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Census Guide 2001
Statistics Canada

The Statistics Canada representative from your area will receive your questionnaire for review. If you want other options for returning your census information, call 1 800 591-2001.

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What's inside

[Index skipped. See original for details.]

About this guide

This guide contains instructions and examples to help you answer each census question as accurately as possible. Also included are reasons why the questions are asked and how the information you provide will be used.

What is a census?

A census provides a statistical picture of a country and its people. Almost every country in the world conducts a census regularly to collect important social and economic information. In Canada, it is mandatory for people to participate in the census.
In Canada the census is mandated by the Constitution and the Statistics Act.
The Census of Canada is conducted once every five years. The 2001 Census will be held on Tuesday, May 15, 2001.

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Why is the census important?

The results of the census are used to make many important decisions -- decisions affecting your community, your province or territory, and the entire country. Governments, businesses, associations, and community organizations are among the many thousands of census users. Census results benefit all Canadians and are used: to determine the number of seats in Parliament; to decide how much money is transferred from the federal government to your province or territory; to plan pensions, health care, housing and employment programs; to determine where services such as hospitals, roads, schools, day-care centres and public transit are needed.

If you need help

Call the Census help line at 1 800 591-2001 if: you need help completing your questionnaire; you have difficulty answering a question and you need clarification; you do not want your form to be returned to your census representative; you or a member of your household would prefer to fill in a separate questionnaire. This free service is available from May 1 to May 31 between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. TDD/TTY Telecommunication Devices for the Deaf/Teletype Machines only) users should call 1 877 881-8301 (free of charge).

What happens to your census questionnaire?

Census questionnaires will be retained in accordance with legal requirements and stored securely. It takes about six months for your questionnaire to be processed. You can request to see the personal information on your census questionnaire by writing to: Privacy Coordinator, Statistics Canada, R.H. Coats Building, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6.

Are census data available free of charge?

Statistics Canada makes every effort to put key census indicators and information in the public domain. Standard census products and publications are made available free of charge in depository libraries and Statistics Canada regional offices. In addition, a wide selection of information from the census such as community profiles are available on the Statistics Canada web site at http://www.statcan.ca.
Custom services and tabulations are offered on a cost-recovery basis to businesses, governments, other organizations and individuals. No identifiable individual information is ever provided in either free or cost-recovery products.

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Does Statistics Canada use census information to conduct other surveys?

From time to time Statistics Canada may use the census results to select households or individuals to participate in other important surveys. This is done only after it can be demonstrated that the census is the most cost efficient and effective means to select the required sample. These uses are strictly for statistical purposes and no one outside Statistics Canada can have access to any identifiable information.

Further information on the census

For information on the 2001 Census, visit the Statistics Canada Web site at http://www.statcan.ca.

Your role in the census

The information you provide will help ensure that the 2001 Census accurately reflects Canada's changing society. Please complete the questionnaire and "Count yourself in" on Tuesday, May 15, 2001.

Starting off -- Step by step
Step A

We ask for your address to make sure we count every dwelling. We use your telephone number to call you only for information you may have forgotten to include in your questionnaire.

Steps B and C

These steps help you to decide who should be included and who should not be included in the questionnaire. They tell us that we have counted everyone we need to count and that we have not counted anyone twice.

Step D

This step tells us if someone in your household operates a farm. It also ensures that we find all farms for the Census of Agriculture.

Step E

No further instructions.

The questions

Basic population information

Question 1 asks for the name of each person in the household so that no one is left out or counted twice. Names are not put on the census database.
Questions 2 to 6 ask about the people living in the household. From these questions we can learn about living arrangements, family size, the number of children living with one parent or two parents, and the number of people who are alone. This information is used for planning social programs, such as Old Age Security and the Child Tax Benefit. It is also used by towns and cities to plan a variety of services such as day-care centers, schools and senior citizens' homes.
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If you have questions or require further information, please phone the free Census Help Line at 1 800 591-2001.
Question 1 -- Name
Question 2 -- Sex
Question 3 -- Date of birth
Question 4 -- Marital status
Question 5 -- Common-law status
Question 6 -- Relationship to Person 1

Activities of daily living

Questions 7 and 8 provide information on the number of people in Canada whose activities are reduced because of a physical condition, a mental condition, or a health problem. The answers are used to find out more about the barriers these persons face in their everyday lives.
Question 7 -- Difficulties with daily activities
Question 8 -- Reduction in activities due to physical or mental conditions or health problems
These questions refer to conditions or health problems that have lasted or are expected to last six months or more.
For young children, include only those conditions or problems that have been diagnosed by a professional.

General information

Questions 9 through 22 provide a social and cultural picture of Canada's population. Question 9 asks the province or territory in Canada, or the country outside Canada, where people were born. This information tells us about population movements within Canada, and between Canada and other countries, and provides information on the diversity of Canada's population.
Question 10 tells us the citizenship status of our population. This information helps in electoral planning; by combining it with age data, we can calculate the number of potential voters. This question also provides information used to plan citizenship classes and programs.
Questions 11 and 12 tell us the number of immigrants and non-permanent residents in Canada, and the year people immigrated to Canada. Information from these questions is often used in combination with other census data to study conditions of immigrants over time; to review immigration policies and programs; and to plan education, health, and other services.
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Questions 13 to 16 are used to implement programs that protect the rights of Canadians under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This information also helps to determine the need for language training and services in English or French.
Question 17 provides information about the ethnic and cultural diversity of Canada's population. This information is used to administer the Canadian Multiculturalism Act. It is also used extensively by ethnic and cultural associations, as well as by agencies and researchers, for activities such as health promotion, communications and marketing.
Questions 18, 20 and 21 provide information about Aboriginal or First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples that is used to administer legislation and employment programs under the Indian Act of Canada and the Employment Equity Act. The information is also used by researchers and Aboriginal governments and associations to explore a wide variety of
demographic and socio-economic issues.
Question 19 tells us about the groups that make up the visible minority population in Canada. This information is required for programs under the Employment Equity Act, which promotes equal opportunity for everyone.
Question 22 provides information on religion and is used to assess the need and potential for separate religious schools in some provinces. In addition, federal and provincial human rights legislation depend on this information to protect Canadians from discrimination based on their religious beliefs.

Question 9 -- Place of birth
For persons born in an area of Canada that was formerly part of the Northwest Territories at the time of their birth but which is now a part of Nunavut, report Nunavut.
For persons born in Newfoundland or Labrador before that province joined Confederation in 1949, report Newfoundland.
For persons born in any of the six counties of Northern Ireland, report United Kingdom. For persons born in one of the counties of the Republic of Ireland, report Eire.
For persons born in the former U.S.S.R., the former Yugoslavia, or the former Czechoslovakia, report the name of the independent country or republic according to the boundaries in existence on Census Day--May 15, 2001.
For persons who are not sure of their country of birth because its boundaries have changed since the time of their birth, report the name of the nearest city, state or province.

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Question 10 -- Citizenship
Mark Canada, by birth for persons: born in Canada (see exception below); born outside Canada, if at the time of their birth one or both parents were Canadian citizens and if this person has retained Canadian citizenship.
Exception: Some persons who are born in Canada should not mark Canada, by birth, if at the time of their birth: one or both parents were government representatives of another country (diplomatic service); and neither parent was a Canadian citizen or a landed immigrant. Mark Canada, by naturalization for persons who have become Canadian citizens. These persons have been issued a Canadian citizenship certificate. This includes persons born in the United Kingdom or in other Commonwealth countries who have immigrated to Canada and have become Canadian citizens.
For persons who were born outside Canada and have not become Canadian citizens, report under Other country the name of the other country or countries for which they hold citizenship(s).
For persons who are dual citizens of Canada and another country, do not report "dual citizenship". Mark either Canada, by birth or Canada by naturalization, and report the name of the other country.

Question 11 -- Landed immigrant status
Mark No for persons who are: Canadian citizens by birth; foreign students, foreign workers, Minister's permit holders, or refugee claimants.
Mark Yes for persons who are: Canadian citizens by naturalization; permanent residents under the Immigration Act. Permanent residents have been granted the right to live permanently in Canada by immigration authorities but have not yet obtained Canadian citizenship.
Question 12 -- Year of immigration
For persons who immigrated to Canada more than once, report the year landed immigrant status was first obtained.

Questions 13 to 16 -- Language
For persons who use Aboriginal or Indian languages: report the specific Aboriginal language (such as Cree or Ojibway) or the specific Indian language (such as Punjabi or Hindi); do not report "Indian".
For persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, or who have a speech disability: report knowledge of English, French, or other languages, including sign language; report the language used most often at home to communicate, including sign language.

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Question 13 -- Knowledge of English and French
Mark English or French only if the person can carry on a conversation of some length on various topics in that language.
For a child who has not yet learned to speak: report the language(s) that the child is learning to speak at home: English, French, both, or neither.

Question 14 -- Knowledge of other language(s)
Report only those languages in which the person can carry on a conversation of some length on various topics.
For a child who has not yet learned to speak: report a language other than English or French that the child is learning to speak at home.

Question 15 -- Languages spoken at home
Part (a): Report the language spoken most often at home. Report more than one language only if all languages are spoken equally often.
For a person who lives alone: report the language in which you feel most comfortable.
For a child who has not yet learned to speak: report the language spoken most often to this child at home. If two languages are spoken, report the language spoken most often. If both languages are used equally often, report both languages.
Part (b): Report any other languages that the person speaks at home on a regular
basis, but not as often as the language reported in part (a).

Question 16 -- First language learned at home
For a person who learned two languages at the same time in early childhood, report the language this person spoke most often at home before starting school. Report two languages only if they were used equally often and are still understood by this person.
For a child who has not yet learned to speak: report the language spoken most often to this child at home. Report two languages only if both languages are spoken equally often so that the child learns both languages at the same time.

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Question 17 -- Ethnic origin
This question refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of a person's ancestors. An ancestor is someone from whom a person is descended and is usually more distant than a grandparent. Other than Aboriginal persons, most people can trace their origins to their ancestors who first came to this continent. Ancestry should not be confused with citizenship or nationality.
For all persons, report the specific ethnic or cultural group or groups to which their ancestors belonged, not the language they spoke. For example, report "Haitian" rather than "French", or "Austrian" rather than "German."
For persons of East Indian or South Asian origins, report a specific group. Do not report "Indian". For example, report "East Indian from India", "East Indian from Guyana", or indicate the specific group, such as "Punjabi" or "Tamil."
For persons with Aboriginal ancestors, report a specific group. For example, report "Cree", "Micmac", "Ojibway", "North American Indian," "Métis". Do not report "Indian."

Question 18 -- Aboriginal self-reporting
Answer this question regardless of whether or not this person is an Aboriginal person of North America.
Aboriginal people are usually those with ancestors who resided in North America prior to European contact and who identify with one of the three Aboriginal groups listed on the questionnaire.
Persons who consider themselves to be East Indian or Asian Indian, or who have ethnic roots on the subcontinent of India, would normally respond No to this question.
Individuals who refer to themselves as Métis in the context of mixed ancestry but who do not have North American Aboriginal ancestry--for example, those from Africa, the Caribbean and South America--would normally respond No.

Question 19 -- Population group
Population group should not be confused with citizenship or nationality.
For persons who belong to more than one group, mark all the circles that apply. Do not report "bi-racial" or "mixed" in the box provided.

Question 20 -- Indian Band/First Nation Membership
A Band is a group of First Nation people for whom lands have been set apart and money is held by the Crown. A Band member is an individual who is recognized as being a member of a Band under membership as defined by either the Band itself or the Indian Act of Canada. Individuals should report their Band/First Nation affiliation rather than their Tribal affiliation (for example, "Chemawawin First Nation Band" instead of "Cree").

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Question 21 -- Treaty/Registered Indian
Mark Yes for persons who: are registered as Indians under the Indian Act; are Treaty Indians, only if they are registered as Indians under the Indian Act; or have become registered as Indians since June 1985 when Bill C-31changed the Indian Act.
All other persons should mark No, including persons who may be entitled to register under provisions of the Indian Act, but for some reason have not.

Question 22 -- Religion
Report a specific group or denomination, even if the person is not practicing (for example, report "United Church", not "Protestant").
For infants or children, report the specific group or denomination in which they will be raised.
For persons who have no connection or affiliation with any religious group or denomination, mark No religion. Report "atheist" or "agnostic" if applicable.

Question 23Only respondents born before May 15, 1986 should answer Questions 24 to 51.

Mobility

Questions 24 and 25 tell us where people living in Canada are moving to and from, both within and outside Canada. This information is used to help estimate the population between censuses at the national, provincial and regional levels. It is also used to identify future needs for housing, education, transportation and social services, and contributes to programs administered under the Fiscal Arrangements Act.

Question 24 -- Place of residence 1 year ago
If the address has changed simply because the boundary or the name of the municipality or reserve/settlement has changed, mark circle 01 (Lived at the same address as now).
For persons who lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada on May 15, 2000: mark that circle and print the name of the city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, and print the name of the province or territory, and print the postal code.
For persons who lived outside Canada on May 15, 2000: mark that circle and print the name of the country according to its present boundaries.

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Question 25 -- Place of residence 5 years ago
If the address has changed simply because the boundary or the name of the municipality or reserve/settlement has changed, mark circle 09 (Lived at the same address as now).
For persons who lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality
or Indian reserve in Canada on May 15, 1996: mark that circle and print the name of the city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, and print the name of the province or territory.
For persons who lived outside Canada on May 15, 1996: mark that circle and print the name of the country according to its present boundaries.

Education

Questions 26 to 31 tell us about the education and training of people living in Canada about and their job skills. Governments and employers use this information to evaluate whether there are enough people with the required education, training and job skills in particular areas of the workforce. They are then able to develop training programs that meet the changing needs of our labour market.
Question 29, which provides information on school attendance, is needed for planning and financing postsecondary and adult education programs under the Canada Student Loans Act. It is also used to develop incentives and programs that help people remain in school or return to school.

Question 26 -- Highest level of elementary or secondary schooling
In the box provided, report the highest grade or level ever attended according to the province or territory where this person attended school, even if this person now lives in a different province or territory.
For persons who obtained their education outside Canada, report the estimate of the highest grade or level according to the educational system of the province or territory where they now live.
For persons who studied in the classical colleges of Quebec, the Versification year is equivalent to Grade 11.
For persons who are currently completing a school grade by private instruction or correspondence, or who are completing a school grade by attending school part time during the day or evening, report the equivalent grade in the regular daytime program.
For persons who attended special education classes or an institution where classes were ungraded, estimate as closely as possible the equivalent level in the mainstream school system of the province or territory where they now live.

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Question 27 -- Years of university completed
Report the number of academic years successfully completed regardless of the length of time it may have taken to complete them.
For persons who attended a university on the semester system, consider two semesters with a regular course load equal to one academic year.
For persons who received university training by correspondence, or attended classes part time during the day or evening, convert accumulated credits to the equivalent number of years in the university's full-time regular program.
For persons who studied in the classical colleges of Quebec, consider Philo I and Philo II equal to first- and second-year university. Do not, however, include Belles-Lettres and Rhétorique as university education.
Teacher training received from a faculty of education that was associated with an accredited university should be reported as university education. Otherwise, report this type of training in Question 28.

Question 28 -- Years of non-university, postsecondary education completed
Do not include any courses taken for leisure, recreation or personal interest.
Include schooling in all postsecondary institutions other than university, whether or not a high school diploma was required for entrance. These include non-university teachers' colleges and police colleges.
Report the number of academic years successfully completed, regardless of the length of time it may have taken to complete them.
For persons who received non-university training by correspondence, or attended classes part time during the day or evening, convert accumulated credits to the equivalent number of years in a full-time, regular program.
Career-oriented, technical-vocational courses are postsecondary programs in the province of Quebec and are similar to community-college programs in other provinces.
For persons who studied in the classical colleges of Quebec, consider Belles-Lettres and Rhétorique equal to first- and second-year, non-university training.

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Question 29 -- School attendance
Do not include any courses taken for leisure, recreation or personal interest.
Report the attendance of persons who have been enrolled in school or an educational institution at any time since September 2000, even if they were registered but subsequently dropped out. Educational institutions include seminaries, schools of nursing, private business schools, private or public trade schools, vocational schools, or schools for people who are deaf or blind.
Mark Yes, full time for persons who were taking 75% or more of the regular course load in the grade or year in which they were registered. Consider any day courses of six weeks or less as part-time attendance.
For persons who attended both full time and part time since last September, mark only "Yes, full time".

Question 30 -- Certificates, diplomas and degrees
Mark Secondary (high) school graduation certificate or equivalent for persons who have graduated from high school. Mark this category as well for persons who have enough credits for the equivalent of high school graduation in the province or territory in which they live, even if they obtained their education outside Canada.
Mark Trades certificate or diploma for persons who have received a certificate or diploma through in-school training in trades-level vocational and pre-vocational courses. Such courses are given at community colleges, institutes of technology, and similar institutions. Persons who have a trade certificate or diploma may or may not also have apprenticeship or journeyman training. Include all training where the minimal entrance requirement was less than secondary or high school, junior or senior matriculation, or the equivalent.
Mark Other non-university certificate or diploma for persons who have received a certificate or diploma (other than a trades certificate or diploma) from a community college (both transfer and semi-professional career programs), CEGEP (both general and professional), institute of technology, or any other non-degree-granting educational institution.
Mark University certificate or diploma below bachelor level for persons who have a teaching certificate awarded by a provincial department of education at an approved institution such as a normal school or college of education. For persons who earned their teaching qualifications at an accredited university's faculty of education, mark Bachelor's degree(s).
For persons who have a diploma, certificate or licence from a professional association and whose course of study was conducted through a university, mark University certificate or diploma below bachelor level (provided that a bachelor's degree was not required to enrol in these programs).

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Question 31 -- Major field of study
For persons who earned more than one highest degree (for example, two bachelor's degrees or two master's degrees), report the field of study for the degree most recently earned.
For persons who specialized in more than one field of study while earning their degrees, report the area in which the greatest number of credits or courses were earned.
Wherever possible, report the subcategory of specialization within a broad area of training--especially for graduate studies or other advanced training.

Place of birth of parents

Question 32 tells us the number of persons born in Canada whose parents were born outside Canada and the places of birth of these parents. Information from this question can be used to assess the socio-economic conditions of second-generation Canadians.

Question 32 -- Place of birth of parents
For adopted persons, report the place of birth of their adoptive parents.
For persons who are not sure of the country because its boundaries have changed since the time of their parents' birth, print the name of the nearest city, state or province in the box provided.

Household activities

Question 33 provides information on how much time people spend on unpaid household activities. When combined with data on paid work, this information will provide a picture of how people living in Canada balance their paid and unpaid work activities.

Question 33 -- Household activities
Mark the circle that contains the total number of unpaid hours spent last week doing each of the activities in parts (a) to (c).
Do not include hours this person spent: working for pay (report paid work in Question 34); doing unpaid, volunteer work for a non-profit or religious organization, charity or community group.
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Activities taking place at the same time
People often perform more than one unpaid activity at the same time. For example, a person may spend one hour preparing a meal while at the same time looking after his or her children. This person should report one hour of housework in part (a) and one hour of child care in part (b) of Question 33. It does not matter that these activities took place at the same time.
Part (a) -- Doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance
Include the hours this person spent doing unpaid housework, yard work, or home maintenance for: him or herself; members of his or her own household; other family members outside the household; friends or neighbors.
Part (b) -- Looking after children without pay
Include hours spent doing activities such as talking or playing with children if during these activities this person was responsible for their care.
Part (c) -- Providing unpaid care to seniors
Seniors include all persons aged 65 and over and some individuals close to age 65 who suffer from age-related infirmities. Include the hours this person spent providing care or assistance to: a senior family member such as a spouse, parent or grandparent; senior friends or neighbors.

Labour market activities
[Questions 34 to 50 collect information on paid work done by people aged 15 and older.]

Questions 34 to 50 collect information on paid work done by people aged 15 and older. This information is important for both businesses and governments at all levels to plan for education and training programs, to assess language uses, to forecast future job opportunities, to plan efficient transportation and commuting systems, and to develop job creation measures in communities throughout the country.
Retired Persons
All persons who were retired on Census Day (May 15, 2001) and who did not work at any time between January 1, 2000 and May 12, 2001 should answer Questions 34 to 39 only, and then go directly to Question 51 (Income in 2000).
Some retired persons may have returned to the workforce following official retirement. All retired persons who returned to the workforce between January 1, 2000 and May 12, 2001 should answer Questions 34 to 50.

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Question 34 -- Hours worked for pay or in self-employment
For persons 15 years and over, enter the total number of hours worked for pay at all jobs last week. Last week refers to the week of Sunday, May 6 to Saturday, May 12, 2001.
Include:
Hours spent working directly towards the operation of a family farm or business without formal pay arrangements. This means working for a spouse or another relative who is a member of the same household. Include any work that helped the relative run his or her farm or business. For example, include bookkeeping for a farm or business owned by a spouse.
Hours spent working in one's own business, farm or professional practice, alone or with a partner. This means hours worked by persons who are self-employed, with or without paid help, including: all time spent maintaining and administering the operation of a farm, business or professional practice; fishing, trapping or hunting for profit or to maintain the community, with equipment that is rented, owned or owned in part; for fishers, hours spent preparing and maintaining boats, nets, etc.; for farmers, hours spent maintaining farm fences, buildings or machinery, cultivating, sowing, milking, etc.
Hours spent working for wages, salary, tips or commission. See Question 44 of this guide for examples.
If the number of hours is not known, report the best estimate.

Question 35 -- Absence from job
Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay in the entire week before Census Day, May 15, 2001 (Sunday, May 6 to Saturday, May 12, 2001).
Mark Yes, on temporary lay-off for persons who expect to return to the job from which they were laid off, no matter how long ago they were laid off.
Mark Yes, on vacation, ill, on strike or locked out, or absent for other reasons for persons who had a job or business last week and were absent with or without pay for the whole week.
Include absence because of maternity leave, bad weather, fire, personal or family responsibilities, etc.
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Question 36 -- New job arrangements
Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay in the week before Census Day, May 15, 2001 (Sunday, May 6 to Saturday, May 12, 2001).
Question 37 -- Recent search for paid work
Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay in the week before Census Day, May 15, 2001 (Sunday, May 6 to Saturday, May 12, 2001).
Question 38 -- Availability for work
Answer only for persons 15 and over who did not work for pay in the week before Census Day, May 15, 2001 (Sunday, May 6 to Saturday, May 12, 2001) and who had actively looked for work in the previous four weeks.
Mark No, because of personal or family responsibilities for persons who could not have started work last week because of family illness, childcare difficulties, jury duty, etc.
Mark No, other reasons only for persons who: did not already have a job; were not temporarily ill or disabled; were not going to school; were no longer interested in working; were out of town last week.

Question 39 -- Last date of work
Include only: work done for wages, salary, tips, commission, piece-rate payment,
payment in kind (payment in goods and services rather than in money); work done in self-employment; work done without formal pay arrangements by family members for family businesses, farms or professional practices.
Do not include: volunteer work; unpaid housework; unpaid child care; unpaid care to seniors; unpaid home maintenance; leisure activities.

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Question 40 -- Name of employer
For persons aged 15 and over whose wages are paid by an agency that hires out their services, report the name of the agency.
For persons 15 and over who work as employees in someone's home (for example, nannies), report the name of the family worked for, then report private household.
Question 41 -- Kind of business
Describe the type of business in detail. For example - rather than: auto parts; furniture; school; aluminum; police; importing. A more complete response would be: automotive brake linings manufacturing; retail household furniture and appliance store; secondary school; aluminum rolling and casting; municipal police department; stuffed toys importing.

Question 42 -- Occupation
Give specific descriptions of the work done. For example - rather than: maintenance; repair work; office work; engineering; engineering; inspecting; supervising; consulting.
A more complete response would be: electrical equipment maintainer; electrical motor repairman; typist, general office work; industrial engineer; industrial engineering technician; electronic equipment inspector; aircraft assembly supervisor; health-care planning consultant.
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Question 43 -- Main activities
Report the main activities this person does in his or her job. Be sure to indicate supervisory or management responsibilities if they apply. For persons who are members of a religious order engaged in teaching or nursing, report these activities rather than the religious activities.

Question 44 -- Class of worker
Mark working for wages, salary, tips or commission for persons aged 15 and over who worked: for wages or salary; for tips; on commission as a salesperson for only one company and did not; maintain an office or staff; for payment in kind (room, board) in a non-family enterprise (for example, as a member of a religious order); for piece-rates; as a member of the Armed Forces; an hour or more for pay in a job such as cleaning or babysitting (in another person's home); as a paid housekeeper or nanny.
Mark working without pay for his / her spouse or another relative in a family farm or business for persons aged 15 and over who worked: without money wages at a task that contributed to the operation of a farm or business that belongs to a spouse or relative who is a member of this household.
Mark self-employed without paid help or self-employed with paid help for persons aged 15 and over who: operated their own business, farm or professional practice (alone or in partnership) even if no goods or services were sold; operated their own business, farm or professional practice (alone or in partnership) whether it made a profit or suffered a loss; operated a farm, whether they owned or rented the land; worked on a freelance or contract basis; provided meals and /or room or daycare services in their own home for boarders, roomers or neighbours' children; operated a direct distributorship selling and delivering products such as cosmetics, newspapers, brushes or cleaning products; fished, trapped or hunted for profit or for the maintenance of the community, with their own or rented equipment or with equipment in which they had part ownership; were setting up a business, farm or professional practice.

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Question 45 -- Incorporation status
An incorporated business is a business or farm that has been formed into a legal corporation under either federal or provincial laws.
An unincorporated business or farm has no separate legal existence, but may be a partnership, family business, or owner-operated business.

Question 46 -- Place of work
Mark worked at home for persons aged 15 and over who worked at home--for example, farmers, private consultants, apartment building superintendents, etc.
For persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer's address: mark worked at home if most of the time was spent working at home (for example, three days out of five); mark worked at the address specified below and print the employer's address if more time was spent working at an employer's address.
Mark No fixed workplace address for persons who go from home to various work locations--for example, building and landscape contractors, travelling salespersons, or independent truck drivers.
Mark worked at the address specified below for persons who worked at an employer's address most of the time. Give a complete address including street number, name, type and, if applicable, direction. If the employer's address is unknown, print the name of the building or of the nearest street intersection. Report this person's regular place of work, even if he or she was temporarily on assignment, training or holiday last week.
For persons who work at a different job site or location every day: mark worked at the address specified below and specify the address or name of the headquarters or depot if they report there before starting work each day.

Question 47 -- Transportation to work
Mark the type of transportation usually used to get to work. Mark only one circle indicating the type of transportation used for most of the distance travelled.

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Question 48 -- Language of work
Part (a)
For persons whose job requires mostly dealing with customers, clients or peers, report the language used most often.
For persons whose job requires mostly writing, report the language written most often.
For persons who are deaf, hard of hearing or who have a speech disability, report a sign language if it is used most often at work.
Report only languages used in performing a job or a major task.
Report two languages only if they are used equally often.
Do not report a language used only during coffee, lunch or other rest breaks.
Part (b)
Report any other languages that this person may use on a regular basis in performing a job or a major task, though not as often as the main language reported in part (a).
Do not report a language used only during coffee, lunch or other rest breaks.

Question 49 -- Weeks worked in 2000
Include any week in which persons aged 15 and over worked for pay in 2000, even if they only worked for a few hours during the entire week.
Exclude weeks on leave without pay.
Include weeks on leave with pay. (Include weeks in which training paid for by the employer was received. Include weeks of paid vacation and sick leave with pay.)
Report 52 weeks for persons who worked less than a year but who were paid on a 12-month basis, such as school teachers.
Self-employed persons
Report 52 weeks for persons who operated a farm, business or professional practice for the full year, including weeks on vacation or sick leave (paid or unpaid).

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Question 50 -- Full-time or part-time work
Mark full time for persons aged 15 and over who worked 30 hours or more per week at all jobs during most of the weeks they had worked in 2000.
Mark part time for persons aged 15 and over who worked less than 30 hours per week at all jobs during most of the weeks they had worked in 2000.

Income

Question 51 provides the only source of detailed income statistics for all people in Canada, their families and households. Income tax records neither cover all people nor do they provide some important information on the characteristics of persons with income.
Governments use income statistics to develop income support programs and social services, such as Old Age Security Pension, provincial income supplements, social assistance, and welfare payments. They also use these statistics to ensure that programs supplementing family incomes do so efficiently and to identify specific geographic areas that need assistance.
Businesses, large and small, use these statistics to locate stores near consumers and to develop new products and services.
Personal or identifiable information is never sold or given to mailing lists. No one, including government departments, has access to income or other personal information collected in the census. All your answers are kept confidential. This is the law.

Question 51 -- Income in 2000
General instructions
Complete Question 51 for all persons aged 15 and over, whether or not they worked or had income in 2000.
Report annual income received from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2000 for each applicable source in parts (a) to (j) as well as the total income from all sources. If you are not sure of the exact amount for a source, give your best estimate. If necessary, consult your 2000 income tax return and information slips.
Report income obtained from outside Canada in Canadian dollars.

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Paid employment

Part (a) -- Total wages and salaries
Include: total wages and salaries from all jobs before deductions for income tax, pensions, etc. (Do not report take-home pay only.); commissions, tips, cash bonuses and casual earnings; military pay and allowances; benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans; employer or union supplementary unemployment benefits.
Report retirement allowances and severance pay in part (j).
If using T4 slips to answer part (a), report the amount in Box 14 minus the amounts in Boxes 30 to 40.

Self-employment income
Part (b) -- Net farm income
Persons who operated an agricultural operation in 2000, alone or in partnership, should report net farm income (gross receipts minus operating expenses such as wages, rents or depreciation) in part (b).
In the case of a partnership, report only this person's share of net income.
Agricultural operations produce any of the following items intended for sale: crops, livestock, poultry or other agricultural products (greenhouse or nursery products, Christmas trees, sod, honey, maple syrup, furs, eggs, milk, etc.)
Include: cash advances in gross receipts received in 2000; all rebates and farm-support payments from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs such as dairy or milk subsidies; marketing board payments and dividends received from co-operatives; gross insurance and program proceeds such as payments from crop insurance or Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA).
Report income from incorporated farms in part (a) and/or in part (h).
For persons who rented out their farms, report the net rent in part (h).
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Part (c) -- Net non-farm income from unincorporated business, professional practice, etc.
Mark Yes in part (c) for: persons who owned and operated a non-farm, unincorporated business or professional practice in 2000, alone or in partnership, including: self-employed fishers, trappers and hunters; persons doing casual work, such as babysitting in their own; home, or selling and delivering cosmetics or newspapers; freelancers, such as artists, writers or music teachers; persons providing room and board to non-relatives.
Report net income (gross receipts minus operating expenses such as wages, rents or depreciation). Do not subtract personal deductions such as income tax and pension contributions.
In the case of a partnership, report only this person's share of net income.
Report income from incorporated businesses in part (a) and /or in part (h).

Income from government
Part (d) -- Old Age Security Pension, Guaranteed Income Supplement and Spouse's Allowance
Mark Yes in part (d) for: persons 65 years and over who in 2000 received Old Age Security Pension (and Guaranteed Income Supplement); 60 to 64-year-old spouses of Old Age Security Pension recipients and widow(er)s who in 2000 received Spouse's Allowance.
Report only money received from the federal government.
Report provincial or territorial income supplements in part (g).
If using T4A (OAS) slips to answer question (d), report the sum of amounts in Boxes 18 and 21.
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Part (e) -- Benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
Include these CPP/QPP payments: retirement pensions; survivors' benefits; disability pensions; orphans' benefits; a combination of these pensions and benefits.
Do not include: contributions to the plan; lump-sum death benefits.
Report income from employee pension plans in part (i).
Report old age, retirement and war pensions received from foreign sources in part (j).
If using T4A(P) slips to answer question (e), report the amount in Box 20.
Part (f) -- Benefits from Employment Insurance
Include benefits received: for unemployment; for sickness; for maternity, paternity or adoption; for work sharing or training; by self-employed fishers.
If using T4E slips to answer question (f), report the amount in Box 14.
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Part (g) -- Other income from government sources
Report in part (g) income received from federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments in 2000 and not reported in other parts of Question 51.
Include: provincial or territorial income supplements to Old Age Security pension recipients; provincial or territorial payments for rent or lodging expenses for senior citizens; workers' compensation benefits; veterans' pensions; war veterans' allowances; pensions to widows and dependants of veterans; refunds of Goods and Services Tax (GST) or Harmonized Sales Tax (HST); refundable provincial or territorial tax credits; cash benefits for food, fuel and shelter from social assistance (welfare) programs; cash assistance to persons who are handicapped or disabled; payments received from training programs sponsored by government; regular payments from provincial automobile insurance plans (exclude lump-sum payments).
Do not include: income tax refunds; Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and any provincial or territorial child tax benefits such as: Nova Scotia Child Benefit, New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit and Working Income Supplement, Quebec Family allowance, Ontario Child Supplement for Working Families, Saskatchewan Child benefit or Employment Supplement, Alberta Employment Tax Credit, British Columbia Family Bonus or Earned Income Benefit, Yukon Child Benefit, Northwest Territories Child Benefit and Nunavut Child Benefit.

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Other income
Part (h) -- Dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
Include: the actual (not the taxable) amount of dividends received from Canadian and foreign corporate stocks and mutual funds; interest from deposits in banks, trust companies, co-operatives, credit unions and caisses populaires; interest on savings certificates, guaranteed investment certificates (GICs), Canada Savings Bonds, other government or corporate bonds and debentures or treasury bills; cash dividends and interest from insurance policies; net rents from real estate, including farm land; mortgage and loan interest received; regular income from an estate or trust fund; investment income received from abroad (report in Canadian dollars).
In the case of a joint investment, report only this person's share.
Part (i) -- Retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
Include: pension income or survivor benefits from an employee pension plan; payments received from all annuities, including payments from a matured RRSP in the form of a life annuity, a fixed-term annuity, a RRIF or an income-averaging annuity contract; pensions of retired civil servants, Armed Forces personnel and RCMP officers; annuity payments received from the Canadian Government Annuities Fund or an insurance company.
Do not include: lump-sum benefits; withdrawals from a pension plan or RRSP; refunds of overcontributions.
Report severance pay, retirement allowances, and old age, retirement and war pensions received from foreign sources in part (j).
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Part ( j) -- Other money income
Report in part ( j) any other regular cash income received in 2000 and not covered in parts (a) to (i).
Include: alimony, child support and any periodic support from persons not in the household; non-refundable scholarships, bursaries, fellowships and research grants; severance pay and retirement allowances; royalties; non-investment income from outside Canada (report in Canadian dollars).
Do not include: money received from gambling, lotteries, the sale of property or loan repayments; Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and other provincial or territorial child tax benefits; a cash refund of pension fund contributions; lump-sum death benefits or any other one-time, lump-sum payment; lump-sum inheritance or insurance policy settlements or cash gifts; capital gains or losses; income tax refunds.

Step F: Housing

Questions H1 to H8 provide information for government planners and private developers to develop housing communities and projects. This information contributes to many programs administered under the National Housing Act and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act.
Information on the number of rooms and bedrooms in homes and on housing costs is combined with data on the number of persons in households to assess the economic situation of families in different regions. Provincial and municipal governments use this information to measure levels of crowding within households and to develop appropriate housing programs.
Information on the age of dwellings and their need for repairs is used by municipalities to develop neighborhood improvement programs.

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Question H1 -- Who pays

No further instructions.

Question H2 -- Owned or rented
Mark Owned if you and /or another member of this household own the dwelling in which you live, even if the dwelling is on rented or leased land, or if it is part of a condominium.
Mark Rented in all other cases, even if: the dwelling you occupy is provided without cash rent or at a reduced rent (for example, a minister's residence or superintendent's dwelling in an apartment building); the dwelling is part of a co-operative.

Question H3 -- Number of rooms and bedrooms
Part (a) -- Number of rooms in dwelling
Do not count any half-rooms (for example, instead of 1 1/2, enter either 1 or 2, depending on which best describes the dwelling).
If a room is partially divided by a fixed or movable partition, or has two parts used for different purposes such as an L-shaped living and dining room, count it as two separate rooms.
Part (b) -- Number of bedrooms
Include all rooms designated and furnished as bedrooms and used primarily for sleeping, even if only used occasionally (for example, a spare or guest bedroom).
Do not include any room used for another purpose during the day and as a bedroom at night (for example, a living room that is used as a bedroom at night).
If no rooms are used primarily for sleeping, report zero.
For a one-room dwelling or bachelor apartment, report zero.
Question H4 -- Period when built
To find out the age of the building in which you live: ask the manager or superintendent in condominiums, large apartment blocks, or other rented dwellings; check your home insurance policies and documents about the purchase of the dwelling; if a dwelling was constructed in 1961 and remodelled in 1999, mark the circle 1961-1970, not 1996-2001.

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Question H5 -- Need for repairs
Regular maintenance means the normal activities continually being performed to prevent the dwelling from deteriorating, such as oiling hinges and replacing electrical fuses.
If some part of your dwelling is damaged, defective or not operating properly, mark minor repairs or major repairs. Choose major repairs if your dwelling needs repairs to structures such as walls, floors, ceilings, or needs major replacements such as a new roof or new external siding.
If your dwelling needs both minor and major repairs, mark only major repairs. Do not mark both circles.

Question H6 -- Yearly payments

Parts (a) to (c)
If you have occupied this dwelling for less than a year, estimate and report the yearly amount based on either your payments up to this date or other available information.
For condominium owners, if electricity or other service charges are included in the condominium fee, mark included in rent or other payments.
Part (b)
To estimate the total yearly cost of fuel, find the amount of fuel you consumed during the year (liters of oil, containers of propane gas, cords of wood or tons of coal) and multiply it by the price per unit.

Question H7 -- Monthly rent
Enter the total rent paid by all household members for the dwelling you now occupy.
Include parking fees paid with rent, if any.

Question H8 -- Owner costs
Part (a)
Mortgage payments are sometimes made in other than monthly installments (for example, weekly, every three months, twice a year, or yearly). In such cases, add all the payments made in the last 12 months and divide the total by 12 to obtain the average monthly payment.
Part (b)
If only municipal property taxes, but not school taxes, are included in the regular monthly mortgage payments reported in part (a), mark No in part (b) and report in part (c) the amount of yearly school taxes.
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Part (c)
Property taxes include local improvement taxes, even if they are billed separately.
Part (d)
If this is a single dwelling, report the value of the entire property, including the land and any other detached structure on the property such as a garage.
If this dwelling is in a building that contains several dwellings, or includes both residential and business premises, estimate the portion of the market value that applies only to the dwelling in which you live.
Part (e)
Include as condominiums those dwellings that are in the process of becoming registered condominiums.
Part (f)
Condominium fees are sometimes paid in other than monthly installments. In such a case, add all payments made in the last 12 months and then divide the total by 12 to calculate the average monthly payment.

Step G

Thank you for completing and mailing your census questionnaire.

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