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Instructions

Enumerator

Population and Dwelling Census

Cuba 2002

National Office of Census -- ONE
La Habana, March, 2002
"Year of the Heroes Prisoners of the Empire"

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Presentation]

Presentation

The National Office of Statistics (ONE) has the responsibility of technically directing the executions of the Population and Dwellings Census 2002, in order to obtain information through the administration of a Questionnaire where we capture a series of basic characteristics, as much about the dwelling as about the inhabitants of the country.

The present instructions in this manual are directed to the Enumerator so that he/she can carry out his/her activities according to the indications that are given here.

The enumerator has the responsibility of immediately taking down the census information declared by the persons in their dwellings. This makes it a fundamental for guaranteeing the quality of census data collection. This is the importance of his/her role.

National Office of Census -- ONE
La Habana, March 2002
"Year of the Heroes Prisoners of the Empire"

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Index]

Index
I. Introduction 1
II. Obligations and Prohibitions 5
III. Basic Definitions 7
IV. Documents and materials that will be used by the enumerator 14
V. Enumeration Guide 15
VI. Following the route before and during the enumeration 19
VII. The Interview 21
VIII. The Census Questionnaire 24

Notations on the Questionnaire 27
Section I. Geographic Localization and address of the housing unit 28
Section II. Classification of the housing units 32
Section III. Information about the private dwelling 34
Question 1. Type of dwelling 34
Question 2. The dwelling is occupied by? 35
Question 3. What is the date of construction of the dwelling? 36
Question 4. What is the predominant material in? 37
Question 5. What damages does the dwelling have? 38
Question 6. How many rooms does the dwelling have? 39
Question 7. Does the dwelling have space for cooking? 40
Question 8. Energy or fuel most used for cooking 40
Question 9. Does the dwelling have piped water installations? 41
Question 10. What drainage system does the dwelling have? 42
Question 11. Does the dwelling have a bathroom or shower with a working installation for running water and sewage? 43
Question 12. Sanitary service 44
Question 13. What is the source of energy that is used for lighting the dwelling? 45
Question 14. Which of the following equipment does the dwelling have? 46
Section IV. Information about the person 47
Question 1. Names and last names 50
Question 2. Relationship or ties to the head of household 51
Question 3. Order number of the mother (or father) and of the spouse on the questionnaire 52
Question 4. Male or female? 54
Question 5. What is the date of birth and age in years completed 54
Question 6. What is his/her skin color? 54
Question 7. Where did your mother reside when you were born? 55
Question 8. Have you always lived in this municipality? 56
Question 9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved from the previous municipality or country? 57
Question 10. Do you suffer from any of the following ailments? 58
Question 11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed? 60
Question 12. What is the highest education level that you finished completely? 63
Question 13. What academic title or degree did you receive in the last level that you passed? 63
Question 14. Do you know how to read and write? 64
Question 15. Are you currently enrolled in an educational center of the National System of Education or in another country? 65
Question 16. What is your civil or marital status? 65
Question 17. What did you do during the week before September 7th? 66
Question 18. What is the principal occupation or work that you did in this job? 72
Question 19. What is the name of the place where you had labor ties in this week? 73
Question 20. Do you have a secondary occupation? 73
Question 21. What is the occupation or work that you did in this secondary occupation? 73

IX. End of the interview 76
X. End of the Enumerator's work 79
Appendix 1 80
Appendix 2 82

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Introduction -- 1 ]

I. Introduction

What is a Population and Dwelling Census?

This is the research that internationally allows each country to have exact knowledge of its inhabitants and of its dwellings.

A Population and Dwelling Census is the set of operations that facilitates collecting, processing, analyzing and publishing information about the population of a country and its dwellings, in reference to a determined moment.

The Population and Dwelling Census covers all of the national territory and constitutes the most important, complex, and expensive statistical research that is done by the majority of the countries of the world, regularly once every ten years.

Who is in charge of carrying it out?

It is organized, designed and carried out under the direction of the National Office of Statistics (ONE) [for its initials in Spanish].

What information does it capture?

The total population of the country, the number of males and the number of females, their ages, their educational levels, their occupations, the total number of dwellings, the types of dwellings, the predominant construction materials of the dwellings, the services of water, electricity, sewage, among other information.

For what is this information used?

This information that is collected serves to provide the government with statistical information for the formulation and evaluation of the diverse plans for social-economic development of the country, related to the population and its living conditions, satisfying, in addition, the multiple needs for information of the national and international organisms.

For example, knowing the population that is school-age can provide sufficient time for planning the quantity of schools necessary for this population by educational type, as well as all of the educational personnel that is needed. By knowing the total of handicapped persons, according to types of handicap, the necessary resources for helping these citizens to achieve a healthier life and facilitate their social adaption will be planned with greater precision.

When will it be carried out?

The Population and Dwelling Census of 2002 will be carried on from September 7th to 16th, 2002, which means, in a period of ten days, which is known as the Enumeration Period.

Where will it be carried out?

The Population and Dwelling Census will include the Cuban archipelago formed by the Island of Cuba, the Juventud Island, and the rest of the adjacent islands and cayos [small islands] that constitute the national territory, excluding the territory illegally occupied by the Naval Base of Guantánamo, which belongs to the government of the United States.

How will it be carried out?

Each of the dwellings of the country will be visited to conduct an interview with a questionnaire and to obtain information about all of the persons and the dwellings.

How is it prepared?

The Census is a task that requires various years of preparation, through an intensive and constant work; which makes it possible to reach all of the dwellings of the country, for which a census structure has been designed in the territorial aspect that agrees with the official conditions established

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Introduction -- 2 ]

In the current Political-Administrative Divisions, with offices at the levels of nation, province, and municipality.

We also establish territorial subdivisions within the municipality for organizational requirements, which are defined as:

Census Area:

In all of the municipalities of the country, offices of control will be established during a period of approximately three months, each of them constituting a Census Area which will control, in general, from 12 to 18 Districts (urban part), or 6 to 9 Districts (rural part), according to the specific characteristics of each territory, which will facilitate the diverse operations of preparation, execution and control of the Census. In the mixed areas (urban/rural), the norm will be established in correspondence to the specific characteristics of the zone, reducing these in the mountainous zones (between 7 and 11 Districts).

Census District:

This is the territory that a Supervisor will attend to in the enumeration period; the District is comprised of 2 to 4 Segments as the general norm, considering the specific characteristics (topography, roads, population density, etc.) of each place.

Census Segment:

This is the territory that an Enumerator covers in the enumeration period. In general, the surface area depends on the average of daily interviews that can be completed according to the characteristics of the land, whether in the urban or rural area. Approximately 250 persons should be enumerated, as a norm, which is the equivalent of an average of 80-90 dwellings (urban part) and 60-70 dwellings (rural part).

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Introduction -- 3 ]

[Illustration]

Province____
Municipality____
Area____
District____
Segment____

Does the population have the obligation of providing the information?

By law, the population has the obligation to provide the information that is requested on the Census Questionnaire, which appears referenced in the Agreement 4122 of June 30, 2001 of the Executive Committee of the Council of Ministers, in the same terms as the persons who collect said data have the obligation of not sharing it. When ONE publishes the results, it is done in general terms with statistical summaries, without referring to any specific person or dwelling.

Who is the Enumerator?

This is the person responsible for visiting the places where persons reside to do the enumeration and to obtain the information about the dwelling and about each of the persons.

Internationally, the work of the Enumerator is considered of great esteem and honor both because of its importance and responsibility and because of its civic and patriotic nature.

In great measure, the success of the Census will depend on the careful, selfless and competent work done by the Enumerator.

The Enumerator will do his/her work applying the knowledge acquired during the training seminars, with the help of these instructions and also complying with the instructions received from his/her Supervisor.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Introduction -- 4 ]

Who is the Supervisor?

This is your immediate boss, who will indicate where you are going to work, he/she will support you in the resolution of the problems and will review your work.

Always remember this.

We want to demonstrate the importance for the Census of avoiding errors or omissions in your work as an Enumerator.

Since approximately 47,000 Enumerators like you will work in the Census, will look at the consequence of an error:

- If each Enumerator in his/her Segment fails to enumerator just one dwelling, at the end of the Census, we would have 47,000 dwellings in the country that are not enumerated.
- For each omitted dwelling, on average, 3.3 persons are not enumerated.
How many persons would be forgotten in the country?
47000 x 3.3 = 155000
- This would be the equivalent of not taking into account a municipality like San Miguel del Padron in Cuba.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Obligations and Prohibitions -- 5 ]


II. Obligations and Prohibitions

Above all, you should know the obligations that you have in the different stages of enumeration, as well as those activities that you should not do under any condition.

Obligations

a. Before the enumeration

1. Receive training through the seminars.
2. Know the census material well, as well as the instructions for its use that are contained in this manual.
3. Follow your assigned Segment route before the taking of census information.

b. During the enumeration:

1. Begin the enumeration on the day indicated (September 7th, 2002).
2. Comply with instructions at all times, without introducing any modifications to the procedures or definitions.
3. Conserve the material that you receive for the census work in good condition.
4. Receive and comply with the training that you receive from the Supervisor.
5. Clarify with the Supervisor any doubts that you have regarding your work.
6. Revise that the documentation and materials that you receive for your work are complete.
7. Carry out your work with fluidity, avoiding unjustified extensions or delays.
8. Enumerate all of the dwellings and permanent residents included in the assigned segment.
9. Present yourself in the dwellings in the correct manner, both in physical presentation and in the friendly and courteous manner in which you should carry out the interview.
10. Carry the present instructions with you as consulting material in the case of questions about your work.
11. Limit your work to only the enumeration, trying to fulfill it in the most efficient manner possible.
12. Be honest.
13. Do your work personally.
14. Exhaust all of the persuasive resources in the cases where you encounter resistance or difficulties in the enumeration.
15. Immediately communicate to your Supervisor any circumstance that can affect the enumeration work.
16. Daily turn in the properly completed Questionnaires to you Supervisor for revision and approval in the place and at the time agreed upon for this purpose.
17. Correct the errors or omissions in the questionnaires as indicated by the Supervisor, visiting the dwelling again if necessary.
18. When it is necessary to return to a dwelling to complete the interview or for another reason (absences of the residents), complete and leave the form "Notice of Return Visit".
19. You should you the identification methods handed out for the enumeration (sweater, hat, and credential).

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Obligations and Prohibitions -- 6 ]

c. After the enumeration

1. Turn in the census material duly revised and organized to the Supervisor.
2. Be available for any consultation required by the Supervisor.

Prohibitions

1. To permit that persons not affiliated with the census organization accompany you to the interviews. In the rural area, you can be aided by persons who serve as guides to locate the dwellings, just as in the urban part with the presidents of the CDR; but said persons should not be present at the time of the enumeration interview.

2. To threaten or make comments that could be incorrectly interpreted by the persons being interviewed.

3. To show or comment on the completed Questionnaire data to persons who are not affiliated with the census organization or to share its contents, which would infringe on legal dispositions.

4. To discuss with other enumerators about the data collected when you have some doubt about its veracity. In these cases, you should discuss the topic only with your Supervisor.

5. To make annotations that are deliberately false or alter the annotations already made.

6. To abandon your work during the labor period agreed upon, without communicating it to your Supervisor.

7. To do any other activity during the enumeration period that is not related to this work.

8. To leave the census materials in place where they can get lost or be used inappropriately, or leave the completed questionnaires in places where they can be examined by persons who are not affiliated with the census organization.

9. To give the material any other use that is not that which corresponds within this work. If for any reason you had the need of leaving any of them unused, you will write the work NULL on it, but you will not destroy it, being required to return it with the rest of the census material that is left over.

In this manual you will find the necessary knowledge for successfully carrying out your activity as an enumerator. Study it and use it as consultation material during the interview, it forms part of your labor and contributes to carrying out your functions with the greatest efficiency.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 7 ]

III. Basic Definitions

To carry out your work with good quality, you should know the definitions of the housing units, permanent resident, census household, head of census household, family and census moment.

What is a Housing Unit?

It is known that all persons have a need to:

- Sleep,
- Prepare and consume his/her food,
- Protect him/herself from the effects of weather, etc.

And for this they must have an adequate place where they can satisfy these vital needs or what would be the same, a place where they can live.

We call this place where people live a Housing Unit, and we define it as all of a place and space that is structurally separated and independent, that has been built or adapted, all or in part, for the purpose of permanent or temporary housing of persons; as well as any other class of non-mobile or mobile space occupied as a place of residency at 12 o'clock midnight on the night of September 6th.

We will understand as separate, that it has boundaries set by walls, roofs, etc.

We will understand as independent the dwelling that has entrance or access directly from the street, or corridor, stairway, patio, etc., which means that to enter or exit from the dwelling it is not necessary to pass through the interior of another dwelling.

What types of dwelling units are considered for the Census?

For the purpose of the Census, there exist three types of Housing Units: private dwellings, work locations, and collective dwellings.

a. Private dwelling

We understand as a private dwelling the one occupied by one or more census households according to the definition given below for the census household, as well as the one that is condition for occupancy, even if it is found unoccupied. The private dwelling can be conformed by:

a. A room or set of rooms designated for housing one or more persons, whatever name is given to it: house, apartment, room in a boarding house or neighborhood house, shack, etc.

b. Any construction built with discarded materials (cardboards, metallic sheeting, fiber-cement, etc.)

c. Any type of space built to be transported or that constitutes a mobile unit or vehicle permanently parked not used as a means of transportation, as well as the natural shelters (rock hollows, caves) and canvas tents used for this purpose on the Census Day.

One of the characteristics that determine the condition of private dwelling is that the room or set of rooms has an independent entrance, which means that to enter the dwelling it is not necessary to pass through other rooms that belong to another dwelling or a work space.

It is not necessary that the dwelling have an independent access from the street, it can be through a patio, corridor, hallway or stairway, even when this is shared by various dwellings.

The majority of the population resides or lives with their family in a dwelling, which we will call a private dwelling.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 8 ]

The private dwellings are easily recognized because families or groups of persons, with or without family ties, always live in them, but:

- They have a shared budget, which means that they share the expenses of dwelling and food.
- They habitually live in the dwelling, which means that they sleep and store their personal belongings in it.

In summary, they live together like a family.

There are various types of private dwelling: Houses, apartments, rooms in boarding houses, shacks, improvised dwellings and others, whose definitions are given below:

House:

This the building that is structurally separated or joined to another that constitutes one single dwelling conformed by one or by various floors but that are connected inside of the same. This includes the set of two or three dwellings joined in vertical or horizontal direction where each floor is considered an independent house, which means, that it has direct access from the street.

Considered as part of a house are those additions made to the same even when they have independent access from the street because it was not possible to connect them through the interior of the dwelling, and that at the Census Moment, are occupied by one single private census household. Pay attention that it constitutes only one dwelling occupied by only one census household.

Apartment:

This is the dwelling that occupies part of a building and that has sanitary services and bathroom for exclusive use. It can occupy a floor or part of it.

Also considered in this category is the room inside what is commonly known as an apartment house or room house, which has had its interior structure modified and has bathroom and kitchen for exclusive use inside the dwelling; in these cases, the dwelling has a common entrance from the street.

Room in a room building or neighborhood house:

This is the shelter or space with characteristics such as common sanitary services and bathroom, shared with other rooms and water outside the room; or some of the services inside the room, but never all three. These are generally rooms in buildings, usually called room buildings, room houses, etc.

This includes the isolated rooms that do not meet the requirements of apartments, nor improvised dwelling.

Shack:

This is the dwelling built with exterior walls of thatch [palm bark] or palm boards and roof of Guano. We clarify that the indicated materials must be the dominant materials for the classification of the dwelling. In the case that the walls are boards of another material that is not palm, it will be classified as a house.

Improvised:

These are those dwelling that have been built with materials that are not adequate or with discarded materials such as: cardboard, metallic sheets, fiber-cement sheeting, etc.

Other:

These are the dwellings that are not included in the previous classifications. Also included in this classification are the mobile dwellings (boats, railroad cars, trailers, shipping containers, etc.), caves, other natural shelters, canvas tents, etc.

The private dwellings can be found occupied by permanent residents, occupied by temporary residents, seasonally occupied, closed, and unoccupied.

Occupied by permanent residents:

The one in which at 12 o'clock midnight on the day of September 6, persons who habitually reside in said dwelling were living, and they are permanent residents in the country, which means that they do have another dwelling where they regularly sleep and store their belongings. This includes the persons who are found renting in the dwelling, as long as this is their habitual residence.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 9 ]

Do not include as permanent residents of this dwelling the persons who are not found in it due to illness, vacations, or simply visiting for a few days, those who have their habitual residence in another place.

Occupied by temporary residents:

These are the dwellings in which at 12 o'clock midnight on the night of September 6, persons lived there who temporarily reside in the country. For example: foreign technicians and students, diplomatic personnel accredited in the country and their families, etc.

Seasonally occupied:

These are the dwellings that are used only for temporary or seasonal residency by the owner or renters, such as, for example, houses for private use on beaches or in the country. In this case, you must consider those dwellings that are closed because the owner or renter does not reside there permanently.

If you find persons there on the day of the census, they should have their habitual domicile in another dwelling in the country.

Classified in this alternative are all of the private dwelling that are for temporary or seasonal use, whether or not the owners or renters are present or not in the enumeration period.

Closed:

These are the dwellings that cannot be enumerated because all of the residents of the dwelling are absent. In this case, the occupants live in the dwelling permanently.

Do not include the dwellings that are "Seasonally occupied" and that are closed because the residents are in their habitual residence, in which case the dwelling will be included in the previous option.

Unoccupied:

These are the dwellings that do not have permanent or temporary occupants, which means, no person resides permanently in it.

In this situation you find dwellings that are sealed by the organisms authorized to do so.

In this category you will also include the private dwellings that have completed the building process and are in conditions for occupancy.

b. Work locations

This is the space designated for the production of goods or providing services (factory, school, business, etc.).

If in the work location, there are one or more spaces used for housing persons, not constituting a separate unit from the rest of the installations. Generally, there is no independent entry, and will only be counted for the purpose of the census in cases where it is habitually used for sleeping by previous or current employees of the work center who do not have another place of habitual residency.

For example: Employees who live in a garage, store, breezeway, or other parts of the work center.

Be aware that the spaces where these persons live do not fulfill the condition of being separate or independent. They will not be considered as private dwelling, but rather as a work location with permanent residents.

If said spaces are separate and independent and present, in addition to their own furnishings, their own household goods and only use the water supply, sanitary or hygienic services and the electricity with the rest of the persons who work there, we will consider it as a private dwelling.

Example: the administrator has his dwelling inside the area of the work center that he directs.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 10 ]

c. Collective Dwelling

This is the dwelling used as a place for special housing, temporary or permanent, for a group of persons, usually not related to each other, who, in general, share a common lifestyle for reasons of simple cohabitation, health, work, education, military discipline, religion or another reason, for which they should fulfill certain norms of shared living.

The collective dwellings can be:

- For permanent residency: These are the dwellings that are fundamentally designated for persons who reside permanently in the general rooms, but who have no family ties, such as:

Homes for the elderly, invalids, retirees, Medical institutions for chronic illnesses, orphanages, children's foster homes, rehabilitation, foundling homes, convents, military barracks, and similar location for long-term residency.

Included in this category are the so-called temporary shelters where persons reside for indefinite periods, without having another place of habitual residency.

All of the persons who reside permanently in these places form a collective census household.

- For temporary residency: These are the collective dwellings used for the purpose of temporary housing of persons, such as:

Hotels, guest houses, rest homes, guest houses, tourist centers, hospitals, and similar locations for temporary residence.

These collective dwellings will only be included in the Census if, for any cause, some person resides permanently.

If in a hotel, guest house, boarding school, home for the elderly, military barracks, etc, there are rooms or a set of rooms occupied in a permanent manner by guests or employees with or without other relatives, or the persons who occupy it possess their own furnishings and other household goods and they do not use the common rooms with the other persons housed there (except for the water supply and the sanitary and hygienic services) nor share the cleaning services, these, for the purpose of the census, will be considered as an independent private dwelling.

What is a permanent resident for the purpose of the census?

For the purpose of the Census, we will consider as residents persons who live in a dwelling in a manner that is permanent, which means, those who sleep in the dwelling in a habitual manner and store their personal belongings in the dwelling.

The condition of resident for the Census is independent of the "Registry of Addresses" possessed by the CDR, or in the "Supply Book".

Despite the previous definition, the following persons do not lose their condition of residency in the place where they reside in the census household to which they belong:

a. Those who, for work-related reasons, frequently sleep outside of the dwelling where they reside, including the members of the FAR, SMA and EJT.

b. Those who, for reasons of study, frequently sleep outside the dwelling or in another country.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 11 ]
c. The members of the Diplomatic Corps and similar who are found in another country, carrying out their offices, or other residents of Cuba, temporarily in another country (official or family matters, including those who have permission for foreign residency; artistic permission, cultural permission, sports permissions, illnesses, etc.).

d. Those persons who are performing tasks or other functions of international cooperation (medical, technical personnel, etc.).

e. The merchant marines and fishermen who reside in the country but are found at high sea during the census period, as well as the rest of the workers whose functions make it necessary to leave the country with regularity (personnel of airplanes, etc.)

f. The persons interned in medical-assistance centers (hospitals, clinics, etc.) in which the patient's stay is not of a permanent nature.

g. The foreigners who are permanent residents in the country.

h. The person who are absent from their dwelling because they are under preventative detention.

i. The persons who died after and those who were born before 12 o'clock on the night of the day of September 6th, 2002.

According to this definition, the permanent resident population is excluded:

a. The foreign technicians who have a labor contract for a defined period after which time they must leave the country.

b. The foreigners who are in the country temporarily for various reasons (studies, medical treatment, tourism, etc.) and who do not habitually reside in Cuba.

c. The members of the foreign Diplomatic Corps accredited in Cuba and their family members.

d. The personnel of airplanes, ships and others from different countries who are found in transit in the country.

What is a Census household?

We consider a census household to be the person or group of persons, with or without family ties, who have a common budget, cook together and habitually live together, occupying a dwelling or part of a dwelling.

The census households are classified according to the type of Housing Unit where they reside, in households in private dwellings, residents in collective units and in labor centers.

Be careful, there are persons who economically assist the members of census household, but who do not belong to it because they are not permanent residents of this dwelling.

You should not relate the number of census households in a dwelling to the quantity of "Supply Books" that are found in it, since a census household can have more than one book or vice-versa.

Persons who are found occasionally in the visited dwelling will not be included in the questionnaire, since they are not residents in it, therefore they do not belong to any of the census households in the dwelling. These persons will have their permanent residence in another dwelling, and there they will be enumerated, even if they are absent at the moment of the census.

Who is the head of a census household?

You will consider the Head of the Census Household who is a resident in a private dwelling, to be the person who resides in the dwelling and is considered and recognized as such by the rest of the members of the household, which means, the one who is consulted by all regarding decisions that must be made or the one who has the greatest weight in the

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 12 ]

same. You should take into account that the concept of Head of Household does not necessarily need to be associated with the person with the greatest income or contributes the most economic resources, nor the person who appears as the Head of the Nucleus in the Supply Book, nor the person who legally appears as the owner of the dwelling.

In the households whose members do not have family ties, the head of household will be the resident person considered as such by the rest of the members or the person who is oldest.

You should not accept that the person enumerated as head of household be a person who is not a resident in the dwelling, even if he/she is the economic support of the household and is related, legally or not, to any of the persons of the same. In addition, he/she should be fifteen years old or more.

In the case of the Collective Dwellings, Director or Administrator will appear as head of household, if he/she resides in the collective dwelling without forming part of a private household. In the case that he/she does not reside in the collective dwelling, he/she will be enumerated in the private household to which he/she belongs, and the second page of questionnaire will be annulled.

What is a family?

This is the group of two or more persons, members of the census household, related to each other through the fourth degree of consanguinity (parents, children, grandparents, grandchild, great-grandchildren, siblings, uncles/aunts, nephews/nieces, and cousins) and to the second degree of affinity (spouse, mother/father-in-law, son-in-laws and daughters-in-law, step-children, brother/sister-in-law, and mother/father-in-law of one's own children [a.k.a., parents of one's son/daughter-in-law]. In one census household, there can be one or more families, or no family group.

Difference between the Household and the Family.

a. The household can be made up of one person, while the family must consist of at least two members.

b. The members of a multi-person household do not necessarily need to be related, while the members of a family do need to be related.

c. A family cannot contain more than one household, while a household can be made up of more than one family, by one or more families together with other non-related persons, or exclusively by persons who are not related to each other.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Basic Definitions -- 13 ]

What is the Census Moment?

For the purpose of the census, we call the Census Moment twelve o'clock midnight of the night before the census begins. For this census, it will be the day of September 6th, 2002, which means, the information will be in reference to the situation of the population and the dwellings at this time, which is as if we have taken a photograph of all of Cuba at this time, and the census will collect what is shown in said photograph.

- If a person is born before twelve o'clock on the night of the day September 6th, he/she will be enumerated; if, on the contrary, he/she is born after this time, he/she will not be enumerated.

- If a person dies before twelve o'clock on the night of the day September 6th, he/she will not be enumerated, but if he/she dies after this hour, he/she should be enumerated.

[Illustration]

You will enumerate:

- Those born before 12 o'clock on the night of September 6th
- Those that died after 12 o'clock on the night of September 6th

You will not enumerate:

- Those that died before 12 o'clock on the night of September 6th
- Those born after 12 o'clock on the night of September 6th

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Documents and materials that will be used by the Enumerator -- 14 ]

IV. Documents and materials that will be used by the Enumerator

The enumerator will receive the following material to complete his/her labor:

1. Credential (form 1)

This is the document that will identify him/her as a Census Enumerator, accredited by the Municipal Department of the Census of the Territorial Office of Statistics.

2. Instructions for use by the enumerator

This is the document that contains all of the instructions necessary to carry out the enumerator's work successfully. After studying it, it will serve as material for consultation.

3. Folder that contains the enumeration guide (urban or rural, forms 2 and 3)

This document shows all of the dwellings in order that the enumerator should visit in his/her Segment, whether it is an urban or rural area. It includes directions, name of the head of the principal household, and the quantity of permanent residents in each dwelling, among other information.

4. Census Questionnaire (forms C-1, C-1a, C-1b)

This is the Basic document of the Census. It contains all of the questions that will permit you to obtain all of the information related to the Population and Dwelling Census. In addition, you will consider pamphlets (form C-1a) for those households with three or more residents, as well as a work form to relate all of those residents in the dwelling (form C-1b).

5. Label for the "Enumerated Dwelling" (form 6)

This label will identify those dwelling that have already been enumerated, and will be stuck the principal door as evidence that it has been enumerated. This will be done only after having enumerated all of the members of the same.

6. Repeat Visit (form 4)

This document will be used to list the dwelling to which it is necessary to return, since it was not possible to carry out the interview or only do a partial interview.

7. Notice of Return Visit (form 5)

Make a note of when you communicate to the absent occupants of a closed dwelling or to the person who you have not enumerated, of the day and time when they will be visited again.

8. Support Materials

Each enumerator will receive: a pen, a clipboard to support the documents and a bag for protecting the documents.

Each of these documents will be explained in detail later.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Enumerator's guide -- 15 ]

V. Enumeration Guide

What is the Enumeration Guide?

This is the Basic form for the enumerator, because it contains the information regarding localization of each of the dwelling units that make up his/her assigned segment. In addition, on this same form you will note the quantity of residents and households that make up the housing unit, as well as the result of the completed visit. There are two types of guide, the Urban and the Rural.

Urban Enumeration Guide (form 2)

Header of the form: this contains the information that identifies the segment that you have been assigned (Province, Municipality, Community, Area, District, Classification, and Segment), which are already noted on the form.

Body of the form: This is made up of 15 columns, of which columns 1 to 4 and 6 to 12 are already completed, and columns 5 and 13 to 15 are blank.

Column 1: Order Number of the housing unit.

Column 2: Number of the Popular Council to which the housing unit belongs.

Column 3: Circumscription Number in which the housing unit is located.

Column 4: Block Number where the housing unit is located.

Column 5: As noted above, this column is blank so that you can note the number of the questionnaire or questionnaires that you used in the housing unit.

Columns from 6 to 10: These columns reflect the address of the housing unit (street or avenue, number of the dwelling, floor or level, apartment or room. and cross-streets).

Column 11: Name of the primary Head of Household of the private dwelling and in the case of collective dwelling (there is also a code in parenthesis) and work centers, the name of it and the name of the person who represents it (director, administrator, etc.).
If the private dwelling does not have residents at the moment of the census, in this column, you will write the reason: under construction, unoccupied or closed.

Column 12: Number of permanent residents; the information contained in the column is that of the Pre-Registration, for which it does not necessarily have to coincide with the number that you will have when you finalize the total enumeration. If they do not coincide, circle the number that is already there and write the new number.

Column 13: After completing the enumeration of the housing unit, you will write the total of the households that you find in said housing unit. Since each household will fill out an independent questionnaire, this will serve to verify the quantity of numbers of questionnaires that you write in column 5.

Column 14 and 15: These columns reflect the state in which you find the enumeration of the housing unit. The first, (14) is used when you have information pending about persons or the dwelling, for which you must return to the dwelling, in which case you mark a diagonal line (/), also making the corresponding annotation in forms 4 and 5 "Visits to Repeat" and "Notice of Return Visit". If the enumeration was done completely, you will mark and X in this column (X).

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Enumerator's guide -- 16 ]

Only make marks (established codes) in column 15 when you cannot obtain the information about the persons who reside in the dwelling for the following causes:

- AP: if the household is absent from the dwelling, but is in the country.
- AE: if the household is absent from the dwelling, but is in a foreign country.
- T: when the dwelling is occupied seasonally.
- D: when the dwelling is unoccupied.
- O: other situation, which you should note at the bottom of the form.

[Example form on page 16 are not presented here]

Rural Enumeration Guide (form 3)

As you can see, the Rural Enumeration Guide is different from the Urban Guide in that the information that refers to the address is expressed in the following manner:

Column 6: These columns reflect the address of the dwelling, work center or collective dwelling, name of community, village, farm, ranch, camp, etc., where it is located.

Column 7: The code for community where the dwelling is located.

Column 8: Reference that identifies the dwelling, highway, next to the store, in front of the school, the first dwelling on the highway that goes to Joturo, etc.

The rest of the information of the Rural Enumeration Guide coincides with the urban, even though the numbers of the columns are different, so you should carefully follow same indications that are given for the urban form, paying attention to the title of the columns.

The back side of both forms has the same columns as the front side.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Enumerator's guide -- 17 ]

[Example form on page 17 are not presented here]

[Example #1 of completing the Guides by the Enumerators on page 17 is not presented here]

[Example #2 of completing the Guides by the Enumerators on page 17 is not presented here]

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Route before and during the Enumeration -- 19 ]

VI. Following the route before and during the enumeration.

When will you know the segment that you will work during the Census?

One or two days before the enumeration begins, as an Enumerator, you will complete a Preliminary Route of your Segment, with the objective of verifying its limits and verifying your "Enumeration Guide", detecting the possible omissions or duplications of Housing Units in the assigned territory, the changes produced by people moving, and other information that will permit you to program the work.

You should follow this preliminary route taking the following into account:

1. Begin the segment route in the same order in which the housing units appear listed in the "Enumeration Guide".

2. If in the route you encounter any building or construction (building, house, work center, etc.) that is not listed in the "Enumeration Guide", do the following:

a. If it is a collective dwelling or work center, find out if there are permanent residents in it. If it does not have residents, do not note it in your guide.
b. If there are residents in the collective dwellings, work centers, or if it is a private dwelling, (occupied or not), you should do the following:
i. Note the address of the building or construction that you encountered.
ii. Communicate the situation immediately to your supervisor.
iii. Include the dwelling in your "Enumeration Guide" according to the instructions that you receive from the Supervisor; in the case that you include it, you will note all of the necessary information in the guide.

3. After you have completed the route, you will meet with the Presidents of the CDR that belong to the assigned segment, doing the following:

i. You will indicate the part of the territory of your segment that corresponds to each CDR, since a segment generally contains dwellings on various streets, attended by different CDR. Therefore, the enumerator should clearly identify the fraction of his/her segment that corresponds to each CDR.
ii. You will check the quantity of dwellings. Not all of the dwellings of the CRD necessarily have to appear in your Enumeration Guide.
iii. You will make note of all of the possible schedules for visiting the dwellings, taking as adequate those in which you can interview the head of household or an adult capable of providing information. In the same manner you will communicate to the same the possible date of enumeration of his/her CDR.

4. After making the authorized changes in the "Enumeration Guide", communicate all of them to the Supervisor, with the objective that both guides contain the updated segment.

5. With the previous knowledge that you have obtained about your Segment, proceed to plan, in an organized manner, the route that you will follow during the enumeration period, making a route program.

6. With the Supervisor, coordinate the control point where you will meet each day and the time that you will meet to turn in and return the completed questionnaires or the ones with problems, as well as to receive new instructions or resolve the questions that come up during the enumeration.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Route before and during the Enumeration -- 20 ]

When you receive the materials, verify that you have all of the necessary forms for completing your work.

How will you complete the route during the enumeration?

The Segment route during the enumeration will be done taking into account the following:

1. The Day of the Census, you will begin by enumerating the dwellings and their residents that appear listed in the "Enumeration Guide", according to the program prepared during the preliminary route before the enumeration.

2. If, during the route, you encounter any dwelling that is not listed in the "Enumeration guide", you will proceed in the same manner as you were instructed in the route before the enumeration, communicating it immediately to your Supervisor so that he/she will tell you if you should include it or not. In the case that gets included, you will note in the Guide, all of the required information, starting after the last dwelling; in the case that there is not enough space, you will add a page that will be annexed to the guide.

3. You should repeat the visits to the dwellings where you did not manage to do the interviews or where you only managed a partial interview, as well as return to those that your supervisor indicates, due to errors or omission in the questionnaires that you turned in for revision.

4. The CDR should know the period of the dates in which the enumerator will be working in this zone and the dwellings that you have not been able to interview.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / The Interview -- 21 ]

VII. The Interview

What is the interview?

An interview is a respectful conversation that you should carry out with the informant to obtain the information for the Census, the Census Questionnaire being the instrument that serves for asking the questions and obtaining the answers.

What should you do during the interview?

Introduction

The introduction is the first contact with the enumerated person; wear your credential as enumerator of the Population and Dwelling Census 2002 in a visible place, since this helps give people confidence. It is recommended that you first greet the person and ask for the head of household; if you do not find him/her, verify that the person who speaks to you is a resident of the dwelling and is at least 15 years old, that he/she knows the information about the rest of the residents of the dwelling.

In front of the enumerated person, introduce yourself, mentioning your name, tell him/her that you are conducting the Population and Dwelling Census and ask him/her to respond to some questions.

An example of an introduction:

Good morning, my name is Rodolfo Fraga and I am conducting the Population and Dwelling Census for 2002 (show your credential). Would you allow me to ask you some questions about your dwelling and the persons who live here?

You should always be aware of the following:

1. In a dwelling, there can be more than one census household, with each household occupying part of the dwelling; in this case, ask the head of household what additional information he/she possesses about the dwelling. If the head of household is not present, ask if there is another adult who can provide the information. If it is a collective dwelling, ask for the Director, Administrator, Supervisor or any other person who could provide a direct link to the inhabitants.

In no case should you try to get information from minors or other persons who, because of age, physical state or mental state, are not in conditions to provide exact information.

If for any reason you do not find any person in the dwelling who can provide the information, do not waste time and make the corresponding annotation in the form "Visits to Repeat" and leave the form "Notice about the next visit", where you will notify them of the date on which you will visit them again during the enumeration period. You will proceed in the same manner if, when you arrive at the dwelling, you encounter a wake, an accident or any situation which makes it an inadequate time for conducting the interview.

2. You will briefly explain the motive for your visit, also indicating the confidential nature of the information that is provided.

3. You will request the cooperation in answering the questions of the Census Questionnaire, asking politely, and please, move to the interior of the dwelling to make the annotations more comfortably, if you are not invited to enter, conduct the interview in the doorway.

4. Determine the number of residents, census households and number of members of each household in the dwelling, assisted by form C-Ib.

5. If there is more than one census household in the dwelling, begin by completing the questionnaire for the principal household, which will be where you will note the information about the dwelling.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / The Interview -- 22 ]
6. In each census household you will take the information about the persons who comprise the household, noting them on the corresponding questionnaire. Whenever possible, directly interrogate each person in the household.

7. Fill in the box "Summary of the household and the dwelling" in the questionnaires for each household, which will be explained later in this manual.

8. Note the name and two last names, as well as the day and month when you conducted the interview, at the end of Census Questionnaire form C-I.

9. Review all of the questionnaires to verify if there are incorrect annotations or omissions of information or persons.

10. Note in the label "Dwelling Enumerated" the necessary information and stick it on the exterior part of the entrance of the enumerated dwelling (whenever you have completely filled out the questionnaire).

11. Say goodbye politely, thanking the persons for the cooperation received. One way to say goodbye could be the following:

I thank you for your time and attention; I ask that in the same way, you receive my colleagues in the case that you are visited again to confirm any information. May I attach the sticker for enumerated dwelling?

12. Make the corresponding annotations in the "Enumeration Guide" (number of questionnaires used in the dwelling, quantity of permanent residents, quantity of households and if you completed the enumeration in the households).

Try to memorize the order given in for the activities that should be completed during the interview and do not be impatient, you will get to know them in more detail and at the rate that you advance in these instructions.

So that the interview is carried out with quality and that you complete exactly the objective of the same, you should take into account:

- Ask only the questions that appear in the questionnaire in the same order and without varying the form. You let yourself be guided by the questionnaire.

- Express yourself clearly, speak slowly, using the correct vocabulary, do not be impatient if you must repeat a question. In these cases, try to use other words that are simpler, in tone with the educational level of the person being interviewed, without changing the meaning of the question.

- Do not argue with the answers, even if they appear doubtful; you should be aware that the answers should be accepted in good faith, which means, without demanding proof.

- Avoid all disrespectful comments about any answer that seems exaggerated or out of the norm.

- If you consider that the answer is not truthful, because it apparently does not correspond to the situation of the person being interviewed, repeat the question assuming that it was not well understood.

- Act with confidence, demonstrating that you know your job, do not vacillate or doubt before any question that the person being interviewed asks in regard t the census. In this way, you will gain trust and will give great prestige to your work. At all times, you should be a friendly collaborator of the interviewee to obtain from him/her the same collaboration.

- Do not try to give any special political meaning to the census and do not discuss it. The Population and Dwelling Census are operations carried out in almost all of the countries, independent of the political-social regiment that they have.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / The Interview -- 23 ]
- If during the interview any person refuses to provide the requested information, you should try to convince him/her in a friendly manner, proceeding in the following manner:
a. You will explain the purpose of the census.
b. You will avoid all arguments.
You will indicate that all of the information provided by the interviewee is of confidential nature and by law cannot be shared in any individual manner or used for any purpose that is not statistical in nature.
c. You will explain that all of the questions are simple, and briefly refer to them: age, sex, educational level, etc.
d. If the person persists with the refusal, you will proceed to communicate this to the supervisor.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / The Census Questionnaire -- 24 ]

VIII. The Census Questionnaire

Description of the Questionnaire:

The questionnaire consists of four sections (Geographic Localization and address of the Housing Unit, Classification of the Housing Units, information about the Private Dwelling and information about the person), completing the same with additional sheets that contain only the section that collects the information about the population and permits you to enumerate all of the members of a census household on the same questionnaire, independent of its size. In addition, there is a form where you will write the relationship of the persons who reside in the dwelling, according to the household to which they belong.

Use of the Questionnaire

The Census Questionnaire will be used for conducting two investigations that are simultaneous and independent: the Dwelling Census and the Population Census.

On the Questionnaire, you will note the information for the census that you obtain from the residents in the private dwelling, collective dwelling or work center.

The same form has the capacity for collecting the information of one dwelling and also for collecting the information about three persons in the same census household.

If the census household has more than three members, inside the questionnaire you will place the additional sheet that contains only the section IV "Information about the person" (form C-1a), resulting in this manner that the questionnaire is prepared for enumerating up to five members of a single census household. If the household is comprised of more than five persons, you will insert as many sheets as necessary.

Section IV will begin on the second page of the Questionnaire, which is dedicated to collecting the information about the Head of household, which will always be considered as Person number 1 of the household.

In the collective dwellings where the head of household does not reside, you will annul this page by making two crossed diagonal lines, then continuing to note the information about the residents starting on the following page, giving each of these a consecutive number, starting with number 2.

When you begin with a new household, you will use a new Questionnaire, for which each census household will have an independent questionnaire number.

We will now see how to use the Census Questionnaire in the private dwellings occupied by permanent residents, occupied by temporary residents, in those occupied seasonally, the closed dwellings, and the unoccupied ones.

Dwelling Occupied with Permanent Residents

- If all of the residents are present or some of them are absent, you should complete all of the sections of the questionnaire of this dwelling.

It can also occur that when you arrive at a dwelling, you encounter that in the same dwelling that some persons reside permanently, but that there are all of the members of another household present who reside in another dwelling. This means that they will be considered "visitors", whatever the cause that motivates them to be visiting. If the members of this other household are going to remain there during the entire census period and in their own private dwelling they have not left a member of the household, you should prepare a Census Questionnaire for this household, in which you will fill in all of the sections from I to IV.

In the Questionnaire for this household (the visitors), in Section I you will place the address of their habitual residence. In the Enumeration Guide, we will incorporate this dwelling that does not belong in the Segment, leaving columns 1 to 4 blank; in column 5 we will place the number of the questionnaire that you used and then the address that appears in Section I of the Questionnaire. In column 11 or 9, whether it is the Urban Part or the Rural Part, you will place the name of the Head of Household and then between parentheses you will note Questionnaire for the traveler, with which you will be indicating that the dwelling does not belong to the Segment.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / The Census Questionnaire -- 25 ]

Another situation that can come up is that when you arrive at a Private Dwelling, you encounter that in the same household there is a household that resides in the dwelling permanently, but the persons who are present are members of another census household who do not live in the dwelling, but who are visitors who will remain in the same during all of the enumeration period.

The procedure that you should follow, in this case, will be to complete the questionnaire for the census household that resides in the dwelling for all of the sections; while for the visitors, you will not complete any, since their information will be declared in their household of residence.

Occupied Dwelling with temporary residents

In this case, we are not interested in enumerating the persons who are temporary residents in the country; they are not the objective of the Census. However, the dwelling should be enumerated.

You should not confuse the condition of temporary residence for the purpose f the census with the condition that legally is legally established by regulations of the Identity Card for temporary residents or transitory residents.

In this case, you will complete the Census Questionnaire sections I to III.

Dwelling Occupied Seasonally

- If on the day of the interview, there is nobody in the dwelling, you should complete a questionnaire with the sections I and II; and the information that you can collect for section III of this dwelling

- If in the dwelling occupied seasonally, on the day of the interview there is one or various persons who form a census household in which any of the members are in his/her habitual dwelling, you should complete a questionnaire with sections I, II and III of this seasonally occupied dwelling.

The persons who you encounter in the dwelling occupied seasonally will not be enumerated in the same, since their information will be collected in their habitual dwelling, which will be provided by the members of the household who remained there.

If all of the persons who are permanent residents of a private dwelling, on the day of the interview are not found in the habitual residence, but they are in the dwelling classified as seasonally occupied, you should:

- Complete another questionnaire with sections I, II and III of this dwelling occupied seasonally.

- Complete another questionnaire with all of the sections (I, II, III and IV) of the habitual dwelling of these persons, placing in Section I the address where they habitually reside, which will be incorporated at the end of the Enumeration Guide, leaving columns 1 to 4 blank. E In column 5 we will put the number of the questionnaire that was used and then the address which appears in Section I of the questionnaire; in column 11 or 9 according to whether it is the Urban or Rural Guide, you will place the name of the head of household and then in parenthesis you will write Questionnaire for Travelers, which indicates that the dwelling does not belong to the segment.

Closed Dwelling

- If on the day of the interview the dwelling is encountered closed because all of the occupants are absent (in another place in the country or in another country), you should complete a questionnaire with Sections I, II, all of the information that you can obtain for Section III. In Section IV you will note the information for the questions 1, 4 and 5 of each of the members of the household, obtained from the Registry of Addresses of the CDR.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / The Census Questionnaire -- 26 ]

Unoccupied dwelling

- If the dwelling is encountered unoccupied on the day of the interview, you will complete a questionnaire with the Sections I and II, as well as the information that you can obtain for Section III.

- If during the enumeration period, the unoccupied dwelling is occupied, you will complete a questionnaire with the Sections I to III, corresponding to said unoccupied dwelling and you will complete another questionnaire with all of the Sections (from I to IV) corresponding to the new dwellings renters, where you will collect the information about their previous residence.

In this case, you will note in Section I the address where this household resided, which will be incorporated at the end of the Enumeration Guide, leaving columns 1 to 4 blank, and in column 5, we will place the number of the questionnaire that was used and then the address that appears in Section I of the questionnaire. In column 11 or 9, depending on whether it is the Urban or Rural Guide, you will place the name of the head of household and then in parenthesis you will write Questionnaire for Travelers, which will indicate that the dwelling does not belong to the segment.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Annotations on the Questionnaire -- 27 ]

Annotations in the Questionnaire

After you have briefly analyzed the structure and use of the questionnaire, we will see how you should make the annotations in it.

In the questionnaire, you will use three types of annotations: letters or words, numbers, and X marks (X) in pre-coded boxes.

The annotations with letters of numbers should be done very clearly, preferably with printed letters and of an adequate size in accordance to the space available. In addition, you should not write any abbreviations, the numbers should be clear so that they do not create confusion, fundamentally between the 1 and the 7, the 4 and the 9, the 3 with the 5 or 8 and the 0 with 6.

The marks in all of the boxes will be made only with an (X) and not with another type of mark. For example:

[Illustration in the original document is not presented here]

An answer noted incorrectly or with incorrect mark should not be erased, but you should circle it and then make the correct annotation. For example:

[Illustration in the original document is not presented here]

If it is necessary to annul a questionnaire, you will make two crossed diagonal lines and you will write the word VOID.

If you have begun to make the individual annotations for a person and then you realize that he/she should not be included in the questionnaire, you will make two crossed diagonal lines on the page for this person to avoid voiding the questionnaire and take the number given to this person and use it for the next person that you interview in the household.

When you have unnecessarily completed the section "Information about the Private Dwelling" in a questionnaire that should not have this section filled in, you will void the same by making two crossed diagonal lines, so that you can use the rest of the questionnaire.

It is fundamental that you respect the steps to the questions that are given to you for the sequence of the interview.

1. This dwelling is:
[] 1 House
[] 2 Apartment
[] 3 Room in a rooming house or boarding house
[] 4 Shack
[] 5 Improvised
[] 6 Other -- Continue with Section IV.

Take into account the age cuts, since these will mark the questions that correspond to each person according to his/her age.

For persons 6 years old or more

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section I. Geographic Location of the housing Unit -- 28 ]

How will we fill in the questionnaire?

Section I. Geographic Localization and address of the housing unit.

In this section you will note the information that refers to the place where the dwellings is located, including the address, determined by Province, Municipality, Human community (urban or rural), Plan Turquino, District, census segment, Circumscription, Popular Council, and block; street, number and cross streets, or farm, highway, road, etc., depending on whether it is an urban or rural address.

[Illustration of Section I. Geographic Localization and address of the housing unit of the original document is not presented here]

The information for completing this section will be taken from the Enumeration Guide, verifying them and transcribing them to the Census Questionnaire; with the exception of the Plan Turquino, for which you should ask the interviewee:

Is your dwelling located in the zone of the Plan Turquino of your municipality? Make the mark in box 1 if the dwelling belongs to the Plan Turquino or, if the contrary, you will mark box 3 if the dwelling is not located in this zone.

This section will be completed in all of the questionnaires

You will not make annotations in:

- The upper right-hand box (sheet number, dwelling number), before the section I.
- The box that says "For office use", which appears at the end of Section I and under the box for the Household Summary.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section I. Geographic Location of the Housing Unit -- 29 ]

Example of how to complete this Section:

[The example is not reproduced here]

[The example for "Section I. Geographic Location and address of the housing unit" is not reproduced here]

Below we will see how we complete the Household Summary, which is included in Section I, before the information that is for Office Use.

[The example for "Household Summary" is not reproduced here]

After you have completed the questions of Section IV for all of the members of the household, we will complete the Summary in the following manner:

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section I. Geographic Location of the Housing Unit -- 30 ]

Dwelling Unit number:

Here you transcribe the number that the housing unit has in the Enumeration Guide.

Household Number:

We will note the number of the household that corresponds to the household within the dwelling, always beginning with the principal household, which will be the one that considered as such by the rest of the households in the dwelling.

Total of households:

You will note the total of households that exist within the Housing Unit. This number will be the same for all of the households that reside in the Housing Unit, which means that in all of the questionnaires for said households, you will note the same number.

Total of persons in this household:

Here you will note the total of persons that the household has, by sex and age groups.

- By sex: This is where you classify the persons who comprise the household by sex, which means, how many men and how many women form the household. The total column is the sum of the two sexes. When there are no persons of one sex, you will place a dash (-).

- By age groups: Here you will group the persons who are members of the household by age groups (0 to 16; 17 to 59, and 60 and over), the sum of these groups should be equal to the total that appears by sex, when there is no person for an age groups, you will place a dash (-).

Examples: If in a dwelling (number 05 in the Enumeration Guide) there are two households, and in the first household you enumerate 4 persons, 2 men and two women, with the age composition being the following: two children under 16, one between 17 and 59, and the other person 60 years-old or more; while in the second household you enumerated 3 persons, 1 man and 2 women, where two are under 17 years old and one is between 17 to 59 years-old.

[The example for "First Household Summary" is not reproduced here]

[The example for "Second Household Summary" is not reproduced here]

How to complete this summary for the different Housing Units:


Private dwellings occupied by permanent residents:

You will note in the Housing Unit number the number that corresponds from the Enumeration Guide. If there is one household in the dwelling, you will write (1), at the same time, you will also note (1) in the Total of Households. If more than one household exists in the dwelling, you will complete one
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section I. Geographic Location of the Housing Unit -- 31 ]
questionnaire for each of them, reflecting in each case, the information of the household that corresponds, maintaining the same Household Unit number and the Total of households that exist in said unit.

Private dwellings occupied by seasonal residents:

You will note in Housing number that corresponds in the Enumeration Guide, and the rest of the columns will be filled in with zeros (0).

Private dwelling occupied seasonally:

You follow the same procedure as those occupied by seasonal residents.

Private dwellings that are closed:

In these dwellings you will ask the neighbors about the quantity of households and persons who live in the dwelling, by sex and ages. If this is not successful, you will go to the CDR to obtain this information from the registry of address, for which the summary cannot come without annotations. In the number of households, you will write 1 in the same way you do for all households.

Private dwellings that are unoccupied:

You will note in Housing Unit Number, the number that corresponds in the Enumeration Guide and in the rest of the columns you will fill in the corresponding spaces with zeros (0).

Work Centers with Permanent Residents:

You should follow the same procedure as with the private dwellings occupied with permanent residents.

Collective Dwellings with permanent residents:

You will note in the Housing Unit Number the number that corresponds in the Enumeration Guide, in household number, and total number of households, you will write a one (1). The information about the quantity of persons by sex and age is obtained from the sum of the members of the collective dwelling.

If the collective dwelling is a segment, which means that it is found alone in the Enumeration Guide, it is because it has more than 99 persons, for which it will be necessary to complete more than one Census Questionnaire. You will note the same number for Housing Unit and Household number and for the total of households you will also write one (1). The rest of the boxes will be completed according to the results of the sums that result by residents (each questionnaire will have its total). Remember that in the box for Household Summary, there should appear at least some annotation in all of the questionnaires used in the housing units.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section II. Classification of the Housing Units -- 32 ]

Section II. Classification of the Housing Units

This section will be completed for all of the dwellings that have permanent residents, whether it is a private dwelling, a work center, or a collective dwelling, according to the definitions given for these Housing Units. In the case of the last two alternatives, you should also write the type and name, in addition to marking the corresponding box.

Section II. Classification of the Housing Units:

[] 1 Private dwelling
Continue with Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling

[] 3 Work Center (With permanent residents)
Type and name of the work center.
_____
Continue with Section IV. Information about the persons

[] 5 Collective dwelling (With permanent residents)
Type and name of work center
_____ [ _ _ ] []
Continue with Section IV. Information about the persons / Code

When we are in the presence of a Private Dwelling, box (1) will be marked and you will continue with Section III "Information about the Private Dwelling".

[Example #1]
Section II. Classification of the housing Units

[x] 1 Private dwelling
Continue with Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling

[] 3 Work Center (With permanent residents)
Type and name of the work center
______ [ _ _ ] []
Continue with Section IV. Information about the persons.

[] 5 Collective Dwelling (With permanent residents
Type and name of the work center
_____ [ _ _ ] []
Continue with Section IV. Information about persons / Code

In the presence of a Work Center with permanent residents, you will mark box (3) and on the line you will note the type and name of the center, then continue with Section IV "Information about the Person". You should annul Section III with two crossed diagonal lines.

[Example #2]
Section II. Classification of the Housing Units

[] 1 Private Dwelling
Continue with Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling

[x] 3 Work Center (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of the Work Center: Elementary School "Rafael López"
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons

[] 5 Collective Dwelling (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of the Work Center
_____ [ _ _ ] []
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons / Code

When it is a collective dwelling, you will mark the box (box 5) and on the line, you will write the type and name of the collective dwelling; you will also note the code of the Collective Dwelling within the municipality, which will be transcribed from the Enumeration Guide (next to the name of the director or person responsible for the collective dwelling, Column 11 or 9 according to whether it is urban or rural). Section III is annulled with two crossed diagonal lines.

[Example #3]
Section II. Classification of the Housing Units

[] 1 Private Dwelling
Continue with Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling

[] 3 Work Center (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of the Work Center
_____
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons

[x] 5 Collective Dwelling (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of Work Center
Psychiatric Hospital "Gustavo Machín" [ 0 1 ] [0]
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons / Code

If the Collective Dwelling forms part of a normal Segment, which means that it is found together with private dwelling and work centers (does not have more than 99 permanent residents), you will note zero (0) in the box next to the code.

If the Collective Dwelling is an entire segment itself, which means, in the Enumeration Guide it is the only dwelling listed because it has more than 99 permanent residents.

In this case, you will mark box 5, noting on the line the type and name of the Collective Dwelling, as well as the code that appears in the Enumeration Guide and in the box that follows, you will note a (1), which corresponds to the first 99 persons in the Collective Dwelling. On the second questionnaire you will note the same information that identifies the Collective Dwelling and you will write (2) in the corresponding box and in the same way you will number successive forms until you complete the Collective Dwelling.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section II. Classification of the Housing Units -- 33 ]

[Example #4]
Section II. Classification of the Housing Units

[] 1 Private Dwelling
Continue with Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling

[] 3 Work Center (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of the Work Center
_____
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons

[x] 5 Collective Dwelling (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of Work Center
Psychiatric Hospital "Gustavo Machín" [ 0 1 ] [1]
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons / Code

[Example #5]
Section II. Classification of the Housing Units

[] 1 Private Dwelling
Continue with Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling

[] 3 Work Center (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of the Work Center
_____
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons

[x] 5 Collective Dwelling (With Permanent Residents)
Type and Name of Work Center
Psychiatric Hospital "Gustavo Machín" [ 0 1 ] [2]
Continue with Section IV. Information about the Persons / Code

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 34 ]

Section III. Information about the private dwelling

If the place of housing results to be a private dwelling (occupied with residents or not), you will proceed to complete Section III Information about the Private Dwelling.

You should include those Private Dwellings that are in the construction process, as long as the construction stage is at a stage that, on the day of the census, the dwellings could be occupied by persons who could live in them. This means, consider only those that have roofs, walls, doors, and windows, even if the construction lacks paint, polishing floors, interior doors and windows, etc.

Do not include those buildings in the construction that will be destined for other uses, such as, for example, factories, work centers, etc.

Question 1. Type of dwelling:

[illustration]

1. Type of Dwelling (only one mark)

[] 1 House
[] 2 Apartment
[] 3 Rooms in boarding house
[] 4 Shack
[] 5 Improvised dwelling
[] 6 Other 6 -- Continue with Section IV

This question is not asked of the enumerated person, but by simple inspection and taking into account the basic definitions we classify the type of dwelling in which we find ourselves.

This question only permits one mark.

In the case that you mark an answer between 1 and 5, you continue with question 2; but if you mark the alternative number 6, you end this section and continue with Section IV Information about the person.

[Example #1]
[illustration]

1. Type of Dwelling (only one mark)

[] 1 House
[] 2 Apartment
[] 3 Rooms in boarding house 3
[] 4 Shack
[] 5 Improvised dwelling
x (for answers 1-5) -- Continue with question 2
[] 6 Other -- Continue with Section IV

[Example #2]
1. Type of Dwelling (only one mark)

[] 1 House
[] 2 Apartment
[] 3 Rooms in boarding house
[] 4 Shack
[] 5 Improvised dwelling
[x] Other 6 -- Continue with Section IV

End of section. Continue with Section IV.

In the case that you find yourself inside a room-house, roof-top room, neighborhood building, you should take care, since there are rooms in the room-houses that have been modified and do not use the common spaces with other dwellings, such as the kitchen, the bathroom and the sanitary services, because they have this incorporated in the interior of the dwelling. These cases will be considered apartments, for which you should ask the question or ask if these services are found inside the dwelling.

The dwellings that are of the type "Other" must be occupied to be included in the census.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 35]

Question 2. The dwelling is occupied by?

This question refers to the form in which the dwelling is found occupied.

For the purposes of the Census, it refers to:

[illustration]

Dwelling occupied by:
[] Permanent residents
[] Temporary residents
[] Seasonally occupied
[] Closed
[] Unoccupied

Taking into account the basic definitions (which appear on previous pages), ask the question to the enumerated person and classify it according to the answer that he/she gives you. Remember that this question only allows one answer and then you move on to question 3, when the dwelling is occupied by permanent residents.

[illustration]

2. The dwelling is occupied by: (only one mark)

[] 1 Permanent residents
[] 2 Temporary residents
[] 3 Seasonally occupied
[] 4 Closed
[] 5 Unoccupied

For answers 2-5: do not complete Section IV.

In the case that the enumerated person does not know how it is classified, or does not understand the question, continue by giving a brief explanation of each of the alternatives.

If you mark any of the options between 2 and 5, you will not complete Section IV, since the alternative to answer 2, the residents are not permanent residents in the country; in the case of number 3, the persons who are found in the dwelling have their permanent residence in another place in the country; in the case of number 5, this has the implicit indication that the dwelling does not have occupants, for which you should ask the neighbors the rest of the questions of this section.

In the case of number 4 of the questionnaire, it indicates that you should not complete section IV, but requires what is obtained from the CDR, the questions 1, 4 and 5 (name and last names, age and sex respectively), for this section to avoid the loss of persons, in that case that they cannot be located in other places in the country because they are in hospitals where the patients' stay is temporary or in the case of tourists institutions, which will not be visited because they are not the object of the Census.

If you mark that the dwelling is unoccupied (box 5) in question 2, you should not have marked that the type of private dwelling is improvised (box 5) in question 1.

How to complete the form for each of the alternatives [of dwelling occupancy]:

For occupied dwellings with permanent residents you will do the following: If all of the residents are present or if some of them are missing, you should fill in all of the sections of the dwelling questionnaire for this dwelling.

If the dwelling is found occupied by temporary residents (foreigners), you should fill in the Sections I, II and III, leaving the Section IV blank.

For the dwellings that are occupied seasonally:

- If on the day of the interview there nobody in the dwelling, you should fill out a Questionnaire with the Section I and II, as well as the information that you can collect for Section III for this dwelling.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 36]
- If in the dwelling occupied seasonally on the day of the interview there is a person who forms part of a census household whose inhabitants are found in their habitual dwelling, you should fill out a questionnaire with Sections I, II, and III for this seasonal dwelling.

The person who is found in the dwelling will not be enumerated in the same, given that his/her data will be collected by his/her habitual dwelling, which will be given by members of his/her household.

- If all of the persons permanent residents of a private dwelling, on the day of the interview, are not found in their habitual dwelling, but are found in a dwelling classified as seasonally occupied, you should:
- Fill out a questionnaire with the Sections I, II, and III of this dwelling that is seasonally occupied.

- Fill out another questionnaire, with all of the Sections (I, II, III, and IV) of the habitual dwelling of these persons.
In all cases, you should inform the Supervisor of the treatment given to this seasonally occupied dwelling.

If the dwelling is closed, you should fill out a questionnaire with Section I and II, with the data that can be collected from the Section III for this dwelling, and you will fill in Section IV with questions 1, 4 and 5 for each of the members of the dwelling using the CDR.

If the dwelling is found unoccupied, you will fill in a questionnaire with Sections I and II, as well as the data that you can collected for Section III for this dwelling.

Question 3. What is the date of construction of the dwelling?

In this question you will ask about the year in which the construction of the dwelling was completed, taking into account that this will only be asked of dwellings that are of the type called House or Apartments.

[illustration]

What is the construction date of the dwelling? (For houses and apartments; only one mark)

[] 1 Before 1920
[] 2 From 1920 to 1933
[] 3 From 1934 to 1945
[] 4 From 1946 to 1958
[] 5 From 1959 to 1970
[] 6 From 1971 to 1981
[] 7 From 1982 to 1989
[] 8 From 1990 to the Census Date
[] 9 Not known

The question should be asked in the following manner:

"The date of construction of the dwelling is?" and you will start to mention the periods until the interviewee tells you to which it belongs.

Mark the box that corresponds to the period in which you encounter the year given by the interviewee, remembering that you should only mark one period.

If the dwelling was enlarged or partially remodeled later, you will take into account the year in which the principal part of the same was built.

Observe that the first period (box 1) covers constructions until the year 1919, which means, it does not include those from 1920.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 37]

Question 4. What is the predominant material in?

4. What is the predominant material in: (only one mark per section)

a. The roof?
[] 1 Cement or reinforced cement
[] 2 Tile
[] 3 Fiber-cement or metallic sheeting, or similar
[] 4 Wood or tar paper
[] 5 Guano
[] 6 Other

b. The floor?
[] 1 Ceramic tile, granite, tile, etc.
[] 2 Cement
[] 3 Wood
[] 4 Dirt
[] 5 Other

c. The exterior walls?
[] 1 Concrete, plaster
[] 2 Wood
[] 3 Palm bark or wood
[] 4 Adobe or mud
[] 5 Other

In this question [question 4] we collect the materials that are predominant in the roof, exterior walls, and floors of the dwellings, according to what is specified in the census questionnaire.

You should ask the question taking into account the header of the question, linking it to all of the parts of the question in the following manner:

The predominant material of the roof is concrete slabs or concrete, tile, fiber-cement sheeting, etc.?

The predominant material of the floor is concrete tile, granite, tile, cement, etc.?

The predominant material of the walls is reinforced concrete, plaster, wood, etc?

If a roof, exterior wall or floor is made of more than one material, you should mark the one that predominates.

Example: If the floor of the dwelling is made up of wood and cement, the enumerator should ask what percent of the dwelling has each. If the answer is that the greater percent of the dwelling is made of cement, then you will mark the box that corresponds to this type of material for the floor.

In the case that the dwelling has half of one type of material and the other part with another type of material, you will mark the one that the enumerated person declares as predominant.

This question will always have three marks for each section.

[Example #1]

[illustration]

4. What is the predominant material in: (only one mark per section)

a. The roof?
[] 1 Cement or reinforced cement
[] 2 Tile
[] 3 Fiber-cement or metallic sheeting, or similar
[] 4 Wood or tar paper
[x] 5 Guano
[] 6 Other
b. The floor?
[] 1 Ceramic tile, granite, tile, etc.
[] 2 Cement
[] 3 Wood
[x] 4 Dirt
[] 5 Other
c. The exterior walls?
[] 1 Concrete, plaster
[] 2 Wood
[x] 3 Palm bark or wood
[] 4 Adobe or mud
[] 5 Other

[Example #2]

4. What is the predominant material in: (only one mark per section)

a. The roof?
[x] 1 Cement or reinforced cement
[] 2 Tile
[] 3 Fiber-cement or metallic sheeting, or similar
[] 4 Wood or tar paper
[] 5 Guano
[] 6 Other
b. The floor?
[x] 1 Ceramic tile, granite, tile, etc.
[] 2 Cement
[] 3 Wood
[] 4 Dirt
[] 5 Other
c. The exterior walls?
[x] 1 Concrete, plaster
[] 2 Wood
[] 3 Palm bark or wood
[] 4 Adobe or mud
[] 5 Other

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 38]

Question 5. What problems does the dwelling present?:

This [question 5] refers to the possible problems in the structure that are present in the predominant materials of dwelling and will be questioned in the same form as the previous manner in regard to the header of the question and with the following parts:

[illustration]

5. What problems does the dwelling present? (more than one mark per section)

a. In its roofs, support beams or flooring joists?
[] 1 Humidity
[] 2 Holes or damages
[] 3 Cracks
[] 4 Exposed metal rods
[] 5 None

b. In the walls and columns?
[] 1 Humidity
[] 2 Holes or damages
[] 3 Cracks
[] 4 Exposed metal rods
[] 5 None

c. Damages?
Interior
[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No
Exterior
[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

Does the dwelling present humidity, holes or damages, cracks, etc. in its roofs, support beams or flooring joists?

Does the dwelling present humidity, holes or damages, cracks, etc. in the walls and columns?

Does the dwelling present any interior or exterior damage?

For this, you must first know the definitions of:

Humidity: This is the consequence of filtrations of water in the constructive elements, which is manifested by stains, drips, etc. in the covered layers of reinforced concrete and others.

In columns, walls, and floor joists, it is the consequence of water filtration from the hydro-sanitation installations. In walls, it is produced by porosity when there is humidity in the land.

Holes and peeled walls: This is the increase of the volume of the constructive elements in the affected parts. When the construction material is expelled, it produces the peeled wall.

Exposed steel: This is the steel that remains exposed in the elements of reinforced concrete due to the loss of the covering of said concrete due to the increase of volume and corrosion due to humidity.

Seams and cracks: This is identified by the separation of the affected parts in the construction elements; they can be vertical, horizontal, and diagonal.

In columns and support beams, it is the consequence of the corrosion of the steel, due to the lack of foundation or the difference in the dilation of the elements.

For these types of damages we will take them into consideration, whatever the dimension of the dwelling that is found to be affected.

For parts A and B, if you mark none (box 5), the rest of the boxes will appear blank.

[illustration]

[Example #1]

5. What problems does the dwelling present? (more than one mark per section)

a. In its roofs, support beams or flooring joists?
[] 1 Humidity
[x] 2 Holes or damages
[] 3 Cracks
[x] 4 Exposed metal rods
[] 5 None
b. In the walls and columns?
[] 1 Humidity
[] 2 Holes or damages
[x] 3 Cracks
[] 4 Exposed metal rods
[] 5 None
c. Damages?
Interior
[] 1 Yes
[x] 3 No
Exterior
[x] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

[Example #2]

5. What problems does the dwelling present? (more than one mark per section)

a. In its roofs, support beams or flooring joists?
[] 1 Humidity
[] 2 Holes or damages
[] 3 Cracks
[] 4 Exposed metal rods
[x] 5 None
b. In the walls and columns?
[x] 1 Humidity
[] 2 Holes or damages
[] 3 Cracks
[] 4 Exposed metal rods
[] 5 None
c. Damages?
Interior
[] 1 Yes
[x] 3 No
Exterior
[] 1 Yes
[x] 3 No

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 39]

Question 6. What is the quantity of rooms that the dwelling has?:

This question [question 6] is related to the quantity of rooms in the dwelling and of these, how many are habitually used for sleeping and how many are used exclusively as bedrooms.

In this question the form of annotation changes, since they are not marked with an X for the answer, but you note a quantity (with numbers), which is given to us by the interviewee. You should take into account that you should note two digits, so therefore you will fill in a zero on the left when the number is not higher than nine.

Considering the generally the rooms are the spaces in the dwelling called bedroom, dormitory or room, living room, dining room, entryway, closed porch, garages, etc., whenever these same rooms are separated from each other with fixed walls that are two meters high or higher, and that in addition they have a surface area of at least four square meters and the kitchen if its size permits the placement of a table with chairs for eating in it.

Do not include the following as a room, even if it has more than four square meters of surface space: bathrooms, closet, interior hallways, open galleries, sanitary services, open portals, patios, balconies, terraces, etc.

[illustration]

Question 6.

a. What is the quantity of rooms that the dwelling has?
(Do not include bathrooms, corridors, open rooms, such as open portals, terraces, galleries, etc.
[ _ _ ]

b. How many rooms are habitually used for sleeping?
[ _ _ ]

c. How many are exclusively dormitories or bedrooms?
[ _ _ ]

In part A) of the question, you should write the total of rooms with which the dwelling counts, taking into account the concept of room given above.

In B) consider those that despite not being bedrooms are used for this purpose at the moment of the census.

Be aware that these are rooms that are used for sleeping, which means, the spaces of the dwelling that you determined as rooms in part A) of this question and that are used for the mentioned purpose.

In this manner, a living room that fulfills the condition of room, and in which a person habitually sleeps, would be a room used for sleeping.

In the same manner, you will include all of the bedrooms, even when some of them are not used by their occupants because there are more bedrooms than are needed.

If, in a dwelling, they inform you that they have two bedrooms, but in addition they habitually use the living room and dining room, you should note under rooms used for sleeping: (04).

However, in section C) you collect the total number of rooms that are used for the exclusive function of bedroom.

An example of how you should complete this question [question 6]:

[Example #1]
The apartment that you visit has the following spaces:

- Two bedrooms with six square meter each.
- A living room with six square meter.
- A dining room with five square meter.
- A kitchen with four square meter.
- A bathroom with five square meter.
- A closet with one square meter.
- An open terrace with five square meter.

They inform you that in addition to the bedrooms, they use the living room for sleeping.

[illustration]
Question 6.

a. What is the quantity of rooms that the dwelling has?
(Do not include bathrooms, corridors, open rooms, such as open portals, terraces, galleries, etc.
[ 0 5 ]
b. How many rooms are habitually used for sleeping?
[ 0 3 ]
c. How many are exclusively dormitories or bedrooms?
[ 0 2 ]

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 40 ]

Question 7. Does the dwelling have a room for cooking?

With this question [question 7], we want to know if the dwelling has a room that is used for cooking, for exclusive use or shared by various dwellings, or if the dwelling does not have this room, which would mean that you should formulate the question exactly as it appears.

[illustration]

7. Does the dwelling have a space for cooking? [mark only one]

[] 1 Exclusive for the dwelling?
[] 2 Shared by various dwellings?
[] 3 Does not have?

You will understand as such, all spaces that are separated from the other rooms or spaces of the dwellings, whatever its size, designated for preparing meals, store food, wash and store the dishes, which means, the room that we generally call the kitchen.

Observe that this room does not necessarily have to be a room, therefore, its size can be greater or less than four square meters, although it must be separated by walls.

Include those commercial kitchen spaces that also have a table with chairs used for eating. But do not confuse that the inverse case is not considered, which means a dining room that has been provisionally set up with utensils for cooking.

If you are informed that the dwelling has a place for cooking, you will mark box 1 (if is for the exclusive use of this dwelling) or box 2 (if it is shared by several dwellings).

If there is no space for cooking, mark box "Does not have".

Question 8. Energy or fuel most used for cooking.

In this question, you will mark one of the eight boxes that are provided. In boxes 2, 3 and 4 there is an explanation in parenthesis, which gives the most common meaning of the term used.

The interviewer will mark, with an (x), the box that corresponds to the predominant fuel used in the dwelling for cooking.

[illustration]
8. What is the energy or fuel most used for cooking? (mark only one)

[] 1 Electricity
[] 2 Manufactured gas (piped)
[] 3 Liquid gas (in tanks)
[] 4 Bright light (kerosene)
[] 5 Petroleum
[] 6 Alcohol
[] 7 Firewood, wood charcoal or other
[] 8 None

In the case of dwelling occupied by more than one census household, and
where each household cooks separately, using different fuels, you should take into account the energy or fuel used by the principal household of this dwelling.

Box 7 will be used, in addition to firewood or charcoal, for any other fuel that is not listed above.

Where there is no energy or fuel used, you will mark box 8, "None".

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 41]

Question 9. Does the dwelling have piped water installed?

This question is comprised of four sections, where you collect information about the piped water installation, the supply form, the source of this product, and the frequency, for the case that the source is the Aqueduct.

[illustration]

9.a. Does the dwelling have piped water supply? (mark only one per group).

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 2 Outside the dwelling
[] 3 Does not have

b. Does the dwelling receive water by:

[] 1 Pipes
[] 3 Delivered by another means

c. The water consumed comes from:

[] 1 Aqueduct
[] 2 Well or artesian well
[] 3 River or spring
[] 4 Other
Answers 1-4 -- Continue with question 10.

d. With what frequency does the dwelling receive water from the aqueduct?

[] 1 Daily
[] 2 Every other day
[] 3 Weekly
[] 4 Other

The question should be formulated in relation to the section, plus the possible alternatives; in section A) Does the dwelling have piped water installations, inside the dwelling, outside the dwelling, or does not have. In this section, you will make one mark.

You will understand as piped water installation, when in the dwelling you find the necessary hydraulic connections for conducting water to the inside of the dwelling (interior) or only to the garden, patio, etc. (exterior), independently of whether at the census moment, water does not flow through said installations.

In this section, what we want to know is if the dwelling has or does not have water installations.

In section B) you will ask, "Does the dwelling get its water through pipes or through another method?" If you mark the first box, you should have marked box 1 or 2 in section A), never box 3, because if they do not have water installation, they cannot be supplied with piped water. In the case that you mark box 3, you can have any box marked in section A), since they can have the installation but never have received water through it and have to get the water supply from another method.

For section C), you will ask about the source of the water. Does the water for consumption come from an aqueduct, a well, or tank, river or stream, or other? To ask this question, you should know some of the concepts, such as:

Aqueduct: This is a public supply system, with water distributed by pipes to the dwellings of a town, city, village, etc.

Well: This is a perforation made in the subsoil from which water flows.

Tank: This is a deposit for collecting rain water. The tank can be subterranean or above-ground. It can be made of metal, brick, or reinforced concrete.

River or spring: This means supplying the water from rivers, water holes, and natural springs.

Other: This includes any other type of water supply not included in the above cases, for example, water-tank trucks.

This section, like the ones above, only permits one mark. If you mark one of the boxes from 2 to 4, do not ask section D) and continue with question 10; but if you mark box 1, you should ask the question from section D).

In section D) the question wants to know the frequency that water is available from the aqueduct. Therefore, you should ask the question in the following manner: How frequently do you receive water from the aqueduct? You can only mark one of the options.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 42 ]

Examples for filling in the answer for this question:

[illustration]

[Example #1]
9. a. Does the dwelling have piped water supply? (mark only one per group).

[x] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 2 Outside the dwelling
[] 3 Does not have

b. Does the dwelling receive water by:

[x] 1 Pipes
[] 3 Delivered by another means

c. The water consumed comes from:

[x] 1 Aqueduct
[] 2 Well or artesian well
[] 3 River or spring
[] 4 Other
(answers 1-4) - Continue with question 10.

d. With what frequency does the dwelling receive water from the aqueduct?

[x] 1 Daily
[] 2 Every other day
[] 3 Weekly
[] 4 Other

[Example #2]
9. a. Does the dwelling have piped water supply? (mark only one per group).

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[x] 2 Outside the dwelling
[] 3 Does not have

b. Does the dwelling receive water by:

[] 1 Pipes
[x] 3 Delivered by another means

c. The water consumed comes from:

[] 1 Aqueduct
[] 2 Well or artesian well
[] 3 River or spring
[x] 4 Other
(answers 1-4)- Continue with question 10.

d. With what frequency does the dwelling receive water from the aqueduct?

[] 1 Daily
[] 2 Every other day
[] 3 Weekly
[] 4 Other

[Example #3]
9. a. Does the dwelling have piped water supply? (mark only one per group).

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 2 Outside the dwelling
[x] 3 Does not have

b. Does the dwelling receive water by:

[] 1 Pipes
[x] 3 Delivered by another means

c. The water consumed comes from:

[] 1 Aqueduct
[x] 2 Well or artesian well
[] 3 River or spring
[] 4 Other
(answers 1-4)- Continue with question 10.

d. With what frequency does the dwelling receive water from the aqueduct?

[] 1 Daily
[] 2 Every other day
[] 3 Weekly
[] 4 Other

[Example #4]
9. a. Does the dwelling have piped water supply? (mark only one per group).

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[x] 2 Outside the dwelling
[] 3 Does not have

b. Does the dwelling receive water by:

[x] 1 Pipes
[] 3 Delivered by another means

c. The water consumed comes from:

[] 1 Aqueduct
[x] Well or artesian well
[] 3 River or spring
[] 4 Other
(answers 1-4)- Continue with question 10.

d. With what frequency does the dwelling receive water from the aqueduct?

[] 1 Daily
[] 2 Every other day
[] 3 Weekly
[] 4 Other

Question 10. What sewage system is used by the dwelling?

Through this question, we want to know the sewage system that is available to the dwelling that is visited, understanding that the sewage system is the system for removing waste water or sewage, which can be through:

[illustration]
10. What drainage system does the dwelling have? (mark only one)

[] 1 Sewer system
[] 2 Septic well or tank
[] 3 Others

Sewage drains: This is a public sewage drain system, which serves a city, town, village, etc.

Septic well or tank: This is the place where the putrefaction and liquefaction of the solid waste residuals takes place and from where water passes on to a sewage well or drain, etc.

Others: Consider any form of removal not contemplated in the previous alternatives, such as, for example: the evacuation of sewage into a river or lake, etc.

You will mark the corresponding box with an (x) based on what is declared in the dwelling that you visit, therefore, you will only have one marked box.

The question should be asked in the following manner: What drainage system does the house have?

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 43]

[illustration]

[Example #1]
10. What drainage system does the dwelling have? (mark only one)

[x] 1 Sewer system
[] 2 Septic well or tank
[] 3 Others

[Example #2]
10. What drainage system does the dwelling have? (mark only one)

[] 1 Sewer system
[x] 2 Septic well or tank
[] 3 Others

[Example #3]
10. What drainage system does the dwelling have? (mark only one)

[] 1 Sewer system
[] 2 Septic well or tank
[x] 3 Others

Question 11. Does the dwelling have a bathroom or shower with running water installed and working drains?

This question refers to whether the dwelling does or does not have a space for personal hygiene and its location. You should consider as a bathroom or shower, any room or special space, separated from other rooms or spaces in the dwelling, whatever its size, that is designated for body washing, with running water and drains installed. This room can have or not have sanitary services (toilet) in addition.

The question has two parts and should be asked in the following manner: A) Does the dwelling have a bathroom or shower with running water and drains installed, for the exclusive use of this dwelling, for shared use of various dwellings, or is there none available?

If you will mark box 3 (does not have), you should not ask part B) and you will continue directly with question 12.

Part B) will be asked of the dwellings where you marked boxes 1 or 2, asking, is the bathroom or shower located inside the dwelling or outside of it?

[illustration]

[Example #1]
11. a. Does the dwelling have a bathtub or shower with an installation of running water and drain for use? (mark only one per group)

[x] 1 Exclusive use of the dwelling
[] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 12.

b. The bathtub or shower is located:

[x] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 3 Outside of the dwelling

[Example #2]
11. a. Does the dwelling have a bathtub or shower with an installation of running water and drain for use? (mark only one per group)

[] 1 Exclusive use of the dwelling
[x] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 12.

b. The bathtub or shower is located:

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[x] 3 Outside of the dwelling

[Example #3]
11. a. Does the dwelling have a bathtub or shower with an installation of running water and drain for use? (mark only one per group)

[] 1 Exclusive use of the dwelling:
[] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[x] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 12.

b. The bathtub or shower is located:

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 3 Outside of the dwelling

In the case that the dwelling has more than one bathroom or shower, and these are located in different parts of the dwelling, one inside and one outside, you will gather the information regarding the one the they use the most.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 44]

Question 12. Sanitary service

With this question, we want to know if the dwelling has sanitary services, if it is for exclusive use or shared, the type of service, and its location.

[illustration]

12. a. Does the dwelling have sanitary services for use:? (mark only one per group)

[] 1 Exclusive of this dwelling
[] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 13.

b. What type of sanitary service does the dwelling possess?

[] 1 Toilet with water
[] 2 Sanitary latrine
[] 3 Latrine or sewage pit

c. The sanitary services are located:

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 3 Outside the dwelling

Part A) is asked in the following manner: Does the dwelling have sanitary service that is for exclusive use, shared use or none?

In the cases where you mark box 1 or 2, you will continue by asking part B). If you marked box 3 (Does not have), you should continue directly with question 13, leaving parts B) y C) blank.

With part B) we want to know the type of sanitary service that the dwelling has. There should only be one mark, asking: What type of sanitary service do you have: water toilet, sanitary latrine, outhouse or black well?

In the case that the dwelling has more than one sanitary service and they are of different types, the types and location, you will mark the one that is used the most frequently.

Part C) is about the location of the sanitary service, asking in the following manner: Is the sanitary service located inside the dwelling or outside of it? You should mark the box that the interviewee declares and you should only have one mark.

Water toilet: This is the sanitary installation with water supplied through pipes and with a sewer connected to a drainage network or sewer or to a septic tank or other similar.

Sanitary latrine: This is a well or hole of size and depth that is adequate and an edge or border and seat (with a cover) made of cement, plaster or wood, situated at no less than five meters from the dwelling and 15 meters from the water well. It has a shelter for total privacy.

Outhouse or black well: This is a well or hole that does not respond to the conditions of the sanitary latrine, with variable dimensions, can have a shelter and wood floor.

[illustration]

[Example #1]
12. a. Does the dwelling have sanitary services for use? (mark only one per group)

[x] 1 Exclusive of this dwelling
[] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 13.

b. What type of sanitary service does the dwelling possess?

[x] 1 Toilet with water
[] 2 Sanitary latrine
[] 3 Latrine or Sewage pit

c. The sanitary services are located:

[x] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 3 Outside the dwelling

[Example #2]
12. a. Does the dwelling have sanitary services for use? (mark only one per group)

[] 1 Exclusive of this dwelling
[x] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 13.

b. What type of sanitary service does the dwelling possess?

[] 1 Toilet with water
[x] 2 Sanitary latrine
[] 3 Latrine or Sewage pit

c. The sanitary services are located:

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[x] 3 Outside the dwelling
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 45 ]

[Example #3]
12. a. Does the dwelling have sanitary services for use? (mark only one per group)

[x] 1 Exclusive of this dwelling
[] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 13.

b. What type of sanitary service does the dwelling possess?

[] 1 Toilet with water
[] 2 Sanitary latrine
[x] 3 Latrine or Sewage pit

c. The sanitary services are located:

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[x] 3 Outside the dwelling

[Example #4]
12. a. Does the dwelling have sanitary services for use? (mark only one per group)

[] 1 Exclusive of this dwelling
[] 2 Shared among various dwellings
[x] 3 Does not have -- Continue with question 13.

b. What type of sanitary service does the dwelling possess?

[] 1 Toilet with water
[] 2 Sanitary latrine
[] 3 Latrine or Sewage pit

c. The sanitary services are located:

[] 1 Inside the dwelling
[] 3 Outside the dwelling

Question 13. What is the energy source that is used for illumination in the dwelling?

With this question we want to know what the source is for energy that is used for illumination and this only permits one mark.

[illustration]
13. What is the source of energy that is used for lighting the dwelling? (mark only one)

[] 1 Union electric
[] 2 Industrial plant
[] 3 Brilliant light (kerosene)
[] 4 Mini hydro electric
[] 5 Solar panels
[] 6 Biogas
[] 7 Own electrical plant
[] 8 Other

For the formulation of this question, you should read it and list the possible answers. What is the source of the energy used for illumination of the dwelling: Union Electric (national network), industrial plant, brilliant light, mini-hydroelectric, solar panels, bio-gas, private generator or another source?

For this, you should already know how to identify each of these energy sources.

Union Electric: When the electrical energy for illumination comes from the general network of the country, supplied by the electrical company.

Industrial plant: This includes the cases where the electricity is supplied by state centers, such as sugar plants, factories, mines, etc., or by Popular Power.

Brilliant Light (kerosene): This is when the illumination is obtained by using energy known as brilliant light (kerosene, liquid gas, coal oil, etc.); or another derivative of petroleum (gasoline, etc.).

Mini-hydroelectric: This includes, in addition to the mini-hydroelectric, the systems that are adapted to use water force to generate electricity.

Solar Panels: This is a system that transforms the solar energy into electricity, using panels that capture solar rays in its solar conducting surface elements that make the transformation.

Bio-gas: This is a system that is capable of producing energy through the decomposition of organic material.

Private generator: This is the electric energy for illumination that is obtained from domestic electric generators, owned by the occupants of the dwelling.

Other: This includes those that are not indicated above, such as: coal, candles, vegetable oil, animal grease, etc.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section III. Information about the Private Dwelling -- 46]

Question 14. Which of the following equipment does the dwelling have?

You will ask about the existence in the dwelling of all of the equipment specified in the census questionnaire.

[Illustration]

14. Which of the following appliances/equipment does the dwelling have?

a) Radio

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

b) Radio-recorder with or without CD

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

c) Color television

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

d) Black and white television

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

e) Electric iron

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

f) Refrigerator

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

g) Wash machine

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

h) Manual or electric sewing machine

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

i) Fan

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

j) Electric kitchen

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

k) Blender or beater

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

l) Rice maker

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

m) Air conditioning

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

n) Video cassette player/recorder

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

o) Computer

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

p) Automobile, truck or tractor

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

q) Motorcycle or motorbike

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

r) Private telephone

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

s) Water heater (non-mobile)

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

Consider all of the equipment that is in working order, even in the case that the equipment has light deterioration or mechanical imperfection that does not impede its functioning. Also include the equipment that is broken and pending repair, if the repair is considered possible. Do not include the broken equipment that has been discarded, which means that no repair is possible.

The question should be asked exactly as it appears, reading the list of equipment to the interviewee and marking the corresponding box based on the answer given for each type of equipment. Therefore, there should not be an answer for each of the types of equipment.

If in the dwelling there exists more than one census household, you should take into account all of the equipment that exists, making marks in the questionnaire of the first census household (principal household), where you collect information "Information about the private dwelling", even if the members of this household are not the owners of the equipment.

In the case that the person who responds for the principal household does not know about the possession of working equipment for the rest of the households of the dwelling, when you ask the questions in the other households, you will ask this one to complete the information regarding household equipment, circling the box NO and making the mark for YES if this is the case. If the equipment that is declared already exists, you will not make any marks.

With question 14, you conclude Section III "Information about the private dwelling".

As is natural, the information about the dwelling will be taken only once, for which only one questionnaire should have this information for each private dwelling visited, independent of whether you have used more than one questionnaire in it and for the rest of the households, you should cross out this section for the rest of the questionnaires completed for this dwelling, making crossed diagonal lines. You should be careful to make the crossed diagonal lines only in sections II and III.

Therefore, the information for Section III will only be noted on the first questionnaire that is used in a dwelling, which means, on the first questionnaire for the first household (principal household). On the rest of the questionnaires, this section will be annulled.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 47 ]

Section IV. Information about the person

Once you have filled in Section III whenever it corresponds to do so, and therefore you have obtained the information for the Dwelling Census, you will continue with Section IV to obtain the information about the population that resides in these same dwellings, by using the Population Census.

Section IV is comprised of four parts, the first formed by 10 questions regarding general characteristics that cover all ages, the second part made up of five questions regarding the educational part that is comprised of persons who are 6 years old or more, the third part is regarding the civil and marital status and is a question for persons 12 years old or more, and the last group of questions which contains 5 questions, about the economic situation of the population that is 15 years old or more.

Before you begin Section IV, you should ask the persons who are present in the dwelling:

- How many persons are permanent residents in the dwelling?
- In how many census households are these residents grouped?
- How many persons make up each household?
- Which is the principal household?

To obtain this information, you will first ask:

How many persons live in or permanently reside in this dwelling?

You should immediately clarify that these are the persons who habitually sleep in the dwelling and who store their belongings in it. Remember the definition.

Once you have this information, you will ask:

- If they have not forgotten any resident who is not present or anyone who has died since September 7.
- And if they have not named some person who is not a resident in the dwelling and who is in it temporarily.

Once you have determined the quantity of residents in the dwelling, you will ask:

How many households are there in the dwelling?

Immediately clarify that this is the group of persons who have a shared budget and who prepare their food together, without any criteria of "Supply Book".

After this, you will move on to ask, "How many persons form each household", verifying that all of the residents who are declared are residents of the dwelling and then find out who the head of household is, verifying who is the Head of Household.

To know who the Head of Household is, you should find out who is the person who is considered as such by the rest of the members of the household, which means, the person who all of them consult about decisions that must be made and the person who has the greatest weight in the decisions. You should take into account that the concept of Head of Household does not necessarily have to be associated with the person with the greatest income or the person who contributes the most economic support, nor the person who appears as Head of the Nucleous in the Supply Notebook, nor the person who legally appears as the owner of the dwelling. In all of the private dwellings, there must be a Head of Household.

In the households whose members are not related to each other, the Head of Household will be the resident person who the rest of the residents consider as such or the one who is the oldest.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 48]

After this, you will continue with the form C-Ib, "List of the persons who are permanent residents in the dwelling, by households", taking into account that you should start with the Principal Household, to which you will give the number of household 1, which appears in Section I, Household Summary. Then you will ask who is considered to be the Head of Household (male or female), giving this person the Number of Person 01, after which you will continue in the following order:

- His/her spouse or companion.
- His/her children, in this order:
a. Single sons/daughters.
b. Unmarried/not in a union sons/daughters, this includes those who are divorced, separated, or widowed.
c. Sons/daughters who are married or in a union.
- Stepsons/daughters and adopted sons/daughters in any order.
- Daughter-in-law or son-in-law of the head of household. If there is more than one, you will note them in any order.
- Grandsons/granddaughters, in the same order by civil or marital status as the children (single grandchildren, not married or in a union, married or in a union).
- Father, mother, father-in-law and mother-in-law.
- Other relatives of the head of household.
Situate any spouses and their children first among those who are "Other relatives" and then the rest.
- Other non-relatives of the head of household. Situate first any spouses and their children who may be among the "Other non-relatives" and then the rest.

Family: For the purpose of the census, this is the group of two or more persons, members of the same household, related to each other through the fourth degree of consanguinity (parents, children, grandparents, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, siblings, uncle/aunts, nephew/nieces, and cousins) and through second degree of affiliation (spouses, father/mother-in-laws, son/daughter-in-laws, step-children, brother/sister-in-laws). In a census household there can be one or more than one family, or no family.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 49]

In the cases where there more census households in the dwelling, these will be listed after the Principal Household, following the same procedure that was used for this one.

[Illustration]

Form O-C-1b
List of persons who are permanent residents in the dwelling, by households.

Please tell me the name and the last names of the persons who live in your census household, beginning with the head of household (male or female), followed by his/her spouse or companion, the children, step-children, daughter-in-law or son-in-law, grandchildren, parents or parents-in-law, other relatives, and other non-relatives.

Remember that you should begin with the principal census household, and then continue with the rest.

Household number / Person Number / Name and two last names / relationship

[_] / [ _ _ ] / _____ / _____
[_] / [ _ _ ] / _____ / _____
[_] / [ _ _ ] / _____ / _____

The part of the questionnaire that contains the questions relative to the dwellings (Section III) will be used for noting the information about all of the dwelling, independent of whether or not there is more than one census household, in which case you will only complete the questionnaire in regard to the members of the Principal Household. In the Basic Questionnaire, Section IV has been designed for registering the information for up to three persons. In the households where more than three members reside, you should use sheets (form C-Ia) that only contain Section IV.
The sheets will be placed inside the Questionnaire, leaving this like a booklet, on which you should identify each one with the household that it belongs to, which you will note the District and Segment where the dwelling is located, as well as the Questionnaire number that it is part of, which you will transcribe on the upper part of the first sheet without making any annotation in the space designated Sheet Number and Dwelling Number.

If there is more than one household in the dwelling, you will prepare as many Questionnaires as there are households, filling in Section I, Geographic Location and Address of the Dwelling on each of them, and nullifying Sections II and III with two diagonal crossed lines.

Once you have prepared the questionnaires, you will proceed to fill in Section IV Information about the Population, always beginning with the Principal Household of the dwelling.

You should first interview all of the members of one household and then all of the members of the other household, beginning a new questionnaire for each household.

Remember that Sections II and III can only be completed in the first questionnaire of the principal household.

Generally, you will only find one household in a private dwelling.

Questions 1, 2 and 3 should be completed consecutively for all of the members of the census household before continuing with the rest of the questions of Section IV, in the following manner:

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 50]

Question 1. Names and last names.

[illustration]

1. Person number [_ _] _____ name(s) and last names

This question is transcribed from form C-Ib "List of the persons who are permanent residents of the dwelling, by household", taking care that the first person who appears in said form is the head of household, for which he/she is located in Section IV as person 01.

When there are additional sheets (form C-1a), next to the box following "Person number", you will write the order number that corresponded to each person who is a member of the census household, in the same order that was used previously in the form C-Ib. Here, the numbers of persons 01 to 03 correspond to the head of household and the other two members of the household that follow according to the order indicated earlier and which comes pre-printed on the Census Questionnaire (form C-1). In the extra sheet, you will number consequentially, starting with 04, until you reach a number that is equal to the members of the census household.

Next, you will write the first two names (if the person has them) and the two last names of each member of the census household.

On the second page of the Questionnaire, reserved for Person Number 01, you should place the Head of Household.

In the collective dwellings, you will note all of the members, one following another, without any pre-established order.

Remember to place all of the members of the census household in the Questionnaire before you continue to question 2.

On the questionnaire, you will note the names and last names of all of the residents of the dwelling who are members of the same household, whether the residents are present or absent.

You should not accept that anyone who is not a member of the household be enumerated as Head of Household, even if the person provides the economic support for the household.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 51]

Question 2. Relationship or affiliation with the head of household.

[Illustration]

Second page
[x] 0 Head of household

Third page
2. What relationship or affiliation do you have with the Head of Household (male or female)? Only one mark:

[] 1 Spouse or companion
[] 2 Son/daughter
[] 3 Step-don/step-daughter
[] 4 Daughter-in-law/son-in-law
[] 5 Grandchild
[] 6 Parents or parents-in-law
[] 7 Other relative
[] 8 Other non-relative
[] 9 Member of a collective dwelling -- Continue with question 4

Fourth page and the rest of the pages

2. What relationship or affiliation do you have with the Head of Household (male or female)? Only one mark:

[] 2 Son/daughter
[] 3 Step-don/step-daughter
[] 4 Daughter-in-law/son-in-law
[] 5 Grandchild
[] 6 Parents or parents-in-law
[] 7 Other relative
[] 8 Other non-relative
[] 9 Member of a collective dwelling -- Continue with question 4

The object of question 2 is to know the family relationship to or cohabiting relationship with the person enumerated with the Head of household.

In the "Private dwellings", or "Work spaces", the second page of the Questionnaire is only used for the Head of household, where the mark in box "0" is pre-printed.

In the "Collective dwellings", this page will be utilized for the Head of household of the collective, whenever he/she resides permanently in the same. If not, you will nullify said page with two crossed diagonal lines.

Starting with page 3 of the Questionnaire, you will mark the corresponding box in agreement with the relationship that the person has in regards to the head of Household, which might be spouse, child, son/daughter-in-law, etc.

This question can be asked in such a way that it serves as confirmation of what was already stated by the interviewee when form C-1b was prepared.

Examples:
You informed me that Esperanza is the wife of Luis who is the head of household. Is this right?
Vicente is the eldest son of Luis.
The box for "Other relative" will be marked when the person is a relative of the head of household in a relationship that is not listed in the boxes 1 to 6, such as:

a) Grandparents, siblings, uncles/aunts, nephews/nieces, cousins, great-grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.
b) Brother/Sister-in-law, Brother/sister-in-law of the spouse, father/mother-in-law of the children of the head of household, and step-brothers/sisters.

Not considered as relatives are certain personal relationships of religious origin, such as those known as godchild, godparent, and the godparents of one's own child, etc.
Box 8, "Other non-relatives" will be marked for the rest of the persons who live in the same private census household, and who are not included in the indicated relationships for boxes 1 to 7.
If the person is a member of a collective dwelling, he/she will be listed on the third page, marking box 9.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 52]

Question 3. Order number of the mother (or father) and the spouse in the questionnaire.

This question is for linking each child with his/her mother and/or father, and each spouse/companion with his/her spouse/companion and vice versa, noting the order number that has been assigned in the census questionnaire to the person. This is the importance of having previously carefully numbered all of the members of the household. This question is not asked; rather, you are the one who should place the corresponding numbers for each couple or the parents of each persons, as will be explained. This has the goal of building the families.

[illustration]
3. Order number of the mother (or father) and the spouse in the questionnaire.
(If this person is not part of this household, write "00".)

Son/daughter of [ _ _ ]
Spouse of [ _ _ ]

The Order Number is the one that was noted in question 1, in the box that follows "Person Number" before "Name(s) and last names" (that of the Head of Household appears pre-printed and is number 01).

Son/daughter of [_ _]

In this space you will note the order number (which appears in question 1 as Person Number), which corresponds to the mother of the person you are enumerating, if she lives with him/her in the same census household. If this is not the case, you will write the number of the father and if neither of them lives in the household, you will write "00".

The mother or father whose order number (Person Number) is noted on the page for the child in this question 3, can have any civil or conjugal status, because we also include the children of single mothers or single fathers.

For the step-sons/daughters or adopted sons/daughters you will note the order number (Person Number) of the step-mother or adoptive mother and if she does not live in the household, you will note the number of the step-father or adoptive father.

Spouse of [_ _]
For the effects of the Census, this is one of the two members of a normal relationship of husband-wife between persons who are legally married or in a stable consensual union, who are of different sex.

In the space you will note, reciprocally for each of the members of a couple that co-habits in the household, the number of the questionnaire (Person Number) of the enumerated spouse, which appears in the line designated in question 1, if he/she is a member of the household. If not, you will write "00".

Once you have completed Section IV of the questionnaire, verify that the persons in this question who have the annotation for the number of the spouse, should have reciprocal numbers with the spouse, should have the marital or civil status of married or in a consensual union (question 15). If this is not the case, the answer should be "00".

Examples of annotations for order number (Person Number) of the mother or the father and the spouse.

a. In this example, Luis (head of household) is the son of Maria (Person Number 8). Her parents and those of Pedro (her spouse, Person 07) are dead (00), and since they are spouses to each other, they will note reciprocally "08" in the space for spouse of Pedro, and "07" in the space for the spouse of Maria. Luis is not married nor in a consensual union.
[] 1 Person Number 01: Luis Perez Rodríguez
[x] 2 Head of household: 0
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 8] Spouse of [0 0]
[] 1 Person Number 07: Pedro Pérez Suárez
[x] 2 Father or father-in-law: 6
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 0] Spouse of [0 8]
[] 1 Person Number 08: María Rodríguez Hernández
[x] 2 Father or father-in-law: 6
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 0] Spouse of [0 7]
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 53 ]
b. In this example, Marcia is the companion of Roberto Prats, (Person Number 05), her mother does not live in the household (00). Mónica is the daughter of Marcia (06), and she is 5 years old ("spouse of" remains blank). Eloisa is the single sister (spouse of 00) of the Head of Household and the daughter of Francisco Prats (Person Number 09).
[] 1 Person Number 06: Marcia Pacheco Alonso
[x] 2 Daughter/son-in-law: 4
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 0] Spouse of [0 5]
[] 1 Person Number 07: Mónica Prats Pacheco
[x] 2 Grandson/granddaughter: 5
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 6] Spouse of [0 0]
[] 1 Person Number 08: Eloisa Prats Robaina
[x] 2 Other relative: 7
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 9] Spouse of [0 0]
c. In the following example, Elena is the spouse of the Head of Household (01), and the daughter of his father-in-law, who appears enumerated with number 10. Luisa is the daughter of Elena (02) and is a widow (spouse 00). Rubén is the son of Luisa (03), grandson of the Head of Household, and since he is less than 12 years old (question 5), you will not note anything for "Spouse of".
[] 1 Person Number 02: Elena Montes Santos
[x] 2 Spouse or companion: 1
[] 3 Son/daughter of [1 0] Spouse of [0 1]

[] 1 Person Number 03: Luisa Ramos Montes
[x] 2 Son/daughter: 2
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 2] Spouse of [0 0]

[] 1 Person Number 08: Rubén Martínez Ramos
[x] 2 Grandson/granddaughter: 5
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 3] Spouse of [0 0]
d. In this example, Juan (Person Number 06) is the first cousin of the Head of Household and the son of an aunt of the Head of Household who does not reside in the household ("00"). His spouse is Petra (08). Josué (Person Number 07) is the second cousin of the Head of Household, the son of Petra (08), he is 13 years old and single ("Spouse of" with 00). Petra is the spouse of Juan (06), whose parents are dead (00); this classifies him as "Other non-relative", since he is not related by blood or affinity.
[] 1 Person Number 06: Juan Cano Blanco
[x] 2 Other relative: 7
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 0] Spouse of [0 8]

[] 1 Person Number 07: Josué Cano Borges
[x] 2 Other relative: 7
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 8] Spouse of [0 0]

[] 1 Person Number 08: Petra Pérez Borges
[x] 2 Other non-relative: 8
[] 3 Son/daughter of [0 0] Spouse of [0 6]

Starting with this question, you will note the individual information for each person who is a member of the household, asking all of the questions to each person successively, which means, you will complete all of the questions for one person and then for another.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 54 ]

Question 4. Is the person a male or female?

[illustration]
4. Is the person a male or female? (only one mark)

[] 1 Male
[] 3 Female

This question is very simple, you should only mark if the person is a male (box 1) or female (box 3).

If the person is present, do not ask, just mark the box. If the person is not present, you should ask if the person is male or female. The question refers to the biological sex of the person.


Question 5. What is his/her birth date and age in years completed?

When you arrive at question 5, you should register the day, month, and year of birth, as well as the age. For this, you should ask the person for the day, month, and year, then note the age without asking for it.

[illustration]
5. What is his/her birth date and age in years completed?

Day ____ / Month _____ / Year ____
Age [ _ _ _ ]

For noting the age, use the "Conversion Table for dates of birth to years completed for the Census Day", which appears in Annex 1 of the present manual, noting "00" for those who are less than one year old.

If the person does not remember the date of his/her birth, you will register the age in completed years in the corresponding space, marking dashes in the spaces for day, month, and year.

If the person does not remember even his/her age, you should refer to historic references to help him/her determine his/her age, as for example:

Years
Second North American Intervention 1906
Beginning of the "Vacas Gordas" 1915
The bank crash 1920
The Fall of Machado 1933
The end of the Second World War 1945
Triumph of the Cuban Revolution 1959

In general, the person who do not remember their age tend to give it in numbers that end in 0 or 5, answering, 20, 35, 40 years old, etc. In these cases, you should not write these ages, but you should ask the person again to try to get an exact age by increasing or decreasing the age, and therefore avoid the error produced by the generalized practice of declaring ages ending in "0 or 5".

Question 6. What is your skin color?

With this question, we want to know the color of the skin of the persons who are enumerated, with the objective of carrying out demographic studies of the Cuban population.

[illustration]
6. What is your skin color? (only one mark)

[] 1 White
[] 2 Black
[] 3 Mestizo or Mulato

For this, we will classify the color of skin in three characteristics: white, black, and mulato or mestizo.

As you can appreciate, these categories reflect the concept that the population commonly holds and will not investigate the race in the ethnic sense, but only skin color.

You should mark the corresponding box, considering the following:

- If the person is present, do not ask the question and mark the answer according to your observation.
- If the person is not present, ask about skin color of the absent person with the person who gives you the information, mentioning the three alternatives so that she can choose.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 55]
- Despite the above, you should avoid asking the skin color of the person who is absent if it is evident, for example, if the parents are present in the interview and they belong to the same color or when all of the family if white, black, etc.

If you have any doubt, you can apply these simple rules to determine the skin color:

- White: In this group, consider those whose skin color looks white. Include those who have Asian aspects, but with dominant characteristics of white skin.
- Black: In this group, consider those who skin tone is dark caramel color or black.
- Mulato or Mestizo: You should include all of the persons who present mestizo characteristic between black and white or Asian and black, as well as Asians. Also considered here are those called mulatos, Indians, and the albinos.

Question 7. Where did your mother reside when you were born?

With this question we want to know the municipality or country where the interviewee resided at the time of birth, for which the question focuses on residency of the mother at this time, since the person could have been born in a different municipality or country from where the mother resided permanently.

[illustration]
7. Where did your mother reside when you were born?

[] 1 In this municipality -- Continue with question 8.
[] 3 In another municipality or country
In which municipality, province or country
Municipality____
Province____
Country____
[] 9 Does not know

(Note) Do not make any notes.

The question should be asked in the following manner: Where did your mother reside when you were born, in this municipality or in another municipality or country?

If he/she responds "in this municipality", this means that it is the same municipality where you are doing the interview, for which you should mark box 1 and continue with question 10.

If, on the other hand, he/she responds "in another municipality or country", box 3, then we ask in which municipality, province or country, noting the names of the municipality, province, or country on the line.
In the case where the municipality and the province correspond to Cuba, you will not write the name of the country. This will only be used for the case of a person born in another country.

If the person tells us that he/she does not know in which municipality his/her mother resided, you will mark box 9, "does not know".

You should take into account that we are referring to the current Political Administrative Division, which means, Santiago de Cuba, Las Tunas and not Provincia Oriente [Eastern Province]. This is valid for countries: Not URSS, but rather Russia, Belorussia, Lithuania, etc.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 56]

[illustration]

[Example #1]
7. Where did your mother reside when you were born?

[x] 1 In this municipality -- Continue with question 8.
[] 3 In another municipality or country
In which municipality, province or country
Municipality____
Province____
Country____
[] 9 Does not know

[Example #2]
7. Where did your mother reside when you were born?

[] 1 In this municipality -- Continue with question 8.
[x] 3 In another municipality or country 3
(In which municipality, province or country)
Municipality: San Luis
Province: Santiago de
Country: Cuba
[] 9 Does not know

[Example #3]
7. Where did your mother reside when you were born?

[] 1 In this municipality -- Continue with question 8.
[] 3 In another municipality or country
In which municipality, province or country
Municipality____
Province____
Country____
[x] 9 Does not know

[Example #4]
7. Where did your mother reside when you were born?

[] 1 In this municipality -- Continue with question 8.
[] 3 In another municipality or country
In which municipality, province or country
Municipality____
Province____
Country: Spain
[] 9 Does not know

Question 8. Have you always lived in this municipality?

This question wants to know if the person has ever moved from one municipality to another, and if he/she did, which municipality.

[illustration]

8. a. Have you always lived in this municipality?

[] 1 Yes 1 -- Continue with question 10
[] 3 No

b. In what municipality or country did you live before moving here?

Municipality____ [ _ _ ]
Province____ [ _ _ ]
Country____ [ _ _ ]
[] 9 Does not know

The question is asked in the following manner: Have you always lived in this municipality? Yes or No.

If the answer is Yes (box 1), continue with question 10, but if the answer is No (box 3), you will move on to ask part B) of the question.

In what municipality or country did you reside before moving here? If it is a municipality in Cuba, ask the name and write it on the corresponding line, then ask for the province and write it on the corresponding line. In this case, the space corresponding to country will be left blank.

If the answer is that he/she resided in another country, you will ask the name of the country and write it in the corresponding space, leaving the lines for municipality and province blank.

In the case that the person does not remember in which municipality or country where he/she resided before moving here, mark box 9 (Does not know).

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 57 ]

[illustration]

[Example #1]
8. a. Have you always lived in this municipality?

[x] 1 Yes 1 -- Continue with question 10
[] 3 No

b. In what municipality or country did you live before moving here?

Municipality____ [ _ _ ]
Province____ [ _ _ ]
Country____ [ _ _ ]
[] 9 Does not know

[Example #2]
8. a. Have you always lived in this municipality?

[] 1 Yes 1 -- Continue with question 10
[x] 3 No

b. In what municipality or country did you live before moving here?

Municipality: Maisi [ _ _ ]
Province: Guantanamo [ _ _ ]
Country____ [ _ _ ]
[] 9 Does not know

[Example #3]
8. a. Have you always lived in this municipality?

[] 1 Yes 1 -- Continue with question 10
[x] 3 No

b. In what municipality or country did you live before moving here?

Municipality____ [ _ _ ]
Province____ [ _ _ ]
Country: Argentina [ _ _ ]
[] 9 Does not know

[Example #4]
8. A. Have you always lived in this municipality?

[] 1 Yes 1 -- Continue with question 10
[] 3 No

b. In what municipality or country did you live before moving here?

Municipality____ [ _ _ ]
Province____ [ _ _ ]
Country____ [ _ _ ]
[x] 9 Does not know

Question 9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved here from the previous municipality or country?

With this question, we will know the time that has passed since the last residency change for the person.

[illustration]
9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved here from the previous municipality or country?

Years [ _ _ ]
[] 00 Less than one year
[] 99 Does not know

We will ask: How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved from the previous municipality or country?

We will not the number that the interviewee declares. In the case that the time is one year or more, numbers will be written in the spaces next to the alternative for years. If the time lived here is less than one year, you will mark the box 'less than one year' and if he/she does not know how long ago he/she moved, mark box 99 (Does not know).

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 58]

[illustration]

[Example #1]
9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved here from the previous municipality or country?

Years [0 3]
[] 00 Less than one year
[] 99 Does not know

[Example #2]
9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved here from the previous municipality or country?

Years [1 0]
[] 00 Less than one year
[] 99 Does not know

[Example #3]
9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved here from the previous municipality or country?

Years [ _ _ ]
[x] 00 Less than one year
[] 99 Does not know

[Example #4]
9. How long have you lived in this municipality since you moved here from the previous municipality or country?

Years [ _ _ ]
[] 00 Less than one year
[x] 99 Does not know

Question 10. Does he/she present any of the following ailments?
Through this question we will know the disabilities that the population suffers and the manner in which it presented itself.

The question should be formulated in the following manner: Do you have any of the following ailments: permanent deficiency for speaking or being mute, weak hearing, deaf, blind, missing any of the upper extremities, disability of the upper extremities, missing any lower extremities, disability of lower extremities, chronic mental illness, mental retardation, or none of the above?

[illustration]

10.

a) Permanent deficiencies for speaking or mutes

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

b) Hearing weakness or hypo acoustics

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

c) Deaf

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

d) Blind

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

e) Absence of upper extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

f) Disability of the upper extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

g) Absence of the lower extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

h) Disability of the lower extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

i) Chronic mental illness

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

j) Mental retardation

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

k) None of the above

[] 9

If when we mention the disabilities to the interviewee and he/she mentions suffering from one or more [ailments], we ask if the ailment is congenital (from birth), acquired (during the course of his/her life) or does not know, and we will mark the corresponding column.

In this question there can be multiple answers, but be careful that if any of the boxes is marked, the box k) none of the above cannot be marked and vice versa.

To develop the question correctly, we should also dominate some concepts, such as:

Permanent deficiencies for speaking or mutes: These are the persons who, with or without the ability to hear, have permanent absence or limitation for speech (excepting persons who stutter, since this is a curable limitation). This includes, for example, the persons with problems with the larynges, the roof of the mouth, persons mute because of accidents, illnesses or congenital deformity of the vocal chords, etc.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 59 ]
Hearing weakness or hypo acoustics: These are persons with hearing disabilities, who generally use hearing aids or hearing prosthesis.

Deaf: A person with total loss of the sense of hearing.

Blind: A person with total loss of the sense of sight.

Absence of upper extremities: This is the physical-motor deficiency derived from the partial or total absence, congenital or acquired, of one or both of the upper extremities or members of the person being enumerated.

Disability of the upper extremities: This is the motor deficiency that corresponds to total or partial paralysis or weakness, congenital (from birth) or acquired, of one or both of the upper extremities or members or the person being enumerated.

Absence of the lower extremities: This is the physical deficiency derived from the congenital absence (from birth) or the later loss, total or partial, of one or both of the lower extremities or members of the person being enumerated.

Disability of the lower extremities: This is the motor deficiency that corresponds to the paralysis or weakness, total or partial, congenital (from birth) or acquired, of one or both of the lower extremities or members of the person being enumerated.

Chronic mental illness: This is the abnormal behavior evident in the persons who are commonly called demented or crazy.

Mental retardation: Mental retardation is frequently called mental weakness (disability), and it is manifested by the evident difficulty for the person to learn and behave in a manner that is similar to groups of persons of the same age, in the social environment of the person.

You will not consider as a limitation the cases of transitory paralysis, product of psychic traumas or temporary physical trauma or accidents where the person will have a relatively rapid recovery.

The cases of hearing weakness or hypo acoustics will correspond to those persons who declare the use hearing aids or prosthesis that facilitate hearing.

You will make the annotations based on the declaration of the head of household or another member of the household, without any verification or mediation.

[illustration]

[Example #1]
10.
a. Permanent deficiencies for speaking or mutes

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

b. Hearing weakness or hypo acoustics

[x] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

c. Deaf

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

d. Blind

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

e. Absence of upper extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[x] 3 Does not know

f. Disability of the upper extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

g. Absence of the lower extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

h. Disability of the lower extremities

[x] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

i. Chronic mental illness

[x] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

j. Mental retardation

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

k. None of the above

[] 9
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 60 ]

[Example #2]
10.
a. Permanent deficiencies for speaking or mutes

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

b. Hearing weakness or hypo acoustics

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

c. Deaf

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

d. Blind

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

e. Absence of upper extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

f. Disability of the upper extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

g. Absence of the lower extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

h. Disability of the lower extremities

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

i. Chronic mental illness

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

j. Mental retardation

[] 1 Congenital
[] 2 Acquired
[] 3 Does not know

k. None of the above

[x] 9

With this question you complete the part of Section IV that corresponds to all ages, and starting here, we will begin to work with segments of the population beginning with the persons who are six years old or more, with questions regarding educational characteristics.

Question 11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed?

This question is about the highest grade or year of studies that the interviewee passed in the most advanced educational cycle in the National Educational System or in a foreign educational system (if the studies in an foreign educational system are special education, request the equivalency with the National system. If he/she does not know it, note the information with details).

[illustration]
11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed?

[] 0 None [ 0 _] -- Continue with question 14
[] 1 Elementary (1 to 6) [0 _ ]
[] 2 Basic Secondary Education (7 to 10) [ _ _ ]
[] 3 Specialized Laborer (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 4 Pre-university (10 to 13) [ _ _ ]
[] 5 Middle Technical (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 6 Mid-level Pedagogy (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 7 Higher or University (1 to 7) [ 0 _ ]

To answer this question correctly, it is necessary to know the different levels of education, as well as the school grades that are included in each of them, for which it is necessary that you carefully read the contents of each educational level that are detailed below, trying to memorize them with the objective of correctly filling in the educational information of the population.

Elementary: This corresponds to the first educational level, whose primary function is to provide the primary elements of education which will permit his/her to continue with a level of Secondary Education. This includes first through sixth grades of General Education and the first through fourth semester (levels 11, 12, 21, and 22) of Campesino Laborers' Education (EOC), it includes elementary levels of art schools; beginning level sports and special education (for children and youth and adults with mental and physical deficiencies). See the conversion tables in Appendix 2 of this manual.

Basic Secondary Education: This includes schools for the second level of education (middle basic), in which students acquire the general knowledge for continuing pre-university studies or military school; it is required for admission to have completed elementary education.

In this level, students currently study seventh through ninth grades in General Education and first through fourth semester (afternoon-night classes) and from the first through sixth semester (hands-on training courses) of Campesino Laborers' Secondary Education (SOC).

Previously, students completed through tenth grade and at other times, grades were completed by years (from first to third or first through fourth in night classes).
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 61 ]
This includes secondary level in the schools for art, beginning school sports, and special education (for youth and adults with physical and mental deficiencies). See the conversion table.

Specialized Laborer: This corresponds to the second level of education (middle basic) daytime classes or for workers; it has the goal of directly preparing the students for a specific occupation (not teaching). It includes the courses that are given by other organizations that are not specialized in education, as long as they are approved by the Ministry of Education. They are calculated by years.

In this level, we includes the Occupational Schools that started with the intention of only accepting students with educational deficiencies and today form specialized laborers from ninth grade to twelfth grade. This education is counted by semesters. (See Conversion Table in Appendix 2).

Pre-university: This also corresponds to the second level of education (upper middle) and has for its objective to provide the necessary knowledge for students to continue with higher education or university education; for acceptance, it requires completion of Basic Secondary Education.

These studies are currently done from tenth to twelfth grade in General Education and from first to sixth semester (afternoon or night classes), or first to eighth semester (hands-on training courses) of the Campesino Worker Faculty (FOC). Previously, these courses were counted based on years that corresponded to first to fifth, and also as eleventh to thirteenth grades. (See Conversion Table in Appendix 2).

Middle Technical: This corresponds to the second level of education (Upper Middle) and has as its objective to prepare students for an occupation or profession that is not teaching. Classes are given during the day or for workers. This includes the courses that are given by other organizations, as long as they are authorized by the Ministry of Education. The classes are given by years.

Mid-level Pedagogy: This was the second level of education (upper middle); its goal was to prepare professors for the occupation of teaching, fundamentally at elementary level. This includes elementary teachers, educators in child-care centers, pedagogical assistants, and professors and instructors of physical education and sports. Currently, this type of studies are not given at this level and those who currently study this field are in the teacher training schools.

Higher or University: This corresponds to the third level of education, for which it is required to have passed Upper Middle Education. This level forms specialists of high qualifications. It includes directed courses or Free Education that even if they are not counted in years, correspond to this level.

We will analyze how we should complete question 10. For this, we ask the interviewee, "What is the highest grade or year that you passed?" We indicate that this is in the National System of Education or in another country. In the case of doubts, you can help him/her by naming the different educational levels that form the question, as well as the respective years and grades of each.

After receiving the information, you will note the grade or year passed in the correct educational level.

Pay attention that in each educational level we indicate the grades or years that are part of it and you only need to write the grade or year.

The question is in reference to any level of education in the National Educational System, at whatever date the person passed the grade or year in question.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 62]

Examples:

- Eighth grade of Basic Secondary
- Tenth grade of Basic Secondary
- Tenth grade of Pre-University
- Third year of Middle Technical

[illustration]

[Example #1]
11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed?

[] 0 None [ 0 _] -- Continue with question 14
[] 1 Elementary (1 to 6) [0 _ ]
[] 2 Basic Secondary Education (7 to 10) [0 8]
[] 3 Specialized Laborer (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 4 Pre-university (10 to 13) [_ _]
[] 5 Middle Technical (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 6 Mid-level Pedagogy (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 7 Higher or University (1 to 7) [ 0 _ ]

[Example #2]
11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed?

[] 0 None [ 0 _] -- Continue with question 14
[] 1 Elementary (1 to 6) [0 _ ]
[] 2 Basic Secondary Education (7 to 10) [1 0]
[] 3 Specialized Laborer (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 4 Pre-university (10 to 13) [ _ _ ]
[] 5 Middle Technical (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 6 Mid-level Pedagogy (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 7 Higher or University (1 to 7) [ 0 _ ]

[Example #3]
11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed?

[] 0 None [ 0 _] -- Continue with question 14
[] 1 Elementary (1 to 6) [0 _ ]
[] 2 Basic Secondary Education (7 to 10) [ _ _ ]
[] 3 Specialized Laborer (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 4 Pre-university (10 to 13) [1 0]
[] 5 Middle Technical (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 6 Mid-level Pedagogy (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 7 Higher or University (1 to 7) [ 0 _ ]

[Example #4]
11. What is the highest grade or year of studies that you passed?

[] 0 None [ 0 _] -- Continue with question 14
[] 1 Elementary (1 to 6) [0 _ ]
[] 2 Basic Secondary Education (7 to 10) [ _ _ ]
[] 3 Specialized Laborer (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 4 Pre-university (10 to 13) [ _ _ ]
[] 5 Middle Technical (1 to 5) [0 3]
[] 6 Mid-level Pedagogy (1 to 5) [ 0 _ ]
[] 7 Higher or University (1 to 7) [ 0 _ ]

When you are informed of a year or grade that is higher than those indicated in the corresponding level, write the last year that appears for each level.

You will write "0" in the box for "None" when the person declares that he/she has not passed any grade, and then from this question you will continue directly with question 14.

Observe that the disposition of the different educational levels is lower at the greater qualification or importance. A person with grades passed in different levels will note only the highest level.

In the cases where the interviewees are currently studying in the Higher or University level in directed courses or free education that is completed by cycles, which means that they are not completed by years, these will calculated according to the years of study. For this reason, if the interviewee informs you that he/she is in the third cycle, you will consider that this is the third year of the course of studies at the Higher or University level.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 63 ]

Question 12. What is the highest level of education that you have finished completely?

The objective of this question is to know the educational level that the interviewee has finished completely.

[illustration]

12. What is the highest level of education that you have finished completely? (only one mark)

[] 0 None -- Continue with question 14
[] 1 Elementary
[] 2 Basic Secondary Education
[] 3 Specialized Laborer
[] 4 Pre-university
[] 5 Middle Technical
[] 6 Mid-level Pedagogy
[] 7 Higher or University

You should understand that a level has been completely finished when the interviewee has passed the last year or grade, obtaining the academic degree or diploma that accredits him/her as a graduate.

Observe that the levels are the same (same code) that you find related to the previous question (11).

You will mark the corresponding box for the completed level for the interviewee. The box "None" will be used for the persons who declared that they have not completely finished any educational level.

Before you mark the box, you should verify that information received with that of the previous question, since this method will allow you to rapidly determine if the answer you received is adequate or not.

Examples of the relationship between questions 11 and 12.
Question 10 / Question 11

Elementary 1 [0 4] / [x] 0 None
Basic Secondary 2 [0 8] / [x] 1 Elementary
Basic Secondary 2 [0 9] / [x] 2 Basic Secondary
Pre-University 4 [1 1] / [x] 2 Basic Secondary
Middle Technical 5 [0 4] / [x] 5 Middle Technical
Elementary 1 [0 6] / [x] 1 Elementary
Pre-University 4 [1 2] / [x] 4 Pre-University
Higher or University 7 [0 5] / [x] 7 University

Depending on the plan of studies that is followed, a year or grade that is passed might or might not give a completed level.

For example:

- 9th and 10th grade of Basic Secondary Education.
- 12th and 13th grades in Pre-university.

For this reason, it is very important that you ask: What is the highest educational level that finished completely?

If in this question you have marked the box 0 "None", you should continue directly with question 12 without asking question 13.

In the case that you encounter persons who graduated from Baccalaureate studies without completing Basic Secondary, but they completed the Baccalaureate for the purposes of the census, you will consider that the highest level of studies completed is Basic Secondary.

The persons who entered the University directly from the Introductory Courses and did not complete this level, for the purpose of the census, will be considered as having Pre-University as the highest level of studies comply finished.

Question 13. What academic degree or diploma did you receive from the last level that you passed?

If the previous question (11) has any of the boxes one through seven marked, indicating that the person completely finished an educational level, you should always note the answer to the question about the academic degree or diploma received that corresponds to this level. If you have marked the box for "None" (0), you should not ask the question.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 64]

If the interviewee declared that in one single level he/she has obtained more than one degree, you should note the one that has the greatest relation to his/her job, or the one that is understood to have the greatest importance because he/she uses it the most in his/her job.

[illustration]

13. What academic degree or diploma did you receive from the last level that you passed?
(Examples: Mid-Level Technician in Accounting, Licentiate in Economy, Specialized Laborer in Welding)

_____
[ _ _ ]
(Based on the classifier)

The interviewee does not have to show you the diploma, it only has to be declared.

For the levels of Specialized Worker, Middle Technician and Upper Level Technician, you should note the specialty of the degree obtained very clearly.

Examples of degree:
Middle Technician in Finances, Elementary Certification, Drill-press Operator, Secondary Certification, Flight Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Licentiate in Economic Control, Specialized Worker in Carpentry (blank), Middle Technician in Metallurgy, etc.

In the cases of the persons who have a scientific degree or other degree of post-graduate education, you will specify the degree that corresponds to the university field and not the post-graduate specialty.

[illustration]

[Example #1]
13. What academic degree or diploma did you receive from the last level that you passed?
(Examples: Mid-Level Technician in Accounting, Licentiate in Economy, Specialized Laborer in Welding)

Mid-level technician in Accounting and Finances
[ _ _ ]
(Based on the classifier)

[Example #2]
13. What academic degree or diploma did you receive from the last level that you passed?
(Examples: Mid-Level Technician in Accounting, Licentiate in Economy, Specialized Laborer in Welding)

Specialized laborer in welding
[ _ _ ]
(Based on the classifier)

Question 14. Do you know how to read and write?

You should consider that a person is literate, which means that he/she knows how to read and write at least a simple text regarding facts related to his/her daily life (it does not matter in which language). Illiteracy is the person who does not fulfill this condition.

[illustration]

14. Do you know how to read and write? (only one mark)
(Mark "Yes" without asking if the interviewee passed second grade or more)

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

The answer to the question will be obtained through declaration and you will not give any test to verify if the interviewee knows how to read and write.

This question will be asked only of the person who have the annotation in "No grade passed" (Question 11) and of those who have only passed first grade of Elementary Education. For the rest of the persons, which means those who have passed second grade of Elementary Education, you will mark the box "Yes" without asking this question.

Box 1 (Yes) will be marked when the person declares that he/she knows how to read and write or when the same has informed that he/she has passed second grade or more of Elementary Education.

You will also include the persons who, knowing how to read and write, can no longer do so due to accident, age, or illness.

You should consider as literate the persons who are blind and can read and write in the "Braille" system.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 65]

You will mark box 3 (No) when the person declares that he/she does not know how to read nor write or when he/she can only read and not write or vice versa, as well as when he/she says that he/she can only write his/her name.

Examples of how you should correctly mark the answers:
1) Juan declared in question 11 that he passed fifth grade of Elementary Education.

[x] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

2) Ana is blind and declares that she does not know the "Braille" system.

[] 1 Yes
[x] 3 No

3) Pedro only knows how to sign his name.

[] 1 Yes
[x] 3 No

4) Elena learned how to read and write at age 35 and she never practiced it again. Now she does not know how to read nor write.

[] 1 Yes
[x] 3 No

Question 15. Are you currently enrolled in an educational system in the National Educational System or in another country?

Here you will only ask if the person is officially enrolled in the current year in an educational system of any type or level, in the National Educational System or in another country, including the courses for training or complementing for the Organizations.

[illustration]

15. Are you currently enrolled in an educational system in the National Educational System or in another country? (only one mark)

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

It is very important to ask the interviewee the duration of the course, especially when the person is studying in courses that are for formation and complementing the organizations, since this is what will help us determine the condition of enrolled for the purpose of the census.

With this question we have concluded the part of Section IV that corresponds to persons six years old or more. We will begin to work with segments of the population that begin with persons who are twelve years old or more with the questions about marital or civil status.

Question 16. What is your civil or marriage state?

The objective of this question is to know the civil status or marriage status of the enumerated persons.

You should ask the question and then you should read each of the boxes so that the person can select his/her civil or marital status.

[illustration]

16. What is your civil or marriage state? (only one mark)

[] 1 Union
[] 2 Married
[] 3 Divorced
[] 4 Separated
[] 5 Widowed
[] 6 Single

You should memorize the following definitions:

Union: This is the person who lives as in a marital relationship in a stable manner with a person of the opposite sex, without a legal contract that recognizes the relationship. The conjugal status is also called consensual union.

You will mark this box if the person is found in this condition even if he/she is divorced, widowed, or if he/she is only separated from the previous spouse.

Married: This is the union of two persons of opposite sex, formally and legally recognized.

Divorced: This is person who has terminated his/her civil status as married, through the dissolution of the marriage by judicial decree and who currently does not live in a consensual union.
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 66 ]
Separated: This is the person who, being legally married or in a union with another person, is currently found separated, which means that he/she does not live in a marital relationship with the person from whom he/she is not divorced, nor lives in a stable consensual union with another person.

Widow: This is the person who, being legally married or in a consensual union, has lost his/her spouse or companion through death and has not remarried nor is currently in a consensual union.

Single: This is a person who has never been legally married, nor lives in a consensual union.

Remember that the persons who declare to be married or in a union, if they live in the same household as their partner, should have the annotation in question number 3 that corresponds to this questionnaire. If the spouse does not reside in the household, it should be noted in the space designated for "Spouse of" as "00".

With this question we have concluded the part of Section IV that corresponds to persons twelve years old and more and we will begin to work with the segments of the population that are fifteen years old and more, with questions about their economic situation.

Question 17. What did you do in the week before the day of September 7th?

This block of questions should be answered by persons who are fifteen years old or more. It is the most complicated block of questions, for which we recommend that you pay attention to it.

[illustration]

17. What did you do in the week before the day of September 7th?

[] 01 Worked
[] 02 Had a job, but did not work
Answers 1-2 -- Continue with question 18
[] 03 Looked for work because he/she had lost his/her job
[] 04 Looked for work for the first time
[] 05 Retired or pension
[] 06 Receives rents or economic assistance
[] 07 Household chores
[] 08 Student
[] 09 Disabled for working
[] 10 Did not do any activity
[] 11 In the hospital, asylum or prison, did not work
[] 12 Other situation
Answers 3 to 12 -- The interview is concluded.

You will take the week of Sunday to Saturday of the week before the week of the Census Moment as the reference period. If we consider the Census Moment as twelve o'clock midnight of the night of September 6th, the reference week will be from August 25th to 31st.

[Illustration of the calendar for August and September 2002, with the weeks of August 25 and September 8, and the dates Sept. 15 and Sept. 16 highlighted. Illustration not reported here]

The economic questions of the Questionnaire begin with question 17. You should ask this question of each person who is fifteen years old or more:
What did you do the week before the day of September 7th?

The question refers to what the person dedicated his/her time or what he/she did in the week immediately before the Census Day (from Sunday to Saturday), and for this it is necessary to know if the interviewee was working, was a student, retired or any of the different situations that appear listed in this question.

After you ask the question to the interviewee, without waiting for an answer, you should begin to read each of the alternatives, and mark an (x) for the one that the interviewee gives an affirmative response.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 67 ]

To select the correct box, you should take into account the following clarifications.

Worked: This is group of persons who, in the week before the Day of the Census, as a reference period, worked at least eight hours in an occupation in the public sector, cooperative, private sector, self-employed or for someone else, in the national territory or in another country (embassies, consulates, commercial offices and other medical missions, or other professions, etc.). As week before, we understand the period before the Census Day and not, for example, from Wednesday to Tuesday, if the interview is carried out on a Wednesday.

We consider as "worked":

- Unpaid family assistants
- Members of SMG and the EJT
- The university graduates in the stage of "social service"
- Persons who are presumed inactive (retirees, housework, etc.), who during the reference week did any paid work.
- The persons who work in their own household under the orders of a state entity.
- The persons who are found being trained under the system of workers directly in production. (Res. 4248 of CETSS)
- The rural laborers (compassions) who rented their lands to the state and who work in the state sector.
- In this group, you should include the persons who are found in training courses or re-training courses as a result of their jobs being cancelled.
- The persons who have been sent by some organization, business or budgeted unit to be training, without this person loosing his/her labor ties to the entity that sends it.

Do not include as working (even if they work or receive payment):

- The students in field schools or in fields.
- The students who are interns in organizations, businesses, etc., who do not included in the "Registry of Workers of the Center".
- The student-teachers and student-assistants of any level.
- The students in the last year of Medical Sciences, who are doing their practice in health centers.
- The person who do any type of work that is not paid (volunteer work, etc.), except the family assistant who does not receive payment.
- The persons who did paid work, but for a period of less than eight hours in the reference week.

Whenever a person declares that he/she "worked", you should ask if the work was paid (not voluntary) and also the time that the person worked in this week to determine if he/she truly worked.

Consider as paid work when the person receives payment in money or in kind for the work done.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 68 ]

Had a job, but did not work: These are all persons who, in the reference week before the Census Day, had secure employment, but did not work because of one of the following conditions:

- Vacations
- Temporary illness
- Work-related accident or another type of accident
- Unpaid permission
- Maternity leave
- Sports leave
- Deployed
- Affected by raw materials, fuels, etc.
- Other temporary labor interruption that permits him/her to return to his/ her job at a later time. This includes persons who are processing their retirement and have not lost their link to the labor center.

Looking for work because he/she has lost his/her job. This includes persons at working age (men from 17 to 59 years old and women from 17 to 54 years old) who in the reference week made direct efforts in the Municipal Employment Office of the Popular Forces, Businesses of Budgeted Units, personnel departments, permission requests or permits for self-employment, to obtain a paid job or who are waiting for the result of these efforts, as long as the person is willing to accept the job for which he/she has applied or a similar job, and as long as the persons have previously been state or private sector workers, who lost their labor links for any reason.

Remember that the persons in this group had to declare that they did not work in the reference week, but that they were making efforts to obtain another job.

Included in this group:

- Self-employed workers who look for employment because they have ended this condition.
- Available workers who are looking for a job.
- Those that have been fired but have not started training courses in organisms.
- Those who wish to do the above-mentioned procedures, but who have not been able to, due to temporary illness or another justified cause.
- Those that have just received a new job, but have not started to work yet.
- The cases of persons who are contracted to work, but due to violations in the work center, are waiting to be called back to work. An example of this could be persons contracted for a specific period for jobs that are not vacant yet, as a violation that was detected through an audit of the work center.

Looked for work for the first time: This includes the persons who are at working age (men between 17 and 59 years old and women between 17 and 54 years old) who in the reference week made efforts to obtain his/her first employment without having worked previously, whether because of his/her age or because of having been previously classified as doing household chores, students, or as unemployed persons in other conditions.

Here we include the members of the labor reserve classified as never having had a previous labor tie, and who in the reference week had not been incorporated in an useful job or in training courses.

Retired or collection pension: This includes the persons who did not carry out any paid work, or they did so for less than eight hours in the reference week, and those who collected income from Social Security for:

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 69 ]

- Age-related pension (retired)
- Pensions for disability, widows, orphans, or other cases of benefits received by relatives of workers who have died.

Observe that these persons come from a previous labor relationship of the worker in benefit of himself/herself or his/her family.
Therefore, do not include maintenance pension given from one person to another.

Collects rents or receives economic assistance: This includes the persons who did not do any paid work at all or who did so for less than eight hours in the reference week, and who received income for:

- Rents or pensions paid to previous owners of dwellings or lands as result of the dispositions of the Law of Urban Reform or other causes. In the case of rural workers (campesinos) who do not work the land for the State, they are considered rent collectors even if they work a parcel of land for their own consumption; those who work for the State will be considered "state workers" instead of rent collectors.
- Economic assistant given by organizations such as the Ministry of the Interior, the Department of Social Security and Social Assistance from the Popular Forces (previously Social Welfare), etc.

Observe that these rents or economic assistances do not originate in a labor activity, even if they should always be given by state organisms, and never from one person to another in the cases of maintenance pensions.

You should consider the rural workers (campesinos) who rented their lands to the State and who work for the State in this group.

Household tasks: This includes the housewives, as well as the members of the household nucleus who are primarily dedicated to the tasks of the household (e.g. food preparation, cleaning, childcare) and who did not do any paid labor at all, whether state, in a cooperative, private, self-employed or other form, for at least eight hours in the reference week.

Generally, these are persons of the female sex, but it can also include persons of the masculine sex.

If any of the persons included in this definition also:

- Studies (training courses, sewing, etc.), he/she should be classified as household chores and not as students.
- Receives pension income (for age or other reason), he/she will be classified as pensioner (according to the situation), if it is for rent or economic assistance, he/she will be classified as collecting rents or receiving economic assistance.

Student: This includes all of the persons who, without doing any paid economic activity (or who did them circumstantially during the reference period) systematically attend an educational establishment with the goal of receiving instruction at any of the educational levels contained in the National Educational System.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 70 ]

Included as students (even if they work and/or receive assistance)

- Persons who are fifteen years old or more, fundamentally dedicated to studying, who regularly attend classes given by the National Educational System (with a scholarship, living off campus, etc.).
- Those students who are practicing as student-teachers and student assistants, even if they receive some payment, since this is generally in relation to the teacher training.
- Here we also include the students in the Higher Teacher Training who work as professors in the ESBEC and the students in the last years of Medical Sciences, who receive similar support.
- Those students who are interns in organizations, businesses or budgeted units, whether or not they receive any stipend for said labor, as long as this is related to the practice or laboratory of his/her future profession.
- Students who are studying on scholarships in foreign countries.
- Those students with learning problems or behavioral problems who are found doing their studies in centers called workshop schools.
- The students who are found working as Enumerators or Supervisors in the Population and Dwelling Census.
- Young persons (17 to 30 years old) incorporated in the Integral Superation Courses, as well as those enrolled in the Schools for Social Workers.

Do not include:

- Persons who study as a secondary activity and who, because of their primary activity, are included in any of the above situations, including working.
- Persons who have been sent by any organization or business to be trained, without this person loosing his/her labor relation with the organization or business that sends him/her to the training.

- Persons who are found being trained, according to the learning system for workers directly in production (Resolution 4248 of the CETSS).

Disabled for work: This includes persons whose physical or mental state impedes carrying out any labor activity as the result of an illness, wound, congenital problem or hereditary problem.

In this situation, you can encounter persons who were working until the time of the illness or wound and who were not protected by the laws of Social Security before the Triumph of the Revolution, as well as those whose limitations date to their birth, infancy, or childhood.

Generally, this group includes: persons who are blind, mentally ill, terminal cancer patients, advanced stage tuberculosis, Down's Syndrome, partial or total motor disability, advance rheumatism, persons with neurological conditions, and with other health problems that make them permanently disabled for work.

Do not include:

- Persons who are temporarily ill.
- Disabled persons who receive retirement, pension, rents, economic assistance, etc., from whom you will mark the corresponding boxes.

Did not do any activity: This includes persons who do not work nor study, and who declare that they did not do any activity.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 71 ]

In the hospital, asylum, or prison and does not work: This includes persons who reside permanently in hospitals, asylums, or other similar institutions or establishments, as well as those who are in prison and not working, which means, those who do not carry out any type of productive labor or services.

This box will only be used by collective dwellings that are of permanent nature: hospitals, asylums, etc.

The persons who reside permanently in hospitals, asylums, etc. and who receive income for pension, rent, etc. will not be included in this group, but should be included in the group that corresponds to each condition.

Other Situation: This includes the persons who do not declare nor indicate any occupation as a means of living, nor a situation that permits inclusion in the previous categories. Here we categorize: training, out of working age, not working nor studying, and others.

Training: This includes those persons who are found receiving training in a course given by some organization or business, receiving a stipend for this and without labor ties with this or any other center. This situation should not be confused with the situation where an organization, business or budgeted unit has sent a person to be trained without the person loosing the labor ties to said entity, in which case he/she is classified as working.

Out of labor age, not working nor studying: This includes the persons who are out of labor age (men less than 17 years old and more than 59 years old and women who are less than 17 years old and over 54 years old) who do not work nor study and who are not found in any of the above situations.

Others: This includes the persons who within neither labor age (men 17 years old to 59 years old and women from 17 years old to 54 years old) who do not declare or indicate any means of earning a living, nor a situation that permits inclusion in any of the previous categories.

Important
The persons who are retired and housewives, who are hired to work in the Census, if not contracted in the week before the Census Day, will be classified as Retirees and Housewives, respectively; if they were already contracted for work related to the Census, then you will consider them as working.

Be aware that the alternatives are in descending order of importance, so if a person declares that he/she is in two different alternatives, you should mark the one that has the lowest code.

For the persons who responded in the affirmative for box 1 or 2 (because he/she is a worker), you should continue asking the questions in the order that they appear in the questionnaire.

For those who declare to be in one of the other boxes (3 to 12), you should not ask the rest of the questions, considering the interview concluded.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 72 ]

Question 18. What is the principal occupation or task that you did in this job?

For the persons who have box 1 or 2 marked in question 17, you will continue by asking the economic questions in the order that they appear in the Census Questionnaire.

[illustration]
18. What is the principal occupation or task that you did in this job?
(Examples: Wiring electrician, teacher, secretary, etc.)

_____
_____
[ _ _ _ ]
(According to the classifier)

For question 18, you need to collect the activity or occupation that the interviewee does in his/her job (whatever the form of holding the employment: state, self-employed, etc.) if in the reference week the person worked (01) or was employed but did not work (2).

You should leave the space that is designated for the codification blank (according to the Classifier).

The work or activity should be recorded in the most complete manner possible, indicating the specialty of the occupation.

In the case that the person declares that his/her principal occupation is Social Service, trainer, or Work that is Socially Useful, you should continue to ask about the job that he/she does in this work center.

Therefore, you should avoid writing generic terms such as:

You should avoid / You should write

Electrician / Wiring electrician, maintenance electrician, etc.
Operator / Construction operation, printing press operator, etc.
Mechanic / Aviation mechanic, refrigeration mechanic, etc.
Clerk / Warehouse clerk, pharmacy clerk, etc.
Engineer / Industrial engineer, metallurgic engineer, etc.
Driver / Bus driver, truck driver, etc.

You should also avoid using terms such as: employee, day-laborer, workers, unspecialized worker, etc.

If the person does not know how to indicate the name of his/her work, ask the person about the principal tasks that he/she does, and write: drive a truck, take care of animals, open button holes, fold sheets of metal, etc.

If the interviewee simultaneously works at more than one job, you should consider the one to which the person has dedicated more time.

Remember that we are only interested the real job or occupation that the person has in his/her state, cooperative or private job, whatever his/her profession or occupation.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 73 ]

Question 19. What is the name of the place where you were affiliated in this week?

With this question we want to know the name and the work that is done in the place where the person does his/her labor activities. The question has two parts. The first refers to the place where the person works and the second is to know the basic activity of that is carried out in said place.

[illustration]

19. a. What is the name of the place where you were affiliated in this week?
(Examples: Textile factory, maternity hospital, cafeteria, self-employed, cooperative, etc.)

_____
_____

b. What did you do in said place?
(Examples: Cattle production, clothing repair, public food preparation, housing services, etc.)

_____
_____
[ _ _ ]

(according to the classifier)

You should try to write the answer declared by the interviewee on the spaces taking into account the following suggestions for part A). Answers for Part A):

You should avoid / You should write:

Workshop / Auto mechanic workshop
School / Elementary School Batalla de Guisa
Hospital / Maternity Hospital Inés Maria
Cooperative / Cooperative Vitalio Acuña

In the case of Part B) you will write, on the lines provided for this purpose, the answers given by the interviewee, but you should always clarify that it is the primary activity of the place, which may not coincide with the activity of the person.

In this question, you should leave the space that corresponds to the codification blank.

In regard to the workers who are employed provided services to Census, for question 18 and 19 the enumerator should write the habitual occupation of the person, as well as the habitual work place and the activity that the person does in the work place and not the activity of the Census.

Question 20. Do you have a secondary occupation?

[illustration]
20. Do you have a secondary occupation?

[] 1 Yes
[] 3 No

End of the interview

With this question we want to determine if the person has a secondary occupation. For this to exist, a worker should carry out both occupations simultaneously, in more than one job. For example: professional with the principal occupation in a factory as an engineer and in addition, working as a self-employed worker (cabinet carpenter).

You should be aware that the person dedicates less time to the secondary occupation than the principal occupation.

If the person being interviewed has a secondary occupation you will mark box 1 (Yes) and you will continue by asking question 21; if there is no secondary occupation, you will mark box 3 (No) and you will consider the interview concluded.

Question 21. What is the occupation or job that you did in this secondary occupation?

[illustration]
21. What is the occupation or job that you did in this secondary occupation?
(Examples: Wiring electrician, teacher, driver, etc.)

_____
_____
[ _ _ _ ]
(According to the classifier)
End of the interview

This question is similar to question 18, where you need to collect the activity or occupation that the interviewee does in his/her secondary job (whatever the form of holding the employment: state, self-employed, etc.)

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 74 ]

If in the reference week the person worked (01) or was employed but did not work (2).

The work or activity should be noted as completely as possible, indicating the specialty in the secondary occupation.

Therefore, you should avoid writing in generic terms, such as:

You should avoid / You should write

Electrician / Wiring electrican, maintenance electrician, etc.
Operator / Construction operation, printing press operator, etc.
Mechanic / Aviation mechanic, refrigeration mechanic, etc.
Clerk / Warehouse clerk, pharmacy clerk, etc.
Engineer / Industrial engineer, metallurgic engineer, etc.
Driver / Bus driver, truck driver, etc.

With this, the interview is completed. When you have finished interviewing all of the members of the household, you should continue with completing the bottom section of the form, which is found at the bottom of on page four of the questionnaire.

Names and last names of the enumerator / Date of the interview / Primary revision

Day / Month / Supervisor / Area Office

Write the day and month that the interview was done, as well as your name and two last names on the spaces designated for this.

Do not make any annotations in the boxes designated for Primary Revision, since these are indicated for use of the Supervisor and the Area Office worker.
With these annotations, we finish filling out the Questionnaire.

Important:

Every time that you finish filling in the Questionnaire for a Census Household, you should review it, with the objective of detecting omissions or errors in the information that you noted.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Section IV. Information about the Person -- 75 ]

[illustration: Summary of the steps to follow for filling in the questionnaire. Not presented here]

*Note for "Fill in Section IV" under "Private dwelling":
Fill in questions 1, 2, and 3 of Section IV for all of the members of the census household. Then continue with the rest of the questions in an independent manner, and one at a time.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / End of the Interview -- 76 ]

IX. End of the Interview

If all of the permanent resident of the dwelling were enumerated, you should continue by:

1. Review all of the questionnaires that were completed in the dwelling.

2. Fill in and attach the sticker for Enumerated Dwelling.

On this sticker, you should write the number of the District, Segment, and Block (urban area) where the dwelling is located. This information will be taken from Section I of the Census Questionnaire. You should also note the total number of enumerated residents in the dwelling, which means, the sum of all of the members of all of the households in the dwelling, which should be obtained by adding the quantities that appear in the space "Total" of the box "Household Summary" of all of the households in the dwelling.

You will also note the day and month when you carried out the enumeration.

This sticker will be attached on the exterior part of the principal entry door or access to the enumerated dwelling.

The sticker should be placed at a convenient height so that it cannot be damaged or destroyed by children, but not so high that it cannot be easily read.

When you attach the sticker, you will inform the household of the instructions that are included on it, which are that it cannot be removed until thirty days after the Enumerator's visit.

3. Politely say goodbye to the enumerated person.

4. Make the corresponding annotations in the "Enumeration Guide".

If any of the persons belonging to one of the households in the dwelling is pending, you should proceed in the same manner described in the previous point, only in this case you will not complete the sticker for "Enumerated Dwelling" (since at this point the enumeration of the dwelling is not complete), you should fill in the form "Repeat Visit" and "Notice of Return Visit" reminding the residents of the day and time when the visit will be repeated.

1. Order number of the visit
2. Line number in the Guide
3. Street or Avenue
4. Number
5. Floor
6. Apartment
7. Name of the Head of Household
8. Number of Residents
9. Cause

Next Visit

10. Day
11. Time

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / End of the Interview -- 77 ]

Instruction for filling in the form

This form will be completed by the Enumerator only in original.

It will be used to list the dwellings where you need to repeat the visit.

Manner of filling in the form:

Header of the Form:

Province, municipality: You will write the name of the Province and Municipality where they appear in the Enumeration Guide.

Neighborhood: You will write the name of the neighborhood that appears in the Enumeration Guide.

District, Segment: You will write the number of the District and Segment that appears in the Enumeration Guide.

Page number: You will write the corresponding number of the enumeration page.
Body of the Form:

Order Number of the Visit: You will write the consecutive order number of the visits to be repeated.

Line number in the Guide: You will write the number of the line on which the dwelling appears in the Enumeration Guide.

Street or Avenue, Number, Floor, Apartment: You will write the complete address of the dwelling where you need to repeat the visit.

Name of the Head of the Census Household: You will write the name of the Head of Household of the household where you did not complete the interview. If you could not do any of the interviews in the dwelling because the occupants were absent or because there was no appropriate person available to give the information, you will write the name that appears in column 9 of the Enumeration Guide.

Number of Residents: You will note the number of members of the household that have information pending. If you did not complete any interview in the dwelling, you will write the total number of residents in the same, which is a number that appears in column 10 or 12 on the Enumeration Guide, depending on if it an Urban or Rural dwelling.

Cause: You will note the reason for having to repeat the visit.

Next visit: You will write the day and time at which the Enumerator will visit the dwelling again, which will also be written on the form (Notice of Return Visit).
National Office of Statistics
Population and Dwelling Census, 2002
Notice regarding the next visit

Name:
_____
We have visited your dwelling today to carry out the enumeration that corresponds to the Census.

With the same objective, we will return to visit you on
___ (name and number of the date) at _____ (time).

We appreciate your attention to this information and we repeat the importance of your collaboration so that the Census can obtain the desired success.

Greetings,

_____
Enumerator
[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / End of the Interview -- 78 ]

This form has as its objective to inform the residents of the visited dwelling of the day and the time when the Enumerator will return to visit them again since the interview could not be done, or it was only partially completed.

In this form, you will write the name of the Head of the Census Household, and you will write the day and time when you will return to visit the dwelling to do or complete the enumeration. This day and time was noted on the form "Return to Visit".

If, in the dwelling, you could not do any enumeration because the occupants are absent or because there was not resident who could give the information, you should complete the forms, "Return to Visit" and "Notice of Return Visit", following the instructions given above for these cases.

Now let us remember the steps to follow in the enumeration.

Summary for the steps to take in the enumeration:

1. Greet the persons in a friendly manner. Show your credentials.

2. Ask for the presence of the Head of Household or another responsible person.

3. Briefly explain the motive of the visit.
Inform them of the confidential nature of the Census.

4. Request that the persons answer the Census Questionnaire.

5. Fill in the data for dwelling on the first Questionnaire that you use in the same (for the principal household, if there is more than one).

6. Determine the number of residents, census households and members of each household that are in the dwelling.

7. Collect all of the data for population for each household in a separate Questionnaire.

8. Fill in the boxes for "Household Summary" and "Quantity of Households in this Dwelling" in all of the Questionnaires completed in the dwelling.

9. Write your name and last names, as well as the day and month that you did the enumeration of all of the Questionnaires completed in the dwelling.

10. Review all of the questionnaires used in the dwelling, looking for errors or omissions of data or persons.

11. Fill in and attach the "Label of Enumerated Dwelling".

12. Say goodbye to residents of the dwelling.

13. Make the corresponding annotations in the "Enumeration Guide".

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / End of the Interview -- 79 ]

X. Termination of the Enumerator's Work

When you complete your work as an Enumerator, you should return all of the material that you received to the Supervisor (whether you used it or not), properly organized.

Only after the Supervisor has reviewed or approved all of the material, as well as verified that you have enumerated all of the dwellings and residents of the Segment, will your work as an Enumerator be considered complete. However, there could be some post-enumeration consultation to clarify any questions regarding your work.

Be aware that the Enumerator is directly directed by the Supervisor, for which you should always do your work based on the directions that you receive from him.

With this, we have concluded the study of all of the documentation and activities that you should know for carrying out your tasks as Enumerator.

If you have any doubts about any topic, repeat your review of the corresponding chapter. If you still cannot understand it, note your doubt and ask the Course Instructor.

Epilogue

As you have been able to observe, the Census is not simple. During the course of the Census, you must collect and classify more than eleven million persons with their characteristics. Therefore, it is easy to image that you will be presented with cases that are not clear or that are not considered in this manual, which means, the special cases can be abundant and diverse.

In consequence, this text is limited to presenting the general principals, illustrating the most typical examples that you will encounter and only some special cases.

To the richness of situations that you will encounter in your labor as an Enumerator, you should apply the general concepts that you have acquired here to be able to apply them to the Census Questionnaire, but if this is not sufficient, consult with your supervisor.

It is undoubtable that the quality of the Census depends on the efficiency of your work and we have complete confidence in your capability, honesty, and civic spirit, for which we are sure that your work as an Enumerator will be successful.

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Annex 1 -- 80 ]

Appendix 1

Years Completed / Years Completed
Year of Birth / If the person was born before the Census Moment / If the person was born after the Census Moment / Year of Birth / If the person was born before the Census Moment / If the person was born after the Census Moment

1885 / 117 / 116 / 1925 / 77 / 76
1886 / 116 / 115 / 1926 / 76 / 75
1887 / 115 / 114 / 1927 / 75 / 74
1888 / 114 / 113 / 1928 / 74 / 73
1889 / 113 / 112 / 1929 / 73 / 72
1890 / 112 / 111 / 1930 / 72 / 71
1891 / 111 / 110 / 1931 / 71 / 70
1892 / 110 / 109 / 1932 / 70 / 69
1893 / 109 / 108 / 1933 / 69 / 68
1894 / 108 / 107 / 1934 / 68 / 67
1895 / 107 / 106 / 1935 / 67 / 66
1896 / 106 / 105 / 1936 / 66 / 65
1897 / 105 / 104 / 1937 / 65 / 64
1898 / 104 / 103 / 1938 / 64 / 63
1899 / 103 / 102 / 1939 / 63 / 62
1900 / 102 / 101 / 1940 / 62 / 61
1901 / 101 / 100 / 1941 / 61 / 60
1902 / 100 / 99 / 1942 / 60 / 59
1903 / 99 / 98 / 1943 / 59 / 58
1904 / 98 / 97 / 1944 / 58 / 57
1905 / 97 / 96 / 1945 / 57 / 56
1906 / 96 / 95 / 1946 / 56 / 55
1907 / 95 / 94 / 1947 / 55 / 54
1908 / 94 / 93 / 1948 / 54 / 53
1909 / 93 / 92 / 1949 / 53 / 52
1910 / 92 / 91 / 1950 / 52 / 51
1911 / 91 / 90 / 1951 / 51 / 50
1912 / 90 / 89 / 1952 / 50 / 49
1913 / 89 / 88 / 1953 / 49 / 48
1914 / 88 / 87 / 1954 / 48 / 47
1915 / 87 / 86 / 1955 / 47 / 46
1916 / 86 / 85 / 1956 / 46 / 45
1917 / 85 / 84 / 1957 / 45 / 44
1918 / 84 / 83 / 1958 / 44 / 43
1919 / 83 / 82 / 1959 / 43 / 42
1920 / 82 / 81 / 1960 / 42 / 41
1921 / 81 / 80 / 1961 / 41 / 40
1922 / 80 / 79 / 1962 / 40 / 39
1923 / 79 / 78 / 1963 / 39 / 38
1924 / 78 / 77 / 1964 / 38 / 37

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Annex 1 -- 81 ]

Years Completed / Years Completed
Year of Birth / If the person was born before the Census Moment / If the person was born after the Census Moment / Year of Birth / If the person was born before the Census Moment / If the person was born after the Census Moment

1965 / 37 / 36 / 1984 / 18 / 17
1966 / 36 / 35 / 1985 / 17 / 16
1967 / 35 / 34 / 1986 / 16 / 15
1968 / 34 / 33 / 1987 / 15 / 14
1969 / 33 / 32 / 1988 / 14 / 13
1970 / 32 / 31 / 1989 / 13 / 12
1971 / 31 / 30 / 1990 / 12 / 11
1972 / 30 / 29 / 1991 / 11 / 10
1973 / 29 / 28 / 1992 / 10 / 9
1974 / 28 / 27 / 1993 / 9 / 8
1975 / 27 / 26 / 1994 / 8 / 7
1976 / 26 / 25 / 1995 / 7 / 6
1977 / 25 / 24 / 1996 / 6 / 5
1978 / 24 / 23 / 1997 / 5 / 4
1979 / 23 / 22 / 1998 / 4 / 3
1980 / 22 / 21 / 1999 / 3 / 2
1981 / 21 / 20 / 2000 / 2 / 1
1982 / 20 / 19 / 2001 / 1 / 0
1983 / 19 / 18 / 2002 / 0 /

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Annex 2 -- 82 ]

Appendix 2

Conversion Table for Adult Education
Rural Worker Education (EOC)
Regular course / Training Courses
Semester / Level/ Elementary Semester / Elementary
1 / (11) / 2nd Grade / 1 / 2nd Grade
2 / (12) / 4th Grade / 2 / 4th Grade
3 / (21) / 5th Grade / 3 4th Grade
4 / (22) / 6th Grade / 4 5th Grade
/ / 5 / 5th Grade
/ / 6 / 6th Grade

Rural Worker Secondary Education (SOC)
Afternoon or Nocturnal (Regular Courses) / Training Courses
Semester / Basic Secondary / Semester / Elementary
1/ 7th Grade / 1 / 6th Grade
2 / 8th Grade / Basic Secondary
3 / 8th Grade / 2 / 7th Grade
4 / 9th Grade / 3 / 7th Grade
/ / 4 / 8th Grade
/ / 5 / 8th Grade
/ / 6 / 9th Grade

Faculty for Rural Worker Education (FOC)
Plan of 6 Semesters (Regular Course) / Plan of 8 Semesters (Training courses)
Semester / Basic Secondary / Semester / Basic Secondary
1 / 9th Grade / 1 / 9th Grade
/ Pre-university / 2 / 9th grade
2 / 10th Grade / 3 / 9th Grade
3 / 10th /Pre-university
4 / 11th Grade / 4 / 10th Grade
5 / 11th Grade / 5 / 10th Grade
6 / 12th Grade / 6 / 11th Grade
/ / 7 / 11th Grade
/ / 8 / 12th Grade

[Header: Instructions for the use of the Enumerator / Annex 2 -- 83]

Pre-University

Current System (Pre-University) / Previous System (Baccalaureate)

Basic Secondary / Preparatory
7 / 7
8 / 8
Baccalaureate (high school)
9 / 1
Pre-University
10 / 2
11 / 3
12 / 4
13 / 5

Trade Schools (Specialized Laborer)

Specialized Laborer / Semesters

1st year / 1st and 2nd semester
2nd year / 3rd and 4th semester
3rd year / 5th and 6th semester