey form. This information should be based on and match the information from the label on your assigned folder and in the map.

8. Conduct the interview asking the questions in the order they appear in the survey and record correctly all information received.

9. Once the interview is finished, make sure to check the form to see if there are no questions unanswered and that you have ask the correct questions to the appropriate residents.

10. Give the residents the proof document with the information of the various censuses of the Dominican Republic, which will be as a small gift to all the households interviewed.

11. Stick the label Surveyed in each household completed.

12. Interview house by house until you finish the workload of every day's journey.

13. Inspect and organize all surveys in order to submit them your Supervisor.

14. Fill in the form CNPV-06: Survey summary for each surveyed household.

15. Meet every day with your Supervisor and inform him/her about your daily workload. Additionally, turn in all your completed surveys.

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2.4 Training as an Interviewer

Once you have been notify as a selected person to be trained as an Interviewer by the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010, you will get the appropriate directions to follow for each day and time in which you will take the training. This training will be conducted by the Head of the area and will last 6 days.
During the training, the Interviewer will receive instruction on the content of the Interviewer's Manual and the Survey designed by the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010, as well as how to use and fill in the control forms. Also, the Interviewer will learn about the cartographic materials that will support his/her knowledge on the assigned area and in his/her fieldwork.

The Interviewer's training has as its goals:

1. The training of Interviewers is to familiarize the Interviewer with the surveys and how they should be filled in order to conduct quality data collection.
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2. Train the Interviewer in the operational procedures that he/she should perform in order to strictly accomplish his/her functions.

3. Instruct the Interviewer in key cartographical aspects so he/she conducts his/her job in his/her assigned area in an organized and systematic way.

The Interviewer's responsibilities during the training are:

1. Attend all trainings on time.

2. Study and follow the instructions in the Interviewer's Manual.

3. Actively participate during training activities, partaking in simulated practices and other responsibilities that are assigned to you. Also, make sure you ask questions about any concerns or doubts you might have in terms of the procedure or concepts you will learn during training.

3. Basic concepts and definitions for the interview

3.1 Segment or Area: is a delimited geographic area. In the urban zones the segment is defined by a block or multiple blocks or part of a block; while in the rural zones, the segment is a part of a zone that contains a group of smaller units where its limits are marked physically and are easy to recognize. Additionally, the segment is the workload of the Interviewer. For the urban zone a segment will contain on average approximately 80 households, on the other hand, for rural zones a segment will contain on average approximately 60 households or housing structures.

3.2 Neighborhood: is an administrative unit that divides the urban zones of each municipality or municipal districts. Generally, neighborhoods are delimited by streets or avenues or by imaginary boundaries.

3.3 Folder: is a small box that contains all the materials needed during the census. Each folder has a label with the census and geographical information of the segment it represents. In order to identify it, the folder has a unique number in the label, which determines the geographical location and the census segment/area that corresponds to its use.

3.4 Location: is a smaller political-administrative unit, that divides the rural zones of municipalities and municipal districts of the Dominican Republic.

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3.5 Block: is the place occupied by households or vacant lots, usually defined and delimited by streets or natural elements such as rivers, streams, canals, or other type of boundaries that define the extent of their spaces. Blocks are considered part of urban zones.

3.6 Housing: is a delimited space or structure usually with walls and roofs of any material, containing an independent entrance. It is use for living, in other words where people sleep, cook, eat and protects from any environmental risks. In this sense, any place where one or more persons live, should be considered a household, even if its construction was not determined to that end.

The previous concept defines the household generically as a physical unit where one person or a group of people live. However it is necessary to identify households according to their use as: single family or collective households. Moreover, single family households can be houses, apartments, rented rooms, etc.

The concept of single family household can present various situations that need to be taken into account to clarify what the concept means and to make an accurate decision. This is the case of the following examples:

Example 1: When you arrive at a building that from the outside appears to be a single family household, you find that it has three different front doors. Each door is the entrance to a completely independent area from the others. In other words, there are walls, regardless of their material, that separate these three areas from each other and in each area there are different residences. Thus, in this case there are three different households within one building. This case would be similar to a building divided into three apartments.

Example 2: When you arrive to a single family home and you find that in the patio there is a structure with a living room, bedroom, kitchen and bathroom, and additionally has its own entrance independent from the main entrance. In this case, there are two households.

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3.7 Household: Is a person or a group of people that share their living expenses and reside under the same roof. However, there should be taken into account some variables that can surface in regards to the meaning of this concept. Next, you will see some examples that illustrate some situations that can help to use the concept appropriately.

Example 1: In a household reside a father, a mother and their two single children; and in one room of the house lives a married son with his wife. This son and wife work outside of the household and get their food independently of the other residents. However, they share with the family all other expenses such as: house payment, electricity, phone, water, etc. Therefore, this house would be considered a single family household.

Example 2: In one residence in the city of Santo Domingo live three students that come from Bonao, Santiago and Puerto Plata and go to UASD [Autonomous University of Santo Domingo]. For convenience and economic benefit, they have rented the place to share the cost, besides that, they share expenses such as food, electricity, water, phone, etc. Therefore that house would be considered a single family household.

Example 3: In a house in the city of Santiago lives a couple. The husband works in the nearby city of Tamboril and eats breakfast, lunch and dinner every day there. He pays for these meals with his own income. Similarly, the wife works in Vila González and also has her three meals in that community. She pays for those meals with her own income. Despite their respective work situations, they have a home in Santiago where they live and spend the night together. In that case, then the home would be considered a single family household.

Example 4: In one house resides a father, a mother and two single children; and in one of the rooms of the house another of son lives with his wife. This son and his wife eat and manage their expenses independently from the household expenses. In this case, the house contains two single family households.

Example 5: In a house in the city of Santo Domingo live three students that come from Bonao, Santiago and Puerto Plata and go to UASD [Autonomous University of Santo Domingo]. Each student has his/her own room and pays a third of the rent; but in each room the student has all the facilities including a stove to prepare his/her food, the room also has its own utilities therefore being independent from the other rooms in the house. In this case, the house would be considered to have three separate households.

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3.8 Permanent Residents: are the people or person that live permanently in the household. In other words, they are the people that sleep, cook, eat and protect themselves from any environmental risks and consider that place as their permanent residence.

There are situations in which it can be confusing to determine who is a permanent resident, and for this reason we count the time of residence in the household in order to consider if the resident is permanent or not. The time varies from one country to another, and from one census to another. For the purposes of the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010 it is considered a period of six (6) months. In order to help clarify doubts that might emerge during the survey, we have the following examples:

Example 1: When you arrive at a house you find out that the daughter of that family just left a week ago to go study in a different part of the country or to another country and she will be there for a full year. In this case, that person (the daughter) is not a permanent resident of the household.

Example 2: When you arrive at a house you find out that the husband has left three days ago to go to work in another part of the country or to a different country, but he will return in five (5) months. In this case, this person, is a permanent resident of the household, because his will be away from home less than six (6) months.

Example 3: When you arrive at a house you find out that the head of household's niece arrived two (2) months ago from a different part of the country to live with her uncle's family, because she will go to medical school in the city's university. Therefore, since she will reside in that household for more than six (6) months, she is considered a permanent resident of that household.
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In the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010, every person that resides in the household must be counted, including foreigners, regardless of their legal status in the country, as long as they have been living in the country for at least six (6) months, or even if they just arrived but have the intention of staying in the country for at least six (6) months. Diplomats that fulfill their duties within the country as well as their relatives, should not be counted.

In summary, permanent residents of a household are:

  • All newborn babies that have not arrived to the household because they have to stay for an extended period in the hospital.
  • All persons temporarily absent because he/she are travelling for leisure, business, study or have been in boarding school or in the hospital or the like that does not imply a change of residence, since he/she regard the residence as a primary permanent residence, and can return to their house at any given moment.
  • All persons with another nationality that live in the household.
  • All household workers and their families as long as they sleep and eat in the household, and who consider the house where they work as their home.
  • All those who live permanently in the home and are present during the census.
  • All those who live permanently in the home and are absent during the census because they are temporarily in or out of the country, but will return to their house after their circumstances allow.
  • All persons that in the moment of the interview are present in the household and do not have a permanent place to live.

On the other hand, the following are not considered permanent residents of the household:

  • All persons that are visitors of the household and have their own household, in other words they are permanent residents of another household.
  • All persons who have left for a period longer than six (6) months for study, work or other causes and live somewhere else.
  • Foreign diplomats and their families.
  • Household workers that do not sleep or stay overnight in the household.
  • Tourists that are on vacation in the country.

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3.9 Agricultural producers: All individuals that take charge and administrative control of cultivation and harvest of farmland or plantations of trees, shrubs and/or those who collect fruits and wild plants, or those who raise animals and livestock and/or products derived from animals or livestock or plants, and those who conserve or manage forest land; or those who fish or farm aquatic animals for his/her own consumption or for earned income.

These people are also referred to as farmers, producers, ranchers, cattle breeders, fishermen, etc.

3.10 Appropriate Informant: is a permanent resident of a household or the person who knows information about all the residents or members of the household. It could be the female/male head of household, their spouse, or a person that is 15 years of age or older. An appropriate informant should be in good mental health in order to answer the Interviewer's questions and should not be under the influence of any substances such as alcohol or drugs.

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4. Interviewing technique

The interview is a guided dialogue that serves to obtain information.

For the purpose of the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010, a survey will be used to establish an order and sequence of questions that facilitate the aforementioned dialogue.

The correct use of the interviewing technique implies a combination of attitude and ability. Attitude refers to the behaviors that help the Interviewer to achieve a disposition that will gain the trust and confidence of the informant, so he/she can provide you with the required information with accuracy and truthfulness. The greeting, the way you look, your kindness, honesty and attention to the interviewee are just some of the attitudes you should show. Ability refers to the skills that allow you to accurately conduct the interview. In both aspects, practice will ensure mastery of the interview.

4.1 How to conduct the interview

Interviewer's introductions when he/she arrives to the household:
The introduction is the first contact between the Interviewer and interviewee. Ask for the appropriate informant. Always bring your badge or identification card, which credits you as an employee of the Office of National Statistics (ONE), wear your badge in a visible place, so the informant can gain trust with you in order to proceed with the interview.

Gaining the trust of the informant depends, for the most part, on the first impression you give from your physical appearance and attitude in initiating the first dialogue. In order to be successful, it is necessary that you address the person respectfully and also dress appropriately for the data collection. You should avoid treating people with too much familiarity, or show fear or insecurity, because that could create an unfavorable environment for the interview.

The essential aspects that Interviewers must observe are: a cordial greeting, proper identification with your name, a description of the activity you are conducting and finally what you require of the informant.

Remember that at every moment you should introduce yourself according to the provided guidelines:

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4.2 General instructions for the interview

Below are the guidelines that the Interviewer must follow during the interview:

1. When you ask the questions, make sure you show good intention and interest without being misunderstood by the informant.

2. Read the questions as they appear in the census survey. You should never, for any reason, try to reformulate them by memory, even if you believe that you already have them memorized. This could lead to serious mistakes of interpretation either on the part of the Interviewer or the interviewee.

3. Make sure you are calm and act natural when asking the questions.

4. Read the questions clearly and slowly.

5. Listen to the interviewee's answers, record them immediately and continue with the next question.

6. Ask the questions exactly as they are written.

7. Inquire for more information when you obtain incomplete or unsatisfactory answers.

8. Do not make early assumptions to any answer.

9. Do not rush the interviewee in order to gain time.

10. Remember that all the information you receive is strictly confidential and therefore you cannot share it with anyone.

11. Record all information received by the informant without expressing any kind of judgment or value about what you hear. You should show neither surprise, approval nor disapproval in your voice tone or with your facial expressions.
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12. When the interviewee gives you vague answers or jumps from one topic to another, you should not stop him/her in a rude manner, you should listen and carefully guide his/her conversation back to the question until you can obtain the required information.

13. When the interviewee changes the subject of the interview, make sure you explain kindly again the topic you are discussing. You can say something like: "This is very interesting, however now we should continue with the interview, if we have more time later we can continue talking about this topic".

14. Follow the order of the questionnaire and the "skips" that are in the survey, otherwise you run the risk of leaving out information or recording information in the wrong place.

15. Read the instructions provided in the survey. This way you will know which questions should be read to specific groups of people and which should not.

16. When the interviewee does not remember the information or has doubts about it and his/her answer is incorrect, make sure you use the survey to ask any additional questions to help the interviewee. Always use neutral words and questions, so that way you do not influence any answers.

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4.3 Ending the interview

Once the interview is finished, after you have checked the entire survey for completion:

  • Say goodbye and thank the interviewee for his/her time and willingness to do the interview. Be cordial, in order to leave the doors open for your Supervisor, in case there is a need to monitor or repeat an interview again.
  • Hand them the package, which is a document of an overview of all the surveys of the country. Let them know that: "Here is a gift for you, of a special historical series that contains information gathered from the last eight Censuses' taken about the Dominican Republic's population".
  • You must stick the label Surveyed in front of each house, on the door or in a visible place. Let the interviewee know that he/she could possibly receive another visit from a member of the team conducting the Census.
  • Notify the interviewee how he/she can identify the people that work for the Census. Let them know that the Census workers have an identification badge and a hat with the logo: IX National Population and Housing Census 2010. Urge them to make sure that they only give information to properly identified people, so others do not take advantage of the project or the informant.

5. Data collection tools

The IX National Population and Housing Census 2010 will use two different tools in order to gather and collect the data: a) the survey census and b) the Community Attributes questionnaire.

5.1 The census survey

The census survey is the tool used to collect data and it is used for the interview that the Interviewer will conduct in each household during the census time. Given that the census survey is the most important tool for the census, it is necessary that the Interviewer knows how to use it properly.

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5.1.1 Structure of the survey:

The survey census contains eight (8) sheets and sixteen (16) pages, in which there are six (6) different sections:

  • Section I : Geographic location
  • Section II : Dwelling characteristics
  • Section III : Household identification
  • Section IV : Household characteristics
  • Section V : List of household members
  • Section VI : Permanent household members' characteristics

5.1.2 Instructions for filling out the survey

In order to complete the survey you must only use the pencil given for the survey. Otherwise, the optical scanner, which is the informational tool used, will not read the gathered information from the survey. Also you should only use the materials provided by the Census, including the eraser, for the interviews.

The following are the instructions you should obey to fill in the survey:

1. Fill in the bubbles of the survey with the given pencil. Remember to use the pencil provided since it is the only one that the optical scanner will read.

2. Fill in the bubbles that correspond to the correct question without recording outside of the bubble. Make sure you record the correct information given by the informant.

3. Write in the boxes with upper case script handwriting with no accents and leaving a box in between words.
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4. Write complete words, never abbreviated word or accented words and with no punctuation marks. Example: basic education, poultry seller , motorcycle driver.

5. In case that there is one or more lines, you should write them as if they were one line, leaving spaces in between words.

6. Make sure that the information you record in numbers, follow the guidelines in shown in the front of the survey.

7. It is important to be careful if you need to correct any information recorded. You should not scratch the paper, erase it carefully and rewrite the correct answer.

8. Fill in the bubble completely without marking outside its borders and also write the answers to open questions taking care that the letters remain inside the boxes. See the example of the correct and incorrect use of the boxes and bubbles.

9. Always mark only one choice for each question, unless the question requires more than one answer.

10. When the answer's categories are marked by a letter that means that more than one choice can be selected. In that case each answer's category should have a bubble marked with 1 if the answer is positive or 2 if the answer is negative.

11. When the answer's categories are not marked by a letter that means that the question only has one possible answer.

12. The survey should not be bended, folded, wrinkled, stained or damaged. Do not eat while filling out the survey.

13. Do not write or mark in the survey other than in the established bubbles and boxes for numbers or letters.
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14. If in any household, the informant denies her/his participation, fill in the geographical information on the survey that corresponds with that household. Answer questions 1 and 2 and then immediately let your Supervisor know about it.

15. Follow carefully the skips according to the questions, because that helps you with the order you must follow in the interview.

16. Read and follow the instructions on the headings of Section VI: Permanent Household members' characteristics that indicate the group of people you must interview with specific questions.
For example: For 3 years of age or older (check question 29)]


17. If the household has more than six members, sum them up in the "population summary" of the first survey you completed.

18. When you arrive at an apartment, ask and confirm the address, then record it as shown in the following examples.
Example 1: Tamarind Street, building 5, apartment No. 10.
Example 2: 25 Miramar Street, building Juan Pozuelo, apartment No. 302.


19. Once you finish the interview check that the number of people registered for the Census from the household is the same as the number of household members recorded in Section V. If the numbers do not match, make sure you clarify why with the informant and correct it according to the situation.

20. Once you finish the interview, check that all the information is gathered. If you missed a question, ask it before you leave the household.

21. Before you end the interview make sure you have included and asked all persons in the household and verify that you recorded all the necessary information for each member.

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5.1.3 Instructions for reading the survey

The Interviewer must pay careful attention to all of what is recorded in the survey. The Interviewer must read and strictly follow all instructions.

Capital letters in parentheses: Indicate that when you ask the question, you should substitute it for the corresponding word in each case. For example, when you ask the question: Does or did [the respondent] attend school, high school or university?, and in this case you refer to a member of a household named Juan, therefore you should substitute the upper case letters in parentheses for his name, in the following way: Does or did JUAN attend school, high school or university?

Texts in boxes: are instructions specific to the use, application and completion of the questions. If the information written in the box is all in capital letters it should not be read to the informant.

Skip to… denotes the flexibility of the questionnaire according to the answers provided by the informant. The "skip to" indicates if the questions should follow a numbered order or if they should go to specific questions or sections according to certain answers. The skips are not read to the interviewee.

Questions that have answer choices ending in a question mark: indicate that each choice must be read slowly and deliberately to the interviewee.

Questions with multiple choice responses: are those in which the answer's categories contain information with 1 if the answer is positive or 2 if the answer is negative.

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5.1.4 Specific instructions to fill out the survey

Section I: Geographic location

The geographic location is composed of: Folder number, Surveyed Housing number, Household number within dwelling, name and code of the neighborhood, block number, whether it is a continuation, household address (street, avenue, alley, way, etc.), interior or exterior number.

Before you start your task, fill in the information of the survey that corresponds to the Geographical Location. Record the data corresponding to the Folder number, name and number of the neighborhood/region and block number, duplicating them from the portfolio and the map of the segment.

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Folder number. This is a six-digit code that represents the geographical location of your census area. Transcribe and copy the number in the corresponding boxes, on the label on front of the folder and in the package.

Neighborhood/Region. Neighborhoods are administrative units into which are divided the urban zones of municipalities or municipal districts. Generally they are delimited by streets or avenues or by natural divisions such as a valley, a stream, a river or an imaginary boundary or a limit of other kind. In turn, regions are smaller regional units that divide the rural zones of municipalities or municipal districts.

In the line or boxes write down the name and code of the corresponding neighborhood/region in which the household is located and appears on the map or label in the package.

Block. This is a reference unit for collecting census and survey data. A block consists of a group of households and/or buildings, lots or areas destined for housing, commercial or industrial use and the like. Write in the boxes, the number of the block as shown in the map, this number has four digits.

Cluster number. Assign a number in a consecutive order to each surveyed household in your area, starting with 001 for the first surveyed house, 002 for the second, 003 for the third and so on until you conclude with all of the households in your area.

Household number within dwelling. This variable allows for the specific identification of each household within a dwelling. You should record the ORDER NUMBER for each household within a particular dwelling in the order corresponding to the census survey.

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If the interviewee answers Question 8 in Section III: Household Identification, that there is more than one household in the dwelling, you should use a separate survey for each household.

For the first household you should completely fill in the survey and in the box that reads Mark here the Household number within the dwelling write a 1.

Likewise, in the survey pertaining to the second household, you must fill out Section I and note a 2 in the box corresponding to the question Mark here the Household Number within Dwelling, and leave blank sections II and III. Continue filling out the questions in sections IV, V and VII.

You must keep in mind that the Surveyed Household Number for each household should never be greater than the total amount of households in a given dwelling.

Continuation: While you are performing the interview in a household, in Section V: List of Household Members, you should note the individual names of the household members. You can take note of up to 20 people. When you are on Section VI: Permanent Household members' characteristics, you will notice that the survey only has space for up to six (6) people. Therefore, if more than six people live in the household, you must add the appropriate number of surveys based on the number of household members

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Household Address: Before you knock on the door, write down the household address as completely as possible, or rather, the street name, avenue, cul de sac, road, path, km, etc. If the household is on a street without a name, write down street with no name.

Exterior Number: is the number located on the front side of the exterior of houses and apartment buildings.

Example of how the exterior number should be recorded when you are working on an apartment building: If Juan says that he lives on Mella Street, building D15, apartment 112, and then the exterior number you will record for that address is building D15.

Interior Number: is the number that is located on the front door of each apartment. As an example in the previous case, the interior number should be recorded as 112.

In rural zones, in case that there is no address, you should record places that function as references and record the exterior and interior numbers if they exist. When there are two visible numbers, record both in the corresponding spaces. If you find a building that has neither an exterior and/or interior number, record N/A in the corresponding spaces. When there is only one household on a given lot, record a dash (-) in interior number. You should keep in mind that the address is never asked as part of the survey.

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Section II: Dwelling characteristics

The questions in this section of the survey will provide the Interviewer information about the main dwelling characteristics: type of household, occupancy conditions of the household, availability of rooms used as kitchens and number of bedrooms, also known as a bedchamber.

Additionally, you will specify the predominant construction materials used for the walls, ceiling and floors of the household.

In this section, questions 1, 2, 3, and 4 are to be filled out based on the observations of the Interviewer; therefore the Interviewer must pay close attention to the dwelling characteristics in order to complete this part of the survey.

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Question 1. Dwelling Type: observe and record

Mark the type of dwelling that you observe, fill out the oval that represents the code for the corresponding household type.

If the housing type corresponds to one of the categories under collective dwellings, fill out the appropriate oval and skip directly to Section V: List of Household Members. In case that the interviewee is a person without housing, proceed in the same way, in other words, fill out the oval that corresponds to option 14, and then move on to Section V.

In this section there are two concepts that are important to understand before learning more about how to fill out the census survey. These two concepts are the meaning of dwelling and collective dwelling.

1. A dwelling is that which is inhabited by one or more people; In a given dwelling, there can be one or more household.

Dwellings are classified as:

1. Independent house
2. Apartment
3. A room in a bunkhouse or in the back of household
4. A barrack
5. House shared as a business
6. A place not designated for housing
7. Other type of household

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2. A collective dwelling is designed to be inhabited by a group of people without family ties, who live together due to health, work, religion, study, specific discipline, as guests, etc. In this respect, a collective dwelling does not have a head of household.

Collective dwellings typically consist of the following types:

1. Hotel, hostel or guest house
2. Military quarters
3. Prison
4. Hospital or health center
5. Religious institutions, boarding schools, or retirement homes.
6. Other type of collective dwelling

For collective dwellings, you do not need to fill out Section III: Dwelling Identification or Section IV: Dwelling Characteristics.

People without housing are those who occupy spaces without walls, with ceilings made from random materials and have an independent entrance. These are people who sleep "wherever the night falls", under a bridge, on the porch or hallway of a building, in the open air, under a tree, in a cave or other type of place that is not a designated household.

In the case of people without housing, you should not fill out Section III: Household Identification or Section IV: Household Characteristics.

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Question 2. This household is: observe and record

First check the conditions of occupancy of the household. In other words, if the household is occupied by present members or if the members of the household are absent or if the household is vacant. Fill in the corresponding bubble to the condition of occupancy of the household.

Before you finish filling in question 2, which refers to the type of household, it is necessary to define the following important concepts:

1. Occupied dwelling with residents refers to the case in which there is at least one member of the household present during the census survey.

2. Occupied dwelling with absent residents means that at the moment of the survey there were no members of the household present however there are signs of residents living there.
If the household is occupied with absent residents you should ask a neighbor when the residents of the household will be back, and then return to the household at the time in which the residents are present in order to conduct the interview. If you do not get any information about the time in which the residents will return, you can leave a message for the residents with a neighbor stating when you will return including the date and time for the census interview. Once you have done that move on to the next household.
3. Vacant household is a house that is uninhabited. In other words, where there are no signs of people living there.
Do not assume upon first glance that a household is vacant even if there is a sign "for rent" or "for sale", or if the household is closed; make sure to ask or find out from the neighbors what is the condition of the place. Make sure that, if the situation of the household is for sure vacant, to fill in the bubble that next to the code 3. Additionally, fill in questions 3 and 4, and then continue with the next household.

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Question 3. What is the main material making up the exterior walls of this household?

By observation, fill in the correct answer for the main material of the exterior walls of the household. If there are equal proportions of two or more materials, record the one with the best quality. The following situations illustrate some examples:

Example 1: When you arrive at the household and the walls are built mainly of concrete or concrete blocks and the rest of the walls are made out of wood planks, fill in code 1.

Example 2: If the walls of a house are made out of concrete or concrete blocks, but the same house contains equal parts of palm fronds or wood planks, then you should fill in the bubble with code 1 "Concrete or concrete block".

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Question 4. What is the main material of the roof of this dwelling?

By observation, fill in the correct answer for the main material of the roof. If there is more than one material, record the main one.

Example: When you arrive to a household, you observe that the roof has two materials of equal proportion, one part made out of concrete and the other made out of tin, fill in the bubble with code 1 "concrete".

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Question 5. What is the main material of the floor of this household?

If you are conducting an interview inside the house, by observation, fill in the correct answer for the main material of the floor of the household. In case of doubt of the main material of the household floor, ask the household members about it.

For example, if the floor is in part made out of tile and mainly of cement, then you should record the bubble of code 2 "cement".

In case that you conduct the interview somewhere outside of the house, then you should ask the informant about the main material of the floor of the household. In that case, if the interviewee mentions more than one type of material, you should investigate with him/her, which one is the main material or the material of largest proportion.

It is a general rule that when the walls, floor and roof of the household are made out of two or more materials, you should always consider the material with the largest proportion, and when the materials have equal proportions, consider the one with the highest quality.

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Question 6. Does this household have a kitchen or room used for cooking either inside or outside the house?

Read the options and record the corresponding bubble according to the answer given by the interviewee. If the informant states that the kitchen is inside the household fill in code 1; if the kitchen is outside the household, record code 2, and if there is no kitchen in the household record code 3.

You should consider a kitchen as a room or area designated only for cooking purposes, either inside or outside the household.

Actually, there can be various kinds of kitchens or rooms used for cooking purposes. Some can be inside the household, and therefore should be recorded with code 1: Yes, inside the household, while code 2 if Yes, outside the household.

Some examples of code 1, Yes inside the household, are:

  • The kitchen is a room inside the household.
  • The kitchen is an area adjacent to the living room, not completely separated by a wall, but by a banister or a breakfast bar. This type of kitchen can be found in apartments as well as households.
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  • The kitchen is an area within the living room and does not have any type of division; however the area contains all appliances and furniture for cooking.

Some examples of code 2: Yes, outside the household, are:

  • The kitchen is a room or a building separated from the household. This type of kitchen is common in the rural zones, and it could also appear in some households in the urban zone, especially in small cities or in big and in the outskirts or suburbs of somewhat larger cities.
  • The kitchen is annexed to the household; therefore its entrance is outside and different from the main entrance of the household.

Question 7. How many rooms does the household have, not counting bathrooms, kitchen, hallways or garage?

Ask and record in the correct boxes the given number of total rooms in the household.

Here you include the living room; the dining room, if it is separate from the living room, the bedrooms, the room for music or television, the study room or office, the domestic worker's room; and other rooms that are used to store belongings or things; guestrooms, etcetera.

If a person lives in a room that does not have any divisions, in other words, the space does not have a wall made out of concrete, wood, drywall or any other material, but the room is used for sleeping and domestic use, such as a kitchen, then you can consider the household as having only one room. Therefore, in the Number of Total Rooms, you should record 1.

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Section III: Household identification

Question. 8. So, how many households are in this dwelling?

This question has the goal to obtain the total number of households within a dwelling.

Remember that before you ask the question to the interviewee, you must read the text in the box above the question in which you can find the definition of a household, and it goes as follows:

read to the interviewee: A household includes one person or a group of people that share food expenses and live under the same roof. Keep in mind the concept of household in chapter 3 heading 3.6 of this manual, as well as the examples that illustrate what a household is in the same section.

After you read the instructions and question 8 to the informant, fill in the corresponding bubble according the answer given by him/her.

If in the household, there are besides its members, domestic workers that live there with their families and share food expenses with all other members of the household, you should count them as part of the household.

Note: the minimum number of households that exist in a dwelling should be one.

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If within the dwelling there is more than one household, proceed as explained in the instructions for question 8, which states:

Use one survey per household and then proceed in the following way:

A. Fill in the survey of the first home.
B. Use a new survey for each additional home and fill in Section I (Geographical Location) and leave blank Sections II and III then continue filling in Sections IV, V and VI

Remember that if the dwelling has more than one household, you should complete one survey for each household. When you fill out the survey for each household identified in the dwelling, you should record in Section I: Geographical Location the HOUSEHOLD NUMBER in the corresponding box and so on for each household in the same dwelling.

In order to illustrate this procedure, see the following examples:

Example 1: If there is only one household in the dwelling, immediately after you ask question 8 do the following:
1. Return to Section I and mark 1 in the box for: Record here the number of the Household in the dwelling.
2. Then continue with Sections IV, V and VI.
Example 2: If in the dwelling there are two households, immediately after you asked question 8 do the following:
1. Return to Section I and mark 1 in the box for: Record here the number of Households in the dwelling.
2. Then continue with Sections IV, V and VI until you complete the entire survey for that household.
3. Immediately after take a second survey.
4. In the second survey, fill in Section I and then mark 2 in the box for: Record here the number of Households in the dwelling. Then leave blank Sections II and III and the proceed to complete Sections IV, V and VI.
Example 3: If there are three households in the dwelling, immediately after you asked question 8 do the following:
1. Return to Section I and mark 1 in the box for: Record here the number of Households in the dwelling.
2. Then continue with Sections IV, V and VI until you complete the entire survey for that first household,
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3. Immediately after take a second survey.
4. In the second survey, fill in Section I and then mark 2 in the box for: Record here the number of Households in the dwelling. Then leave blank Sections II and III and then proceed to complete Sections IV, V and VI.
5. Then take a third survey, fill in Section I and then mark 3 in the box for: Record here the number of Households in the dwelling. Then leave Sections II and III blank and move on to complete Sections IV, V and VI.

Section IV. Household characteristics
This section's objective is to gather information that permits a glimpse of the material conditions of the people who live within the household.

Question 9. Which of the following items or appliances does your household have?

This information provides standards of well-being, such as the capacity for economic consumption of its members. It is a fundamental question for the analysis of poverty.

Read slowly all the goods or properties and then fill in the bubbles accordingly, if "Yes" fill in code 1 and if the answer is "No', fill in code 2.

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In this question, each choice must have an answer, according to the answer provided by the interviewee.

For example: If the informant declares that there is a stove in the household, you should record code 1, in case that the answers is no stove, then you should fill in code 2. Similarly, you will proceed with all options given in the question.

Question 10. This dwelling (or the part of it that is occupied by the household) is…?

This question gathers information about the classification of ownership of the household and what proportion of the household is: owned, paid off, owned and paying mortgage, rented, borrowed or given, other. This information will serve as a base in order to establish the relation of housing and ownership throughout the country.

Read all the options to the informant clearly and slowly, and then fill in the correct code answered by the informant. If the answer does not work for any of the options from 1 to 4 . Then fill in code 5 "Other".

Owned, completely paid off, is a household acquired by the head of household or other household member and it is completely paid off.

Owned, paying mortgage is a household acquired by the head of household or other household member, but he/she is still paying the mortgage. This is commonly the case of houses financed by the bank, especially in urban zones.

Rented is the household where the head of household or other member pays a monthly rent to live in all or part of the house.

Borrowed or given is the household that has been given as part of a salary or borrowed for free to a relative, friend or someone close to the family.

Other refers to any other situation in which a house is used, under any other form of ownership different from the ones previously mentioned.

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Question 11. How many rooms (bedrooms) are in this household?

The objective of this question is to determine the number of rooms or bedrooms that the household has, including those that are not being used during time the census is being taken. This question is essential to measure the level of overcrowding in the households.

Verify in question 7 that the Total number of rooms of the household is higher than the Number of bedrooms or rooms that are used only for sleeping.

If a person lives in a room that does not have divisions, in other words, there are no spaces separated by walls of concrete, wood or any other material, and in that room there is a bed for sleeping and a stove, then in this case there is no bedroom. In this case, you should record in Number of bedrooms 00.

Question 12. What kind of toilet facility does your household have?

Read all the options and fill in the corresponding code to the kind of toilet facility that the household has.

If the informant answers that there is a toilet, mark code 1. If the answer is a latrine, then fill in the bubble for code 2. If the answer is no toilet facility mark code 3 and the skip to question 14.

Question 13. Does your household share a bathroom with other households?

This question serves to determine if the household has a bathroom that is shared or is used exclusively for its residents.

Ask the question and then fill in the bubble corresponding to the answer given by the informant. If the informant replies that the bathroom is used only by the members of the household, fill in the bubble corresponding to code 1. If the answer is that the bathroom is shared with other households or people of the dwelling, fill in code 2.

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Question 14. How does the garbage get disposed of in this household?

This question identifies the way that the household disposes of its garbage.

Fill in the bubble of the corresponding code to the given answer by the informant. If there are various ways to dispose of the garbage, choose the one that is most frequently used.

Example: If the interviewee answers that the garbage is burned as well as collected by the municipality, investigate which way is the most common and select the option given with the corresponding code.

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Question 15. What is the principal source of water used to wash, scrub, shower, etc. in the household?

This question provides the identification of different sources of water used in households, which in turn helps to measure of the public service coverage and therefore, the importance of other sources of supply (such as well with a pump, well with no pump, river, etc. ). From this information we can estimate the proportion of households without access to a water system (hygienic or regular).

Read all the answer options and fill in the bubble with the corresponding code pertaining to the answer given by the informant.

If the household uses water from more than one source, record the most frequently used source.

Example: If the informant answers that the source of water comes from the water conduit inside of the house and from a neighbor's tap, ask what is the main source used and then record the option given as the correct answer.

In case that the water source is not included in any of the options from 1 to 9, fill in code 10, corresponding to "Other".

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Question 16. What type of fuel does your household mainly use for cooking?

The goal of this question is to establish the main type of fuel used for cooking in the household.

Ask the question and fill in the code given by the informant. If the informant states that there is more than one fuel for cooking, ask which one is primarily used, then record the one that corresponds to the option given. In the case that the fuel used is not propane, coal, wood or electricity mark the option "Other" and when the members of the household eat out or get their food already prepared, meaning, there is no cooking in the household, then fill in the option to code 6 "Never cook".

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Question 17. What type of electricity does your household use?

The answer to this question helps identify what type of electricity is used or mostly used in households. It is a basic component of the social conditions of well-being.

Ask the question to the interviewee and record the answer. If the informant replies that the household uses electricity, fill in code 1. When the type of electricity is different than the options provided in 1 to 4, then fill in the option of code 5 "Other".

Mortality

This small section is intended for information about recent mortality in the households.

Question 18. Including all newborn babies and elderly people, has any household member died as of 2009, in other words between January 1st and December 31st of 2009?

If the informant answers "Yes", a member of the household has died during the past year, fill in code 1 and then ask the name of the person or people and write it down in the corresponding lines of the corresponding column Names. This column has space for the names of at least three people who have died within the past year.

In question 18a. What is the sex of [the respondent]?, fill in the bubble corresponding to the sex of the first deceased person according to the answer of the interviewee. Fill in the bubble of code 1, if male or code 2 if female.

In question 18b. When did [the respondent] die? Record the "Day" and "Month" in which the first deceased person from the household died.

In question 18c. How old was [the respondent] when he/she die? Record the age of the first person who died within the past year in the household. If the person was less than one year of age record code 000.

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Follow the same procedure with the second and third deceased person from last year, if any. For the second and third deceased person continue with questions 18a, 18b, and 18c.

If the informant states that there were "No" members who died as of 2009, meaning between January 1st and December 31st of 2009, fill in code 2 and then skip to question 19.

Agricultural Production

The goal of these questions is to gather information about the different agricultural producers, classifying them according to the agricultural work they do, such as farming or livestock farming, either for their own consumption or for sale.

Question 19. Do any of the members of this household have sown fields, uncultivated land, fallow land (either owned, rented or half-half, etc.) or have they harvested within the last 12 months?

If the informant answers "Yes", fill in the bubble for code 1 and then tell the interviewee the following: Please tell me the name of those members. Record the name of the producers in column 1 after the aforementioned petition.

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After you record the names of the agricultural producers, for each of them ask the second part of question 19: How many lands does [the respondent] have sown? And then the following question: Did [the respondent] harvest in the last 12 months? Follow the same order with the next agricultural producers if any.

If in the first part of question 19, the informant replies that in the household there are no persons that have sown any land or harvested in the last 12 months, fill in the bubble corresponding to code 2, and then go to question 20.

The following are examples of how you should proceed in recording information gathered for question 19.

Example 1: Pedro is a member of the household and he has currently 60 sown areas, however in the last 12 months he only harvested 35 areas of corn. In this case, record 60 in the corresponding boxes: ...does (Pedro) have sown? and then record 35 in the boxes corresponding to: ...did (Pedro) harvest in the last 12 months?

Example 2: Manuel is a member of a household, he has only 18 sown areas, in which he planted bananas four (4) years ago, and he has been harvesting them for the last three (3) years. In this case, record 18 in the boxes corresponding to:... does (Manuel) have sown? and 18 in the boxes corresponding to: ...did (Manuel) harvest in the last 12 months?

Example 3: Antonio is a member of the household, currently he does not have any sown land, however he harvested 23 areas in the last 12 months. In this case, record 0 in the boxes corresponding to: ... does (Antonio) have sown? and then record 23 in the boxes corresponding to: ...did (Antonio) harvest in the last 12 months?

Example 4: Jose is a member of the household, he currently has 20 sown areas of manioc, however in the last 12 months in those same areas he planted 20 areas of corn and of potatoes, all during the same time. In this case, you should record 20 in the boxes corresponding to: ...does (Jose) have sown? and then record 40 in the boxes corresponding to: ...did (Jose) harvest in the last 12 months?

Example 5: Gonzalo is a member of a household and he currently has 55 sown areas where he planted bananas, that he has been harvesting since two years ago, however in the past three months he planted in between manioc. In this case you should record 55 in the boxes corresponding to: ...does (Gonzalo) have sown? and then record 55 in the boxes corresponding to: ...did (Gonzalo) harvest in the last 12 months?

If in the first part of question 19, the informant answers that in the household there is no one who has sown land or that has harvested in the last 12 months, then fill in code 2 and then skip to question 20.

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Question 20. Do any of the members of this household have animals for household consumption or for sale?

If the interviewee answers "Yes", fill in the bubble with code 1 and then ask: Please tell me the name of those members. Record the name of the livestock producers in column 1 after the aforementioned petition.

After you have recorded the names of the livestock producers, for each one of them ask the second part of question 20: How many cows, bulls, calves and oxen does [the respondent] have? and then the third part: How many goats, sheep, rabbits does [the respondent] have?; and then the fourth part of question 20: How many ducks, turkeys, geese does [the respondent] have?, and then the fifth part of question 20: How many hens, chickens, roosters does [the respondent] have?; and then the sixth part of question 20: How many pigs does [the respondent] have?; and then the seventh part of question 20: How many bees does [the respondent] have?

Ask all seven parts of question 20 in the same order of the second and third livestock producer, in case of any.

If in the first part of question 20, the informant answers that in the household there are no persons who farm livestock either for their own consumption or for sale, then fill in code 2 and skip to question 21.

The following are examples of how you should proceed in recording information for question 20:

Example 1: Daniel is a member of the household and he has three (3) cows, two (2) calves; two (2) bulls and one (1) ox. In this case you should record 8 in the box corresponding to: How many cows, bulls, calves or oxen does (Daniel) have?

Example 2: Jacinto is a member of the household and he has two (2) sheep and eight (8) goats. In this case, you should record 10 in the boxes corresponding to: How many goats and sheep does (Jacinto) have?
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Example 3: Altagracia is a member of the household, and she has a farm where she has 30,000 chickens, but in her house in the country she has 250 hens and 150 roosters. In this case you should record 30400 in the boxes corresponding to: How many hens, chickens, roosters does (Altagracia) have?

Example 4: Galindo is a member of a household and he has two (2) boxes and five (5) barrels of bees. In this case you should record 7 in the boxes corresponding to: How many bees does [the respondent] have?

When the livestock producer answers that he/she does not have any of the animals mentioned in the follow up questions of question 20, you should fill in in the boxes with zeros. This is important because it states that you asked the questions.

Example: Juan is a pig farmer. In this case, you should record the information given in the part of the questions that states: How many pigs does (Juan) have?, and the other boxes should be filled in with zeroes.
Section V: List of household members

The goal of this section is to identify all members who reside in and make up the household; including children, newborn babies, elders and people who might be on vacation or disabled members of the household.

When you record the names of the members of the household, remember that a household is composed of a person or group of persons that share food expenses and live under the same roof.

Question 21. Please tell all the names of the permanent residents of this household, starting with the head of household:

The goal of this question is to identify all members considered part of the household (permanent residents). Record them in relation to each other, so then after in Section VI, the demographic and socioeconomic data corresponds to that order.

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Remember that the concept of permanent resident is defined in chapter 3, section 3.7 of this manual. Also remember that there are various examples of what can be considered a permanent resident in that part of the manual too.

In addition, remember that the information of the household and its members should only be given to you by the head of household or a person older than 15 years of age who knows about all the members of his/her household.

Record the name of each member of the household starting with the head of household and so on, until you record the names of all the members.

The first person that you should record in the List of Household Members is the male or female Head of Household, this allows for an orderly manner in which to record all persons and provides an organized coverage of the population. The names of the people are asked so the Interviewer identifies the information for each member.

Check that names of all members of the household are recorded. For newborns, please record in question 21 "newborn" in case that they do not have a name yet. Ask about elderly people who reside permanently in the household or disabled people. These members sometimes go unnoticed.

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The identification of the head of household is the responsibility of the members of the household; therefore, the head of household is a person who is recognized as such by the rest of the household members.

In question 21 there is space to record the names of at least 20 members. Therefore, if in the household there are more than 20 members, then you should use as many surveys as necessary in order to complete the census for everyone. For example, if in the household there are 23 members, then you should use a second survey in order to record the information of persons 21, 22 and 23. This means that the second survey in the column Order number, where you read 01, you should cross it out and record 21, where there is a 02, you should substitute it for 22 and where there is 23, you should record 23.

In order to illustrate this procedure, see the following examples:

  • If the number of members of the household is smaller than 20 follow the instructions below:
  • Record the names of all members of the household in the given lines in question 21.
  • Record the sex of all members of the household in the given spaces in question 22.
  • Ask questions 23 and 24 and then proceed to fill in the population summary in question 25.
  • Then continue with Section VI.
  • If the number of members of the household is between 21 and 40, then you should use two survey forms:
  • For the first survey form follow the instructions below:
  • Record the names of the first 20 members of the household in the given lines in question 21.
  • Record the sex of the first 20 members of the household in the given spaces in question 22.
  • Then fill in the population summary in question 25 for the entire household, in other words, add all members of the household even if all were recorded in two survey forms.
  • Then continue with Section VI.
  • For the second survey form follow the instructions below:
  • Record the names of the members from 21 and so on of the household in the given lines in question 21.
  • Record the sex of those members of the household in the given spaces in question 22.
  • Ask questions 23 and 24.
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  • Return to Section I and complete it, fill in the corresponding bubble to continuation.
  • Leave blank sections II, III and IV, then complete Section VI.

Keep in mind the following factors:

  • The Population Summary should always be completed in the first survey form.
  • For the collective household there is no need to identify the head of household, because in this type of household the members of the household should be recorded according to the order given by the informant.
  • Do not forget to circle the number order of the informant.
Question 22. Sex

Sex is the same as the other questions, you must ask about it. Sometimes we assume that by the name of the person we know their sex, however there are names that can be used for men and women alike. Some examples of those names are: Cristina, July, Alex, Deyvi, etc. Therefore the question about sex is: Is [the respondent] male or female?

Record "M" if the person is male in the line of question 22 or ‘F' if the person is female.

Question 23. Are there newborn babies or children that were not included?

The objective of this question is to prevent not recording newborn babies or children in question 21, either because they go unnoticed or were forgotten by the informant.

Ask and investigate the question, then fill in the corresponding bubble according to the answer given by the interviewee. If the informant answers "Yes", fill in code 1 and then record the name of the newborn or child in the List of Household Members above the question.

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Question 24. Besides the people mentioned, is there any household member that is not present and is travelling for leisure, business, study or has been in the hospital, etc.?

This question helps verify all recorded members of the household.

If the informant answers "Yes" fill in code 1, and then record the persons not previously recorded in the List of Household Members.

Question 25. Household population summary

This question records the total number of residents of the household by sex. If the household required more than one survey form because there were more than 20 members, then the population summary will always be recorded in the first survey form for that household.

  • Add the total number of "M" from the Male column in question 22, and record the amount in question 25 in the boxes corresponding to "Male" as the total number of male residents in the household.
  • Add the total number of "F" from the Female column in question 22, and record the amount in question 25 in the boxes corresponding to Female as the total number of female residents in the household.
  • In question 25, in the corresponding Total boxes, add the total amount of Males and Females in the household.

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After you have added all members of the household in Section V, then proceed as follows for Section VI:

1. Go to the heading of page 4 and record the order number and the name of the person that has that order number of 1 (the head of household) in question 21.

2. Then go to the heading of page 6 and record the order number and the name of the person that has that order number of 2 in question 21.

3. Then go to the heading of page 8 and record the order number and the name of the person that has that order number of 3 in question 21.

4. Then go to the heading of page 10 and record the order number and the name of the person that has that order number of 4 in question 21. Continue this way until you have recorded all members of the household in Section VI.

5. Then return to page 4 and start the questionnaire of Section VI for each household member.

In case that in Section VI, were recorded more than 6 members, then you should use a new survey form for the household members in order to ask them the questions from Section VI.

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When necessary use two survey forms for a household, in the second survey form you should fill in Section I then fill in the bubble that states continuation; and go to Section VI.

When necessary use three survey forms for a household, in the second and third survey forms you should fill in Section I then fill in the bubble that states continuation; and go to Section VI.

Section VI: Permanent Household Members' Characteristics

The goal of this section is to collect data for the demographic, educational and economic characteristics of each household member.

Verify that the order number and the name of the person and the information from question 21 matches. First you should ask all questions from the survey to the first member, then to the second, and so on, until you have collected all information from all members.

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Question 26. What is the relationship of [the respondent] to the head of household?

Kinship is defined as a link or relationship between the head of household and its members; this relationship could be marital, by blood relation or by adoption, and so on.

Fill in the corresponding code, according to the answer of the informant. For example, other relative means relatives by blood or by law such as: uncle, grandchild, great grandfather, while those who are Non-relative would include godchildren, godfather, guests, etcetera.

Question 27. Is [the respondent] male or female?

Based on your observations fill in the sex of the interviewee and for all other members ask the question. Do not assume the sex of the person guided by his/her name, remember that as mentioned before, there are numerous names that are used for men and women alike. Therefore, ask the question as it is on the survey and then fill in code 1 if male or code 2 if female.

Question 28. When was [the respondent] born?

This question, similar to question 29, is designed to establish the age of all people, one of the fundamental attributes of the demographic analysis. Both questions are asked with the purpose of improving the quality of data collection.

Read the question that refers to the date of birth and wait for the interviewee's answer, then record it in the corresponding boxes, first the day, month with two digits and then the year with four digits.

For Example: If the person was born on October 2nd, 1973, then in the boxes you should record 02 10 1973
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There will be two cases in which: if the day and month of the person's birth is before or the same as the day and month of the interview, then the age will be equal to the difference between the two years.

If the day and month of birth is after the day and month of the interview, then the age will be equal to the difference of the two years minus one.

If the interviewee does not know his/her date of birth or age, you can estimate the age of that person with another member whose age is known and might look similar in age.

If necessary you can ask about an important event or time during the person's lifetime in the country, province or municipality, such as: a stream bed, a tropical storm, hurricanes, droughts or other type of natural disasters.

For Example: If there is a women that does not know her own age, you can ask her about her age when she had her first child and then ask for the age of the current age of the child. Then her age could be calculated from the sum of the current age of that child and the age she had when the child was born. For example, if she says that she had her first child when she was 18 years old and currently the child is 50 years old, then her age is approximately 68.
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Question 29. How old is [the respondent]?

The age refers to the years of age a person has lived until the present date from his/her date of birth. Ask the interviewee how old he/she is and then record the declared age in the boxes corresponding to the answer. If the person is less than one year old record '000' in the boxes.

If you have already questioned and attempted to help the person remember his/her age, and there is no way to establish the age of that person or any other member of the household, then you should record code 999.

Question 30. Where was [the respondent] born?

For census purposes, a person's place of birth refers to the place in which the mother of that person lived when he/she was born, even if the person was born in a hospital, clinic or house outside of the mother's residence.

This question has three possible answers:

  • If the person replies that he/she was born here, in this municipality, fill in code 1 and then skip to question 34.
  • If the person replies that he/she was born in another municipality, fill in code 2 and continue with question 31.
  • If the person replies that he/she was born abroad, fill in code 3 and then skip to question 32.
  • For example: If the informant replies that Manuel was born in La Vega Hospital and her mother lived in Cotui, then Manuel's place of birth is the municipality of Cotui.

Question 31. In which municipality of the Dominican Republic was [the respondent] born?

Ask the informant the name of the municipality in which he/she was born, then record it in the corresponding boxes and skip to question 34.

Remember to fill in the boxes with capital letters and to leave a box in between one word and the next, do not abbreviate, accentuate or add commas.

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Question 32. In which country was [the respondent] born?

This question must be asked to all members of the household that answered in question 30 that they were born abroad. Ask the informant for the country's name in which he/she was born and then record it in the corresponding boxes.

Question 33. In which year did [the respondent] arrive to the Dominican Republic?

This question is also only for those members of the household that replied in question 30 that they were born abroad. Ask the informant the year of arrival to the Dominican Republic and record it in the corresponding boxes.

Write down the year of arrival in the corresponding boxes.

Note: The year of arrival recorded in question 33 should be greater than or equal to the year of birth of the person recorded in question 28.

Question 34. Does [the respondent] have any of the following disabilities?

This question is designed to gather data about certain types of disabilities in the population. A disability is the result of a deficiency in an individual's activity or their ability to perform physically. Therefore, a disability represents a disruption in a person's level (of personal life).

Read, to the interviewee, each type of disability and fill in the bubble according to the informant's answers. Remember to read each option one by one and immediately fill in the answers accordingly.

The correct way to read the question is:

  • Does [the respondent] have permanent difficulty seeing, even though he/she uses glasses?
  • Does [the respondent] have permanent difficulty hearing, even though he/she uses a hearing aid?
  • Does [the respondent] have permanent difficult walking or climbing stairs?
  • And so on, until all questions are asked.

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For example: if the informant states that Juan has impaired sight, even if he uses glasses or lenses, fill in the bubble of code 1; in case that the answer is "No" then fill in code 2. You should proceed in the same way when asking about all other forms of disability.

Remember that you should fill in an answer for each type of disability, either a 1 or 2 depending upon the interviewee's answer.

Question 35. Does [the respondent] know how to write and read?

Notice the instructions that are in the box above Question 35, which indicates that question 35 and thereafter are for persons 3 years or older. Therefore, you should ask the questions to all members of the household that are 3 years old or older.

Before beginning to fill out the questions about education, verify, in question 29, if the person being surveyed is 3 years old or older.

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Fill in the bubble with the corresponding code according to the answer given by the informant. If the person replied that he/she knows how to write and read, fill in code 1, otherwise if the answer is that he/she does not know how to write or read fill in code 2. If the person whose information you are recording only knows how to write his/her name and a few numbers then consider that the person Does not know how to write and read and then fill in code 2. If the informant replied that he/she only knows how to read but does not know how to write then record "Does not know how to write and read", therefore fill in code 2.

Question 36. Has [the respondent] attended school, high school or university?

This question is designed to find out information about school attendance for all people age 3 and older. Attendance is defined for any accredited educational institution or program, in other words public or private, of levels ranging from preschool, primary or basic school, secondary or high school and university.

For purposes of the Census the following are not considered educational centers: daycare, typing school, fashion or beauty school, mechanics shop, radio and television courses or other extracurricular courses.

Ask if the interviewee attends or has attended school, college or university. Fill in the corresponding bubble to the answer given by the informant. If the answers is "Yes, attends school", then fill in code 1. Otherwise if the informant answers that the person "Does not attend, but attended school in the past", then fill in code 2. Or if the informant "Never went to school", then fill in code 3, and skip to question 42.

Question 37. What is the highest level of school [the respondent] has attended: preschool, primary/basic, secondary/high school, university?

The level of education refers to, "each stage of the educational system that is determined by the cognitive, emotional, and physical development of students as well as their social needs" (Art. 31, Section (a), of the Law of General Education 66-97, of the Dominican Republic). This question is aimed inasmuch as people who currently attend an academic institution as those who attended in the past.

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If the informant answers that the person attends or attended school, college or university, ask for the highest level of education attained by the person being surveyed and fill in the bubble with the code corresponding to the informant's response.

Example: If the informant replies that the person attends or attended school at the preschool level, fill in code 1 and then skip to question 42. If the informant answers that the person attends or attended school at the primary or basic level fill in code 2 and then continue with question 38. Meanwhile, if the informant answers that the person attends or attended school in the secondary level or high school fill in code 3 and continue with question 38. If the informant answers that the person attends or attended school at the University or higher level then fill in code 4 and skip to question 39.
Chart 1 shows the structure of the education system in the Dominican Republic, exhibiting the years of study, according to the level:

Preschool or Early Childhood Learning- Three years long

  • Early Childhood Learning is the first level of education and occurs before Basic or Primary Education is set up with the family and community. It targets the population of infants and young children 5 years of age or less. The final year is obligatory for children who are 5 years old.

Primary or Basic Level if Education- Eight years long

  • The first set, that lasts 4 years, includes grades 1st through 4th. This level usually begins when the child is 6 years old, and never younger than 5 years old.
  • The second set, lasts four years and includes 5th through 8th grade.

Secondary or High School- Four years long

  • The first set of grades in Secondary school is the same for all students.
  • The second set of Secondary or preparatory set is made up of three areas: General, Technical/Professional, and the Arts, in which students who complete it, will receive a diploma or degree in the area studied.

College or University- Approximately five years long

  • Universities consist of departments offering majors or "careers" that generally take between 3 and 5 years to complete depending on the specific course of study. The exception is medicine, which can take up to 7 years to complete.
  • In order to record the year in school as given by the informant, be aware that: 2 semesters equal one year, 3 trimesters equal one year, and 4 quarters are equivalent to one year.

Postgraduate Studies- Approximately five years long

  • This level of studies corresponds to the specific degree obtained by the student during their university studies, and the degree levels are called Master's, or Doctorate. Typically, a Master's degree takes about 2 years to complete, and the Doctorate is the next degree level obtained immediately following the Master's and generally takes 2 more years to complete.

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Question 38. What is the highest level of education [the respondent] has completed?

This question inquires about the last year of school completed by the person being surveyed in the highest level of education that he/she is studying or has studied. It is important to remember that this means the actual years of school completed, therefore the level he/she is currently attending or any incomplete levels he/she attended do not count.

Record in the corresponding boxes the last level of school the person completed and then skip to question 42.

In order to illustrate how to record the last level of school [the respondent] has completed, see the following examples:

Example 1: If the interviewee was in the first level of secondary or high school, but did not completed it, then in question 37 you should record code 3 and in question 38 you should record 0.

Example 2: If the interviewee completed the third level of secondary or high school, but continued studying, then in question 37 record code 3 and then in question 38 you should record 3.

Example 3: If the interviewee is currently in second grade of primary or basic school, then in question 37 you should record code 2 and then in question 38 you should record 1.

Example 4: If the interviewee states that the person being surveyed is in first level of primary or basic school, then in question 37 you should record code 2 and then in question 38 you should record 0.

Example 5: If the interviewee states that the person being surveyed is currently in the first level of secondary or high school, then in question 37 you should record code 3 and in question 38 you should record 0.

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Question 39. What is/was the university major or "career" [the respondent] studied or studies?

This question is for persons who are currently attending or attended school. This question will be only asked if the informant answered code 4 from question 37. Record the name of the major or "career" declared by the informant.

In case the person being surveyed has completed more than one "career", record the one that informant declares as the main one. You should record the name of the career in capital letters leaving blank a box between words and do NOT abbreviate, accentuate or write commas. You should record the name of the career fully and correctly as shown in the examples below:

  • Law
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Odontology
  • Biology
  • Civil Engineering

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  • Hydraulics Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Bio analysis
  • Computer Science
  • Systems Engineering
  • Agronomy

Question 40. Did [the respondent] complete his/her career?

This question inquires whether or not the person being surveyed has completed the career answered in question 39. If the informant answers that the person being surveyed has completed a career fill in code 1. Otherwise if the person did not finish, then fill in code 2.

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Question 41. How many years did [the respondent] study at the college, master's or doctorate level, including a specialty?

The number of completed years a person has studied are the sum of the years of study corresponding to a career, a specialty, a master's degree or a doctorate.
Find the total number of years of university studies, based on the information in chart 1 from the previous pages.

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These questions are only asked for people who are 5 years of age or older, as verified by question 29 about the age of the respondents.

The goal of the following questions is to compile information about migration, internal and international, occurring in the country between November 2005 and November 2010.

Question 42. Where did [the respondent] reside in November, 2005?

This question is designed to determine the person's residence in the previous five years before the current census. The information derived from this question is useful in the study of migration.

Notice the instructions in the box above question 42, which indicates that this and the following questions are only for persons 5 years of age or older. Therefore, you should only ask about members of the household that are five (5) years old or older.

If the informant responds the the person lived Here, in this Municipality, fill in the bubble corresponding to code 1 and move on to question 45.

On the other hand, if the informant responds that, in November 2005, the person lived In another Municipality, fill in the bubble corresponding to code 2 and continue with question 43.

However, if the informant answers that the person lived Abroad, then you should fill in the bubble corresponding to code 3, and move on to question 44.

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Question 43. In November, 2005, in what municipality did [the respondent] live?

Ask the informant about the name of the municipality where he/she lived in November 2005 and then record it in the corresponding boxes and then go to question 45. Remember to fill in the boxes with clear capital letters leaving a box in between words. Do NOT use abbreviations, accents or commas.

Question 44. In November, 2005, in what country did [the respondent] live?

This question is only applicable to people born abroad. Ask for the country in which the person lived in November 2005 and record it in the corresponding boxes. Remember to fill in the boxes with clear capital letters leaving a box in between words. Do not use abbreviations, accents or commas.

Question 45. During the past week (seven days) has [the respondent] done any type of work in which he/she received any kind of payment, even if he/she was not working because of time-off, illness or other reason?

Notice the instruction given above question 45, which indicates that that question and the following are only for people 10 years of age or older. Therefore you should only collect data from the members of the household that are 10 years old or older.

The purpose of this question and the following ones is to collect information about economic characteristics of each of the surveyed people. Because many of the questions in the following segment refer to Last Week. Last Week corresponds to the week before the census date.

If the interviewee had a stable job (remunerated or paid in kind) the week before the census interview, even if the person did not work due to holidays, sickness or some other reason, fill in code 1 and then skip to question 52.

On the contrary, if the interviewee answered that the person did not have a job or did not work the week before the census interview, fill in code 2 and then continue with question 46.

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Question 46. During the past week (seven days) has [the respondent] done any type of work for at least one hour such as selling food or clothes, sewing, motorcycle taxi, selling tickets, etc. in which he/she received some kind of payment?

This question tries to document the type of work that could be considered a stable job and that is why the question refers to activities of that kind.

If the informant answers that the person worked in any one of the aforementioned activities during the last week, fill in code 1 and then go to question 52.

In case that the informant answers that the person did not work in any of the mentioned activities for some kind of payment during last week, then fill in code 2 and continue with question 47.

Question 47. During the past week did [the respondent] help in a business, farm or a family activity, in which he/she did not receive any remuneration?

If the informant answers that the person helped a relative or non-relative with a business, farm or family activity during the week before the interview, fill in code 1 and then go to question 52.

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In case the informant answers that the person did not help a relative or a non-relative in a business, farm or family activity during the week before the interview, fill in code 2 and then continue with question 48.

The week before the census, the interviewee may have helped with a familiar or unrelated business refers to the unpaid help or assistance that the person being surveyed may have given during the week prior to the census, selling or taking care of a business, store, shop, or some other establishment or activity of this type. Also, the person being surveyed may have helped an acquaintance or family member laboring in the field, doing such jobs as planting or harvesting; raising or taking care of farm animals; or in some other agricultural or fishing tasks.

Question 48. During the last four weeks, has [the respondent] looked for a paid job or tried to establish his/her own business or company?

Notice that the period this question refers to is the four weeks prior to the census. Ask if the person being surveyed looked for work or was trying to establish his/her own business or company, during the four weeks before the census.

If the informant answers "Yes" fill in the bubble next to code 1 and skip to question 51. If the informant answers No, fill in the bubble for code 2 and continue with question 49.

Question 49. What has [the respondent] been doing during the last week?

This question refers once again to the week prior to the census as its time of reference. Ask the question and fill in the bubble that corresponds to the informant's answer. Look at the following examples regarding the question.

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Example 1: If the informant answers that the person only worked in household chores during the prior week of the census, then fill in code 1.

Example 2: If the informant answers that the person does not work because he/she is retired or on a pension, then fill in code 4.

Example 3: If the informant answers that the person does not work or perform any economic activity because he/she studies, then fill in code 2.

Next, see the explanation of the concepts regarding the different types of answer choices in this question, so you know how to choose the correct one according to the answers given by the informants.

  • Household chores: This type of activity is done by the person who works exclusively in his/her own home and does not produce any goods or services to be sold. This does not include paid household employees. This does include any persons related or not related who help take care of the house without receiving pay for their work.
  • Studying: This refers to the person who regularly and exclusively attends an educational institution or studies for their own interest, although he/she may occasionally help out with household chores.
  • Landlord: This is the person who receives money from renting a house, building, vehicle, machine, tool, etc.
  • Retired or on a pension: This is a person whose only income comes from a pension that he/she may have as a widow/widower, orphan, disability, illness, or years of service.
  • Not working because of handicap: This refers to the person who is handicap or permanently ill since birth or by accident.
  • Not working because of old age: This category includes persons who given their old age cannot work in an economically productive manner.
  • Other: This group includes persons who are not part of any of the aforementioned categories.
  • None: This group includes persons of age 10 or older who do not work or do any sort of productive activity.

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Question 50. Last week, would [the respondent] have had the time and necessary conditions to get to work if he/she had been offered a job?

If the informant answers that the person had time and the means necessary to work and if the person was offered a job the week before the interview, fill in code 1. On the other hand, if the informant answers that the person did not have the time or means necessary to work the week before the interview even if the person was offered a job, fill in code 2.

Question 51. Has [the respondent] worked before for a remunerated work?

This question is directed towards the people who do not work or perform an economic activity, with the goal to determine if they had worked ever before.

If the informant answers that the person has worked before and has received payment of any kind, then fill in code 1. On the contrary, if the informant answers that the "person has not worked before", fill in code 2 and then skip to question 55.

Question 52. What was [the respondent]'s main occupation, last week (or in his/her last job)?

This question inquires about the type of work the person currently does, if the informant works or worked in his/her previous job, in the case that he/she is not presently employed, but had worked in the past.

Ask the question exactly as it appears in the survey and then record the answer given by the informant in the corresponding boxes. Remember to fill in the boxes with clear capital letters leaving a box in between words. Do not use abbreviations, accents or commas.

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When the informant gives you a vague or incomplete answer, make sure you ask further questions to determine the specific job or occupation the informant has or had. Make sure the informant gives you the correct name of the job or occupation. In order to help you better understand what the question asks and therefore obtain the accurate information about the occupation of the person being surveyed see the following examples with correct responses and some possible incorrect answers that you should not accept.

Correct Answers:

  • Example 1: If Pedro says that he works as "bank teller", the answer is correct.
  • Example 2: If Maria says that she works as a "supermarket cashier", the answer is correct.
  • Example 3: If Andrés says that he works as an "auto mechanic", the answer is correct.
  • Example 4: If Manuel says that he works as an "industrial mechanic", the answer is correct.
  • Example 5: If Juana says that she works as a "street vendor of clothes", the answer is correct.
  • Example 6: If Pericles says that he works as a "street vendor in a shop", the answer is correct.

Incorrect Answers:

  • Example 1: If Pedro says that he is an "Engineer", the answer is incorrect, because Engineer is not an occupation.
  • Example 2: If Juan says that he is a "Civil Engineer", the answer is incorrect, because Civil Engineer is a PROFESSION, but not an occupation. And question 52 asks about the person's occupation.
  • Example 3: If Maria says that she works as a "public employee", the answer is incorrect, since a State Representative is a public employee and the janitor at the Our Lady of Grace Hospital is also a public employee, in that they both work for the State.
  • Example 4: If Adriano says that he works as a "mechanic", the answer is incorrect, since there are various types of mechanics.
  • Example 5: If Miguel says that he works as a "cashier", the answer is incorrect, since a cashier can work in a diverse number of jobs.
  • Example 6: If Sandra says that she works as a "vendor", the answer is incorrect, since there are many different types of vendors.

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Question 53. In that job [the respondent] was (or is)?

This question has the goal of defining the occupational category that the person being surveyed had in the business or company where they worked during the week before the census interview. In the case of people who were not working the week prior to the census, but who did work some time in the past, the question refers to the occupational category in their last paid job. Fill in the bubble according to the informant's answer.

What follows is an explanation of the concepts related to the various alternatives of occupational categories, with the purpose of providing you with enough knowledge to choose the correct response based on the informant's answer.

  • Salary paid employee is the person who maintains a dependent relationship with the company or institution that he/she works for and receives pay in the form of a salary, either in cash or kind.
  • Employer or Owner is the person who runs or manages on their own a business or career, employing one or more paid employees, in addition to family members or non-relatives who work, not necessarily paid.
  • Family worker with no remuneration is the person who works in the business or company of a family member or non-family member without pay, for at least one hour during the week before the census. However, if the person is regularly paid a pre-determined amount of money, that could be considered a salary, he/she should be recorded as a paid employee.
  • Independent Worker is the type of worker that has neither a boss, nor is in charge of employees or laborers. The business or company only has one worker, not belonging to another organization, that sells and/or produces goods and/or services for that which a price is charged. Examples: an independent lawyer, engineer, plumber, electrician, door to door salesperson, artisan, etc.
  • Other. This category exists for people who are economically active and cannot be included in any of the previous categories.

Ask the question exactly as it is written in the census survey and fill in the bubble corresponding to the code that fits the informant's answer.

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In order to provide you with an understanding of the concept of occupational category, and thereby obtain the most accurate information on the part of the people being surveyed, see the following examples below.

Example 1: If the informant answers that Juan is an elementary school teacher, fill in the bubble corresponding to code 1.

Example 2: If Pedro is the owner of an automotive repair shop and has three mechanics that work for him, then fill in the bubble corresponding to code 2.

Example 3: If Antonio makes candy and sells it himself, fill in the bubble corresponding to code 4.
Question 54. What is the goal of the business, company or institution where [the respondent] works or last worked?

This question is designed to determine the branch of economic activity of the company, business or establishment where the person works or worked. It is important to indicate the type of products or services that are made or sold in the establishment, such as: taxi service, planting flowers, making shoes, making clothing, selling food, etc. Also, it is important to investigate what the company, business or establishment specializes in where the person being surveyed works.

Read the question exactly as it appears in the survey. Never be sure that you already know it. Ask the question as it is written and record the answer in the corresponding boxes. Remember to fill in the boxes with clear capital letters leaving a box in between words. Do NOT use abbreviations, accents or commas.

In order to help you better understand the concept of branch of economic activity, and thereby obtain the most accurate information on the part of the people being surveyed, see the following examples below.

Example 1: Maria works or worked in a company that makes and sells shoes, the branch of economic activity is production and sales of footwear. Therefore, you should record in the following boxes: production and sales of footwear.
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Example 2: Luis works or worked in an appliance store, the branch of economic activity is appliance sales. Therefore you should record in the corresponding boxes: appliance sales.

Example 3: Santiago works in a store and sells plastic covers. Ask if he makes them too, in that case record: sales and fabrication of plastic covers. In case that he only sells them, record: sales of plastic covers.

Example 4: Augusto works in an automotive repair shop, so you should record in the corresponding boxes for question 54: automotive repair

Example 5: Freddy works in an elementary school, as a teacher, then you should record: teacher

The following examples could be common answers of the different economic activities: Clothing factory, shoe factory, wallet factory, pharmaceutical factory, orthopedic device factory, dental equipment factory, cheese factory, cold meats factory, beef sales, banana production, yautia (xanthonsoma) production, pig farming, poultry farming, candy factory, ice cream factory, supplies sales. Shrimp, tomatoes and cantaloupe production; home, bridges and highways construction; health, communication, moving and shipping services; furniture repair and construction, sugar production, alcohol sales, transportation, telecommunication services, food services, etc.

Question 55. Currently, is [the respondent]:

This question is designed to establish the marital status of the informant. The marital status is different from the civil situation of the relationship. In the Dominican Republic there are only two categories of marital status: single and married. However, in demographic terms what is important is the civil situation, which has the following categories: separated, divorced, widow/widower, separated from a civil union, married, living together and single.

  • Separated legally or religiously represents the status of a person who is legally or religiously married, but that currently is separated from his/her partner and does not have another partner.
  • Divorced is the person who was married but is legally divorced from his/her partner and currently does not have another partner.
  • Widow/widower is the person who was married but his/her partner is deceased and currently does not have another partner.
  • Separated from a civil union is the person who was in union with a partner but currently does not have a partner.
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  • Living together is a person that currently is living together with a person in civil union or by consent.
  • Single (Never married or in a civil union) is the person that does not have a partner and was never married or in a civil union with anybody.

In order to facilitate your understanding of the concept of marital status, and gather the correct information from the person being surveyed, see the following examples:

Example 1: Juan was married and then separated from his wife, but he has not legally divorced from her and now he lives in civil union with another woman. Then his status is that of "Living together".

Example 2: Maria lived together with a person for seven months, then she got separated and now she is by herself. Then her status is "Separated from a civil union".

Example 3: Andres had never married, or lived with a person. Then his status is that of Single, in other words Never married or in a civil union.

Example 4: Altagracia was married, but her partner died, then she remarried and now she lives with her new partner. In this case, her status is that of Married.

Example 5: Pedro was married, but his partner died, he never remarried and is by himself. In this case, Pedro's status is that of a Widower.

Example 6: Margarita was married, but then she got divorced and she stayed by herself and is currently with no partner. In this case, her status is that of Divorced.

Example 7: Waldo was married but after some time he got separated from his wife, but has not legally divorced from her and he does not have a new partner. In this case Waldo's status is that of Separated legally or religiously.
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Read the information on the box above question 55, which indicates that the question is only for people age 15 or older. Therefore the question should only be asked to all members of the household of age 15 or older, and as it is stated in the box above the question, you should check the age of the members of the household from question 29.

Ask the question to the informant accurately and fill in the code corresponding to the given answer. This is the correct way to ask the question:

  • Is [the respondent] currently separated legally or religiously?
  • Is [the respondent] currently divorced?
  • Is [the respondent] currently a widow/widower?

and so on.

Question 56. In total, how many children has [the respondent] had, even if the baby died a few hours or days after being born?

The purpose of this question and the following questions is to gather information in order to estimate two important demographic variables: mortality and fertility.

All children born alive are considered alive if they are breathing, had heart beat or any other sign of life. Ask the mother about her live births, since it is common for mothers to not count as live births those children who were born alive but died a few hours or days after being born.

Read the information above question 56 which indicated that the question is only for women age 15 or older. Therefore you should only ask this question to all women who are 15 years old or older, as stated in the instructions you should check the age and sex of the women from questions 27 and 29.

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Question 57. Of all the children, how many are currently living?

In the two first boxes of (Female Children) record the number of female children currently alive. Similarly, in the other boxes of (Male Children) record the number of male children currently alive. If the woman does not have any children then record "None".

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Question 58. In what month and year was [the respondent]'s last child born alive?

This question refers to the respondent's last female or male child born alive, independently of the date of birth. Record the month and year for the date of birth of the interviewee's last child in the corresponding boxes.

Remember that female or male children born alive can include those who were born alive, but died a few minutes or hours after being born.

Question 59. Is the last child of [the respondent] still alive?

If the informant answers that her last female or male child is alive fill in code 1 and then continue with the next person. In case that the
informant answers that her last female or male child is not alive, then fill in code 2.

Question 60. How old was the child when he/she died?

Record in the corresponding boxes the age of the last female or male child when they died. If the child was less than one year of age record 00.

After you fill in this question continue with the next person in the household. Once you have completed interviewing all the people in the household, if you have any observations please record them in the lines for observations on page 16. Once you have recorded your observations proceed with the information of the next household in the same dwelling if that is the case. If not continue with the next household.

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6. Interviewer's tasks

In this chapter there is a description of the use of the forms, as used specifically by the Interviewer.

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6.1 Use of forms

For the purpose of maintaining high levels of control in the operational process before, during and after the data collection of the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010, each of the employees responsible for the particular operations of the census must use a series of forms depending upon the activities and tasks he/she performs.

The control forms are documents in which certain activities and procedures that are undertaken during the census are registered. In order to use these forms it is necessary to have two or more responsible employees within the operational structure of the census.

Some forms are designed to be filled out every day or only at the end of the census operation, depending on the types of activities that need to be documented.

Among the forms used by the Interviewer are:

1. The CNPV-03: Verification of the census area/segment: The goal of this form is to record all households and their information during the first tour in which the Interviewer becomes familiar with his/her area or segment. This form should be submitted to the Supervisor once the tour has been finished.
2. The CNPV-06: Census Summary: This form is used by the Interviewer every day, and contains the census summary for each household surveyed, as long as the survey has been completed. You must turn in this form to the Supervisor at the end of the census period.

7. Operational procedures

This chapter describes the necessary preparations for the job of use of the forms, operating procedures, reception of materials and documentation, workload reception, practical orientation, awareness and tour of the Interviewer's area, etc.

7.1 Reception of materials and documentation

In order for you to carry out your work adequately, before and during the census period, the Supervisor will provide the Interviewer with the following materials.

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Chart 2: Materials and Documents for the Interviewer

Types of Materials and their Utility:

  • Pencil- For filling in forms
  • Eraser- To erase possible errors
  • Sharpener- To sharpen the pencil
  • Plastic Cover- In order to cover up the Interviewer from the rain and his/her materials
  • Small box- To carry and keep all materials
  • Census Surveys- To collect data from households and housing
  • Identification badge and hat- Official identification of the Interviewer
  • Map of the area/segment- To know the fieldwork
  • CNPV-03 Verification of the census area/segment- To control and gather information
  • CNPV-06 Census Summary- To control and gather information
  • Surveyed Labels- To identify surveyed households
  • Brochures with Census information- To give as a small gift to surveyed households

7.2 Workload reception

The Supervisor will assign you an area or segment where you will collect the census data every day from the census date until the end of the census period. The Supervisor will give you the amount of surveys needed for the census data collection until the end of the census period for the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010. Each segment will have approximately 80 houses or dwellings in urban areas; meanwhile, rural areas will have on average approximately 60 houses. It is good to estimate that your daily workload should be at least 12 to 15 houses, be it in an urban or rural area.

Before you go out into your assigned area for fieldwork, the Supervisor will give you a small box or briefcase where you will find:

  • Cartographic materials that locate, delimit and describe your assigned area.
  • Census Surveys
  • A briefcase to carry all your materials
  • Labels for Surveyed households
  • Brochures for gifts to surveyed household members
  • Pencil
  • Eraser
  • Sharpener

The census surveys and labels will be given in the amount necessary for the households in the segment, in case that you need additional materials for your tasks, you should request them from your Supervisor.

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Before heading out to your work area, write (or fill out), every day, on the front of the survey forms, the identification of the geographic information found in the front of the small box with your materials and of the map of the area. This information is comprised of: folder Number and block Number.

7.3 Practical orientation

Two days before you start collecting census data, the Interviewer should receive from his/her Supervisor a map of the area or segments (if the case). The Supervisor will supervise four different Interviewers including you. All of the Interviewers will be directed and guided by the Supervisor in the fieldwork and to become familiar with the area.

It is important that you are guided by your Supervisor who will help you in any concern or problem present in your mar or in the tour of the area. In order to avoid any doubts, you will learn how to use the map, keeping the orientation North always. Usually is easy to identify where is the North in the map, since you can also by extending your right arm in the direction of the sun rise you would be in front of the North and you will have on your back the South.

7.4 Awareness and tour of the Interviewer's area

As one of the first tasks in the census process, two days prior to the surveying period, the Interviewer must make a round of the survey area to become aware of the surroundings.

This task has as one of its goals, to familiarize the Interviewer with his/her census segment, by means of a systematic tour of the area, with the result being a full awareness of the assigned area in order to successfully fulfill the gathering of data, of both the people and the existing dwellings.

Awareness of the census area will allow you to establish:

  • The place where you will commence the segment survey.
  • The path that you will follow during the census survey.
  • Also, it will allow you to organize the survey of the census segment.
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Two days before the start of the surveying period, the Interviewers will meet with their Supervisor, from whom they will get their instructions, the map of the segment to which they have been assigned, and the form CNPV-03: Verification of the census area/segment.

Together, the Supervisor and group of Interviewers will go to the site where they will identify each segment that will comprise the Supervision Area. They will go to the first segment and identify the starting point. From this exact spot, the Interviewer will mark an X on the map to indicate the starting point. The supervisor must make sure that the first Interviewer correctly identifies and records the first dwellings in the form allocated for this purpose. After this, the Supervisor and the other Interviewers will go to the rest of the segments and will do the same as the first Interviewer.

The Interviewer of the first segment will continue the tour of his/her segment, passing by the rest of the dwellings in the tour and continue recording, in the form CNPV-03: Verification of the census area/segment, each dwelling that he/she comes to.

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During the time of the verification of the census area/segment the Interviewer must visit all building structures that can have a household, even if the building structure is permanent or in not, as in the case of a structure that can come apart, but that is used as a house. Remember that in a business building or commercial establishment there could be persons residing there, which can be difficult to determine if that is the case.

Keeping this type of situation in mind, during the verification time, in the business building or commercial establishment that are part of your segment, make sure you inquire with a neighbor if any person or group of people live in those places. In the case of a small establishment, it could be possible that the owner might live there; the same can happen with security employees or guard staff. Additionally, remember to record all non-permanent households with absent residents and also those households that are vacant during your verification visit.

In the same vein, during the verification time, the Interviewer must take notes on problems or difficulties he/she observes in order to access the households. The Interviewer must consult those concerns with his/her Supervisor at the end of the verification of the area.

The form CNPV-03: Verification of the census area/segment that you should complete during your first tour of the area contains two parts: the first corresponds to the geographic and census identification as well as the identification of the staff you will work with and the second is about household registration.

First Part: Geographic and Census identification and identification of census staff

Geographic Location:

a. Province
b. Municipality
c. Municipal district

Census Location:

a. Census province
b. Census municipality
c. Zone
d. Supervision area
e. Census segment/area

Identification of census staff:

a. Name and last names of the Interviewer
b. Name and last names of the Supervisor

In order to complete the information about the geographic and census location you will transcribe the information given in the map of the area/segment.

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Second Part: Household registration

Touring the urban area

1. In the urban area the census segments are composed of a block or a group of blocks or in some cases a part of a block. In order to start touring the area so you can become familiar with it, the Interviewer must match the physical area with what is illustrated in the map, and search for a reference point such as a school, a church, or a place that verifies that you are in the right area.

2. Once you locate your area, then go to the northeast block of the segment; once there you can start your tour in a clockwise and orderly manner to verify and familiarize yourself with the houses in the area, keeping always as a reference your right side. Once you complete the block continue with the next (in case that there are more), the next in the closest east side and continue that way until you finish your area.

3. In the case that the segments are located in housing buildings or skyscrapers you should follow the aforementioned instructions; locating first the front door of the building and then moving in a spiral way, in other words, recording all households in the first floor, then the second floor, and so on until you complete registration of all households in the building or group of buildings.

Touring the rural area

In order to tour the rural area, if the area contains a downtown, in other words if it is an area similar to an urban area or the streets are defined with blocks and the like then follow the instructions as if you were in an urban area.

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On the other hand, if the rural area does not resemble a city, then you will have a geographical dispersion of the households, or better said, there is distance between one household and the next, then you will locate a starting point in the pathway of entrance to that area. In this case you should start your tour in a zigzag manner or according to the houses you find first when touring the segment.

Instructions to fill in the form CNPV-03: Verification of the census area/segment

1. Geographic location

In the space that follows Province, record the name of the province where your segment is located, do not record abbreviations.

Then, record the code that corresponds to that province. The information will be found in the map of your segment. Similarly, proceed recording the name and corresponding code of the municipality and municipal district.

2. Census location

To fill in the information needed for the census location, refer to the segment map. First you will record the code corresponding to the census province and then the census municipality, continue by recording the code for the area and then the information about the supervision area and finally the code corresponding to the census segment/area.

In this section, there will be no need to record any names, only the codes of each level of the census structure.

3. Identification of census staff

In the corresponding spaces, record your name and last names and those of your Supervisor.

4. Date

Record the date using two digits for the day, two digits for the month and the last two digits of the year, for example, if the date when you toured your segment was on October 26, 2010, then you should record the date as follows: 26/10/10

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5. Household registration

a. Column (1): Verifying order

  • In this column there is the order number that corresponds to each household according to your tour of verification, which in turn will serve you to follow the same order during the census date.
  • The verifying order is already given, and will allow you to know how many households you will visit in your entire segment. The first household you find in your tour is the household that will have number 1 from the column, the second will have number 2, the third will have number 3, the fourth will have number 4… and so on, so if in your tour you find 69 households, the last household must have the number 69.
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b. Column (2): Block number

  • In this column record the corresponding block number of which you are touring. You must record this number according to the block(s) along your tour of the segment. The order depends on the number registered on the map of the segment. This information will be only recorded for blocks in the urban zone.

c. Column (3): Street, road or alley name

  • In this space record clearly the name of the street, road or alley where the household is located. Record the name completely avoiding any abbreviations.
  • If for some reason the street, road or alley name is not visible, ask the neighbors. Once you have investigated the name with the neighbors or the residents of the household, and the street, road or alley still does not appear to have a name, then record "No Name".

d. Column (4): Exterior number (Ext. No.)

  • In this column record the number found in the exterior of the building, meaning, the number of the house or building. In case that the house does not have a number record N/N [no number] and in column (10): Observations, record the color of the front wall.

e. Column (5): Interior number (Int. No.)

  • In this column record the number that is found in the interior of the building, in the front door of the household. This column will mainly be used for building apartments or condominiums. For example: in the case that apartment 3-B is located in Las Flores Street, Building No.32, then in column (5), you should record: 3-B

f. Column (6): Kilometer (km)

  • In this column, record the kilometer number if it exists or if the residents of the location can identify it as such, otherwise leave the column blank.


g. Column (7): Neighborhood/Region

  • In this column record the name of the neighborhood or region where the household is located. This information can be found in the map of the segment.
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h. Column (8): Name of head of household

  • In this column record the name of the male/female head of household, once you have asked the members of the household. If the door is closed ask the closest neighbor, in case that the neighbor does not know leave the space blank until you can contact the members of the household.

i. Column (9): Number of household residents

  • In this column record the total number of household residents by asking a member of the household or a neighbor. If the door is closed, ask the closest neighbor, in case that the neighbor does not know leave the space blank until you can contact the members of the household.

j. Column (10): Observations

  • Record in this column all observations that can be useful to guide you or your Supervisor or for any other person on the census staff that needs to verify the data.

Finally, in the box that appears in the bottom part of the last page of the form, record the number of the last registered household and the total number of registered population for the segment.

Keep in mind that you must turn in the completed form CNPV-03: Verification of the census area/segment to your Supervisor immediately after you have completed the tour. The Supervisor will give you a copy of it, he will keep a copy too and the original will go the Head of Areas.

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7.5 How to proceed in different regions and dispersed settlements

Generally, the periphery in the urban zones and the rural zones are the most difficult areas. This is due to different causes, most of which fall into one of the following categories:

They are zones with uneven or irregular blocks such as:

  • In development or under construction.
  • Streets are not well defined, named or numbered.
  • Uneven topography
  • Dispersed households with no defined blocks

These are reasons that require taking some measures that can help with the verification and touring of the periphery, refer to the following as examples:

a. During your tour make sure you take note of the form and extension of the area, also observe the distribution of the households.

b. In case that you have any doubts, you can ask someone who knows the area and can help you as a guide during your tour.

c. If the area is extensive, it is suggested that you divide it in parts so you can get the best accuracy out of your tour.

d. In case that a region has one part of the households in blocks (a populated grouping), and the other spread out, we recommend that you start in the households on the block. Follow the instructions in section 3 previously, and then continue with the spread out households establishing an order and system and always paying attention to the suggestions of your Supervisor.

e. If your segment or area is comprised of more than one region, your Supervisor will help you locate the first one and then how to access the other(s) using properly the cartography and the route to get to those places.

f. If the households are spread out, start your tour in the first household that is pinpointed in the assigned area. Continue along the ways and routes you find for access to other households always working in an orderly manner and organizing your tour.

g. When you find inconsistencies between the map and the real place, take notes and consult with your Supervisor about it, if you can fix the problems on the map you must do it and inform your Supervisor about it.

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7.6 Tour of the census area

Remember that you will tour the census area by yourself; therefore you must remember all that you learned in the practice tour. Follow the same procedure as you were instructed by your Supervisor.

Remember that in order to cover your entire area, it is necessary to tour in a very systematic and orderly manner; with the goal of identifying properly all households in the area during the census date.

You should not skip any households, because all households must be registered in the order they appear. If you have to return to a household left behind for some reason, remember to leave a form with the order you are following so when you come back, you know where it is and in what order it goes. Always keep in mind that you must completely cover your entire census area/segment.

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7.7 Survey identification for housing and households

Once you have completed the interview and before you continue with your census tour, it is very important that you check and register (in case that they were not registered previously) all the surveys you used with all the identification data, so you know each survey belongs to a specific dwelling or household. In order to do that see the following:

If you use more than one survey because the dwelling has more than one household, then order your surveys from smaller to larger according to the number of household and check that the order number of last household matches with the total amount of households in the dwelling (Section III Household Identification)

Inside the front cover, in Section I Geographic Location, assign one number per household consecutively and record it in the household order number. This number corresponds to the order in which you are completing the visits. When you are in a dwelling and you find more than one household or the dwelling has more than 6 residents, you will use the same household order number for all surveys that are continuations of other households.

Immediately after you record in the survey the household order number within the dwelling, this number indicates which household within the dwelling corresponds to the information.

In each one of the surveys complete Section I: Geographic location. Please transcribe the data without leaving out any letter and taking care to not make a mistake.

When there is more than one household within the dwelling all questions from Sections II and III will be collected only for the survey used in the first household of the dwelling.

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7.8 Survey organizing procedure

At the end of a workday and before you turn in the information to your Supervisor, organize the surveys of the surveyed households the following way:

Per household: Organize the surveys consecutively per household, in the first survey (survey 1) of the household, you should introduce all the surveys completed for that household in the following order (survey one, two, three, etc.)

Per dwelling: Once you have organized and separated the surveys for each household, introduce the survey of household 2 of dwelling 1; if the dwelling has three households in the same way they will be included in the survey of the first household; this way you will have the surveys order by dwelling.

Once you have organized all the surveys by dwelling and household, organize the surveys per block according to the order number of dwelling previously assigned. Organize it from smaller to larger and verify that the numbers run consecutively without interruptions. Additionally, verify that all surveys are completed and that the information is correct.

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7.9 Procedure of data collection delivery

Every day you must turn in the collected information to your Supervisor. Remember to organize all surveys inside the folder as previously directed. The Supervisor will give you back the surveys he finds with errors or that are not completed in order for you to make the necessary changes.

The Supervisor is responsible for setting the time and place where he/she will meet with you every day. These meetings can be done in the working area or in a specific place depending on the flexibility of the staff and the access to working areas. Take advantage of these meetings so you can let your Supervisor know about any questions or concerns that might come up and the solutions you might adopt or use.

Fill in form CNPV-06: Survey summary for each surveyed household, with the summary information for each household once you have completed your daily workload. So before you turn in your surveys to your Supervisor you must have completed this form.
These are the procedures you need to follow for the form:

1. Record all corresponding codes in the geographic and census identification.
2. In column 2 record the code of neighborhood/region in which each household or dwelling is located.
3. In column 3 record the order number of the dwelling that corresponds to each of the surveyed households.
4. In column 4 record the number of males surveyed in each household.
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5. In column 5 record the number of females surveyed in each household.
6. In column 6 record the total number of the population of each of the surveyed households.
7. In the bottom box in the last page of the form, record the total population number by sex.

Remember to turn in the completed form at the end of the entire census.

When you turn in or receive the materials such as the folder, sign form CNPV-02D
Delivery and return of census documents and materials. This form has information with the proof of your work as well as the turn-in of all materials to your Supervisor.

Once you have completed all your work turn it in to your Supervisor. This materials will be sent to the ONE. The only thing you can keep is your hat.

When you finish the census work, turn in the following materials:

  • Completed Surveys
  • Map of your segment/area
  • All left over materials: surveys, brochures and labels
  • Identification badge
  • The form CNPV-06 Survey summary for each surveyed household

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Appendix 1: Glossary of terms

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Economic activity: is the combination of actions which result in the production of goods, service benefits and or in the buying and selling of goods. In other words it is an activity that takes place when resources are combined such as equipment, workforce, production techniques among others in order to obtain specific goods, provide services or for buying and selling goods.

Non-economic activity: is the action destined to satisfy personal or family necessities, for the well-being of the household, the family and its members, in which the work excludes any benefits from goods or services for others.

Agriculture: activity related to the sowing and harvesting of different plants and the selling of those products.

Agriculture and Livestock: is the activity related to the harvesting of land and farming livestock; it includes both industries.

Literate: is a person 15 years of age or older that knows how to read and write.

Illiterate: is a person 15 years of age or older that does not know how to read or write.

Year of entrance to the Dominican Republic: establishes the year in which a person born in a different country entered the national territory of the Dominican Republic. It allows for a classification of foreigners according to the date of entrance into the country. This is directed to persons that enter the country with the purpose of living in the country permanently.

Apartment in the building: is a single household of solid construction that is part of a bigger complex of households and that shares a wall, roof or floor with other households. This includes housing in horizontal condominiums. The principal characteristic is that it has an independent entrance.

Landlord: is the person who gives the right to use a property to another person (such as a household, farm or any building or property) for a specific time and for a specific price.

Rent: is a mutual agreement in which the landlord, an owner of a property or building, lets a person use that property or building for a specific time in turn for a payment or service.

School attendance: is the condition that determines if a person attended any accredited educational institution or program, in other words public or private, with levels ranging from preschool, primary or basic school, secondary or high school and university.

Absent residents during the census visit: means that at the moment of the survey there were no members of the household present when you knocked on the door.

Poultry farming: is the activity related to the farming of poultry and the selling of products derived from it.

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Helped in a familiar or unrelated business: persons 10 years of age or older that helped a relative or non-relative with a business, farm or family activity during the week before the interview.

Helped in agriculture or livestock: persons 10 years of age or older that helped in agriculture or livestock activity during the week before the interview.

In exchange of payment helped in another type of activity: this refers to the population of working age people that declared to have done a job or activity in exchange of payment during the week before the interview.

Neighborhood: is an administrative unit that divides the urban zones of each municipality or municipal districts. Generally, neighborhoods are delimited by streets, avenues, or blocks and have public basic services that correspond to cities.

Street: is the access way to transportation and vehicles which define it as such and also according to the cadastral registry.

Alley: is a narrow and long access way or path between walls.

Path: it is the place where usually pedestrians walk which might not be paved or planned.

Career: is the type of degree or career a person receives in the technical or professional areas.

Married: is the person that during the census is living with another person as married legally (by Law) or by the church.

Downtown: is a housing concentration which usually exists in sections or regions with characteristics of urban like spaces, since they have more than 50 households or buildings.

Type of household: is the classification of a household by a family or people who do not have family ties, but who share expenses, therefore the type of household is regarded according to the relationship with the head of household (see definition of household).

Type of private household: is the differentiation of a household according to its infrastructure characteristics, independence and construction (see definition of household).

Occupation condition of the person: this is the situation that classifies the population in economically active or inactive, according to the work they perform or the search for an economic activity during the week before the census.

Occupation condition of the household: this situation helps classify households as occupied with present residents, occupied with absent residents or vacant.

Spouse resident: is the person declared as a spouse (male or female) to the head of household and at the moment of the census is a permanent resident of said household.

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Military or police headquarters: is a type of collective dwelling that houses military or police personnel.

Room: is a delimited space in a household that has fixed walls and a roof of any material for the purpose of housing people and where they can have different family activities. Bathrooms, hallways, patios and garages are not considered as rooms of the household.

Unoccupied person: This group includes persons age 10 or older who do not work, but would like to work and recently have been looking for a paid job.

Handicap person: This reflects the consequences of a deficiency in the functional performance of an individual. The disabilities can present disorders for a person (individual dimension).

Working availability: in a general sense, these criteria refer to the working availability of a group of the population in a specific age category that has not searched for a job the week previous to the census but that can accept a job if it was offered to them.

Municipal district: is part or section of a municipality.

Divorced: is the person who was married but is legally divorced from his/her partner and currently does not have another partner.

Household worker: is a person does the household chores of the home of another person and receives payment in salary or kind from that work.

Age: the time from the date of birth to the census date. For the IX National Population and Housing Census 2010 we will count the completed years of age of the population.

Median age: age that divides the population in two equal parts, in other words the age of 50% of the total population.

Average age: refers to the average age of the entire population.

Structure: is any independent and sustained structure that can be used for housing, commercial or industrial purposes or for other services.

Education: is the multidirectional process in which knowledge, values, and customs and how the human being should behave is transmitted.

Basic education: contributes with the integral formation of a person by educating him/her by means of holistic development such as scientific, technical, humanistic and artistic abilities.

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Preschool Education: is the previous phase of basic education.

Basic level: is the phase in the educational process considered to be the minimum level of education that all citizens of the country have a right to receive. This level usually starts at the age of 6. In the Dominican Republic, the basic level is known as the "primary school" and it lasts for eight years and starts in first grade through eighth grade.

Initial level: it is the first level of education, which is taught before basic education level, and it is directed to the population of children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old.

Secondary level: this is the level after the basic level. It is usually known as "high school". This level is organized in four years, divided in two cycles of two years each. This level offers general training as well as options to guide students' abilities, interests, vocation and necessities, in order to efficiently prepare students for the workforce and/or further studies. All students have the first cycle of the secondary level in common.

Higher level: this level comprises different institutes of higher education and universities. The institutes offer degrees for technical jobs, the universities offer professional degrees in technical fields as well as academic and postgraduate or masters levels.

  • A technical degree lasts for two years.
  • A professional degree lasts for at least three to four years.
  • A postgraduate degree lasts for one year, after a professional degree.
  • A master's degree lasts for two years and includes the year of postgraduate degree for those who want to continue studying.

Emigrant: is the person that leaves a determined geographical unit (such as a province, municipality, or country) to reside permanently in a different one.

Census registry: is the activity of the census in which the Interviewer visits each of the households in his/her segment and gathers information about the household and its residents by performing a survey.

Employee: is any person that works for a person, business, company or for a public or private branch who may or may not receive payment in return, in the form of a salary, a commission, a tip or payment in kind. This includes persons that work outside of the establishment, but are still legally bound to it as a place of employment, such as workers who are temporarily absent due to an illness or accident, or have a work conflict, are on vacation or other type of leave, non-authorized absences, etcetera.

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Salary paid employee is the person who maintains a dependent relationship to the company or institution that he/she works for and receives pay in the form of a salary, either in cash or kind.

Employer or Owner is the person who solely runs or manages their own business or career, employing one or more paid employees, in addition to family members or non-relatives who work, although not necessarily paid.

Business: is any organization legally defined as, having independent accountants, subjected to the legal authorities that may be a legal or physical person, and with the purpose of performing, in one or more locations, one or more activities in the production of goods or lending of services.

Marital status: establishes the condition of each person in relation to the civil union, marriage according to the prevailing laws or customs in a country.

Age structure: is the relative distribution of the population per major age groups. A population's age structure affects the overall socioeconomic conditions in a nation. Countries with young populations (having a high percentage of the population under the age of 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (having a large portion of the population over the age of 65) need to invest more in their health care system.

Student: a member of the household that, on the given date of the census interview, studies or attends a school, and does not have other economic engagements.

Agricultural development: a parcel of land used entirely or partially for growing crops, trees, or raising animals; without regard to the title, size, or location, by a producer and the members of the household. A number of small farms or plots of land together constitute one unit as long as they are within the same district. To be considered as such, they should comply with one of the following requirements:

  • A plot of cultivated land
  • A stable or stockyard dedicated for livestock with:
  • One head of cattle more than 2 years old.
  • Two heads of cattle less than 2 years old.
  • Five smaller animals (sheep, goats, pigs, etc.)
  • Twenty five turkeys, geese, ducks, or rabbits.
  • Fifty chickens, roosters, egg-laying hens, or those used for meat.
  • Ten beehives for harvesting honey.

Official date of the Census: is the day in reference for the population being surveyed.

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Fertility: is the study of births of live children, in relation to the women of a fertile agem or rather, between the ages of 15 and 49.

Farm: is a plot of land located in the city or the country, dedicated for use in agricultural production or raising livestock.

Cattle: type of livestock related to cows.

Shared living expenses: is the part of the budget that is shared among the members of the household, for buying food or other goods for use or consumption by the household members.

School grade: determined amount of time that is separated by educational cycles, and that correspond to the organization and sequence of curriculum contents.

Living children: are those who, on the date of the census, are found alive, may or may not live with their parents, either in another part of the country or abroad.

Household: is a person or a group of people that share their living expenses and reside under the same roof.

Family home: is one in which at least one of the members is related to the head of household; classified as extended, conjoined, or nuclear.

Non-family home: is one in which none of the members' share a kinship with one another or the head of household; classified as homes with co-residents, or single persons.

Nuclear home: composed of the head of household and his/her spouse; the head of household, spouse, and children; or the head of household and children. Consider children independently of their marital status, as long as they do not live with a spouse and children; there could also be domestic employees and their relatives.

Single person home: formed by only one person.

Hospital or health center: is a collective dwelling that serves as lodging for people with health issues; these places also offer diagnostic evaluations and treatments for those who require it.

Permanently disabled to work: any person 10 years or older, who does not perform any activity for economic gain, due to a physical or mental disability.

Appropriate informant: is a permanent resident of a household or the person who knows information about all the residents or members of the household. It could be the female/male head of household, their spouse, or a person that is 15 years of age or older.

Inappropriate informant: is a person who does not fulfill the criteria of appropriate informant during the census visit.

Immigrant: any person who enters a determined geographical unit (province, municipality, or country), in order to stay and live there.

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Head of household: is a person who is recognized as such by the rest of the household members, can be a man or woman.

Retired or on a pension: this is a person whose only income comes from a pension that he/she may have as a widow/widower, orphan, disability, illness, or years of service.

Place of birth: is the territorial division in which a person was born; to those born abroad, it is the country of birth.

Permanent residence: the geographical place where the person being surveyed lives at the moment of the census has lived for a while and where he/she plans to reside for some time.

Residence from 5 years ago: refers to the municipality of the Dominican Republic, or foreign country in which the person resided, exactly 5 years prior to the date of the census survey.

Block: is the unit of reference for the operational task of gathering census data. It contains a variety of dwellings and/or buildings, patios or lots zoned for residential, commercial or industrial use.

Geostatistic framework of one: is the delimitation of national territory into in area codes with the purpose of referencing the statistical information and census data. The limits might not coincide with the political division of the country.

Members of the household: are the people that reside permanently in a dwelling and share living expenses, most commonly food.

Migration: it is the change of residence within the country (internal migration) and from one country to another (international migration).

Migrant: is a person who changes residence and it can mean crossing some political border.

Ownership: it describes the way that a person can possess land.

One-parent family: is a family home composed of the head of household and children and other members of the family, but the head of household has no spouse.

Mortality: the term mortality refers to deaths as a component of population change.

Municipality: is a territorial division of a province, run by a syndicate or mayor. It is composed of an urban and a rural zone. Each municipality is identified by a code of two digits that do not repeat within the province. It is the third territorial division according to size.

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Municipality of birth: is the municipality where the interviewee's mother lived when he/she was born. When there is information about the municipality of birth, there could be also information about the province in which the municipality belongs.

Municipality of residence during October 2005: is the municipality where the interviewee resided five years before the census time. The information about the municipality also determines the province to which it belongs.

Born alive: according to the UN "is the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of conception, irrespective of the duration of pregnancy, which after such separation, breathes or shows any other evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord or definite movement of voluntary muscles, whether or not the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached; each product of such a birth is considered live born (all live-born infants should be registered and counted as such, irrespective of gestational age or whether alive or dead at the time of registration, and if they die at any time following birth they should also be registered and counted as deaths)"

School level: refers to each stage in the educational system that has the purpose of psychological and physical development of students as well as their social needs. The Dominican education system comprises the following levels: initial, basic, secondary and higher levels.

Name of permanent residents of the household: identifies the members of the household by their specific names.

Number of households: the amount of households identified in a dwelling given that they share food expenses.

Number of households within the dwelling: the household is the unit for the census survey. For the census collection, this is key, since it determines the number of surveys the Interviewer will use according to the number of households in a dwelling.

Number of persons in the dwelling: is the amount of people who reside permanently in a dwelling, including the household employees who sleep in the dwelling.

Never married or in a civil union: is the person that does not have a partner and was never married or in a civil union with anybody.

Occupation: is the type of work a person who declared to have a job does or the type of job a person did in the past.

Main occupation: this refers to the main occupation that a person has or had during the week before the census. In other words, it is the person that worked during the week of reference. The Interviewer's task is to determine with the interviewee what was the main occupation he/she performed.

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Household residents: are the people that permanently live in a household, it excludes people in refugees camps, those who do not have a house (homeless people) and persons who serve abroad for the Dominican External Services and also those estimated living in vacant households.

Other type of dwelling: this could be a dwelling built with precarious materials and of an improvised nature.

[Image of a house]

Country of birth: it is the country of birth of the interviewee, independently from his/her current nationality. This enables the census to distinguish between people born in the Dominican Republic and those who were born in another country. This question provides information about international immigrants residing in the country and their characteristics.

Region: The smallest geographical unit of a rural area and is part of a section.

Smallholding or plot: A parcel of uniform land either due to having only one owner, only one type of crop, or other economic activity.

Kinship: Link between any of the members of the household and the head of household. Regardless of the type of link, whether it is a relation by marriage, blood or by convenience.

Livestock: activity of raising animals for either own consumption or for sale.

Hostel or hotel: establishments that accommodate lodgings for a short period of time.

Census period: refers to the days during which the census data is collected.

Working staff: refers to the people who work in an establishment for at least one third of the work day, either permanent or a contracted employee. These people may or may not receive a salary, similarly for people working outside of the workplace though still employed. This also includes workers on strike, on a leave of absence, vacation, or sick leave.

Room in a bunkhouse: a room used as a bedroom in a grouping of dwellings, usually located in a patio or an alley.

Non-working population: refers to the population that has worked or been employed previously, but during the current time happens to be unemployed or not working.

Unemployed population: all people 10 years or older who, during the period in reference, declared to be without a job, but were actively looking for work.

Active Economic Population (AEP): is the total number of people age 10 or...

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...older who worked in some economic activity during the reference period, and those who did not work, but were actively looking for a job.

Inactive Economic Population (IEP): is the total number of people aged 10 or older who did not work or actively pursue employment during the reference period. This includes students, housewives, rental landlord, retirees, disabled, etc., who do not produce any economic activity.

Household Population: are surveyed people, nationals and foreigners, who reside permanently in the country, and occupy a permanent dwelling.

Homeless population: is the population of people without a home, who live in the streets on a regular basis. Due to high mobility, this population is difficult to recognize and survey.

Employed population: are all people age 10 or older that had some type of employment or work during the period in reference (the week prior to the census survey). This includes those who at the time of the census had a job, but during the time in reference were not working due to paid time off, vacation time, sick leave, strike, lack of supplies, etc.

Total population: all the people surveyed, both national and foreign, who permanently live in the country. The grand total is referred to on the date of the official census. This includes Dominicans who serve in diplomatic roles overseas, their families who are surveyed wherever they are appointed; this also includes the population without dwellings. This does not include foreigners who are serving as diplomats in the country, nor their families.

Producer: in the work sector, refers to each person that is affiliated with the production of goods or services.

Agriculture and livestock producer: is a natural person who makes decisions and manages activities of production and sale within the Sector of Agricultural and Livestock Production.

Province: is the largest geographic area in the political division of the Dominican Republic. The national territory is divided into 31 provinces and a National District. Each province has its own two-digit code that was assigned in alphabetical order.

Household chores: this type of activity is done by the person who works exclusively as a caretaker in his/her own home.

Activity branch: refers to the type of work or service that is produced by a person in a given establishment or business. It is necessary to indicate the type of product or service that is produced or sold in that establishment.

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Shelter: is an improvised housing or place for living. It is considered as a household as long as there are people living there.

Relation of demographic dependency: it is the result of a division between the total number of dependents (children under age 15, and elders over age 64) over the total number of independent people (between ages 15-64) and this result multiplied by a hundred.

Relation of demographic dependency (in households): it is the result of dividing the total number of dependents (children under age 15, and elders over age 64) by the total number of independent people (between ages 15-64). According to this, the households are classified as: a) with no dependents, b) at least one dependent per independent person, c) more than one, but less than two dependents per independent person, d)more than 2 but less than 3 dependents per independent person, e) 3 or more dependents per independent person and f) no independent person.

Landlord: is any person who is economically active and receives payment from his/her rents, his/her investment or his/her retirement.

Permanent household: is the specific place of residence (a household or dwelling where a person usually sleeps and eats) that is owned by a person and the place where he/she can return at any time, in other words, it is the place a where the person can reply to the question: Where do you live?

Previous permanent household: it is the geographic space where the interviewee used to live permanently before he/she moved to the place where he/she is being surveyed.

Refuse to give information: means that there will be no interview due to the lack of cooperation by the informant.

Section: is a rural political-administrative jurisdiction constituted by regions. Usually it is equal to a zone in the census operations.

Sector of activity: it is the first level of grouping of related economic activities, in terms of their similarity in the process of production in the economic unit, company, business, establishment or place where the employed population worked during the period in reference. The primary sector is made up of the agricultural, livestock, lumbering, hunting and fishing; the secondary sector includes mining, drilling and extraction of oil or natural gas, the manufacturing industry, generation and distribution of electricity, water distribution, and construction; the third sector encompasses commercial activities, transportation, Government, and others.

Segment: is a bounded geographic area. Each segment will have approximately 80 houses or dwellings in urban areas; meanwhile, rural areas will have on average approximately 60 houses.

Separated legally or religiously: represents the status of a person who is married legally or through the church, but is currently separated from his/her partner and does not have another partner.

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Separated from a civil union is the person who was in union with a partner but currently does not have a partner.

Sex: is a biological condition that distinguishes male from female.

Total area: is the total area for the purpose of agriculture, without taking into account the ownership, use or location of the lands that form the total area.

Household size: refers to the number of members that make up the household.

Average household size: is the result of dividing the total members of the households by the total number of households.

Land: a parcel of land equal to 628.86m².

Household ownership: determines the condition of ownership of a dwelling and records the number of households belonging to the dwelling, or if another condition of ownership applies (tenant, inherited or gifted, occupant, etc). This information is of great importance in making estimations of housing demand.

Had a job but did not work: refers to the members of the household who, although hold a job, on the date of the census inquiry were absent from work due to reasons such as: on vacation, medical leave, on strike, etc.

Time of residence in the country: refers to the interval of time, measured in years from the time the person, who was born outside of the country, arrived to the country to live until the date of the census.
Keep in mind that all people who normally live in a dwelling are considered permanent residents. That is, they sleep there, prepare their food, eat and are sheltered from the elements in that place, and therefore is considered a residence.

Rented lands: are those lands that are allowed to be used or enjoyed by a person who is not the owner for a determined amount of time, for a certain price or exchange of service that is satisfactory to the renter.

Type of household: is the classification of the household as either familiar or unrelated, determined by the existence or absence of family relationship between the members of the household and the head of household.

Type of dwelling: is the differentiation of a dwelling per the use of the people who make up the households, or rather the people who have to comply with the code of conduct for the given accommodations. The dwelling is classified, according to its type, as single or collective.

Worked: refers to the people who carried out some form of economic activity in exchange for pay or wages, during the time period in reference (the week prior to the census survey).

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Independent Worker is the type of worker that has neither a boss, nor is in charge of employees or laborers. The business or company only has one worker, not belonging to another organization that sells and/or produces goods and/or services for that which a price is charged. Examples: an independent lawyer, engineer, plumber, electrician, door to door salesperson, artisan, etc.

Family worker with no remuneration is the person who works in the business or company of a family member or non-family member without pay, for at least one hour during the week before the census. However, if the person is regularly paid a pre-determined amount of money, that could be considered a salary, he/she should be recorded as a paid employee.

Last (male or female) child born alive: are the last children born alive during the census independently of living or not with the parents, in another part of the country or abroad.

Living together: is a person that currently is living together with a person in civil union or by consent without being married legally or by religion.

Sells a product: refers to the population of people age 10 or older who during the reference period, worked selling products or goods.

Verification: is the action that allows the precise verification and validation of something known or of data collected.

Collective dwellings: is designed to be inhabited by a group of people without family ties, who live together due to health, work, religion, study, specific discipline, as guests, or for social reasons.

Collective dwellings are classified as:
Hostel, guesthouse, hotel
Military barracks
Prison
Hospital or Health Center
Religious Institution, boarding school
Other type of collective residence

Collective dwelling with independent household: are those collective dwellings that, besides lodging people for reasons such as living assistance, health, education, religion, discipline or services, must abide by the code of conduct of the collective dwelling, but house people who also share food expenses, constituting a household independent from the rest of the the residents in the dwelling.

Dwelling shared with a business: is the dwelling used not only for living but that has a part in which there is an economic activity is performed.

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Vacant dwelling: is a house that is uninhabited and it is closed. It could be for rent, or simply vacant and closed.

Duplicated dwellings: are dwellings that were surveyed and, according to methodological definitions, were not single dwellings or were not within the boundaries of the segment.

Dwelling in construction: is a dwelling that is only partially built, or rather has not been finished even though it is being used to live.

Occupied dwelling: is one in which at the moment of the survey, it is occupied by one or more people that claim to reside there on a regular basis.

Omitted household: are those que, according to methodological definitions, should have been surveyed in a segment, but were not.

Single dwelling: Is one that is inhabited by a person or group of people. It can be classified as:

1. Independent House: is located on a plot of land and does not share any walls or other part of the construction with other dwellings.

2. Apartment: the principal characteristic of an apartment is that it has its own entrance from a patio, stairway, or hallway, even though it shares a common entrance from the street.

3. A Room in a bunkhouse or in the back of household: is a habitable space within a group of dwellings generally located in a patio or alleyway, with an independent entrance from the alley or patio.

4. A Barrack: is a type of bunkhouse that shares a roof and usually exists in outbuildings of a sugar refinery or other temporary constructions, typically serves as lodging for people in need.

5. A Place not designated for housing: is a single dwelling with permanent construction that was built with a different purpose in mind than that of a dwelling, but at the time of the census survey is found to be inhabited by one or more people.

6. House shared as a business: is a dwelling that, in addition to being used for living has a part of the building designated for some type of small business.

Single-family dwelling and establishment: is a dwelling that, in addition to being used as a space for one or more people to live in, related by blood or not, also occupies the space of a commercial establishment.

Widow/widower is the person who was married, but his/her partner is deceased and currently does not have another partner.

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Appendix 2: Control Forms

[Pages 120- 125]

[Forms have been omitted]