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[PAGE 1]

Introduction

The content of this manual intends to unify the essential themes and concepts that will be presented to understand the census. Simultaneously, it serves as a tool for all of the interviewers to do their important census job for the country.

The first part of the manual highlights the importance of the census, the census data and the interviewers' responsibilities; the required tools, basic cartographic concepts among other themes.

The second part, explains the structure and design of the census survey, the instructions to collect data and all the questions that need to be researched.

The images facilitate the comprehension and content of the manual.

The interviewers and all census' staff, has in this manual a reference document that can be consulted when needed it. The success of the census depends upon the engagement of everyone.

[PAGE 2]

Contents

Introduction ii
What is the Population and Housing Census? 3
What is the importance of the Census? 3
What is the Census data useful? 3
What does the law say about the Census? 4
What is the importance of the interviewer? 4
What are the interviewer's responsibilities? 5
What are the materials needed to collect data? 5
General Instructions for the Survey 9
General Directions to physically take care of the Census Survey? 9
General Directions to fill in the Census Card 10
What are the cartographic concepts that should be known? 11
How is the Census Card constructed? 12
How should the Census Card be filled in? 13
Section I Identification 12
Section II Housing Characteristics 13
Section III Household Identification 17
Section IV Household Characteristics 18
Section V List Of Household Members 20
Section VI International Emigration And Remittances 23
Section VII Personal Characteristics 24
Section VIII Identification Of Agricultural Producers 40

[PAGE 3]

What is the census of population and housing?
"is a complete process of collection, reception, assessment, analysis, publication and distribution of demographic, economic and social data, which relate, at a given moment in time, to all the residents of a country or of a well-defined partial geographic area" *(United Nations, 1992)

What is the importance of the Census?
The Census is the main source of demographic and social data of the country, which provides information of all of its inhabitants of all households and their location in the rural zones as well as in the neighborhoods of the urban zones. Specifically, the Census provides a snapshot of real Dominican life, in the following aspects:

a) Population size
b) Population's composition by sex and age
c) Internal and International Migration
d) Economically Active Population (PEA)
e) Distribution of occupation of the Economically Active Population
f) Employment and Unemployment
g) Population with physical or mental limitations
h) School Attendance
i) Literacy Level
j) Household Type and Condition
k) Household Size and Composition
l) Mortality and Fertility, and
m) Other Aspects

What is the Census data used for?

The Census Data is used for:

The formulation and evaluation of social and economic policies
The programs of social and economic investment to benefit the population
The calculation of needs such as health services, employment, housing, education, among others.

Examples:
a) The need of classes and teachers for primary and secondary levels.
b) Unsatisfied demand of electricity services, garbage collection, water supplies, among others.

*United Nations: Population and Housing Censuses Handbook, Part II. New York; 1992.

[PAGE 4]

Moreover, the Census Data:

Provides the needed sample framework to conduct the sample surveys given after the census.
Provides the framework for the National Agricultural Census, which is conducted after the Population and Housing Census.
Is used for public and private entities, researchers, and non-profit organizations, students, etc.

What does the law say about the Census?

The Law No. 5096 of March 6th, 1959, establishes that the National Office of Statistics (ONE) is the entity that organizes and directs the Population and Housing Census in the country. Said Law establishes that all residents should provide the required information and collaboration when needed it by the ONE.

The law sanctions those who do not follow the established norm.

According to this Law, the gathered data and information is exclusively confidential, and it will be used for the preparation of global statistical reviews and never individual ones.

What is the importance of the interviewer?

You have the important task of requesting, obtaining and collecting data from households, homes and people that comprise the different areas of your list of registered residents.

The success of the census depends upon the engagement and quality of work of each interviewer.

[PAGE 5]

What are the interviewer's responsibilities?

You will have an area or census section given by your supervisor. It is your responsibility to collect all the data of that section, always working strictly within its limits and conducting the surveys to all the households within the area even if they do not appear in the map.

A Census Section is the group of households assign to each interviewer to be surveyed during the three days of the Census. You will have a supervisor, who will supply you with the documents you need in order to conduct your work, and will provide you with the technical support and the required instructions for the collection of data.

What do you have to do before the census?

Attend all training sessions in a punctual manner.
Study the Interviewer's Manual and follow all its instructions.
Tour and familiarize yourself with your area or census section.

What do you have to do during the census?

Survey all permanent residents of each household. A permanent resident is a person that lives in the household permanently.
Be in your designated location at the designated time to start your census work.
Use the proper identification on your t-shirt or on the front pocket of your blouse or shirt.
Follow your supervisor directions and ask or inform him/her of any important news or difficulties you might encounter.

Create a population summary of Section V of the Census Survey and immediately record all required information in columns 1-5.

[PAGE 6]

Check every Census Survey once the interview is over to make sure that:

a) Every permanent household member was registered.
b) All questions were asked according to age limits (for children 3 years or older, or children 5 years or older, children 10 years or older, etc.)
c) The chart population summary of Section V of the Census Survey that appears below the list of household members matches the same number of male and female residents (column 5).
d) The skips, filters or questions that go unanswered because they were not applicable, were respected.
e) The number and information of the registered people in Section V (list of household members), matches with the number of registered residents and their information in Section VII (personal characteristics).

What do you have to do after the Census?

After you are done with the interviews in each household and checked every Census Survey, you must stick the label "surveyed" in front of each house, in a visible place with the corresponding codes.

Make sure you interview every household on your designated area.
Fill in correctly and completely each form (CPV) that corresponds to your area.

Organize your work material and give it back to your supervisor, with all filled and checked Census Surveys.

In a different envelope put all left forms and surveys in an organized manner and give it to your supervisor.

What are the materials needed to collect data?

You will receive a folder with the following materials:

A map of the households of your assigned areas, this map will be attached to the front of the folder

The Interviewer's manual

Census Surveys

Forms CPV

An accredited identification

Labels and stickers with "SURVEYED"

Two pencils

A pencil sharpener

An eraser

Only use the materials given to you by your supervisor. In case that you lose a pencil request another one to your supervisor.

[PAGE 7]

Who should you ask for information?

You should recognize who is the household head to conduct the interview. If the household head is absent, ask the information to an adult that knows everyone in the household.

In case that the household does not have an adult, continue interviewing other households on your area and later return to the pending household.

Where should you conduct the interview?

The household members should be interviewed in their permanent residence, in other words, you should conduct the interview in every household where the people there live as permanent residents.

Where should you record all the information from the interview?

You must record all the information you receive in the following documents:

Census Survey
This is the questionnaire in the form of a small notebook, which you will use to record information about the household and its permanent residents.

Form CPV-02 (List and Summary of Interviewed Households)

This form is used to record the address of the household, the cluster number/number of order, the household head, the number of census surveys used in the household and a summary of the household and population of each place surveyed.

[PAGE 8]
Form CPV-03 (Interviewer's Summary)
This form is a summary that is used to record the geographic location and census registry of the household and also to corroborate form CPV-02's summary.

Form CPV-04 (List of [male and female] Agricultural Producers)
This form is used in order to create a list of the different agricultural producers within the census area.

Interviewer, please pay close attention to the following:

Be kind and respectful in all interviews

Record only what the interviewee says. If you do not understand well an answer, repeat the question slowly and listen carefully for the answer.

This is an individual assignment. Therefore, only you should working on it.

All information collected in the census is strictly confidential, therefore, only you and your supervisor should handle the census surveys.
During the Census time your should only focus on your assignment.

Be discreet with all the information that you collect. Remember that all information is confidential under the 5096 Law.

Use your materials for their purpose.

In case that you get sick during the census, let your supervisor know, immediately.

[PAGE 9]

General Instructions for the Survey

Strictly follow all the instruction on your Interviewer's Manual

Be neutral during the interview. Avoid suggesting with body language or words an answer.

Read each question exactly how is written in the survey, fill it in and slowly continue, making sure you follow the order of each question. In case that the interviewee has a difficulty understanding the question, help him/her understand the question without inducing him/her to a specific answer.

Carefully follow each skip, and then the instructions in the survey. Be careful, avoid any errors.

When the interview is finished make sure that all the sections in the census survey are correctly filled in, including those that correspond to each household member.

General guidelines on how to take care of the census survey.

Before you go to the fieldwork, verify if any questionnaire is incorrectly printed then if there is one put it aside and give it to your supervisor.

Make sure you have an adequate space where you can fill in the questionnaire, such as a table or a flat surface no smaller than the booklet open, and also make sure that that surface or space is not wet or greasy.

Do not fold, crush or reverse any page of the questionnaire booklet.

Do not wet the questionnaire nor touch it with dirty or greasy hands.

Do not tear up nor add any pages to the booklet.

Do not turn over the booklet

If a questionnaire gets damaged exchange it for a new one. Carefully copy all the collected information and then destroy the damaged one.

[PAGE 10]

General Directions to fill in the Census Survey

The results from each Census Survey will be collected by an optical reader (scanner), that requires the following steps in its writing:

Some information is recorded by FILLING IN A BUBBLE in each question. In case that a question contains more than one answer fill in all the BUBBLES necessary.

Other information will be recorded in letters or numbers that should be written in the provided boxes. Make sure that you completely fill in all boxes and bubbles.

Fill in the bubbles that correspond to the correct question without recording outside of the bubble. You can start recording the border of the bubble until you complete filling in the full bubble.

In the survey as well as in the Interviewer's Summary use only the pencil provided by the Office of National Statistics.

Write carefully and precisely.

Avoid erasing, and when necessary, do it carefully, without leaving traces or pieces of the eraser in the paper. Use the eraser provided by the ONS, which will be included in your folder.

Write in the boxes only an uppercase letter, with no accents, and leaving a space within words. Write full words, never abbreviating or shortening them.

In case that you make a mistake when writing, do not record an ‘x'. Use the eraser.

When a question contains two or more lines of boxes, you should write in them as if it is a continuation of the next, no leaving extra spaces within words.

In case that the answer is a number, fill in the box from right to left, leaving in black the boxes on the left not on the right. Please see the example: [Note: example shows where to put the number]

[PAGE 11]

What are the cartographic concepts that should be known?

Dominican Republic is divided into political-administrative units: 9 Regions, 31 provinces and a National District. Each province is divided into municipalities, municipal districts, sections and regions.

In order to facilitate your census work and its supervision, the Office of National Statistics, subdivides said units in smaller areas, denominated zones, supervision areas and census segments.

A census segment is the group of households assigned to an interviewer. It could be a building or condominium of apartments, part of a building, a full block, or part of a block, two or more blocks with less households or an area where households are scattered.

[Map image omitted]

[In a box: Each census segment represents the area where the interviewer will work during the three days of the Census]

The map or sketch that is attached to the front of your folder contains the description of the limits of your segment, indicated by yellow lines. Additionally, the map, contains information in order to identify the sector, be it: Province, Municipality, or Municipal District, Urban Zone, Section, Neighborhood (in the city) or Rural Zones, as well as the codes of each area, a supervised area and segments previously surveyed.

A Supervised Area is the group of places supervised by one supervisor. It is a group of 1 to 5 segments, and it is indicated by the green lines.

The Census Area is the group of approximately 10 supervised areas, and it is indicated by the red lines.

[PAGE 12]

How is the Census Survey/Questionnaire constructed?
The Census Survey has 8 sections, which are described as follows:

Section I Identification
This section contains the number of folder, cluster number, number of order of the household in the dwelling and address of each household (street, road or dirt road, house number or building number, apartment number or floor number, in case of a condominium or a building).

Section II Housing Characteristics
This section contains information on the physical conditions of the household, sources of pollution, etc.

Section III Household Identification
This section determines the number of houses that belong to a dwelling.

Section IV Household Characteristics
This section contains information about the conditions and characteristics of households (utilities, appliances, household layout/floor plan, etc.

Section V List of Household Members
This section contains the list of permanent residents and their general characteristics (kinship, relationship to household head, age, sex), as well as a summary of the entire population.

Section VI International Emigration and Remittances
This section is destined to obtain information about the total number of Dominicans that reside abroad, categorized by sex and the total amount of remittances sent to Dominican households.

[PAGE 13]

Section VII Personal Characteristics
This section contains the different personal characteristics of household members, such as sex, age, education level, income, etc. This section has two pages for each household member.

Section VIII Identification of Agricultural Producers
This section has the purpose of generating a list of agricultural producers in the country, which will be used for the National Agricultural Census, which is conducted after the Population and Housing Census.

How should the Census Survey be filled in?

Section I Identification

Folder Number. Write in the boxes the number of the folder corresponding to the number in the front of the folder. [Image of the boxes where number goes]

Cluster number. You should record 01 in the first surveyed household, 02 for the second, 03 for the third and so on, until you include all households in your assigned area.

Number of order of the household in the dwelling. For the first household, write 1 in the correct box. If the dwelling contains more than one household, you should record each one, writing 2 for the second household, 3 for the third one, 4 for the fourth one and so on.
[Image of the boxes where number goes]

Write the name of the street, road or dirt road, the house number or building number, apartment number or floor number.

[Image of the boxes to record each household in a dwelling]

Section II Housing Characteristics

A dwelling is any space or locale that is inhabited or constructed for residence, separated or independent, for permanent or temporary housing for people related or not.

Also, a dwelling is any type of shelter, fixed or mobile, occupied for housing. For example: a van, a wagon, a cave, an abandoned bus, etc.

The dwellings should have an independent entrance, meaning, you should not go or leave the dwelling through another one. Dwellings should have walls, barriers or fences and a ceiling.

[PAGE 14]

Often times a dwelling can be a business, store or shop, which contains a space where people reside or sleep.

It should be consider built-in parts of the dwelling: rooms with an entrance or structures annexed to the principal dwelling, used by household members, including maids or home assistance workers.

In case that the dwelling is occupied or not, but with no one there, record per observation questions 1,2 and 3, and then go to the following household.

In case that the dwelling is occupied with residents there, fill in by observation questions 1-6 and continue with the questionnaire.

Questions 1: Household type

a) Household:
Is that one which is inhabited by a person or group of people. It could be an independent house, an apartment, a room in a bunkhouse, a barrack, etc. A household can contain more than one home. [Three images of different household types]

1. Independent House: place where people to enter and exit their house do not have to go through another one. An independent house can have direct access from the street or from the backyard, corridor or communal stairs.
2. Apartment: part of a building that has an independent entrance from a corridor or stairs and has access to a street.
3. Room in a bunkhouse or in the back of premises: unit of rooms generally in backyards or alleys.
4. Room in barracón: unit of rooms with a common roof that are found in bateyes, settlements or communities that developed around the sugar industry, or in temporary housing sites established to house victims of natural disasters.
5. Premises not intended for housing: space that was not originally designated as a place to live, however is being used as such during the census; for example, a garage, a barn, etc.

[PAGE 15]

6. House in construction: house or dwelling that is partially constructed or in construction and can house people permanently or provisionally.

7. Housing shared with business: house that is used as a business.

8. Other: house built with recycled materials or improvised housing.

[Box: A Collective Household does not have a household head]

b) Collective Household

A house that is a collective household, means a group of people with no family ties that for reasons such as health, work, religion, studies, discipline, accommodation, etc. live together.

A collective household could be: a hotel, a boarding house, a military or police barracks, a prison, a hospital or health center, a religious institutions or boarding schools or any other type such as nursing home, or a shelter.

Question 2: You arrive to the household by:

The purpose of this question is to determine the accessibility to the household, in other words: is about knowing if you arrive to the household by a street, or a paved street or other type of path. In this case, record per observation the best fitting answer, filling in the corresponding bubble.

Question 3: This household is:

This question intends to establish the condition in which you find the household, for example, if the house is occupied and has household members present or absent, or if it is a vacant household. Fill in the bubble that correctly records your observation.

[PAGE 16]

1. Occupied Household with residents: refers to a household where there is at least one permanent resident at the moment of the census

2. Occupied Household with absent residents: is when the household is closed and no residents are present.

In this case, ask the neighbors or in the closest households for a good time when the residents of that household are present. Then, once you know when, you should return to conduct the census.

3. Vacant Household: If the house is closed, with FOR RENT or FOR SALE sign option.
3. If there is no sign, ask the neighbors about the household's situation. If they tell you that no one lives there, fill in the bubble for option 3 and continue to the next household.

Question 4: Main Materials of the exterior walls in the household.

By observation, fill in the correct answer for the main material of the (exterior) walls of the household. If there is more that one material, record the main one. If there are equal proportions of two or more materials, record the one with the best quality.

Question 5: Main Material for the Roof.

By observation, fill in the correct answer for the main material of the roof. If there is more that one material, record the main one.

Question 6: Main Material of the Floor.

By observation, fill in the correct answer for the main material of the floor, considering all the types of floor in each room of the household.

[PAGE 17]

Question 7: How many rooms does the household have, not counting bathrooms, kitchen, hallways or garage?

Record in the box the number of corresponding rooms that the household has not counting bathrooms, kitchen, hallways or garage.

Question 8: Does this household have a kitchen?

If the person answers "YES" ask also if the kitchen is inside or outside the house, then fill in the answer accordingly to the correct answer. In the case that the house does not have a kitchen, record option 3.

Question 9: What are the main sources of pollution in this household?

[In box: Notice that in this questions there could be more than one answer.] Read slowly all the possible answers, and fill in all the indicated answers.

Section III: Household Identification

This section determines the number of houses that belong to a dwelling.

Make sure you read to the interviewee the definition of a household, which is in this section of each survey and says: "A household is that one which is inhabited by a person or group of people that share food, even if not at the same time but share the common expenses".

A household include any type of person/people that live together either with family ties or not. For example, three people with no family ties that live together and prepare and share their food can constitute a household.

If one or more household members do not share food expenses because they eat out (at work for example) but share all other expenses, these(this) people(person) are part of the household. Also are household member(s) those who share only food expenses.

[PAGE 18]

Question 10: Now tell me, how many households or groups of people that eat/have separate food expenses live here, including yourself?

Fill in the corresponding bubble to give the number of households or groups of people that eat/have separate food expenses, including the interviewee.

If there is only one household fill in the correct bubble and then skip to question 11.

If there is more than one household, fill in the bubble corresponding to codes 2,3,4 or 5 and more, depending on the number of households and then:

a) Fill in the survey of the first home
b) Use a new survey for each additional homes and fill in Section I Identification, writing down the number of households in the corresponding box: 2 for the second one, 3 for the third, 4 for the fourth, 5 for the fifth and so on.

Section IV: Household Characteristics

Question 11: This household (or part of it) is:

Read each option and fill in only one. If the ownership or possession of the house is none of the options on 1-4, fill in option 5 (other).

Question 12: How many rooms or bedrooms are in this household?

Write down in the box the number of all of the rooms in the household. Do not include the ones that are used for sleeping at night and during the day are used for other purposes.

[PAGE 19]

Question 13: What type of fuel does your household mainly use for cooking?

Fill in the bubble according to the answer. If the household cooks with more than one fuel, fill in the option that is mainly used.

If in the household they do not cook, fill in option 6 (no cooking).

If they cook with other fuel than natural gas, firewood or electricity, fill in option 5 (other).

Question 14: What type of electricity does your household use?

Fill in the bubble according to the answer. Keep in mind that this refers to a permanent source of electricity,

Fill in the bubble according to the option ("other") if the type of electricity is different than the options provided in the question.

Question 15: What is the principal source of water used to wash, scrub, shower, etc. in this household?

Fill in the correct given answer. If the household water source is more than one, record the one mainly used.

If the water source is not any of the options provided from 1-7, fill in option 8 (other).

If the interviewee tells you that the water source comes from a broken tube or pipe on the street, back yard, plot or other place, fill in option 3 (From water conduit, piped in water)

[PAGE 20]

Question 16: What kind of toilet facility does your household have?

Fill in the option 1 if there is a toilet, 2 if latrine (outside or inside the house). If the house does not have any type of bathroom, fill in option 3 (none) and skip to question 19. [Translator's note: the skip here does not match with the one in the questionnaire]

Question 17: Does your household share a bathroom with other households?

Fill in the correct choice to the question.

Question 18: How does the garbage get disposed of in this household?

Fill in the correct choice according to how it gets disposed.

Question 19: Which of the following articles or services does your household have?

Read all of the articles and services and fill in the bubble only when the answer is "yes".

Section V: List of Household Members
This section contains the list of permanent residents (present or absent during the survey), including children, newborn babies and elderly people.

For the purpose of the census, a permanent resident is a person that lives permanently in the household.

During the census visit, a person who has been absent from the household for less than 6 months because he/she was travelling for leisure, business, study or has been in boarding school or in the hospital or the like, or in jail with no determined sentence or in military service, is a also considered a permanent resident.

[PAGE 21]

In the collective households, all of the following are considered permanent residents:

Residents admitted to a hospital, nursing home, convent or the like.
Residents condemned for life sentence.

Additionally, permanent residents are:

Household workers that live in the workplace, independently of how many times they work (weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, etc.)

The following are not considered permanent residents and should be surveyed in their respective households:

The people that conveniently or obligatory sleep in the workplace (i.e. doctors, nurses, soldier, construction worker, seasonal agricultural worker, etc.) but that normally return to their houses.
Household workers that only work by day or hours (i.e. those who work from 8 AM to 5 PM), or only some days and return to their home.

How do you complete the chart for the household members?

Observe that the chart where you will record the information on the household members has five columns.

In column 1 record the order number of each household member, starting with 01 for the male or female head of household. A head of household is a person who is recognized as such by the rest of the household members.

In column 2 write the name of each permanent resident, following the previous order.

In column 3 write the established relationship of head of household to the rest of the residents in the same household.

In column 4 record the age, as of the current year, of each household member.

In column 5, record the sex of each household member

In order to check that you recorded all household members proceed to questions 20 and 21 to check all permanent household residents.

[PAGE 22]

Question 20: Is there a newborn or child that was not included?

In case that the interviewee says "yes", record the information of the newborn or child in the chart of the List of Household Members with all the information in the chart. If the answer is "no" proceed to the next question.

Question 21: Besides all people mentioned, is there any household member that is not present and is travelling for leisure, business, study or has been in the hospital, etc.?

If the answer is "yes" record the information of that person in the chart of the List of Household Members.

Question 22: Population Summary

Fill in the chart "Population Summary" the following way:

a) Check the correct boxes of the total of men and women (from column 5).
b) Sum it all up and write the number in the total box.
c) Write the total of people of 18 years of age or older in the corresponding box.
What do you have to do if there are more than 6 members of the household?

The census survey is design to record the information of six (6) members. In case that there are 7 or more members in a household, you should do the following:

a) Fill in the first survey, then
b) Use a new survey,
c) Fill in the bubble in the upper right corner of the new survey, indicating that it is a continuation of the first survey.
d) In Section I (IDENTIFICATION) copy the information collected in the first survey, that is the number of folder, cluster number, number of order of the household in the dwelling and address of each household (street, road or dirt road, house number or building number, apartment number or floor number, in case of a condominium or a building).
[PAGE 23]
e) Find Section V (LIST OF HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS) and continue recording the information of the household members, starting in the first column with number 7 for the person that follows the last person in the first survey. When you finish recording the information in Section V,
f) Go directly to Section VII (PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS) and record the number and name of the 7th person and then 8th for the next and so on.

[In box: The Population Summary must be recorded only in the first survey]

Section VI: International Emigration and Remittances

Question 23: Any of the residents of this household live abroad?

Consider all people living abroad (men, women, adolescents, children and elder people) those who being members of the household live permanently outside of the country in a different one; independently of how long they have lived abroad and are visiting for some days even during the census time in Dominican Republic.

Fill in the bubble to the correct answer. If the answer is "No", skip to question 25.

[Images of questions 23 and 24 showing the skip and the boxes]

Question 24: How many male and/or female residents live abroad?

Record in the boxes the number of male and female residents living abroad. If all are men record the number of them living abroad and 00 in the female boxes; on the contrary, if all are women living abroad record the number and then record 00 in the male boxes.

[PAGE 24]

Question 25: Do any of the permanent residents of the household receive money from abroad?

Fill in the correct answer. If the answer is "No" skip to question 27 of Section VII.

Question 26: In average, what is the amount of money that is received from abroad?

Record the approximate total amount (in Dominican pesos) that the household resident(s) receive from abroad. If the declared amount is in another currency (dollar, euro, Spanish peseta, Dutch guilder, etc.) ask the interviewee for an estimate of the amount in Dominican pesos.

Section VII: Personal Characteristics

Before you ask the first question in this section (question 27), record in the corresponding boxes the number of order in the list of household members of Section V and then write the name of each person.

For all Residents
Remember that in the "LIST OF HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS" (Section V), you recorded all the permanent residents of the household. Now, fill in this section: personal characteristics for each person following the same order as in the aforementioned list.

Question 27: What is the relationship of (NAME) to the head of household?

Fill in the correct bubble that represents the relationship of each household member with the female or male head of household.

Question 28: Is (NAME) male or female?

Fill in the bubble with the answer for this question.
Fill it in by observation for each person interviewed and also ask the question. Do not infer the sex of the person by his/her name, given that there are many names that are use for both men and women.

[PAGE 25]

Question 29: When was (NAME) born?

Record in the boxes the day, month and year of the person's birth. For example, if that person was born in 19 of February of 1975. [See the example in the picture next to it].

Question 30: How old is (NAME)?

Write down in the boxes the age as of the day of the census of the interviewee.
(If he/she is a child less than a year old, record 00. If he/she is a person of 98 years of age or older, record 98).

Sometimes the interviewee will not remember his/her date of birth or age, but might remember that he/she was born during a specific event. At the end of this manual you can find a list of different important events that can help you estimate the age of the person. Use the list for guidance.

Question 31: Where was (NAME) born?

For the purpose of the census, the place where a person was born is the place where the mother of that person lived when she gave birth, even if the person was born in a hospital, clinic or house outside of the mother's house during that time.

There are three (3) possible options for this question:

Here, in this Municipality. In case that the person was born in the same municipality in which he/she is being surveyed. After choosing this option skip to question 32.
In other Municipality, in the case that the person was born in a different municipality than the one he/she is being surveyed. In this case you should ask:
The name of the municipality or municipal district in which the person was born, and then record it in the corresponding boxes.
Abroad, if the person was born in a different country. In this case you should ask:
a) The name of the country in which the person was born, and then record it in the corresponding boxes.
b) The year that the person arrived to the Dominican Republic, record it in the corresponding boxes and then skip to question 34.

[Text in the circle: Always use four digits for the year, for example: 2001]

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Question 32: In which country was the mother of (NAME) born?
Fill in the correct answer:
1. Here, in Dominican Republic if the mother of the person was born within the country.
2. Abroad, if the mother of the person was born in another country (a different country than Dominican Republic). In this case, you should ask for the name of the country in which the mother was born and write it clearly in the corresponding boxes.

Question 33: In which country was the father of (NAME) born?

Fill in the correct answer:
1. HERE, in Dominican Republic if the father of the person was born within the country.
2. Abroad, if the father of the person was born in another country (a different country than Dominican Republic). In this case, you should ask for the name of the country in which the father was born and write it clearly in the corresponding boxes.

Question 34: Is (NAME)'s mother alive?

This question refers to the biological mother, meaning the person who bears him/her. Fill in the correct answer.

Question 35: Does (NAME) have any of the following disabilities?

Read to the interviewee each option and fill in the answer every time the person says "YES". If the person answers "None", fill in the corresponding bubble and then skip to question 37.
If the person said another disability different than the ones previously read, fill in the bubble with "other disability".

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Question 36: What is the cause of this (these) disability(disabilities)?

Fill in the correct answer declared by the interviewee.
If the person has two or more disabilities, fill in the most prominent/severe disability.

For People Age 3 or Older

Question 37: Does (NAME) know how to write and read?

Fill in the correct answer. If the interviewee only reads or only writes record option 2 ("No").

Question 38: Has (NAME) attended school, high school or university, public or private?

Fill in the correct answer.
If the person answer that he/she is going to a public or private school, fill in the corresponding bubble and then skip to question 40.
If the person answers that he/she "Never went to school", fill in the bubble with the corresponding answer and then skip to question 45.
If the person answers that he/she is not going to school but that he/she went before, fill in the corresponding bubble and then go to question 39.

Question 39: What is the main reason (NAME) stopped studying?

Read clearly each possible answer to the question. In the case that the person declares more than one reason why he/she stopped going to school, fill in the corresponding bubble.
If the person answers option 13 (other reason), fill in the bubble of option 13.

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Question 40: If the person currently attends school (question 38, code 1 or 2), ask the following: During the current school year, what level and grade is (NAME) attending?

First fill in the bubble that correspond to the level he/she answered, then record the number of finished years that he/she completed in the next box. (You should remember that at the college, level, master's or doctorate level, a year of study equals to a 4 trimesters or 3 quarters or 2 semesters).
If the person answered options 1, 2, 3, or 4, skip to question 43.
If the person answers the he/she is not currently going to school that in the past went to school (question 38 code 4), you should ask the following: What is the highest level of school (NAME) has attended and what is the highest grade (NAME) completed at that level?

Fill in the bubble corresponding to the declared level and record the number of years/grade that the person attended in the corresponding box.
If the person answers option 9, skip to question 45.

Question 41: Did (NAME) complete that level?

This question is only for the people that attended or attends at the level of college, university, master's or doctorate. Fill in the bubble accordingly to the answers "Yes" or "No".

Question 42: a) What is the career that (NAME) studied or studies?
Write down the career indicated by the interviewee. The career is the one that is studied before graduate school. For example: Medicine, Economics, Law, Engineering, Business Administration, Computer Sciences, Electrical Engineering, Accounting, etc.
If the person answered a graduate specialty, master's degree or doctorate in question 40 (codes 6,7 or 8) ask:
b) What graduate specialty, master's degree or doctorate (NAME) is studying or studied?
Record in the corresponding boxes the name of the graduate (specialty, Master's or doctorate) that the interviewee is studying or studied.
If the interviewee answered questions 42a) or 42b) skip to question 45 and then: verify in question 30 if the person is 30 years of age or younger, if that is the case go to question 43. If the person is 30 years of age or older skip to question 45.

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Question 43: During the previous school year, did (NAME) attend school or high school?

Fill in the correct answer.

Question 44: Is (NAME) repeating the grade/level that he/she is currently studying?

Fill in the correct answer.

For People Age 5 or Older

Question 45: Where did (NAME) reside 5 years ago?

This question has three (3) possible answers; you should only record one of the following:

HERE, in this Municipality, in case that the person lived since five years ago in the same municipality he/she is being surveyed.
In ANOTHER municipality, in case that the person lived five years ago in a different municipality different from the one he/she is being surveyed. In this case, you should ask if the municipality where he/she lived was a rural zone, town/city and then fill in the correct answer.
ABROAD, if the person lived abroad five years ago. (You should fill in the corresponding answer to one of the given options)

If the person lived in ANOTHER municipality, you should ask the name of the municipality and write it down in the corresponding boxes.

If the person lives ABROAD, ask the name of the country and write it down in the corresponding boxes.

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For people age 10 or older
For the census purposes we distinguish between work that is paid or earns something in kind and unpaid or non-remunerated work.

Paid Work or Earnings in kind refers to the production of good and services that a person works on and that generates him/her an income in cash or in kind, being a salary or in kind. The paid work can be of two types:

a) Fix payment: is an established payment that is given regularly by an institution, business, company to a specific person or family house, that in exchange works a workday for profit.

b) Other type of remunerated work refers to the irregular activities and occupations, commonly worked independently although the person might get help from family members for which the person gains some sort of profit.
Unpaid or non-remunerated work is the activity of producing goods and services that a person does as a help to a business, company or family farm in which he/she does not receive any remuneration or payment.

Question 46: During the past week (seven days) have (NAME) done any type of work in which he/she received any kind of payment, even if he/she was not working because of vacations, illness or other reason?

Fill in the correct answer.
1. If the interviewee had a permanent job (paid or earned in kind) the previous week of the census, even if he/she is not working because he/she had vacations or had an illness or other reason, fill in the option "Yes" and then skip to question 50.
2. If the interviewee did not have a job or worked the previous week of the census, fill in "No" and then continue to question 47.

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Question 47: During the past week (seven days) have (NAME) done any type of work for at least one hour such as selling food or clothes, sewing, motorcycle taxi, selling tickets, etc. in which he/she received any kind of payment?

Fill in the correct answer.
1. If the person answered "Yes" fill in the corresponding bubble and then skip to question 50.
2. In case that the person has not done any type of work, fill in "No" and then proceed to the next question.

Question 48: During the past week did (NAME) helped in a business, farm or a family activity, in which he/she did not receive any remuneration?

Fill in the correct answer.
1. If the person helped a relative or a business, or farm or family activity during the previous week of the census, fill in the corresponding "Yes" bubble and then skip to question 50.
2. In case that the person did not help a relative or in a family activity, farm, business during the previous week of the census, fill in the corresponding "No" bubble and then continue to the following question.

Question 49: Has (NAME) worked before for a remunerated work?

Fill in the correct answer.
1. If the person had a paid work or earned in kind any time before the previous week of the census, not matter how long the person has been unemployed, mask "Yes" in the corresponding bubble.
2. If a person never worked fill in "No" and then skip to question 55.

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Question 50: What was (NAME)'s main occupation, last week (or in his/her last job)?

The main occupation is the job, position or function that a person did during the previous week of the census (or in his/her last job). In the case that the person worked in more than one job, the main occupation is the one that he/she worked most time. If he/she had equal amount of time of two or more jobs, record the one that the interviewee declares as his/her main occupation.

For the recording of occupations or jobs, it is necessary to record them with the best detail as possible, avoiding vague or unnecessary information.

The following lists various examples of the how you should record correctly the information given:

a) A person that works in construction, his/her occupation is that of a CONSTRUCTION WORKER.

b) A person that works selling fruit in the street, his/her occupation is that of a STREET VENDOR OF FRUIT.

c) A person that takes care of cars on the street, his/her occupation is that of a PARKED CAR SECURITY GUARD.

d) A person that teaches at the university, his/her occupation is that of a UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR.

e) A person that finished his/her degree in education and manages a public secondary school, his/her occupation is that of a SECONDARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL.

f) Similarly, a psychologist that works as a bank teller, his/her occupation is that of a BANK TELLER.

Question 51: In that job (NAME) was (or is)?

Read clearly all the answer options to the interviewee for this question. Read slowly and clearly so the interviewee can fully understand.

Fill in the correct answer.
If the interviewee answered with code 4, 5 or 6 skip to question 54.

Salary paid employee: A person that works as an employee, laborer, day laborer and that receives a salary for the work he/she does in an institution, company, business or farm. These include those employees that receive a fix salary (monthly, biweekly, etc.) as well as those who get paid by commission or by job basis, or by honorary or in other similar ways.

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Employer or Owner: A person that has his/her own company, business, or establishment and employs more than one person, which he/she pays a salary.

Independent Worker: A person that works independently in an economic activity. He/she could work by himself/herself or be associated to others and receive help from family members.

Family worker with no remuneration: Persons that do not receive any type of remuneration, either a salary or any payment for the work that they do in a business, company or family economic activity.

Member of a cooperative: A person that works for a cooperative obtaining some sort of income from his/her work there.

Other category: A person with other positions or work characteristics not previously specified.

Question 52: What type of company, business or institution did (NAME) work, last week (or in his/her last job)?

Read each option and fill in the correct answer, accordingly:

Factory or company in a free zone: When a person works for a specific industry, factory, company, workshop, warehouse or storehouse or any other establishment within the limits of the free zone or industrial area of the country.
Other private factory, company or business: When a person works for a specific industry, factory, company, commerce, hotel, farm, etc.
Non-profit organization or NGO: When a person works for an institution of social support or services or community service with no profit.
Working for an individual: When a person works for a specific person (i.e. as a chauffeur or as a bodyguard, etc.)
Public institution or company: When a person works for a public organization such as an office, branch, or state institution, including the city council, legislative or judicial branches, military or police.
Household: When a person works for a household doing domestic chores, including being a chauffeur, gardener, caretaker, housekeeping, etc.
Other: When a person works for an institution or organization not included in the previous categories.

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Question 53: How many people work/worked in that business, company or institution?

Fill in the correct number of employees from the household in the corresponding boxes.

Question 54: What is the goal of the business, company or institution where (NAME) works (worked in the last instance)?

In this question you should record the specific activity or goal that the business, company or institution carries out, and where the person works or worked. For example: AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AGRICULTURAL SERVICES, TOBACCO INDUSTRY, SHOE INDUSTRY, OIL REFINERY, ETC.

Question 55: During the last week, was (NAME) looking for a paid job or trying to establish his/her own business or company?

This question should be posed only if the interviewee answered "No" in questions 46, 47 and 48.
If the answer is "Yes" fill it in and skip to question 59.
If the answer is "No" fill it in and continue to the following question.

Question 56: What was the main occupation that (NAME) did last week?

Read each option and answer accordingly.

Make sure that you follow the guidelines for the answer options:

Housekeeping: A person that works as a housewife in house chores with no payment.
Study: A person that studies without doing other than that and does not receive any payment.

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Landlord or Stockholder: A person that receives income by renting or investments (i.e. interests, salaries, deposits, rent, etc.) and that does not work to acquire other income.
Retired: A person that receives income from a pension or retirement, and that does not work to acquire other income.
Elder or disable: A person that due to his/her age or a permanent disability cannot work.
Person with no activities: A person that does not work or performs any job, even if is physically capable and of age to work. (These people are considered vagabonds, hobos)
Other: When a person is in a situation or condition different that the ones previously mentioned. In this case, you should record the name or situation in which the interviewee is involved. Some examples of who might be in this category are those who are in prison or confinement, priests, nuns, etc.

Question 57: Currently, would (NAME) work if he/she was offered a job?

1. If the person is available to work if he/she was offered a paid job, record "Yes" and then continue to question 58.
2. If the person is not available to work even if there is a paid job offer, record "No", and then skip to question 59.

Question 58: Why didn't (NAME) look for a job, last week?

Read all options to the interviewee and fill in the correct one.
The following guidelines can help you to clarify any doubt that the interviewee might have:

The person has look for a job in the past and does not find one. In the case that a person has filled in job applications, has had job interviews and done anything necessary to find a job but had not been able to get one.

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The person believes that is very difficult to get a job. The person did not look for a job because he/she believes is very difficult to find one.

Other people are helping him/her look for a job. In the case that other people, (such as friends, and relatives) are helping him/her look for work.

The person is waiting for a job application or employment answer. When the person has applied for a job and done all the necessary to get a job and still waiting for an answer.

The person studies. When a person only studies and is not looking for a job.

The person has to take care of the children at home. A person stays at home to take care of children and household chores.

The person is a landlord or retired. A person that gets his/her income from rent or retirement and is not looking for a job.

The person does not need or want to work. In case that a person does not need to work or does not want to work.

The person is disable or very old to work. When a person has a permanent disability or is very old and cannot work.

His/her partner does not allow him/her to work. A person that has a partner that does not him/her work and therefore is not looking for a job.

Other. When there is a different reason from the ones previously mentioned, in which the person did not find a job.

Question 59: Last month, how much did (NAME) received as a source of income such as salary, rent, pension, retirement, interests or other income?

Record the total income (in Dominican pesos) that the person receives for his/her job or other service.

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For people age 15 or older:

Question 60: Currently, is (NAME):

Read each option and fill in the correct answer.

1. Married. If the person is married legally (by Law) or by the church.
2. In union. If the person lives with a partner without being married legally or religiously.
3. Divorced. If the person was married and is divorced legally or religiously and has not been married or living in union with another person.
4. Widow/widower. If the person was married and his/her partner died and has not been married or living in union with another person.
5. Separated legally or religiously. If the person lived in legal union or religiously and separated from his/her partner and has not been married or living in union with another person.
6. Separated from union. If the person live in union with a partner (free union or concubinage) and now is separated and has not been married or living in union with another person.
7. Single. If a person has never been married or in union.

Question 61: How many sisters of 12 years of age from the same mother has (NAME) had?

Record the number of sisters from the same mother that the interviewee has had and that they are twelve years of age or older. In case that the interviewee had sisters that died when they were 12 years old or older, you should count them too.
If the interviewee answered "None", fill in the correct bubble and then skip to question 64.

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Question 62: Of all these sisters, how many are not living?
Of the total number of sisters noted in the previous question (61), write down the number of sisters that have died being 12 years of age or older.
If the interviewee responds "none" fill in the bubble that corresponds and skip to question 64.

Question 63: Of the sisters that died, how many died during pregnancy, childbirth, or at-risk pregnancy?
Of the total number of sisters who died and were noted in the previous question (62), write the number of sisters who died during pregnancy, childbirth, or at-risk pregnancy.
If the person responds "none", fill in the corresponding bubble.

Questions 64-67 should only be asked to women who are 15 years old or older.

Question 64: In total, how many live births has (NAME) had, even if the baby died a few hours or days after being born?
Consider live births to be only those that "after being pushed out or removed from the mother's womb, was breathing or with some other vital signs, such as heartbeat, a pulsating umbilical cord, or muscle movements or voluntary contractions, regardless of whether the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta has been removed or not".

Record in each box the total number of male children and female children that the woman has born.
If the woman answered that she has not had any female or male children alive, fill in the bubble to none and continue with the next person.

In the case that all children are male record "00" in female children, and if all children are female record "00" in male children.

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Question 65: Of all the children, how many are currently living?

Record separately the number of male and female children alive the day of the census.
If the woman answers "none", continue with the next question.
If the woman answers that all of her children are male record the number in the box for male children. In the opposite way if all children are female, record the number in the box for female children.

Question 66: In what month and year was the last child born alive of (NAME)?

Record the month and year of the birth date of the last child.

Use two digits to record the month. For example, 01 for January 02 for February 03 for March and so on.
Use four digits to record the year. For example: 1999.

Question 67: Is the last child of (NAME) alive?
Fill in the correct answer according to the interviewee.
In case that the interviewee answers "Don't know" fill in the corresponding bubble.

Interviewee:
Remember that after recording all the information of one person you should continue with the information of the next person until you record all the information from all the residents of the household.

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SECTION VIII: IDENTIFICATION OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS

Question A- Do any of the males or females of this household have sown field, uncultivated land, fallow land (either owned, rented or half-half, etc.) or have they harvested within the last 12 months?

In case that the answer is "Yes", fill in the correct bubble and fill in the chart the following way:
1. Copy from Section V (LIST OF HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS) the same number of order and the name of the person who said has sown field, uncultivated land, fallow land or has harvested within the last 12 months
2. Record the sex of the person(s).
3. Record in each column the quantity of cultivated land

In case that the interviewee answers "No", go to question B.

Question B- Do any of the males or females of this household have animals for household consumption or for sale?

In case that the answer is "Yes", fill in the correct bubble and fill in the chart the following way:
1. Copy from Section V (LIST OF HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS) the same number of order and the name of the person who said has animals.
2. Record the sex of the person(s).
3.Record in each column the quantity of animals, counting the type of animals that are recorded in each column.