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Chile 2002

Enumerator Instructions, XVII Population Census and VI Housing Census, April 24

[Pages 1-4 were not translated into English.]

[p. 5]

1. Census Definitions

Private dwelling:
Structure equipped for the permanent or temporary lodging of people, with separate and independent access. They can be: fixed or mobile; made of various materials; and house one or more households.

Private Household:
A private household is composed of one or more persons, either related or unrelated, that:

live in the same dwelling
share a single, common budget
eat together, regardless of the ownership or type of kitchen used
recognize a household head among themselves

Household head:
Man or woman, recognized as such by the members of the private household.

[The following text is in the circle at the upper right of the page]
Remember that to enumerate a person you must enumerate his/her dwelling. In extreme cases, if the person slept on a park bench or under a bridge, this becomes their dwelling.

[p. 6]

How to identify a dwelling and a household

Dwellings are places where one or more households can live. [An arrow points to a picture of such a dwelling.]

When we speak of a household we are speaking of people who:

share the same dwelling [This text is contained within a picture of a house.]
are related or unrelated [This text appears below a picture of 3 people watching TV.]
have a common food budget [This text is below a picture of food, cooking equipment, and the symbol for a single, common budget.]

This is a dwelling where one household lives. [This text appears to the right of a picture of a dwelling filled by a single household, along with the symbol for a single, common budget.]

This symbol [picture of a bag with a "$" on it] indicates a single, common budget.

[p. 7]

How to recognize a private dwelling with two or more households

Private dwelling with two private households [An arrow points to a picture of such a dwelling.]

Rolando and Sofía combine their pensions and cook their own food. [An arrow points to one of the households in the picture.]
Nancy and Camila cook separately from Rolando and Sofía. [An arrow points to the other household in the picture.]

Private dwelling with three private households [An arrow points to a picture of such a dwelling.]

Angélica has her own income and cooks her food independently. [An arrow points to one of the households in the picture.]
Julio and Mariela have a single budget that they use to cook just for themselves and for their son René. [An arrow points to another household in the picture.]
Osvaldo and Anita cook separately because they have a separate budget from the other occupants of the dwelling. [An arrow points to the last household in the picture.]

Remember!...the symbol [picture of a bag with a "$" on it] indicates a single, common budget.

[p. 8]

Collective Dwelling: A dwelling that houses a collective household

Collective Household: A group of unrelated people that share a dwelling, or part of one, and live communally for reasons of health, work, religion, study, discipline, etc.

A collective household does not have a household head.

[p. 9]

Collective Dwellings (each with a collective household) [An arrow points to three pictures, one of a convent, one of a penitentiary, and one of a hospital.]

A collective household is always enumerated in a collective dwelling, and a private household is always enumerated in a private dwelling. However, if I find a private household living in a collective dwelling (such as the caretaker of a boarding school and his/her family), I must enumerate them on a different questionnaire as a private dwelling and a private household.

[Pages 10-26 were not translated into English.]

[p. 27]

B. Dwelling

In this section we will report on where we live, what our dwellings are like, what conditions we live in, if we have basic services, etc. . .

Question 1

"Collective Dwelling": Mark this alternative when, for example, you unexpectedly come across a boarding house (collective dwelling) that doesn't appear on the F1 [The F1 is a census form which indicates the geographic area to be enumerated by each enumerator.]. In this case, you mark it and continue to Sections D and E. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1b on the census form.]

Remember that collective dwellings that are recorded on the F1 you do not have to enumerate or record on the summary sheet, because they belong to another area of the census. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1b on the census form.]

[p. 28]

For any place that has served as lodging and does not correspond to any of the distinct types of dwelling, you should fill in the oval other type of private dwelling. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 1a on the census form.]

Remember that dwellings are made of different materials, are of different sizes, and may be fixed or mobile.

[p. 29]

Question 2

"Dwelling occupied by people who are absent" . . . in this case you should fill in a questionnaire with the number of the dwelling, the address, record it in C2 (or C3) [The C2 is an urban summary sheet for a given census sector and the C3 is a rural summary sheet for a given census sector.], in "Observations" put "pending," and return at the end of the route and, if there is still no one home, leave form C10 [The C10 is a citation.]. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 2a on the census form.]

If the dwelling is unoccupied, meaning that no one lives there, just as in the previous case, you fill in a questionnaire with the number of the dwelling, you fill in the "unoccupied" oval, and you continue to the next [dwelling], recording in "Observations" on the summary sheet that the dwelling is unoccupied. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 2b on the census form.]

[Questions 3 through 16: Only for private dwellings which are occupied with people present.]

Question 3

[A graphic of question 3 on the census form is provided.]

[p. 30]

Question 4

Construction materials allow us to define the actual conditions of Chilean dwellings. The following questions are asked:

4a. Exterior walls [An arrow points to a picture of an exterior wall.]
4b. Roof [An arrow points to a picture of a roof.]
4c. Floor [An arrow points to a picture of a floor.]

Question 4a. Exterior Walls

When more than one material is used, you should mark the most used, the predominant material. You should only fill in one oval. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4a on the census form.]

[p. 31]

Question 4b. Roof

In the case of an apartment, you should ask about the roof of the last [i.e., the uppermost] floor of the building. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 4b on the census form.]

Questions 4b (Roof) and 4c (Floor)

Please: Remember to fill in only the oval with the type of material that the informant considers the most used. [Two arrows point to graphics of questions 4b and 4c on the census form.]

[p. 32]

Electrical lighting, water supply and its source, hygienic services and showers are indicators of the living conditions of the inhabitants of Chile.

Question 5. Lighting

Fill in only one oval. [A graphic of question 5 on the census form is provided. Arrows point from the following options:

from "public network" to a graphic of power lines
from "private or community generator" to a graphic of a generator
from "solar panel" to a graphic of solar panels.

Question 6. Water Supply

Fill in only one oval. [A graphic of question 6 on the census form is provided. Arrows point from the option "public system" to a graphic of a faucet and from the option "well or water wheel" [pozo o noria] to a graphic of a well.]

[p. 33]

Question 7. Delivery of water

"Piped water" should be marked only if there is a faucet. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 7 on the census form.]

Question 8. Hygienic Services (toilet)

Mark only one oval. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 8 on the census form.]

Question 9. Presence of showers

This question is to find out if the dwelling has a shower. Mark only one oval. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 9 on the census form.]

[p. 34]

Question 10. Total number of rooms

Don't forget that one room can have two or more uses. That is, you can fill in one or more ovals per line. For example, Room 1: living room, dining room, kitchen. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 10 on the census form.]

The total number of rooms should always coincide with the quantity of rooms used for different purposes. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 10 on the census form.]

Question 11. Number of households in the dwelling

If "1" is marked, continue with C. Household Information. With two or more households:

use a new questionnaire for each household
use the same portfolio number
use the same dwelling number
assign a different number to each household [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 11 on the census form.]

[p. 35]

C. Household Information

Question 12

Mark only one oval. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 12 on the census form. An arrow points from option 3, kerosene, to a graphic of a gas can.]

Question 13

[A graphic of question 13 on the census form is provided, accompanied by a picture of a baby in a crib.]

Question 14

This question asks about access to a shower (it could be a neighbor's shower). Don't confuse this question with question 9 of the Dwelling section. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 14 on the census form. An arrow points from that graphic to a graphic of a person showering.]

[p. 36]

Question 15

Remember that you should mark the ovals for devices that the household has as well as those that it does not have. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 15 on the census form. Arrows point from the following options:

from "color T.V." to a graphic of a television set
from "boombox or stereo system" to a graphic of a stereo
from "washing machine" to a graphic of a washing machine
from "refrigerator" to a graphic of a refrigerator.]

Question 16

[A graphic is provided of question 16 on the census form. Arrows point from the following options:

from "bicycle" to a graphic of a bicycle
from "motorcycle, scooter, moped" to a graphic of a motorcycle
from "delivery truck" to a graphic of a delivery truck
from "car, station wagon" to a graphic of a car
from "motorboat, sailboat, boat" to a graphic of a motorboat
from "pickup truck, van, jeep" to a graphic of a jeep.]

[p. 37]

D. The People that Make Up the Household

When there are more than 6 people in the household, mark the number of men, the number of women and the total only on the first questionnaire. [These instructions refer to a graphic of the top of Section D on the census form.]

You can't forget [to include]:

the elderly
those born before midnight on April 23
those that live there but were doing shifts at work, nursing, or as a security guard
those who passed away after midnight on April 23
everyone who slept [there] during the night of April 23 to April 24 [An arrow points from this text to a graphic of a reminder at the bottom of Section D on the census form.]

Here you should note your first and last name and sign. [These instructions refer to a graphic of the spaces provided for name and signature at the bottom of Section D on the census form.]

[p. 38]

E. People in the Household

Question 17

The option "Household head" only appears on the first page of this section, given that each household has only one. The family relationship of each person in the household is always with respect to the household head. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 17 on the census form.]

[p. 39]

Question 18. [Sex]

Always ask this question. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 18 on the census form.]

Question 19

Age is recorded in number of years completed [on the last birthday], not in number of years that will be completed [on the next birthday]. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 19 on the census form. An arrow points to a graphic of a birthday cake.]

Question 20

If there is more than one type of impairment, mark all that apply. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 20 on the census form.]

Question 21

[A graphic of question 21 on the census form is provided.]

[p. 40]

Question 22

Note: When the person being enumerated was born outside the country, mark the country where the mother was living [at the time the person being enumerated was born] and the year that the person being enumerated arrived in Chile. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 22 on the census form. Arrows point to the second and third set of boxes in question 22.]

Questions 22 and 23

Fill in the name of the municipality only if it is different from the municipality currently being enumerated. [These instructions refer to graphics of questions 22 and 23 on the census form. Arrows point to the first set of boxes in those questions.]

[p. 41]

[Questions 24 - 26 are for people 5 years old or older.]

Question 24

[A graphic of question 24 on the census form is provided.]

Question 25

[A graphic of question 25 on the census form is provided.]

Question 26

[These instructions refer to a graphic of question 26 on the census form.]

"Normal": This option refers to the old Normal Schools [schools where one studied and trained to work as a teacher at a primary school].

[p. 42]

[Questions 27 - 33 are for people 15 years old or older.]

Question 27

Don't forget that you have to ask about the current civil or marital status of the person being enumerated. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 27 on the census form.]

Question 28. [Religion]

Mark only one oval. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 28 on the census form.]

[p. 43]

Question 29

"Last week": Between Monday, April 15 and Sunday, April 21. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 29 on the census form.]

In this question, you should only mark one oval. The informant determines the option that best describes him/her. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 29 on the census form.]

Question 30

[A graphic of question 30 on the census form is provided.]

[p. 44]

Question 31

You should describe the occupation in detail. For example: ice cream vendor. If more than one occupation, the informant should choose the main one. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 31 on the census form.]

Question 32

Don't confuse [the establishment's industry] with its official name. If the person works in the Internal Revenue Service, put: "collection of taxes." Don't write "IRS" [SII]. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 32 on the census form.]

[p. 45]

Question 33

This question applies only to those people who responded with option 1, 2, 4, or 7 on question 29. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 33 on the census form.]

Only fill in the boxes [with the name of the municipality] when the response is "in another municipality." [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 33 on the census form.]

[Questions 34 - 36 are for women 15 years old or older.]

Question 34

If, upon being born, the baby cried, breathed, or moved and then died, this should be considered a live birth. These instructions refer to a graphic of question 34 on the census form.]

[p. 46]

Question 35

[A graphic of question 35 on the census form is provided.]

Question 36

Mark the months using the first three letters of each one. [These instructions refer to a graphic of question 36 on the census form. An arrow points to the boxes for "Month".]

[Pages 47-64 were not translated into English.]