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[page 1]


Ministry of Planning and Investment
Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics - IBGE
Demographic Census 2010

Interviewer's Manual

CD -1.09
Rio de Janeiro
2010

[Obs.: Starting from the second page, the pages are in landscape format with two pages per sheet. The pages in the original file are not numbered. Thus, the count will be done page by page.]

[page 2]

Interviewer's Manual - CD - 01.09 – record of the Census 2010

Interviewer's Identification
Interviewer's Name:
Address:
Interviewer's Phone:
Supervisor's Name:
Supervisor's Phone:
Collection Unit's Address and Phone Number:
ACM's Name:
IBGE Agency:
Agency's Address and Phone:

Training
Date:
Location:
Time:

[page 3]

Introduction to the IBGE

The Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics - IBGE is the main provider of data and information for the country, which intends to meet the needs of different segments of civil society, as well as the interests of the agencies at federal, state and municipal government levels.

IBGE offers the most current and complete overview of the country, through the performance of its core functions:

  • Production, analysis, coordination and consolidation of statistical information;
  • Production, analysis, coordination and consolidation of geographical information;
  • Coordination of the national statistical system, and
  • Participation in the coordination of the national cartographical system.

The IBGE is a federal public institution, affiliated to the Ministry of Planning, Budget and Management and has four offices and two central agencies:

  • Executive Board - DE;
  • Research Board - DPE;
  • Geosciences Directorate - CGD;
  • Department of Computer Sciences - DI;
  • Center for Data Documentation and Distribution - CDDI, and
  • National School of Statistical Sciences - ENCE.
[Obs: the acronyms above match the Portuguese name of the agencies and offices]

[page 4]

In order to cover the entire national territory, the IBGE has a national network of research and distribution, consisting of:

  • 27 State Units (26 in state capitals and one in the Federal District);
  • 27 Branches of Data Documentation and Distribution - (26 in state capitals and one in the Federal District) and
  • 538 Data Collection agencies in major municipalities.

The Demographical Census is the longest and most complex statistical operation that a country can undertake when all households are covered within the national territory, urban and rural areas, and the entire population is counted.

While covering approximately 8 million square kilometers of a heterogeneous and often difficult to access territory, the IBGE will obtain socio- demographic information for all 5,565 Brazilian municipalities, which are available even for smaller areas in big cities.

[page 5]

Dear Interviewer,

This guide is an introduction to the work you will need to do while also serving as your main source of consultation and guidance for the 2010 Census. This manual contains the description of instructions and procedures to be used in the activities related to your work.

For everything to be presented to you as best as possible, teams of technicians and professionals were involved in producing this manual, in order to meet the guidelines necessary for the collection of information.

The manual will be with you throughout the census work, to be consulted, especially on occasions when you cannot readily turn to your supervisor to ask questions. Therefore, it never hurts to observe some precautions:

  • Keep it with care, and ensure its integrity;
  • Read each Thematic Unit, emphasizing the points worthy of special focus. If there is any doubt, write it down to talk with the instructor during classroom training or with your supervisor, and
  • Make notes that you find necessary on the pages that are at the end of your manual.

You should be aware of the concepts presented in this manual because they need to be used at all times, so that the data will be collected with great care and attention. Remember also that you will respond to the Study Guide based on these concepts, as follows: after each group of topics are presented in this manual, there will be an indication referring to exercises on these subjects and their respective pages in the Study Guide. You must fill in the sheet for the Initial Test (Answer Sheet) and deliver it to your instructor during training.

[page 6]

Considering what would be most beneficial, some resources were created to help you study and understand important content.

See below the following.

  • Important! - Will appear whenever any information or relevant concept is presented.
  • What is it? - Is used to present the meaning of terms. These terms will be in bold text in order to underscore its meaning.
  • Did you know? - Is used to display some important detailed information related to the content about the IBGE and/or the 2010 Census.
  • Attention! - Is used to warn you that such information is essential for your preparation, therefore you should take read it carefully. In other words, key concepts will be presented to prepare you.
  • Remember! - It has the task of reviewing the main issues that were studied over a unit so you will not forget them. This section may appear at the end of a set of contents or at the end of each unit.
  • It is your turn! -It is a task for you to resolve may be a challenge and/or activity.
[page 7]
  • Handheld Computer - indicates an explanation for a registration procedure on your handheld device.

The symbols "Important!", "Remember" and "It is your turn!" appear with certain animated characters. In addition to these characters you will find others throughout the study. They will appear illustrating situations, with questions and dialogues directed to you.

And why characters?

The characters were created to represent the diversity of Brazilian physical types to bring you closer to that reality, the reality of a diverse Brazil.

[Figure of an interviewer]

This manual will be your "important guide", offering clear and accurate guidelines that should be implemented while collecting data. Take good care of it!
Enjoy your studies!

[Obs.: Starting from the eighth page, the pages are in landscape format with two pages per sheet and are numbered]

[page 8]

[table of contents omitted]

[page 11]

Unit I - Getting to Know the IBGE and the Demographic Census

The Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics - IBGE is the coordinating body and producer of statistical and geographical information of Brazil, being the main data provider of our country

In order to accomplish successful work the IBGE has a well-defined mission:

MISSION
Represent Brazil in necessary informative terms that identify its reality and its citizenship.

IBGE, among its many activities and research, offers an up to date complete perspective of Brazil:

  • It identifies, analyzes and maps the territory;
  • It counts the population;
  • It shows how the economy develops through citizens' labor and production, and
  • It reveals citizen's living conditions.

One of the fieldwork activities that the IBGE administers is the Demographic Census. The Demographic Census collects information essential to the definition of federal, state and local governmental policies, and for budgeting purposes either coming from the private sector or from any governmental level.

[page 12]

What is the Demographic Census?

The Demographic Census is the process of counting and obtaining detailed information about the population of a country.

Almost all countries have a regular census, counting their population every decade, obtaining information such as (sex, age, color, religion, migration, education, work, etc.), and knowing in detail the living conditions of its population and the level of socioeconomic development, as well as a comprehensive perspective of the national reality.

The results of the Census are used, among other goals, to make decisions that affect every municipality, every state, and the whole country at large.

The government (federal, state and municipal), corporations, universities, research centers, community organizations and associations are among the many groups who use the Census information to propose and define public policy and to plan services that benefit the entire population.

The results of the Census are used primarily to:

  • Provide calculations that define the financial resources to be transferred from the federal government to each state and each municipality;
  • Determine the political representation of states in Congress;
  • Know the structure of the labor force in each municipality, and
  • Support public policies in health, education and housing, determining, for example, where hospitals, health centers, schools and housing are needed.


[page 13]

Brazil has been administering its own population censuses, since 1872.

The first censuses, conducted from 1872 to 1900, were primarily concerned with population estimates. However, since the 1920 Census questions about disabilities and income among others were incorporated.

The IBGE was founded in 1936, which became an entity responsible for conducting population censuses in the country.

The decennial censuses since 1940, have allowed a continuous process of improvement that has provided greater clarity to the picture of Brazil.

Further research as well as the inclusion of new topics of interest in the country, has been a constant factor in the census operations. On the other hand, the permanent search for improvement in data quality and the speed at which the results are offered to society can also be seen throughout the Census. Thus, in the 2000 Census, the IBGE, using scanners to read tags and characters, was able to perform the data entry stage in about 100 days, which allowed subsequent progress on critical tasks, coding, tabulation and analysis, culminating with all data reported in several publications, including the volume containing all the methodology of operation, between the years 2000 to 2003.

Each census reflects the national reality in the social and economic levels and the territorial occupation at a given moment in time. Recording the development of specific stages in the country while allowing that nowadays in the XXI Century, several comparative studies could be performed from those results.

[page 14]

What has changed?
From 1872 to 2010

In order to see the changes, the timeline below shows some of the developments of the censuses performed over the years, note that not all years had censuses. In Brazil, censuses were conducted in the following years: 1872, 1890, 1900, 1920, 1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1991 and 2000.

[Timeline begins]
1872 - 1st General Census of the Country, manual counting.
1890 - 2nd General Census of the Country.
1920 - The use of separating and tabulating machines.
1940 - The first census administered by the IBGE.
1960 - The use of sampling technique and computers.
2000 - Entry of data through scanners for reading marks and characters.
2010 - Use of handheld computer data collection and computerization of collection points
[End of time line]

Did you know?
In census surveys, the handheld computer was first used in Brazil in the 2007 Agricultural Census and Population Estimates. It was not until 2000 that paper questionnaire were used.

So, how will the 2010 Census be?

In 2010, the IBGE will hold its XII Demographic Census. It will be a full-length illustration of the country, containing the population's profile and the household's characteristics. In essence, the census will tell us how we are, how many we are and how do we live.

The inquiries to be investigated in the 2010 Census are the results of extensive consultations and discussions of representatives of the Brazilian society, technical and governmental agencies, in which the IBGE serves as the moderator of this process.

[page 15]

All the data collected and statistical work will show the following information of the Brazilian reality:

  • The size and composition of the population;
  • Housing situation;
  • General characteristics of the population;
  • Migration movement;
  • Levels of education;
  • Marriage;
  • Fertility;
  • Workforce;
  • Patterns of individual and household income, and
  • Mortality.

The results of the Census will answer to fundamental questions such as:

  • What is the country's total population by sex and age and how is it distributed throughout the national territory?
  • What is the life expectancy of the population in the country?
  • What is the estimate of Brazilians living outside the country?
  • What is the average number of children a woman could have during her fertile years?
  • What is the population's living condition (i.e. housing)?
  • What is the population's estimate with access to basic sanitation?
  • What is the population's level of education?


[page 16]

  • What are the working conditions and income of the population?


The 2010 Census will have two primary working stages: Pre-collection and data collection.

The pre-collection consist in the first fieldwork survey, which aims mainly to update the maps and the national register of addresses in order to prepare a more accurate sampling for the Census data.

The Data Collection is the survey of all households, establishments and buildings under construction, also including a census of all residents - the start date is from July 31 to August 1, 2010 - with the implementation of the respective questionnaires.
What methodology is used in collecting data?

The information from the survey will be collected by the interviewer recording the responses on a handheld computer or by completing the questionnaire via Internet.

The data collection will use two distinct models of questionnaires: The Basic or Sample questionnaires, used in all households within the national territory.

The 2010 Census is a major statistical enterprise, mobilizing thousands of people from the planning phase to the distribution of results. Some Census data show the complexity of the enterprise: surveying about 200 million people in approximately 60 million households located in 5,565 municipalities. About 230,000 people will be hired temporarily for the pre-collection stage, data collection stage, supervision, administrative support, data processing and the verification of results.

[page 17]

Unit II - The role of the Interviewer in the Demographic Census 2010

In Unit I, you have learned about the history of the IBGE and gained an understanding of how the Census is important for Brazil.

In Unit II, you will learn about the main duties you have to do as an interviewer and the description of the tools you will use to carry out your work. Also you will learn about the other professionals that will work with you in the census operation and the local support of the entire team.

How is the work of a 2010 Census interviewer?

The work of the interviewer is basically going to a certain area of a municipality, to conduct the survey at all addresses (including households, businesses and buildings under construction) and interview its residents.

After training, you will choose the working area where you will perform data collection in the municipality and will receive a map. First, it should be done prior recognition of this area, i.e., you will recognize the streets and the area's boundaries, to give reality to the map.

Once you know the area, you will start your fieldwork, visiting all addresses and conducting interviews to obtain information about the characteristics of households and population.

[page 18]

The main responsibilities of a 2010 Census interviewer are as follows:

  • Get a previous knowledge of your fieldwork area accompanied by your supervisor;
  • Fully respect the limits of your working area;
  • Record all existing units on your working area;
  • Conduct interviews strictly following the instructions for completing the basic or sample questionnaires;
  • Record all the residents of occupied households in your working area;
  • Communicate your supervisor any problems while performing the work;
  • Consult the diverse collection of monitoring reports on your handheld and remedy any pending issues recorded;
  • Monitor and take action on the closed units and households recorded as pending type and any pending questionnaires;
  • Properly use your handheld and ensure its conservation;
  • Transfer the information stored on your handheld to the laptop's Collection Units at least twice a week, and
  • Backup and save the information collected every day.


[page 19]

Collection Tools

In order to perform your task of collecting data adequately, you will have access to three data collection tools:

Interviewer's Manual

The manual is the interviewer's guide. The manual contains the concepts, definitions, procedures and instructions necessary for you to perform your activities and register the information.

Map and Sector Description

The map and sector description are in printed form to guide the interviewer in the fieldwork area, graphically showing the entire surveyed area and the description of its boundaries.

Handheld Computer

This is a device that will provide you the application to register, collect and store the information gathered.
It contains:

  • Sector Map: a graphical representation of the sector in your handheld computer.
  • Address List: the list contains all information concerning the addresses of the units previously visited in the pre-collection, belonging to the working area.
  • Basic Questionnaire: contains fewer items, such as household characteristics and of its residents in the specific date, and is applied in most of the national territory.
  • Sample Questionnaire: contains more questions, such as the household characteristics and its residents in the specific date, and will be applied only in selected households chosen in the sample.


[page 20]

  • Collective Household Form: is the tool for recording the household identified data and lists the various units of collective households with residents.
  • Monitoring Reports: this is a summary of listed collected information and questionnaires with pending issues.
Attention!
There will be sectors that are not available in the Sector Map and Addresses' List on your handheld computer. However, later you will be instructed how to proceed in those situations.

Collection Posts
As you know, you will be conducting fieldwork, collecting the census data. However, you will have a common place where you should go often: The Collection Post.
The Collection Post is a work unit bound to a cluster of census sectors of a municipality. It serves as the headquarters of the census team and is the place in which the information collected is stored.

[page 21]

See what André says about the Collection Posts:

[Figure of an interviewer]
[The character speaks]

During data collection, we must go to the Collection Post at least twice a week, on a time scheduled with our Supervisor. During these visits you will transfer the collected data from your, handheld computer to the system of the Collection Post, which will be subsequently transmitted to the Central Collecting Data from IBGE.

Important!
It is essential that the frequency of attendance to the Collection Post for data transfer is respected, because this procedure helps guarantee that there will be no loss of data and, consequently, extra work for the data collector, causing delays in the time of the Census.

You should also go to the Collection Post if you have questions or concerns about any procedure or concept used in the Census. There, you can always count on an ACS (Census Supervisor Agent) and/or ACM (Census Municipal Agent). These professionals will be present in your day-to-day work.

The ACS is the Supervisor of the team of interviewers you are a part of. The supervisor will be your main support during your work in the Census. For example: if you are concerned with the limits of your census sector while in the fieldwork you should refer primarily to him/her.

[page 22]

[Figure of André, the interviewer, and Luiza, a woman, who is the supervisor]

The interviewer André, for example, has Luiza as his supervisor.

This supervisor will help you and other interviewers in regards to the tools, support and instructions you need to use during your fieldwork. During your fieldwork, you will be monitored and evaluated by your supervisor. This assessment will be done via computerized systems designed specifically to indicate possible inconsistencies in the data and to issue requests for supervision. In these requests, the Supervisor will check the coverage of the route and interviews, in order to compare the data collected by you. If there is any indication of inconsistencies in the data, s/he may ask you to return to the area to confirm some information or redo some interviews.

It is important that you know that some tasks, even performed on your interviewer's handheld computer, will be administered by the ACM or the ACS:

  • Restore backup;
  • Reopen the Sector;
  • Transfer questionnaires in the sector;
  • Stop Sector in progress, and
  • Move Sector paralyzed to progress.


[page 23]

The Supervisor will also monitor your production, as well as measures taken by you, in order to resolve pending issues in the reports. The supervisor will ensure that everything is done within the deadline.

The ACM is the manager of the Collection Post to which you and your supervisor will be linked. Some of the ACM's main duties are:

  • Hire interviewers and take necessary measures for the renewal of contracts;
  • Coordinate all activities in your census area, following technical, operational, administrative and data processing instructions established in manuals and current standards;
  • Oversee the work of supervisors and interviewers in their municipalities and areas, keeping the team up to date on procedures and regulations, and
  • Oversee the progress and timing of the work and the quality of data collected.

You will work directly with the ACM and the Supervisor. However, there are other professionals involved in the census operation of their municipality, these are: Area Coordinator and Sub Area Coordinator/Regional Census Agent.

The Area Coordinator is responsible for carrying out the census operation, in all its aspects, of a group of municipalities within the state.

The Sub Area Coordinator/Regional Census Agent is responsible for the execution of the census operation of a subset of states or parts of a large municipality in an area.

[page 24]

Organizational Chart of the State Units for the Census Operation

[Chart that contains the organizational structure of Census operation. Including all the different components of the Census]

[Animated Character: reminds reader to take note of key words]

[page 25]

Unit III - Learning the Fundamental Concepts for the 2010 Census

In this unit, we will see the fundamental concepts necessary for you to do your job.
Many of the concepts are part of everyday life for us all, interviewers or not, for example: address, resident, street, household. Other concepts will be new for you. All the concepts, well known or new, will be very important for you to do your job correctly.

Brazil's Political Division

To begin, let's recall some facts about our country. Politically, Brazil is divided into territorial units, as described below:

Federative Units - are the states, created by federal law, and the Federal District;

Municipalities - divide the states into smaller areas, created by state legislation;

Districts - divide the municipalities into smaller areas, created by municipal legislation. Every municipality has at least one district;

Subdistricts - divide the districts into smaller units, created by municipal legislation. Subdistricts are usually established only in some major cities in order to subdivide districts with large populations or extension.


[page 26]

The map below shows all units and the total number of each one in the country:

[MAP OF BRAZIL]

UF - Federal Units - 27
Municipalities - 5565
Districts - 10138
Subdistricts - 489


Additionally, the territory of each municipality is separated into two distinct areas defined by municipal law:

  • Urban area - is the area within the urban perimeter of a municipality or village. For cities or towns where there is no legislation to regulate such areas, an urban area is established for the purpose of collecting census data, which limits are approved by the local Mayor and
  • Rural area- is the area outside the municipality limits. Some municipalities do not have a rural area, therefore, are fully urban.

In the census operation, the Brazilian territorial units are maintained. However, to facilitate census collection, the IBGE subdivides these units into even smaller areas called Census Sectors.

[page 27]

Census Sector
The Census Sector is the database control unit formed by a continuous area, contained in urban or rural area, which size, number of households and establishments allow the interviewer to perform his activities in a given period, following the schedule of activities.

The census sector is the working area of the interviewer.

Take a look at an example of the census sector below:

[Animated character represents a map of a census sector]

[page 28]

Each census sector meets all legally defined boundaries, i.e. a sector is always fully contained within a single municipality, a single district, subdistrict and unique situation (urban or rural).
All the census tracts are represented graphically via the Sector Map.

What is it?
What is the Sector Map?

The Sector Map is a graphical representation of the geographic area to be surveyed, aiding the interviewer to locate specific areas during the fieldwork.

You will receive from your Supervisor, a sector map, on paper, describing the geographical boundaries of the census area; you may also consult a version of the map stored on your handheld device.

To perform your work correctly, you will have to frequently refer to the paper map of your sector. But this requires that you familiarize yourself with this map.
First, consider that a map is always a very simplified model of reality. To produce a map, it is necessary to leave out many details. However, despite the simplicity, a good map can help you greatly in your work. See figures on next page, notice this simplification.

[page 29]

Picture of a sector where one can identify streets, trees and building details.

[Satellite image of a sector]

[page 30]

[Sketch that shows the census sector]

Map of the same sector only showing the streets.

[page 31]

As you saw in the previous image, the Sector map that you will receive is a simplified representation of reality. To carry out your work, it is essential that you can easily identify your position on the map and make sure that is within the limits of the sector. To do this, you need to correctly interpret your map. That is, you need to:

  • Recognize the public areas that are part of it;
  • Identify the boundaries of the sector, through its description, and
  • Identify any topographical features that may exist.

Look carefully over the next few pages, as it is the description of the perimeter of the sector map that you will use:

[page 32]

[Figure: Three forms that describe the perimeter of the sector]

Model of the perimeter of the sector.

[page 33]

[Figure of urban map]

Example Map of Urban Sector

[page 34]

As you can see the map contains:

  • The census sector number;
  • The street addresses;
  • The blocks and sidewalks, and
  • The limits of the sector and its description.

Let's get to know each of these elements.

Census Sector Number

In order to identify and distinguish between Census Sectors, each one receives its' own number.
The Census Sector number is the mark to identify it in relation to other sectors. The number is intended to represent specific data about the census sector: such as its state, municipality, district, subdistrict and sector. See the table below, as an example of the sector number:

State Municipality District Subdistrict Sector
15 07003 05 00 0001

Besides having the corresponding numbers in each map, this numbering also appears in the upper right corner of the Perimeter Description of the Sector, as you will see later on.

[page 35]

Public Area

[Figure that illustrates a person in a public area singing a song from Caetano Veloso, a Brazilian artist]

Do you know the song "Sampa," of the singer and composer Caetano Veloso? The song contains some verses that mention two famous avenues in the municipality of São Paulo: Avenida Ipiranga and Avenida São João. These avenues are considered public areas, as are streets, bridges, squares, and alleys. In other words, public areas are spaces of open circulation for people, vehicles and other commodities, recognized by the community and, in most cases, associated with a well-known name.

[page 36]

Important!
For IBGE surveys the official name of the street, recognized by the Municipality must be used. For example, in Rio de Janeiro, Avenida Dom Helder Camara (official name) is best known as Suburban Avenue, the former name of this street.
And in your municipality? Are there streets that have this phenomenon?

A public place can be formed by up to three components:

Type - indicates the nature of the construction of the public area. For example: street, avenue, lane, square, etc.;
Title - indicates the patent, profession, and the title of nobility of the honored. For example: Professor, General, Baron, etc.;
Name - describes the essential name of the public place. However, it should be noted that there are also the public areas without names - that should be represented by the term UNNAMED.
Did you know?
Avenida Ipiranga and Avenida São João are official names of public areas.


Look carefully at the examples of public areas in the following table:

[page 37]

Examples | Type | Title | Name
Rua General Canabarro | Street | General | Canabarro
Avenida Brasil | Avenue | [left blank] | Brasil
Travessa Santa Rosa | Lane | Santa | Rosa
Rua Pintor Jordão de Oliveira | Street | Painter | Jordão de Oliveira

Blocks and Sides
A Block is usually a rectangular piece of a well-defined urban area or rural village with open or closed sides bounded by streets and/or roads. However, it can be irregularly shaped and is sometimes constrained by factors such as railroads, waterways, or slopes. In some places the block is called a "quarteirao".

A side refers to each side of the block, whether or not it contains households or establishments.
Below is an example of a block with four sides.

[image that depicts a block with four sides]

[page 38]

The figure of the previous page is an example of a closed block.
The block shall be considered open when it is missing one or more sides that would otherwise enclose its borders.

Sector limits and their descriptions.

The sector map will be accompanied by a Description of the Sector Perimeter, i.e., a text that defines the limits of your work area: the sector perimeter. Therefore, the sector map and the description of its boundaries define the census sector where you will operate.

What is it?

The Description of the Perimeter of the Census Sector is the relationship of natural or artificial topographical features, listed sequentially, that defines the imaginary line around the sector's boundary area.

[Figure that exemplifies the description of the perimeter of the census sectors]

[page 39]

Important!

Always be aware of the limits of your census sector;

These limits were defined, preferably, for having stable reference points and easy identification. That way, interviewers are to avoid making errors such as, the collection of data in a sector assigned to another interviewer or failure to complete the collection of data in the entire area under his/her responsibility.

[Figure of an interviewer]
[The interviewer speaks:]

Remember!
The boundaries of the Sector, may never for any reason, be changed by the interviewer.
[end of speech]

In some situations, the actual features of the sector may have been modified after preparing the map and the pre-collection phase, for example: name changes of public sites, appearance and disappearance of sides or entire blocks. If during your fieldwork you identify any modification, it is essential that you indicate it on the paper map and communicate the change with your Supervisor.

The sectors are defined taking into account two criteria: the number of existing units built within a sector and the extension of its territory. Thus, very densely populated areas in a sector can be restricted to a few blocks, to a single block or even a single building. This is true as in the case of residential buildings with large amounts of units.

[page 40]

In less densely populated areas, the sector may have fewer units spread farther apart that may limit the possible range that a single interviewer can cover.

It's your turn!

[This section presents a figure with a map as an exercise for the interviewer]

In order for you to evaluate your level of comfortability using the sector map, study the map below for a moment and respond to the following questions.

[page 41]

[Continuation of the exercise (questions based on the map) for the interviewer]

1. According to the map, is Rua Regente Braulio completely contained within sector 0002? What about Travessa do Portinho?
2. Is the address Rua Sete de Setembro #52 within sector 0002? What about Rua das Crioulas #127?
3. Is the Banco Bradesco contained within sector 0002? What about Mercado Central?
Now, identify the limits of the sector starting at the point indicated by the arrow and following it in a clockwise direction.
[page 42]

Address

Now that you know how to interpret the map and its elements, we will learn a concept that is central to the implementation of your work:

The Address and its components.

Pay attention to all the information about the address, as addresses will be registered on your handheld computer during the data collection you will do in your assigned area.

The address is a text that adequately identifies, within a municipality, a built unit, such as a house, a building, an apartment, an establishment, etc. The address has several components: number, modifier, landmark (point of reference), complement, neighborhood and postal code.

See the following example:

Street/Public Area | Number | Landmark | Neighborhood | Postal Code
Clarisse Lispector St.| 16| 2nd house, at the end| Felicidade Neighborhood| 22222-222

Obviously, you already know most of these components, since your own address contains some of them. However, for your Census work, it is important to understand each of these components in more detail. Previously, you have learned that a street is a public area where people, vehicles and other commodities, circulate, and it is recognized by the community and, most often it is associated with a well-known name, or title.

[page 43]
In case you cannot properly define a public area by its address, consider the name of the farm or the name of the village (hamlet, village, town, etc.) as a public area, for example:

Street/Public Area | Number |Landmark
Farm St. Benedict | N/A | Third house on the right side of St. Benedict's Church.


Number and modifier

Number is the numeric value that indicates the position of the building along the street. A modifier, which may exist or not, is associated with the number providing distinctive information in case of a repeated number. The modifier is always marked in alphabetical order.

i.e.: Avenida Brasil (Street) 1367 (Number) B (Modifier)


In the example above, we have information on the number: 1367 B , which is used to indicate the relative position of a unit on Avenida Brazil. The modifier is a sequential field and may include numbers, or letters. In the latter case, the letter accompanying the number is called a modifier. The modifier is found, for example, in shops belonging to a single building subdivided into stores.

But how do you know what is the number on the street?

You can obtain the number of the street usually in a nameplate, or in other visual public information or by asking the interviewees. The existence of identity is the visual record of the number, regardless of the quality of its material. That is, even nameplates or a visual record made with ink, chalk or charcoal should be taken into account for the census operation.

[page 44]

The identification (nameplate or visual record) can be located on a wall, gate or on an internal wall, as long as it can be seen from the outside. Thus, in case of apartments or houses in the back, just consider the numbering of the access unit.

The identification number of an address can be:

  • A single unit - if the unit has more than one number, consider the first number listed in the order of the route;
  • A group of houses in private compounds or condominiums, and the complement for each of its units ;
  • A single number for the establishment consisting of several buildings such as a quarter, factory, hospital, etc.;
  • The number of the main entrance of the buildings occupying a full block comprising various units, and
  • A single number for apartment buildings or houses, with the complement for each of its units.

In the case of rural areas, where there is no numbering, it should be recorded some sort of identification of listed households. For example, in the 35th km of a highway, record the number and 35 km in the modifier.
When there are no official numbers, and identification is found in a public agency, such as 157 FUNASA, use this identification, considering the number: 157 and the modifier such as: FUNASA.

In units that do not have numbers and when the address is located in shelters, tents, vehicles, etc., the modifier SN (without numbering), however a point of reference to the place should be recorded to facilitate an identification of the unit.
And what is a Point of Reference?

[page 45]

Point of Reference

The point of reference is descriptive information often used to identify a visited unit when it is not possible to appropriately register an address. It occurs mainly in rural areas and in subnormal agglomerates in urban areas.

Example: The first house after the Pedra Linda River Bridge


Complement: element and value

Let's review the previous example, noting the additional information.

Avenida Brasil (street), 1367 B (number and modifier), store 3 (complement)

You are already able to identify the address and the number (in this case, with the identifier). The new element - store 3 - is what we call complement.

Usually, when arriving at an address, we observe the number and if there are several units that are in the same building or associated to the number we must identify them. The complement is used to correctly identify each unit in that building.

Examples of complement include: block, apartment, house, backyard, loft, etc.

[page 46]

Generally, the complement is formed by an element and a value. Look at the example:

Rua Castro Pimentel, 374, House 1 (element), backyard (value).


In other words:

The element is the type of complement that indicates if it refers to a house, a main entrance, a block, etc.

The value may or not exist and will be either shown in numbers or letters. The letters or numbers are the value assigned to the element.


[page 47]

[Tables with examples of element and value, omitted]

[page 48]

Neighborhood

Neighborhood is the place or region of streets where you find an address. In the urban areas, a neighborhood can be a borough, whereas in rural areas it could be the municipality or region where you find the address.

[Tables with examples of the type of areas, omitted]

Postal Code

The Postal Code is a set of records used by Brazilian Postal Services - ECT. It may correspond to the whole municipality, when in areas of low-demand. In highly populated areas, the postal code might be related to a neighborhood, an address, part of an address or, in more specific cases, to a single building -- the special postal code. In urban sectors divided into city blocks, each street or block might have its own postal code.

[page 49]

It's your turn!

[Picture of a house which displays also the address, postal code, number and complement]

In the picture, the house's street is Rua São Fidélis. Look at the picture and identify the different components of the address: the number, the modifier and the complement- if any:

Type:
Title:
Name:
Number:
Modifier:
Complement:


[page 50]

[Review of concepts, omitted]

[page 51]

Now that you learned about some concepts, go to your study guide and carefully solve exercises 1 to 8. If you need to review the content please refer back to the information in this manual.

Now that you know the different components of an address and how to identify them correctly, it is crucial to continue learning new concepts that will help you perform your job accurately in the 2010 Census.

Date of Reference

You should not forget the Date of Reference for the 2010 Demographic Census: from the night of July 31st to August 1st, 2010.

Resident
A resident is the person who:

a) Habitually resides in the household and was there on the date of reference.
b) Habitually resides in the household, even if absent for no more than 12 months, on the date of reference due to the following reasons:
- Leisure, business, study abroad, etc.;
- Education or institutional internship, boarding school, student's dorm: to facilitate school attendance during the school year.


[page 52]

- Detention without final judgment declared;
- Temporary hospitalization in a clinic or similar establishment, and
- Boarding service (military, oil fieldworkers).


Attention!

In all of these situations it is important to double check that the absence has not been for more than 12 months, considering the amount of time no later than the date of reference -- the night of July 31st to August 1st, 2010.

Regardless of the period of absence from the household, the person will be considered as a resident of the household where he/she was present on the date of reference in the following situations:

- Permanently admitted in a mental health facility, nursing home, convent or similar establishment;
- Residing in a boarding school and had no other regular place of residence;
- In prison serving a declared sentence, and
- Migrated to other regions in search of work, and settled there.


Important!

A domestic worker, doctor, nurse, military, construction worker, seasonal farm-worker or any other professional who is on the date of reference in his/her workplace for convenience or obligation will have to be counted in his/her regular place of residence.

[page 53]

And who needs to be interviewed?

All people who lived in the household on the date of reference - night from July 31st to August 1st, 2010.

According to the following criteria:

- People who were born after July 31st, 2010 will not be counted, that is, they are excluded from the Demographic Census, 2010.
- People who died after July 31st, 2010 should be counted, since they were part of the household on the date of reference and, therefore, they should be included in the Demographic Census, 2010.


Another possibility is that a person might reside in two or more residences. What should you do in this case?

It will be necessary that you inquire, with the interviewee, which was his/her main residence on the reference date, since he/she cannot be considered as a resident in two households at the same time.

But what is the criterion to determine the main residence?

Do the following, in the order provided:

- ask the interviewee to indicate his/her main residence (primary residence);
- if the interviewee is not able to indicate it, then he/she should be considered as a resident of the household where he/she stays for the most part of the year;
- if the person lives in two residences for equal periods of time during the year, he/she should be considered as a resident in the household that was owned for longest time.


The residence that was not considered as the main one should be registered as Household of Occasional Use.

[page 54]

Type of Unit Visited

In your daily work routine, you may find in the registered addresses, three types of buildings:

- Those exclusively made up of residential units;
- Those exclusively made up of establishments;
- Mixed residences and establishments.


The type of unit characterizes the main use of the address.

The types of units visited can generally be classified as:

- Household - a building constructed for the purpose of housing residents;
- Establishment - building not intended for housing residents;
[page 55]
Let's examine the types of units in detail :

Domicile
[picture with Cora Coralina's excerpt]

The previous excerpt is from the poet and storyteller Cora Coralina from the state of Goias. It refers to the house in which she lived for most of her life. In this place, the writer describes her household, built of "stone, logs and clay".

Similarly, to complete your task, you should understand the details about the household characterization, its concepts and categories. Let's learn about them.

Did you know?

According to the 2000 Census, there were, in Brazil, approximately 54 million households.

[page 56]

A Household is a place with the intended purpose of residence or dwelling. Most people live in an apartment or a house, but you can find a household in a place apparently not intended for people to live: a room in a building that is exclusively commercial or in the back of a shop or factory, for example.

Therefore, the identification of a household will depend on the accurate application of the concept. As you can see:

A Household is a structurally separated and independent location intended for housing one or more people, or a place being used as such.

The essential criteria for defining the existence of more than one residence on the same property or land are those of separation and independence.

See the characteristics of each:

Separation: This criterion is determined when the household is limited by walls, fences or other enclosure and is covered by a roof. This allows people who reside in it to be isolated from others to sleep, prepare and/or consume their food and protect themselves from the environment, paying for all or part of their food or housing expenses.

Independence: This criterion is determined when the residence has direct access that allows its residents to enter and exit without going through main areas of a household of other people.


[page 57]

You can only determine the existence of two or more households when both criteria: separation and independence are determined, which should be applied to households located in the same property or piece of land.

The rooms provided with separate entrance and adjacent buildings to the main, used by people in the household, including domestic servants, should be considered integral parts of the household provided that it is not characterized by the criterion of separation.

Attention!
Always check the existence of other households within the same property, at the backyard of the property, as well as concierge or caretaker residences and other dwellings in the basements of apartment buildings and in vacation homes.

[PAGES 58-59]
It's your turn!

[Exercise for the interviewer with a matching terms of examples of households to determine how many of them can be in a single property]

[page 60]

Now that you can identify the existence of one or more households, a property or piece of land based on the criteria of separation and independence, it is important that you know how to characterize them.
Households can be individual or collective. Also, there are sub classifications. Check it out below!

[Organizational chart of the classifications of households]

[page 61]

Private HouseholdThis is the residence where the relationship between the occupants is dictated by kinship, dependency or domestic standards of living.
The Private Residences can be classified as: permanent or improvised. Notice!

Permanent Private Household
It is the household that was built to serve exclusively for housing as of the date of reference, and was intended to serve as housing for one or more people.

Attention!
Remember, the date of reference for the Census is from the night of July 31, 2010 to August 1, 2010.

The apartments in buildings or live-in hotels and housing in tenements, rooming houses, hallways, etc., Should be considered as permanent private households.

Institutional settings - such as hospitals, asylums, monasteries, barracks, schools, prisons and related places - should be considered private permanent households, for those located in independent buildings and during the date of reference, were occupied by:

  • Families whose members, one or more, were employees or owners of the establishment;
  • Families whose members, one or more, were part of the institution or not, as in rehabilitation centers;
  • Families whose members, one or more, whether or not they were part of institutions or military zones.
[page 62]

For permanent private households, we have the following types:

  • Occupied;
  • Closed;
  • Occasional use;
  • Vacant.

See each type in detail and make sure you know the differences between them.

Permanent Occupied Private Household

It is the permanent household that, on the date of reference, was occupied by residents and where the interview was conducted. In a permanent occupied household, the relationship between the occupants is dictated by kinship, domestic dependence or rules of coexistence.

[page 63]

Learn about the different types of permanent occupied household :

House
It is a building with direct access to a street ( avenue, road, pathway, etc.), legalized or not, regardless of the material used in its construction. Consider the house as a building with one or more paved floors that is occupied entirely by a single household.

Town house or condominum
A Town house is the domicile located in the house that forms part of a group of houses with unique access to a public space. In a townhouse, the houses are grouped together, and sometimes detached from each other. Each has a door that identifies its unique designation. For example: Rua das Acacias, 34, House 2 - Villa Helena.

A Condo is the house that is part of a residential gouping consisting of common use spaces (such as recreation areas, playgrounds, courtyards, sports facilities, etc.). Condos are typically separated from each other, each having a door with a specific identification or number. For example: Avenida das Americas, 7000 - Condo 21.
[page 64]
Apartment
It is the private household located in a building with one or more floors, with more than one residence and public spaces (lobby, stairs, corridors, reception or other dependencies). Also apartments are considered households when they are located in buildings with two or more floors in which the other units are non-residential, and also those located in buildings of two or more floors with separate floor entrances.

Housing in rooming houses, tenements or "hallways"

It is a multi-family dwelling unit, i.e. where several different families reside with the following characteristics:
  • Common use of water and sanitary facilities (bathroom, kitchen, water tank, etc.).
  • Use of the same environment for various functions (sleeping, cooking, eating, working, etc.).
  • Several households (private households) built on urban lots or subdivisions of households in the same building, usually leased, or transferred without formal lease agreement.
[page 65]
Hut or Shack

Indigenous Brazilian dwellings with rustic characteristics, which can be simple and without walls; small, made from tree branches and covered with straw or leaves; or a large hut made of bamboo and tree trunks, covered with straw or dry palms, used as housing for various Indigenous Brazilian families.
Attention!
The terms, Hut or Shack, shall only be applied in indigenous lands and should be considered as permanent households. No indigenous housing (hut or shack) should be considered as an Improvised Household.


[page 66]

Closed Permanent Private Household
Is the permanent household which was occupied on the reference date, but it was not possible to conduct the interview at the time of the Census visit, since its residents were absent.

In such cases, you, the interviewer, should report to a neighbor to double check if the absence is only during the day because of work and/or study, or if residents are temporarily absent for reasons of vacation, business trip to relatives, admission to hospital, etc.

You should also try to find an hour or day to find a qualified resident to provide information on all residents. Make periodic visits to the household until the end of the collection time in order to check if someone already returned, and then conduct the interview.

When the tenant is found and it is possible to conduct the interview, delete the type Closed Permanent Private Household and include the type Occupied Permanent Private Household.

[page 67]

When you finish the census sector, the Permanent Private Households in which the residents could not be reached throughout the collection period should be classified as Closed Permanent Private Household.

Permanent Private Household for Occasional Use

This is the Permanent Private Household which served as casual housing on the reference date, i.e., the domicile was used for rest on weekends, holidays or otherwise, even if, on the reference date, its occasional occupants were present.

A Household should also be considered as of Occasional Use, if the household is not considered as primary, given that when the respondent declared that he/she lives in two households.

Vacant Permanent Private Household

This is a Permanent Private Household that had no resident on the reference date.
Examples: buildings that were on sale or for rent without residents on the reference date.

[page 68]

Attention!
Even if the household has been occupied during the data collection time, the prevailing condition of Vacant Permanent Private Household is defined with respect to the reference date.

We have learned all the types of Permanent Private Households, now you will learn about Occupied Private Improvised Households

Occupied Private Improvised Households
This type of household is located in a building that has no spaces intended solely for housing (i.e. inside a bar), as well as inappropriate locations for housing and that were occupied by residents on the date of reference.

[page 69]

Also in Improvised Occupied Private Households, the relationship between the occupants is dictated by kinship, domestic dependence or rules of coexistence.
The following are considered inappropriate locations for housing:

  • Rustic buildings in rural areas that are not intended to be used as housing, such as storerooms, stables, rain shelters, etc.;
  • Buildings attached to the principal residence for the storage of vehicles, animals and tools;
  • The buildings located on public streets or squares, such as newspaper stands and kiosks for the sale of food, cigarettes, drinks, etc.;
  • Tents, trailers, caves, etc.
  • Buildings under construction in ruins, demolition, etc.
Attention!
Abandoned buildings that were invaded and occupied by residents will also be considered as Improvised Occupied Private Households when the interview is conducted.
The types of Improvised Occupied Private Residence are:

  • Tents or lean-to shelters made of canvas, nylon or similar materials for lightweight construction and easily removable;
  • Inside of a store - a space not intended for housing or simply an accommodation (bed or mattress) within an establishment, and
[page 70]
  • Other (car, trailer, cave, barn, building under construction, warehouse etc.), any dependency whose purpose is not to provide a living space, but is serving as such.
Collective Household
This is an institution or establishment in which the relationship between people, on the reference date, was restricted to the norms of administrative subordination. It may be with or without residents.

There are two types of Collective Households:

  • Collective Household with resident, and
  • Collective Household without resident.

Collective household types are:

  • Nursing homes, orphanages, convents and related facilities;
  • Hotels, motels, campsites, guesthouses and related;
  • Accommodations for workers or student dorms;
  • Prison, penitentiaries or detention facilities, and
  • Other (barracks, military hospitals and clinics – with hospitalization), etc.

[page 71]

[Review of concepts, omitted]

[page 73]

Establishment

You already know how to identify the types of resident and define who the household residents are.

Now look at the illustration below and think about how you would classify the units represented in it.
[Figure showing different establishments]

These units are classified as establishments, for example they are buildings used for purposes other than housing, such as schools, commercial buildings, etc.

[page 74]

Observe the diagram below and see how establishments are classified:

[Figure showing the classification of establishments]

Let's see what the characteristics of each type of establishment are:

1. Agricultural establishment
This is a production unit, that regardless of its size, legal status or location (urban or rural area), is devoted entirely or partly to agricultural activities, livestock, forestry and aquaculture activities.

In order to be considered as an agricultural establishment, it is necessary that, apart from agriculture, forestry, aquaculture or livestock activities, the unit contains a building located on the ground, such as farmhouse, warehouse, shed, barn, etc.

Attention!
Agricultural locations not containing any structures, such as the cultivation in seasonal floodplain forests, beekeeping, extraction of fruit and wood from native forests, etc. are not considered agricultural establishments.
[page 75]

Agricultural, forestry and aquaculture activities can include:

  • Soil cultivation with permanent or temporary cultivation of vegetables, flowers, medicinal and ornamental plants;
  • Growing plants in water (hydroponics) and other means;
  • The raising and breeding of large, medium and small size animals;
  • Fish farming (the "fish and pay" will only be considered when breeding fish) and shellfish;
  • The breeding of wild animals in captivity (such as alligator, ostrich, partridge, capybara, collared peccary, white-lipped hog and others);
  • The breeding of exotic animals (ostrich, pheasant, peacock, wild boar and others);
  • The exploitation of forests and native or planted forests.

The following are not considered agricultural activities:

  • The raising of domestic animals such as birds, dogs, cats;
  • The breeding of animals for laboratory experiments, production of serums, vaccines, etc.;
  • The confinement of cattle from third parties, as a service provided to farmers, and
  • Fishing.

The following are not considered agricultural establishments:

  • The backyards of households with small pets and household gardens.
[page 76]

2. Educational establishments
An educational establishment is a building used for the purpose of teaching/education of regular courses, regardless of belonging to the public or private sector or educational foundations, for example, elementary or middle schools, universities, military academies, etc.

Important!
Buildings used for informal tutoring practice or vocational training courses, such as: private English courses, computer tutoring, craft-making, etc. should not be considered as educational establishments. Also excluded from this category are child care centers that do not have kindergarten.
3. Health facilities
A Health facility is a building used for the sole purpose of health. It covers all health establishments, whether belonging to public or private sectors and which provide patient care in mobile facilities, clinics, hospitals, emergency or service settings to support health diagnosis and therapy. Health facilities should have specific equipment and exclusive health professionals for patient care.

Some examples are:

  • Medical clinics;
  • Medical offices;
  • Health centers;
  • Radiology centers, laboratories, psychotherapy and dental centers;
  • Emergency rooms;
  • Hospitals, and
  • Others.

Health facilities with hospitalization are classified also as a Collective Households with or without residents, as appropriate.

4. Establishments for other purposes
These are buildings used for other purposes that do not fit the options mentioned previously, such as a garages, car repair shops, shoe repair stores, pharmacies, offices, churches, etc.

Important!
The practice of economic activities in a Private Household, with no site dedicated solely for that purpose, does not characterize the unit as an establishment for other purposes.


[page 78]

Establishment Type

The name of the establishment and/or its use is what we characterize as type of establishment. The type of establishment will identify if the unit, for example, is a local school or a pharmacy.

[Table with examples of types of establishments, omitted]

When a property is not being used, record, for example, vacant shop. This indicates that there is an establishment that is not being used for any activity.
Do not use general terms such as "shop" for a facility in operation. If you do, you are not identifying what type of establishment has been recorded. Record, for example, "children's clothing store."

Address Indicator
The Address Indicator determines whether the same type of establishment occurs one or more times in the same address. You will use this concept only for the following type: educational establishment, health facilities and for other purposes.
Thus, the type of establishment would have an address indicator:

  • Single - where the type occurs only once in the address specified, and
  • Multiple - where the type occurs two or more times in the address.


[page 79]

For clarification, observe examples of Address Indicators:

[Figure]

a) A commercial gallery with various shops and a medical office.
  • The record for a commercial gallery, which is classified as establishment for other purposes, will have a multiple address indicator.
  • The medical office classified as Health facility, will have a single address indicator.
b) A shopping mall with several stores, with medical offices and a college.
  • The record for a commercial gallery, which is classified as establishment for other purposes, will have a multiple address indicator.
  • The medical office classified as health facility, will have a multiple address indicator.
  • The college, which is classified as an educational establishment, will have a single address indicator.


[page 80]

So far, we have learned about households and establishments and their classifications. Now, we will continue to learn about two types of places.

1. Buildings under construction
This is a future building, considered from the foundation and while work in progress or not yet completed, since there is no resident on the date of reference.

A building under construction, if there are no residents, should be recorded as building under construction.

2. Pending classification of visited unit

This is a building whose classification has not been possible to identify in time to be recorded, i.e. during the visit of the census sector.

It is very important that all units found are registered. If you exhausted all possibilities of classification of a unit, and you still do not know how to characterize it, register it as pending.

This situation should be solved until the end of the collection, since the sector will not be given as completed while this unit is missing classification.

Attention!
The success of the census operation depends on correctly identifying the types of places, since it determines whether an interview should be conducted at that address and if there is more than one type of address present.

[page 81]

Address with more than one type

In the same address you might encounter two or more types. For example, this address is composed of: A religious school, a church and a boarding house for students and staff.

In this case, if you cannot make an identification of the complement (element and value) that distinguishes each of these three types, you should include the units in each type of the same registered address.

That is, the educational establishment (school), establishment for other purposes (church) and the Collective Household (housing) will be part of the same address.
Note that these three types - educational establishment, establishment for other purposes and collective household - are associated with a single address.

For household units there may be only one record for each address.

[Review of concepts, omitted]

[page 83]

Now that you've been introduced to these concepts, solve carefully the exercises 9-17 from your study guide. Whenever necessary, review the contents of this manual. Additionally, never forget to write down questions that arise, and ask your instructor about them during your training.

Route of the Census Sector
To carry out your work and use all concepts already studied, you should learn the correct route to walk through during the Census Sector.

The Route of the Sector is the procedure used to walk in a certain area, in a disciplined and careful manner, so you would not miss any of the addresses, or the registration of any unit as household, establishment or building under construction. In this search, the area visited is the Census Sector.

Let's understand step-by-step how to make this journey, according to the characteristics of the sector.

Walking through the Sector divided into blocks and sidewalks
You probably remember the Census Sector in the example used in sector's map, isn't it? The sector is divided into blocks and sidewalks. In this situation, your route is based on the identification of existing blocks and sidewalks within the sector and how you walk through them in an organized manner.

[page 84]

Let's look at how you should walk through the sector in an organized manner.

To walk through the sector divided into blocks and sidewalks, you should do the following:

1) Locate the starting point block as described in the sector perimeter;


[Map is shown here pointing with an arrow to starting point]

2) Identify the sidewalk of the block in the starting point on the map;
3) Check the name of the street;
4) Walk along all the sidewalks of the selected block, keeping the work area on your right (with your right shoulder against the wall), recording all of the households, businesses and buildings in construction found in the route of the sector;


[page 85]

5) Walk through, one block at a time, starting from the side 1 (one) of each block, and


[Map is shown here with numbered blocks to follow in order]

6) When you complete the work of the block, choose one that will be adjacent to continue the work until you reach the last side of the last block.
[Map is shown here with numbered blocks and arrows to follow in order]

In some cases, even in organized sectors, there is the need to walk through blocks and sidewalks according to the sequence of public sites or landmarks. To understand this, consider the following figure, which represents the map of a sector.

[page 86]

[Map drawing is shown here with different routes to follow as the arrows show]

Looking at the same sector, see the following route through the numbering of the sidewalks. Note that sidewalk 1 is associated with Pires street.

Numbering of Sides

[Map drawing is shown here with numbered sidewalks and street names]

[page 87]

[Table of a commonly used route, omitted]

[page 88]

Walking through a sector not divided into blocks

To walk through a sector not divided into blocks, do the following:

1) Locate the starting point specified in the description of the sector.
2) From the starting point, record all households, all establishments and buildings under construction in the order found on the route, for example street by street or road by road, following along one side at a time, keeping the work area always at your right;
3) If there are transversal public spaces (such as private streets, alleys, lanes and paths), stop the survey and record the units located in the main road. Continue recording the main street from the point it was interrupted, until you complete the sector.


Observe in the following figure the direction of the arrows indicating how you should proceed in the areas not divided into blocks.

Starting point: the intersection of General Azevedo and Pimentel Barbosa streets.


[Figure of a circular area is shown here ]

[page 89]

The sectors in rural areas have different characteristics, and we will study them in Unit V of this manual. Meanwhile, we will learn how the course of route should be done in a rural sector.

Walking through the Census Sector in rural areas

The interviewer, should:

1) Start the route of the Sector at the most accessible site. This site should be located within the limits of the sector, for example, a road or a path identified on the map. At this point you should mark the Sector map with an X, the point at which the journey started;

2) Record all households, all establishments and buildings under construction in the order you found them.

3) When you complete an interview, ask the respondent which is the nearest unit, the resident's name or the name of the responsible person of the establishment and the easiest way to get there. This way you can reach the units located in places that cannot be spotted from the road or main road, making sure that you cover the entire Sector.

4) Always make sure that the units surveyed are in the area within the limits of the Sector;

5) Browse the entire Sector, to ensure that you located and recorded all units found in order on your route.


Notice in the figure on the next page, how the units are distributed unevenly in a Rural Sector, which highlights the importance of having the reference of the previous residents to go through the entire sector properly.

[page 90]

[Map of a rural sector with addresses marked to see irregularity]

Example: Map of a rural sector.

[page 91]

Unit IV - Running the Data Collection

In this unit you will learn how to perform your fieldwork applying all the concepts you have studied, using the handheld computer to run the data collection of the 2010 Census.

The first activity that you will perform as an interviewer is the early recognition of your census sector.

Early recognition

The Early Recognition means that you will identify your work area before you start gathering information in order to fix any inaccuracies while knowing the limits of the census sector. In order to do this, follow the order below:

- Before going to the sector:
  • Carefully review your paper sector map, as well as its description and limits;
  • Make an inventory of the postal codes related to your census sector;
  • Identify the means of transportation to easy access the sector, and
  • Resolve any questions or concerns about the location with your Supervisor.
- In your sector, during early recognition:
  • Identify your working area, locating the starting point, the blocks – when it is applicable - and its limits, and
  • Go through all boundaries of the sector until you return to the starting point of the route, to verify that the information contained in the paper map (…)


[page 92]

(…) is accurate.

[Figure of an interviewer saying:] In this first step, you will be accompanied by your supervisor, so he/she can answer questions related to your sector.

Once you are familiar with your Sector, you should perform the sector coverage.

Sector Coverage
The sector coverage is a survey of all households and establishments, but also includes an inventory of all residents of the Sector on the date of reference, and the application of the questionnaires.

Attention!
Always remember: the date of reference of the 2010 Census starts the night of July 31 to August 1, 2010.

[page 93]

[Figure of an interviewer saying:] Covering the sector is to record all addresses found in the order of the route, during the 2010 Census data collection. Following the information contained in your handheld computer and conducting interviews in the occupied households.

That is:

During the Sector Coverage, beginning at the starting point, you must:
  • Walk in an orderly and disciplined manner, keeping the work to be done always on your right, that is, walking around the sector properly;
  • Identify and record all households and all businesses, as well as inappropriate locations for housing, effectively occupied, in the order found in the route;
  • Conduct the interview, every time you record an Occupied Permanent Private Household; an Improvised Occupied Private Household or a Collective Household with residents, always observing the date of reference - the night of July 31, 2010 to August 1 2010; and
  • In buildings with many households (apartment buildings, condominiums, etc.) and in collective households, contact the owner, manager, administrator, trustee or porter, to accurately identify the place in order to conduct the interviews.


[page 94]

Attention!
Remember that in order to cover your sector, you must respect its limits.

Performing Sector Coverage

The 2010 Census data collection should be recorded on your handheld computer that you will use daily during fieldwork to record all addresses found and all the data reported by respondents when answering the survey.

You need to have a good understanding of the applications to use the handheld computer properly and record all information.

However, even before we begin how to use the handheld computer, it is important that you know that you can find two different situations in terms of data collection in the Census application. Be ready for them and the procedures to be performed for each one.

1st situation:

  • You might work in a sector where there is a list of addresses made by your supervisor during the pre-collection time. In general, the urban sectors will have a list of households;
  • In this case, it is important that you carefully check and verify the list of households according to the actual situation during fieldwork;
  • If you find changes in the fieldwork, you should make the necessary changes so that the data collected correctly portrays the reality of the sector. Therefore, include all missing addresses, if any, and the application in the handheld computer will automatically exclude those not confirmed.


[page 95]

2nd situation:

  • The sector might not have a list of households. The rural sector in general will not have this list, and
  • In this case, you must record carefully all addresses found by walking through the sector, along the lines of the route.

Attention!
In both situations, pay special attention to less visible households, such as houses in backyards, multi-story houses, basements and others.


You must remember also that the correct address on the registration application depends on the accurate identification of the following information: the street, the block and sidewalk, address and the type of household. Thus, in the application, you will find a specific screen to record/identify each of the aforementioned information. While conducting the interview, the application will identify the type of questionnaire and present the corresponding screens for you to record the information provided by the resident.

Now let's see how to use the handheld computer application for the 2010 Census to perform the coverage of the sector, namely the registration of all addresses the definition of their type and the data collection from residents.

[page 96]

[Text and figures of how to use the Census Application, omitted]

[page 149]

Conducting the Interview
The IBGE expects the interview to go as smoothly as possible, therefore it is essential that you can build and maintain a friendly relationship with the interviewee.

[Figure of an interviewer]

And how should you go about building that relationship?

Before looking at your sector, you must properly prepare to present yourself to the interviewee:

  • Wear comfortable and non-flashy clothes;
  • Always wear your badge, and
  • Have a photo identification with you.


Attention!
You should also, check every day that the battery of the handheld computer is charged, to prevent any problems during the interview.

Moreover, it is essential that you know how to conduct the interview, as directed by the IBGE.

1 - Introduce yourself to the resident: say your name, explain that you are representing the IBGE, and talk briefly, about the purpose of the interview;
2 - Explain that the information provided to the Census is confidential. Only employees who work in the IBGE have access to statistical data from the questionnaires, and (cont.)


[page 150]

3 - Assure the interviewee that under no circumstances will the information he/she provides be viewed by persons other than the Census staff. This standard of IBGE is followed to the letter.


Attention!
Those responsible for a breach of confidentiality in the census shall be punished with dismissal and will be subject to criminal prosecution.

Important!
It is important that you clarify to the interviewee that if he/she refuses to be interviewed, under the existence of Law No. 5534 of November 14, 1968. This law ensures the confidentiality of information provided and the obligation to provide statistical information to the IBGE. Here's an excerpt of this law:
Article 1? - Every natural or legal person under public law or private law that is under the jurisdiction of Brazilian law is required to provide information requested by the IBGE for the implementation of the National Statistics (Decree-Law No. 161 of February 13, 1967, Article 2, § § 2).
Sole Paragraph - The information provided will be confidential in nature, used exclusively for statistical purposes and may not be the subject of a certificate, nor, under any circumstances, serve as evidence in administrative or judicial proceedings, except, only, as the result of violation under the provisions of this law.

[page 151]

During the interview, you should always maintain a friendly rapport, as to catch the attention and confidence of the interviewee. In order to foster a good interviewing climate, you should:

  • Treat the interviewee with courtesy and respect, and
  • Conduct the interview only in regards to the data collection, avoiding conversations unrelated to the survey.


In addition, to guarantee that you gather quality information, you must be always careful. See the advice below!

Important advice to ensure the gathering of quality information:

  • Strictly follow all instructions in the manual to record the information;
  • Interview head of household. In his/her absence, you can interview another person who resides there, with enough knowledge to give you information about the residents;
  • When you cannot find a qualified person to interview, you should inquire about the times you can find a resident able to provide the information, leaving a message on the day and time again to get the census information. To do this, use the Comment Sheet, and
  • To facilitate the identification of comments in the database, the words must be written without:
  • Accents (acute, grave and circumflex);
  • Tilde;
  • Cedilla, and
  • Hyphens.


[page 152]

However, these are not the only things you should consider when conducting the interview. You need to be mindful of how you ask the questions and also how you receive the answers.
In order to know how to ask questions, read carefully the following:

Asking questions

You should ask the questions exactly as they are presented in the questionnaire, thereby having answers that are expected. If each interviewer formulates the questions in his/her own words, the Census is likely to have incorrect information, since the questions can be interpreted differently from what is expected in the survey.

Moreover, it is essential that you read fully and slowly all the questions in the order that they appear. If the respondent has difficulty understanding, help him/her comprehend the question, without prompting him/her to an answer.

[page 153]

And what is the format of the questions?

The questions are structured in, basically, two formats. In the table below you will see the two examples, learn how you should read each of the questions.

[Table with example of how to read the questions, omitted]

After questioning, how should you receive the interviewee's answer?

Even if you assume to know the answers to some questions, do not answer them for the interviewee. It is essential that the interviewee can listen to and answer all of the questions, since omitting or changing the wording of any question or answering it for the respondent, can affect the quality of the result of the Census.

[page 154]

Finishing the Interview

[Figure of an interviewer] And how should you finish the interview?

First, once you see the screen Finishing Questionnaire, you need to verify that all questions have been completed; if there are any pending questions, go back to answer them. Then, inform the respondent that your Supervisor might conduct a new interview to confirm the data, if necessary. Finally thank the interviewee for his/her collaboration.

Attention!
You should always have this manual with you, since it can be helpful in clarifying any issues that may arise during the interview.

Now that you have received the necessary instructions to have the competence in order to adequately conduct the Census interview, look at the questionnaires and the information regarding the correct way to record the answers.

[page 155]

Knowing and Completing the Questionnaires - Basic and Sample

First, you need to know that one of the main goals of the Census is to ensure that the entire population is carefully surveyed, to obtain quality data collection. The Census collection uses two types of questionnaires:

  • The Sample Questionnaire, and
  • The Basic Questionnaire.


Familiarize yourself with each questionnaire!

The Sample Questionnaire
It is the tool to record each occupied household unit selected for the sample, it inquires on household and residents' characteristics, on the date of reference. The Sample Questionnaire application requires a sampling technique.

What is sampling?

It is the selection of a specific population for research, in order to estimate the results for an entire population.

The sampling selects a group of Individual Households and Collective Households with Residents.

[page 156]

Therefore, the sampling should include:

  • Private Households and their residents, and
  • Collective Households and their residents, individuals or families.

For Collective Households, the sample selection will be determined by the records on the List of Units with residents.

The information obtained from sampling households will be used to gather valid results for the whole population.

Important!
How you collect information from Collective Households with residents, will be explained in detail later in the section Understanding the Collective Household Form.

The Sample Questionnaire inquires about the following content:

  • Household Characteristics
  • International migration
  • Residents' Information
  • List of Residents on July 31, 2010
  • Residents' Characteristics
- Sex;
- Age;


[page 157]

- Orphaned by mother;
- Color or Race;
- Ethnicity and Language (applicable only for the indigenous population);
- Religion;
- Birth Registration;
- Disability;
- Migration (Internal and International Migration);
- Education;
- Household displacement for study;
- Marriage;
- Work and Income;
- Work commute;
- Fertility, and
  • Mortality
The Basic Questionnaire
This is the tool used in each household not selected for the sample, that inquires on household and residents' characteristics, on the date of reference, from July 31 to August 1, 2010.
This questionnaire contains questions necessary to know household and residents' characteristics, which are of great relevance to the census operation.

[page 158]

The Basic Questionnaire inquires on the following content:

  • Household Characteristics;
  • International Emigration;
  • Head of Household;
  • List of Residents on July 31, 2010;
  • Residents' Characteristics;
- Sex;
- Age;
- Color or Race;
- Ethnicity and Language (applicable only for indigenous population);
- Birth Registration;
- Literacy;
- Resident's Income, and
  • Mortality.

Done! Now you know the necessary information to understand how to complete the questionnaires.

Continue studying and do not forget: write down any questions or concerns in order to clarify them with your instructor during your training.

Completing the Questionnaires
Before getting to know the questions in each questionnaire, let's look at some general instructions to complete them!

[page 159]

General guidelines for completing the questionnaires

As you know, only one type of questionnaire should be given in any specific situation, either Basic or Sample questionnaires:

  • In Private Households (Occupied Permanent Private Households and Improvised Occupied Private Households) and their residents, and
  • For those living in Collective Households.


The criteria and related guidelines presented below refer to the numbering of the Sample Questionnaire. The criteria and guidelines for the Basic Questionnaire are marked for you to identify them every time you see the letter "B" and the corresponding question number, located on the corner of the box, as the following example.

When the guidelines are for the Basic Questionnaire you will see the letter "B" and the question number.

[Figure of an example question from the basic questionnaire]

B 6.00
6.00- Person's Name
The information will be accessed automatically through the List of Residents.

[page 160]

Important!

  • The questions are grouped into blocks according to the subject they refer to;
  • Depending on the response to a question, the application can ‘skip' some questions, i.e., some questions will not appear on the handheld computer and therefore will not be answered, and
  • Warning messages will appear any time the collected information is inconsistent, or when a field that should have a record is blank, or even warning messages to confirm or delete the record.


The first section of the Questionnaire - both the Basic and Sample - is about the Household Characteristics.

Household Characteristics

In this section, you will learn about household characteristics only for Permanent Private Occupied Households, during the date of reference.
The questions in this block are intended to:

  • Gather information on the housing conditions and levels of quality of life.

In the Sample Questionnaire, the household characteristics are surveyed in more detail. The data collection is based on existing assets in the household, number of rooms, etc., in order to investigate the patterns of well-being of the population.

[page 161]

B 2.012:01 - This household is:
This question investigates the condition of household occupations.

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Resident Owned - mortgage paid: If the household is owned in whole or in part, by one or more residents and already paid in full.
2 - Resident Owned - paying mortgage: If the household is owned in whole or in part, by one or more residents and is not yet fully paid.
3 - Leased/Rented: If the household is rented and the rent is paid by one or more residents. Also consider as rented the household where employer (of any of the residents) pays it, as part of a salary.
In the Sample Questionnaire, you must select the range that corresponds to the total amount of rent due in July and then register the declared value. Do not include property taxes and/or condominium fees.


[page 162]

4 - Provided by employer: If the address is assigned by employer (public or private) of any of the residents, although residents might be charged a fee of occupancy or utilities (condo, gas, electricity, etc.). In this case, you should count households in which the rent is directly paid by the employer of one of the household residents.
5 - Another provider: If the household is given out free by a person who is not a resident or given by an institution other than an employer of any of the residents, although a fee of occupancy (taxes, condo, etc.) may apply. In this case, you should count households in which rent is paid, directly or indirectly, by a non-resident or institution other than a resident's employer.


[page 163]

6 - Other conditions: If the household is occupied differently than the aforementioned options.
Count households in which:
• the rent is paid by resident, although the household is attached to an establishment (office, store, etc.).
• is an agricultural establishment where the family renting resides there, and
• in instances when households are occupied by trespassers.


[page 164]

2.02 - The main material on the exterior walls is:
You must record the main material used in the construction of the exterior walls of the household building. Depending on the situation, record:

1 - With masonry coating: For walls with brick lining (plaster, plasterboard, and spatter dash), stone, pre-molded concrete or apparent. Consider also those covered with marble, metal, glass or paneling.
2 - Without masonry coating: For brick walls without lining (plaster, plasterboard, and spatter dash).
3 - Wood paneling (set): To walls of any kind of wood that has been prepared for this purpose.
4 - Coated stucco: For walls made of mud or lime and sand with poles and sticks of wood, paneling, plaster or wattle-and-daub coated (plaster, plasterboard, and spatter dash).
5 - Uncoated stucco: For walls made of mud or lime and sand with poles and sticks of wood, paneling, plaster or wattle-and-daub provided there is no finish (plaster, plasterboard, spatter dash).


[page 165]

6 - Wood remnants: For walls made of wood packaging, fences, scaffolding, etc.
7 - Straw: For walls made of thatch, leaf or tree bark, etc.
8 -Other materials: For walls made of any material that has not previously been described. Example: zinc, plastic, etc.
9 - No wall: For households which do not have walls, and which cover is being supported by wooden poles or similar.
Item 9 should be marked only on indigenous regions.

2.03 - How many rooms does your household have? (Including bathroom and kitchen)In this regard, you must report the total number of rooms that are in the household. For this registration to be done correctly, read the information below.

[Figure of a house] A room is: each space in the household that has a roof and is bounded by walls, including the bathroom and the kitchen.

[page 166]

[Figure of a crossed out space] Do not consider as a room:

  • Corridors, open balconies and porches, and
  • Garages and other rooms used for non-residential means.


Important!

1 - Count all of the rooms on the outside of the building that are an integral part of the household. For example: a room constructed in the lot that serves as a bedroom of a household resident.
2 - In households where rooms are shared, do not count in the total kitchens and bathrooms for common use (community room).


[page 167]

2:04 - How many rooms in your household are used for sleeping?
In this question you must record the number of bedrooms or any room that is used by household residents for sleeping.
You must also include the rooms contained within the property where household residents use for sleeping.

B 2.02
2.05 - How many bathrooms are in the household for residents' exclusive use? (Including those located in the yard or within the property)

[] Bathroom(s) with shower (or bathtub) and toilet (or WC)

This question inquires about the existence of a room used as a bathroom, which has a shower (or bathtub) and toilet (or WC) and that is for residents' exclusive use, including residents residing in rooms within the property.

Record the total number of bathrooms or if there is no bathroom, record 0 (zero).

If there are nine or more bathrooms, register 9 (nine).

Attention!
In some households, it is possible that the toilet and shower or bathtub is located in separate rooms. In this case, you should consider that the household has a bathroom and you should count the two rooms where the toilet and the shower are as one only.

[page 168]

B 2.03
2.06 - Do you use a toilet or a pit to defecate, even those included in your yard or property? (Surrounded by walls of any material)

1 - Yes
2 - No

Consider as a toilet a place bounded by walls of any material, covered or not by a roof, that has a toilet or a pit.
According to different regions in the country, bathroom can be known as: outhouse [can], bush, latrine, toilet, lavatory, WC, privy, the john, etc...

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes: When there is a toilet or pit use by residents in the household, yard or property. Register this option for households whose residents that share the bathroom with other households.
2 - No: When there is not a toilet or pit use by residents in the household, yard or property.


[page 169]

B 2.04
2.07- The bathroom waste is disposed of (thrown) into:

1 - General sewage or water drainage
2 - Septic tank
3 - Rudimentary cesspit
4 - Pit
5 - River, lake or sea
6 - Other


If there is more than one type of sewage outlet in household, mark the first in the order listed.
Even if the toilet or bathroom is shared by more than one household, depending on the situation, record:

1 - General sewage or water drainage: When the channeling of wastewater and waste, from the bathroom or toilet, is connected to a collection system that leads to an overall drainage area of the region or municipality, even if the system lacks treatment of the sewage.
2 - Septic tank: When channeling the bathroom or toilet is connected to a septic tank. The matter is directed to a nearby pit, where it undergoes a treatment or sedimentation process, with or without the liquid, and then carried out to a drain of the overall area, region or town.


[page 170]

3 - Rudimentary cesspit: When the bathroom or toilet is connected to a rustic pit (well, hole, etc.).
4 - Pit: When the bathroom or toilet is connected directly to an open pit.
5 - River, lake or sea: When the bathroom or toilet is connected directly to a river, lake or sea.
6 - Other: When the sewage of waste, from the bathroom or toilet, does not fall within the categories described above.

B 2.05
2.08 - The source of water used in this home is:In the case of the existence of different sources of water, mark the first in the order listed. Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Piped Water: When water supply consists of a direct connection from household, land or property where it is located, with a general network, which consists of a set of interconnected pipes leading to water withdrawal in the consumption points.


[page 171]

2 - Spring or well on property: When water supply occurs from wells or springs located on the ground or on the property where the household is built.
3 - Spring or well not on property: When water supply occurs from wells or springs located outside the property where the household is built.
4 - Water Truck: When water supply used as household water is transported by tank car.
5 - Rainwater Tank: When water supply is from rainwater stored in tanks, cement box, etc.
6 - Rainwater stored not in tank: When water used is from rainwater stored in containers, plastic tanks, etc.
7 - Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams: When water supply comes from rivers, ponds, lakes and streams.
8 - Other: When water supply for the household comes in other way than those previously mentioned.


[page 172]

9 - Spring or well in the village: When water supply from comes from wells or springs located within the village.
10 - Spring or well somewhere else: When water supply comes from wells or springs located outside the village.
Questions 9 and 10 can only be marked for indigenous regions.


2.09 - Does this household have piped in water (plumbing)?Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, at least in one room: When the household has piped in water with internal distribution to one or more rooms.
2 - Yes, only in the yard or property: When the water is not piped into the household, but in the yard or property.
3 - No: When there is no piped in water in the household, yard or property.


[page 173]

B 2.06
2.10 -The garbage in the household is: If there is more than one destination for the household garbage, mark the first one in the order listed below. Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Collected by sanitation services: When the household garbage is collected directly by public or private sanitation services.
2 - Put in the garbage cans of the sanitation services: When the household garbage is deposited in a garbage can in the household, before being collected by public or private sanitation services.
3 - Burned (in property): When garbage is burned in the household's yard or property.
4 - Buried (in property): When garbage is buried in the household's yard or property.
5 - Thrown in vacant lot or in the street: When the household garbage is thrown in a vacant lot or public area.


[page 174]

6 - Thrown in the river, lake or sea: When the household garbage is thrown into a river, lake or sea.
7 - Disposed of some other way: When the garbage is disposed of in a way different from those listed above.


B 2.07
2.11-Does the household have electricity?Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, provided by the electric company: When the household has electricity distributed by a company.
2 - Yes, from other sources: When the household has electricity from other sources such as wind power, solar power, a generator, etc.
3 - There is no electricity: When the household has no electricity.


[page 175]

B 2.08
2.12 - Is there an electricity meter in the household?
Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, for exclusive household use: When there is an electricity meter that exclusively registers electricity consumption in the household.
2 - Yes, for shared use: When there is an electricity meter that registers electricity consumption for more than one household. Also consider shared use, when electricity meter is use for various establishments.
3 - No, there is no electricity meter: When there is no electricity meter in the household.


How to proceed in a property where there are three houses, and the energy consumed is recorded in a single meter, installed on the household front? In this situation, record option 2 - Yes, for shared use. Otherwise, record option 3 - No, there is no electricity meter.

Next, you will see questions related to home goods or appliances within the household during the date of reference. You should only consider home goods or appliances that work and are in use, even if the home goods or appliances are owned, borrowed or rented by residents.

[page 176]

What is it?
What are home goods or appliances?

Home goods or appliances are those used during a long period of time. Some examples are appliances, vehicles, machinery, equipment, etc.
Does your household have a:

2.13 - Radio (including a radio that is part of another device)?
1 - Yes
2 - No

Select Yes, when the household has any kind of radio, even if it is part of another device. Do not consider a radio if it is attached to a personal device such as mobile phone, mp3 player, etc.

2:14 - Television?

1 - Yes
2 - No

Consider working televisions even if in color, black and white, plasma and LCD.

[page 177]

2:15 - Washing Machine? (Do not consider washboards)

1 - Yes
2 - No

Use the No option when there is no washing machine or when there is a washboard.

2.16 - Refrigerator?

1 - Yes
2 - No

Use Yes when there is a refrigerator in the household, even if it is fueled by gas or kerosene.

2.17 - Cell phone?

1 - Yes
2 - No

Record Yes if any resident has a cell phone. Otherwise, register No.

[page 178]

2.18 - Landline?

1 - Yes
2 - No

Record Yes if the household has a land line telephone, even if it is rented, or has an extension.

2.19 – Personal computer/tablets?

1 - Yes
2 - No

Choose Yes if there is a desktop computer, laptop and netbook.

2.20 - Personal computer with internet access?

1 - Yes
2 - No

This item will only be answered for households that have a computer.

[page 179]

2.21 - Motorcycle for private use?

1 - Yes
2 - No

A motorcycle for particular use in the household means that one or more residents have a motorcycle for mobility to work or study.

It should also be considered a motorcycle for private use if it is for professional occupations: i.e. moto-taxi, mail delivery, other types of delivery, etc., as long as it is also used to transport household residents.

2.22 - Car for private use?

1 - Yes
2 - No

A car for particular use in the household means that residents have a car for mobility to work or study.

Consider also a vehicle used for professional occupations such as taxi driver, a salesman, delivery man etc., as long as it is also used to transport household residents.

[page 180]

You already know the questions regarding the "Household characteristics" section. Now let's learn about the questions concerning International Migration and Residents' Information.

International Migration

Before we study the purpose of this section, do you know what international migration is?

International Migration is the action of leaving one country to live in another. For example: someone who left Brazil to live in Italy.

This issue will be searched only for Occupied Private Households, whether permanent or improvised.

The purpose of this topic is:

  • To obtain the profile, by sex and age of Brazilians who have moved abroad, and
  • To capture international migration movements.

This information will be used to subsidize the population projections made by the IBGE, and enable specific studies on international migration.
Only people who were living in another country on July 31, 2010, should be considered.

B 3.01
3.01- Was any person living in your household living in another country on July 31, 2010?

1 - Yes
2 - No


[page 181]
B 3.02
3.02 - Name
Enter the first name of person(s) who live(d) in another country at the date of reference.

B 3.03
3.03 - Sex

1 - Male
2 - Female
B 3.04
3.04 - Year of birth
Register the year of birth.

B 3.05
3.05 - Year of the last departure to live abroad
Record the year in which the person left Brazil to live in another country. If he/she has migrated more than once, record the year of the last departure.

[page 182]
B 3.06
3.06- Country of residence on July 31, 2010
Record the name of the person's country of residence on July 31, 2010. If you do not know, register "do not know the foreign country".

Now, you should solve exercises 18 to 22 of your study guide. They will help you remember how you should conduct the interview, the types of surveys and the different blocks of questions about Household Characteristics and International Migration.

Attention!
Remember, the date of reference for the Census starts the night of July 31, 2010 to August 1, 2010.

Residents' Information
For Private and Collective Households


B 4.01
4.01- How many people lived in this household on July 31, 2010?Record the total number of residents living in a private household and all residents in a collective household unit.

[page 183]

For Private Households

B 4.02
4.02 - Head of household: (mutually agreed head of household)

1 - Only one resident
2 - More than one resident


To complete this question, you must know the concept of head of household.

Head of household is a person who is at least ten years old, and is recognized as such by the rest of the household members.

You should investigate with the household residents if the responsibility is exercised by one or more residents.

List of Residents on July 31, 2010

The purpose of this part in the questionnaire is:

  • To list all the household residents at the date of reference, and
  • To establish the relationship of head of household among the rest of the residents in the same household.
[page 184]

5.01 - Residents' Name
The relationship of the residents must be made according to the following steps:

  • Click the Add button;
  • Record the first name and last name of all household residents at the date of reference. If there are more than one resident with the same first and last names, enter the other names which distinguishes them, and
  • If it is necessary to change or delete it, select that record and then click the button corresponding to the procedure.

After registering all residents, read the names of all persons listed and check with the respondent, in case he/she has forgotten to include a child, an elderly person or someone who was temporarily absent due to school, work, hospitalization or for some other reason, for example if a person is deceased after July 31, 2010.

When closing the names' record, click on the button Define Relationship and then ask the following question: Have all the household residents, including absent, elderly and children, been listed?

If the answer is Yes the following message will appears on your handheld computer:

You should read the following to the respondent:

"In order to complete household relationships questions, is important to indicate first who is the head of household"
[page 185]

Then select the head of household's name and click the Confirm button.
If the answer is No, add the name of the head of household to the list.

B 5.025.02 - What is the relationship of this person to the head of the household?

The system will open question 5.01 with the List of Residents, in which each name must be selected and assign the relationship as family or cohabitation (including domestic dependence) of the resident with the head of household. Depending on the situation, record:

01 - Head of Household: To the person (male or female), with at least 10 (ten) years of age, recognized by residents as head of household.
02 - Spouse or partner of different sex: For the person (man or woman) who lived conjugally with the head of household, being of the opposite sex, whether or not in marriage and at least 10 (ten) years of age.



[page 186]

03 - Spouse or partner of the same sex: For the person (man or woman) who lived conjugally with the head of household, both being of the same sex and at least ten (10) years old.
04 - Son/daughter of head of household and spouse: For legitimate child, either by blood or adopted, of the responsible person and spouse.
05 - Son/daughter of the head of household only: For legitimate child , either by blood or adopted solely by the responsible person.
06 - Stepchild: For the legitimate child, by blood or adopted, or raised solely by the spouse.
07 - Son or daughter-in-law: For son or daughter-in-law of the head of household or his/her spouse.
08 - Father, mother, stepfather or stepmother: For a parent, stepparent of the head of household.
09 - Father or mother in-law: For the father of the head of household or his/her spouse.
10 – Grandchild: For the grandson of the head of household or his/her spouse.


[page 187]

11 - Great grandchild: For the great-grandchild of the head of household or his/her spouse.
12 - Brother or sister: for legitimate brother or sister, either by blood or adopted, of the head of household.
13 - Grandfather or Grandmother: To the grandfather or grandmother of the head of household or his/her spouse.
14 -Other relative: For grandfather/mother, brother/sister, uncle/aunt, nephew, of the head of household or his/her spouse.
15 - Non-paying housemate: For the person that lives in private households without being a relative, cohabitant, pensioner, employee or relative of the household, not paying or contributing to the household expenses.
16 - Cohabitant/roommate: For the person living in private households without being a relative, sharing food and/or housing expenses.
17 - Pensioner: For the person living in private households without being a relative, sharing food and/or housing expenses.
18 - Domestic employee: For persons residing in private household providing domestic services to one or more of the household members.


[page 188]

19 - Parent/relative of domestic employee: For persons residing in private household that was related to a domestic employee and did not provide domestic services to household residents.
20 - Individual living in a cooperative household: For a single person, who lived in a Collective Household, sharing the expenses with another person sharing no kinship relation.

.

When completing this question, click the Close List button and then on the Next arrow. If it is necessary to include another resident after closing the list, you must click the Reopen List button and then repeat the same procedures to add the person.

Attention!
If a single resident is marked in a particular or collective household, questions 4.02 and 5.02 will be automatically filled by the system.

B 5.035.03 - Cluster Number
After the completion of question 5.02 the system will assign a sequential number for each resident, according to the order of the relationships codes, living or domestic dependence of the resident with the head of household.

[page 189]

Residents' Characteristics

In this section, we will collect data on some residents' characteristics. These characteristics will allow us to determine the demographic and socioeconomic profile of the population of the country to estimate numbers and need for support, planning and development of governmental policies and programs.

As we have learned in the Sample Questionnaire, household residents' characteristics will be collected in a more complete and detailed manner. Thus, in addition to information about sex, age, color or race, education, income, etc., you will collect data on religion, disability, migration, marriage, work, fertility, commute to work or school and mortality.
From this section on, each item will be displayed only once in a manner that can be answered, for each of the residents to whom it might apply.

For example, in question 6.01 - Sex, the names from the List of Residents (completed in section 5) will appear so question 6.01 can be answered for each registered resident.
Once you have the List of Residents, you will always start any question from there, make sure that you follow the order given in the application of your handheld computer.

Let's look at the requirements of this section of the questionnaire, as well as the necessary guidelines for filling in the questions.

B 6.00
6.00 - Name

This information will be accessed automatically through the List of Residents.

[page 190]

B 6.01 6.01 - Sex

1 - Male
2 - Female

Record the option corresponding to the sex of the person surveyed.

B 2.06
6.02 - What is your birth date?

Record the month and year of the person's birth.

If the person does not know the month or year of birth, skip to 6.03, only if you have exhausted all efforts to obtain the month and year of birth.


B 6.036.03 - How old were you on July 31, 2010?
Depending on the situation, record:

1 year or more: If the age is one (1) year or more, record the number of complete years in the field 1 year or more.

Less than one year: if the age is less than one (1) year, record the number of full months in the field Less than 1 year. For newborn babies under the age of one (1) month, record 0 (zero) in the field Less than 1 year.


[page 191]

6:04 -Is your mother alive? (Consider only birth mother)

1 - Yes, and lives in this household
2 - Yes, and lives in another household
3 - No
4 - Do not know


This question investigates if a person is orphaned by his/her mother and will apply to all household residents. Consider only birth mother.

6:05 – Name of resident's mother

If the answer to question 6.04 was 1 ("Yes, and lives in this household"), the application will open question 5.01 (List of Residents), so you can check on the name of resident's mother.

Color or race
The goal of this section is:

• To investigate the composition of the population by color or race, through self-identification; and
• To update studies on the ethnic patterns and distribution.


[page 192]

B 6.046. 06 - Your skin color or race is:
Read the options of color or race to the person and record the one that is declared. If the declaration does not match one of the alternatives listed in the question, review the options for a person to determine which one he/she considers most appropriate. You must not influence the response of the interviewee.

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - White: For persons who declare themselves white.
2 - Black: For persons who declare themselves black.
3 - Yellow: For persons who declare themselves yellow (of Oriental origin: Japanese, Chinese, Korean, etc.).
4 - Brown: For persons who declare themselves brown.
5 - Indigenous: For persons who declare themselves as indigenous. This classification applies to indigenous people living both on and off indigenous regions

.

[page 193]
B 6.05
6.07 - Do you consider yourself indigenous?

1 - Yes
2 - No

For persons who live on indigenous regions and do not declare themselves indigenous, investigate if they considered themselves indigenous in accordance to their traditions, customs, culture, ancestry, etc.

Ethnicity
Before we learn about the questions in this section, we need to understand the concept of ethnicity.

Ethnicity

Is a group of people that share linguistic, cultural and social elements. It corresponds to a tribe or a group of people characterized by its own culture and social life.
This questions will only be asked to people who declare themselves or consider themselves indigenous.

B 6.06
6:08 - What is your specific ethnic group or tribe?

Record the name of ethnic group or tribe of the respondent.
If respondent does not know or does not remember, record "Does not know".

[page 194]

Language

The purpose of this section is to know the indigenous languages of Brazil in order to establish planning policies for social and educational measures to linguistic minorities.

Consider the language used for communication at households where people declare or consider themselves indigenous.

You may also register Urubu-Kaapor Sign Language (LSUK) used by indigenous groups.

B 6.07
6.9 – Do you speak an Indigenous language in the household? (Consider sign language)

1 - Yes
2 - No


B 6.08
6.10 - What indigenous language do you speak in the household? (Specify the indigenous language(s)- record up to two)

Two languages can be recorded on question 6.10, and each language should be on one space in order to record them properly.

If the indigenous respondent reports that he/she speaks "the language of his/her people," repeat the name of the ethnic group or tribe declared in questions 6.08 (QA) - 6.06 (QB).

Consider also Urubu-Kaapor Sign Language (LSUK) .

Whenever it is not possible to obtain an answer to questions 6.10 (QA) - 6:08 (QB), record "Does not know".

[page 195]
B 6.09
6.11 – Do you speak Portuguese in the household? (Consider sign language)

1 - Yes
2 - No

Consider also Brazilian Sign Language (Libras).

Attention!
For children who have not yet learned how to speak or for people who, because of illness or disability, do not speak sign language, register No.

Religion
The purpose of this section is to know which religions are declared by the population and the number of its adherents.

For Indigenous people, you should also consider traditional religious beliefs and ritual practices of their own people.

6.12 - What is your religion?
The record must identify the sect, cult or religion professed such as: Roman Catholic, Brazilian Catholic, Lutheran, Pentecostal, Baptist, Assembly of God, the Universal Kingdom of God, Christian Congregation of Brazil, the Seventh Day Adventist, Kardecist, Shintoism, Jehovah's Witness, Candomble, Umbanda, Buddhism, Jewish, Mohammedan (or Islamist), Esoteric, etc.

[page 196]

Do not register generic expressions such as Catholic, Protestant, Spiritualist, Christian, Evangelical, etc.
For persons who do not profess any religion, register no religion.
In case of doubt on the definition of the religion for children, record the religion of the mother.
Do not make assumptions from the declaration of the person who is providing the information. Record the religion declared by each member of the household.

Birth registration
The purpose of question is to know how many people from age 10+ have some form of birth registration.

B 6.10
6.13 – Do you have a birth certificate?
(Check the first option in which the person fits, in the order listed)

1 - Government Center/Civil Registry
2 - Declared Alive (DNV) by hospital or maternity ward
3 - Registry of Indigenous Births (RANI)
4 - No birth certificate
5 - Do not know
[page 197]

Attention!
The third option is available only for people who declare themselves or consider themselves indigenous.

Disability
The purpose of this section is to know the number of people who have disabilities as well as the severity of the disabilities. Thus, we expect appropriate policies that provide equal opportunities for this segment of the population.

The investigation of this issue requires that questions are asked one by one for each person, followed by response options to the respondent, the interviewer should check in the corresponding box to the answer given, without any personal interpretation.

6.14 - Do you have a vision impairment?(If using glasses or contact lenses, used them to determine sight)

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, not able to see: A person who declares himself/herself unable to see.
[page 198]

2 - Yes, has difficulty seeing: A person who has a permanent and/or great difficulty to see even with glasses or contact lenses.
3 - Yes, some difficulty in seeing: A person who has some difficulty seeing, even with glasses or contact lenses.
4 - No, can see very well: A person who sees very well, even if he/she needs to wear glasses or contact lenses.


6.15 - Do you have hearing impairment?(If hearing aids are used, used them to determine hearing)
Depending on the situation, record:
1 - Yes, not able to hear: A person who declares himself/herself unable to hear.
2 - Yes, has difficulty in hearing: A person that has difficulty in hearing, even when using hearing aids.


[page 199]

3 - Yes, some difficulty in hearing: A person that has some difficulty in hearing, even with the use of hearing aids.
4 - No, can hear very well: A person that can hear very well, even if he/she needs to use hearing aids.


6.16 - Do you have difficulty walking or climbing stairs?(If using a prosthetic limb, a cane or other walking aid, use them to determine walking ability)
Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, unable to walk: A person who declares himself/herself unable to walk or climb stairs without the help of another person, because of physical disability.
2 - Yes, has difficulty walking: A person that has great difficulty walking and/or climbing stairs without the help from another person, even when using prosthesis or walking aids.
3 - Yes, some difficulty walking: A person that has some difficulty walking and/or climbing stairs without the help from another person, even when using prosthesis or walking aids.


[page 200]

4 - No, can walk very well: A person that does not have any difficulty walking and/or climbing stairs, even if she/he uses prosthesis or walking aids. Include children who have not yet learned how to walk and have no motor difficulties.


6.17 - Do you have any permanent mental or intellectual disability that limits your daily activities like working, going to school, playing, etc.?



What is it?
What is mental disability?
Mental disability is a delay of intellectual development and is characterized by difficulty communicating with others, caring for him/herself, doing household chores, learning, working, playing, etc. In general, mental deficiency occurs in childhood up to 18 years old.


Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes: When the person declared the existence of a permanent disability that limits his/her daily activities.
2 - No: Even when people have mental disorders or diseases such as autism, neurosis, schizophrenia and psychosis.



[page 201]
Migration
This section covers two important issues: internal migration and international immigration.

Internal migration is the act of leaving a municipality to live in another municipality within the national territory. For example: someone who leaves Porto Alegre - RS and moves to live in Porto Velho - RO.

International Migration is the act of entering another country to live in it. Example: someone who leaves Italy to live in Brazil.

The purpose of this section is to verify population movements occurring within the national territory, taking into account that the Census is the only data source that allows for the analysis of population mobility at the municipal level, in addition the results of the census help to estimate population totals.

6:18 - Were you born in this municipality?Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, and always lived here: This is a person who was born and always lived in the same municipality.
Consider also a person born and always lived in the municipality if the following conditions apply:
  • Was born and resides in the same municipality, even if the municipality has changed its name or whether it was emancipated or incorporated into a new municipality, and
  • Was born in a maternity ward or hospital located outside of the municipality, but returned to live in the municipality soon after birth.


[page 202]

2 - Yes, but lived in another municipality or foreign country: This is a person who was born in this municipality, but has lived in another municipality or foreign country.
3 - No: This is a person who was not born in the municipality of current residence. In this case, add persons who were born in a foreign country but registered as Brazilian, according to the laws of Brazil.


[page 203]

6:19 - Were you born in this state?
1 - Yes, and always lived here.
2 - Yes, but lived in another state or foreign country.
3 - No.

Depending on the situation, record one of the previous options.

Consider persons who were born in the same state of current residence if the following conditions apply:

  • Was born in the current state of residence, even if it has changed its name, and
  • Was born in a maternity ward or hospital located outside of the state of residence, but returned soon after birth

.

Persons who were born in a foreign country, should be marked as No, even if they are registered as Brazilians, according to the laws of Brazil.

[page 204]

6.20-What is your nationality?Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Brazilian: A person who was born in Brazil or was born in a foreign country and was registered as Brazilian, according to the laws of Brazil.
2 - Naturalized Brazilian: A person who was born in a foreign country and obtained Brazilian citizenship by way of naturalization or according to the laws of Brazil.
3 - Foreign: A person who was born outside of Brazil or a person who was born in Brazil and is registered in foreign country, and is not naturalized Brazilian.


6.21 – In what year did you move to Brazil?
Record the year in which the naturalized Brazilian or foreigner moved to Brazil.

[page 205]

6.22 - In which state or foreign country were you born?1 - State
2 - Foreign Country

For native Brazilians

Record the name of the state where the person was born. If the person does not know the name of the state, record Do not know the state.

For those who were registered as Brazilian citizens but were born in a foreign country:

Enter Does not know the state.

For foreigners and naturalized Brazilians

Record the name of the country of birth or, if the country is not known, record Does not know foreign country.

Attention!
If the foreign country or the state changed its name, record the current name.

[page 206]

[Table with abbreviation of the Federative Units, omitted]

[page 207]

6.23 - How long have you lived continuously in this state?(If less than one year, record zero)

- Record the number of complete years a person has lived in the state, without interruptions, until July 31, 2010;
- Record the time of residence since the last return for a person who has migrated to another state or foreign country and then has returned, and
- Register 0 (zero) when the duration of residence is less than one (1) year.


[page 208]

6.24 - How long have you lived continuously in this town/municipality?(If less than one year, record zero)
- Record the number of complete years a person has lived in the municipality, without interruption, until July 31, 2010;
- Record the time of residence since the last return for a person who has migrated to another municipality and then returned, and
- Register 0 (zero) when the duration of residence is less than one (1) year.


6.25 - In what state, city or foreign country did you live before moving to this municipality?
1 - State/Municipality
2 - Foreign Country

For a person who has lived in Brazil before moving to this municipality, record the state and the name of the municipality where he/she lived before.

If the person does not know the name of the state or the name of the municipality where he/she lived before, register Does not know state for state and Does not know the name of the municipality for municipality.

If the person only knows the name of the state, register the name and, for the name of the municipality, record Does not know municipality.

If the person only knows the name of the municipality, register for state Does not know the state and the name of the municipality where he/she lived before.

[page 209]

For the person who, before moving to this municipality, lived in a foreign country, record the name of the country where he/she lived before. If he/she does not know the name of the foreign country, register Does not know foreign country.

For the person who has lived in the municipality and migrated to another municipality or foreign country and then returned, record the name of the municipality or foreign country where he/she lived before moving to this municipality.

If the state, municipality or foreign country changed its name, record the current name.

In rare cases, if the person cannot answer the question, please register Does not know state or foreign country. In this case, you have to click on the item - State/Province and select to type a text in the state/province drop down menu.

6.26 - In which state, city or foreign country did you live on July 31, 2005?

1 - State/Municipality
2 - Foreign Country

Record the name of the state and the municipality or the name of the foreign country where the person resided on July 31, 2005.

[page 210]

If the person does not know the name of the state or the name of the municipality where he/she resided on July 31, 2005, record "Does not know state" for state and "Does not know municipality" for municipality.

If the person only knows the name of the state, register its name and "Does not know the municipality" for municipality.

If the person only knows the name of the municipality, record "Does not know state" for state and the name of the municipality in which he/she lived on 31 July 2005.

For the person who resided in a foreign country on July 31, 2005, record the name of the country where he/she resided.

If he/she does not know the name of the foreign country, register "Does not know for foreign country."

If the foreign country or a state has changed its name, record the current name.

If the municipality has changed the name or has been emancipated, record the current name.

In rare cases, if the person cannot answer the question, please register "Do not know state or foreign country". In this case, you should click on the item - State/Province and select to type a text in the state/province drop down menu.

Now, go to your study guide and solve exercises 23-29, which refer to the following parts of the questionnaires: List of Residents and some points of Household Characteristics.

[page 211]

[Review of migration concepts, omitted]

[page 212]

Education
Goal
Collected information about education serves to:

  • Know literacy rates in the country;
  • Quantify the population of children that attend daycare and school;
  • Outline the educational profile of the population, and
  • See the level of education in the workforce and in relation to income

.

Information about the types of courses (College, Master's degree, and PhD) may:

  • Be associated with the characteristics of work, especially those relating to occupations and activities that result in the development of the job market.


[page 213]
For residents 5 years of age or older

B 6.11
6.27 – Do you know how to read and write?


Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes: A person who can read and write a simple note in the language he/she knows. Consider also a literate person who has become physically or mentally unable to read or write.

2 - No: A person who cannot read and write or just writes his/her name. Also consider not knowing how to read and write, a person that has learned how to do it, but due to the poor literacy conditions never fulfilled the learning process.


For all ages
6.28 - Do you go to school or daycare?

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, a public school/day care - A person who attends school or day care in the public sector.
2 - Yes, a private school/day care - A person who attends school or day care in the private sector.


[page 214]

3 - No, but have attended before: A person who does not attend school or daycare, but haa attended in the past.
4 - No, never attended: A person who has never attended school or daycare.

Now, it is important that you learn key information for the accurate completion of this question!

Consider the following types of school or day care in which the person is enrolled and attending:

  • Child daycare (consider as a child care center a place in which a child at early ages attends during the day);
  • Pre-school (or kindergarten);
  • Literacy class - CA;
  • Youth and Adult Literacy - AJA;
  • Regular courses - elementary school or secondary school;
  • Youth and Adult Education - EJA or alternative elementary school or secondary school;
  • Higher Education, Master's degree or PhD, and
  • Professional degree (minimum of 360 hours).


[page 215]

Besides a person who attends courses on site, you should also consider a person attending school at any educational level (primary, secondary or higher) in the form of Long Distance Education -EAD, accredited by the MEC for this type of teaching.

What is it?
What is Long Distance Learning (EAD)?

This mode of learning is based on teaching-learning via technology, which allows the learning process to be versatile, since the interaction between teacher and students can happen at different times and in different physical spaces. Besides that, long distance education also allows for classroom activities.

But what if the person is temporarily impaired to attend classes due to illness, etc.?
In this case, consider that person as attending school.
Do not consider a person attending school if the setting is:

  • A short vocational or cultural course, such as sewing, dance, languages, computing;
  • Higher education, for professional development or as an extension of previous education;


[page 216]

  • Elementary and Secondary Schools (2nd grade) courses offered via radio and television or by correspondence, and
  • Pre-university courses.

Now, you know how to consider if a person is attending school or daycare. However, it is necessary to distinguish when the school or day care center is classified as public or private, as there is one answer for each item.

Consider as:
Public Sector- federal, state and municipal schools and day care centers.

Private Sector- private schools or day care centers, including some establishments funded by neighborhood associations, businesses, foundations and donations.

Whenever the person attended more than one school (public or private) you should count the sector in which the person received the highest level of education.

Attention!
If a person studies a certification or technical degree program and, simultaneously, college, consider college as the highest level.

[page 217]

So, how about a resident who is not currently in school but previously attended school?

This refers to residents who are not currently enrolled in school, but previously attended school, in any of the courses mentioned above whether public or private.

Did you know what names were used in the Brazilian educational system, in earlier times? Let's learn about them!
The old education system in Brazil had:

  • 1st level - divided into eight grades;
  • 2nd level- structured in three or four grades;
  • 3rd level or higher - its structure varied according to the course. At this level, students could earn credit or courses according to the discipline, either by semesters, or yearly.

The system of education prior to the one above, had:

  • Elementary (elementary school) - divided into four, five or six grades, depending on the era;
  • 1st Level (middle school) - divided into four or five sets, depending on the time;
  • 2nd level (classic, scientific, etc.) - Structured in three or four grades, depending on the time, and
  • Higher education- structured according to the discipline.


[page 218]

Also consider as having attended school a person that took the tests according to Article 99 (1st level or 2nd level for middle school) or alternative (elementary or first level or second year) and approved the course, even if she/he never went to school.

And the person who never attended?
This situation is for the person who never attended any course included in the definition of school attendance.

For residents that go to school or day care
6.29 - What level of school do you attend?

Depending on the situation, record:

01 - Day care: for the day care of children in their first few years, institutions could be accredited or not.
02 - Pre-school (or kindergarten): course for children under the age of 6 (six) years, where physical, psychological, intellectual and social development, complementing family and community practices.


[page 219]

03 - Literacy class - CA: literacy course for children of all ages.
04 - Youth and Adult Literacy: literacy course for young people and adults.
05 - Elementary School: basic education courses, organized in years, academic periods, semesters, phases, modules, cycles, etc.
06 -Youth and Adult education or alternative elementary school – EJA: basic elementary education courses for youth and adults.
07 - High School: high school course (former 2nd level), organized by credits or classes during years, academic periods, semesters, phases, modules, cycles, etc., including technical courses.
[page 220]

08 – Youth and Adult education or alternative high school – EJA: basic high school education for youth and adults.
09 - College: undergraduate/college level.
10 - Professional degree (minimum of 360 hours): a post-graduate specialization (non-degree seeking). This type of course should last a minimum of 360 hours.
11 - Master's degree: a master's degree course, even for those who are in preparation for the dissertation.
12 - Doctorate: a doctorate course, including those who are working on writing a thesis.


[page 221]

6:30 - What is your highest grade/year in school?
01 - First year
02 - First grade/Second year
03 - Second grade /Third year
04 - Third grade /Fourth year
05 - Fourth grade/Fifth year
06 - Fifth grade /Sixth year
07 - Sixth grade /Seventh Year
08 - Seventh grade /Eighth year
09 - Eighth grade/Ninth year
10 – Non-leveled course

Record the grade or year that the respondent is attending, according to the duration of the course, 8 or 9 years.

Currently, a change is being implemented on the duration of basic education in which regular school of 8 years will now last 9 years, with mandatory enrollment at 6 years of age, according to the Law 11.274 of February 6, 2006. This process has been gradually taking effect in municipalities, states and the Federal District, although it is until 2010 that there is the expectation that every municipality, state and Federal District have made the change.
In cases where the person attends courses in different grades (accelerated classes, multi-grade or dependencies), check the box corresponding to the year/grade in which the person is registered. In case a person attends a course that is structured by modules, stages, cycles etc., and is not possible to count the time in the regular system, check box 10 - Non-leveled course.

[page 222]

6.31 - What level are you attending?

01 - First grade
02 - Second grade
03 - Third grade
04 - Fourth grade
05 – Non-leveled course


This question should be filled in only if the person is attending the basic education system.

6.32 – Have you completed a college course?

1 - Yes
2 - No

This question inquires if the person that is attending college has already completed another undergraduate degree.

For residents who are currently not in school but previously attended school or day care
6.33 - What was the highest level of school that you attended?

01 - Day care, Pre-school (or kindergarten), Literacy classes - CA
02 - Youth and Adult Literacy
03 - Elementary (Old system)


[page 223]

04 - Middle school (old system)
05 - New system elementary school (from 1st to 3rd grade/from 1st to 4th year)
06 - New system elementary School or 1st level (from 4th grade /5th year)
07 -New system elementary School or 1st level (from 5th to 8th grade/from the 6th to 9th year)
08 - Alternative elementary school or the first level
09 - Middle school or 2nd level (Old system: scientific, classic, etc.)
10 - Alternative middle high school or 2nd level
11 - College
12 - Professional degree (minimum of 360 hours)
13 - Master's degree
14 - Doctorate


Attention!
If the person attended elementary school (or first level) in the new system, record the information in detail according the grade/year as given in answers 5, 6 or 7.

If the person attended primary school (or first level) or middle school (or second level) in the EJA (Youth and Adult Literacy programs) model, you must register item 8 or 10, according to the interviewee's answer.

[page 224]

6. 34 – Have you completed this course?

1 - Yes
2 - No


Attention!
Master's degrees: will be marked as completed if a diploma has been issued and if the dissertation has been approved, even if the diploma has not been given yet.

Doctorate: will be marked as completed if a diploma has been issued and if the dissertation has been approved, even if the diploma has not been received yet.

6.35 - What is the highest course/level that you have completed?

1 - College
2 - Master's degree
3 - Doctorate

According to the each case, you will register one of the three previous options.
Specify the highest degree completed, if applicable, the area/specialty of ??the Master's degree or Doctorate completed. For example: Computer Engineer, Civil Engineer, History of Brazil, Preventive Medicine, Demography, Public Health, etc.

[page 225]

Commuting to SchoolFor residents attending school or day care

Goal
Gather information about a person's school commute between different municipalities and/or foreign countries.

The information for the next question should refer to the answer of question 6.29.

6:36 - In what municipality and state or foreign country are you attending school (or daycare)?

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - This municipality: When a person goes to school or daycare in the same municipality where he/she resides.
2 - In another municipality: When a person goes to school or day care in another municipality than the one where he/she resides. Make sure you select the state and the municipality. If he/she does not know the state, select Does not know state for the state. If he/she does not know the municipality, select Does not know municipality for the municipality.
3 - In a foreign country: When a person goes to school or day care in a foreign country, select the country. If the person does not know the country, enter Does not know foreign country.


[page 226]

In specific cases, if the person cannot answer the question, enter Does not know state or foreign country. In this case, you must click on answer 2 - In another municipality and select the text in the state drop down menu.

[Review of education concepts. omitted]

[page 230]

MarriageFor residents 10 years of age or older

The purpose of this section is to know the marital status of the population, in order to conduct studies on family structures and marriage patterns.

6.37 – Do you live with a spouse or partner?
Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes: when the spouse or partner is a resident of the household.
2 - No, but I had lived with partner/spouse: when the spouse or partner does not live or is not in a relationship to the resident.
3 - Never had partner/spouse: when the person never lived with/had a spouse or partner.


6.38 - Spouse/partner's name
Select the name of the spouse or partner from the List of Residents.
This item will be filled in for women 10 years or older who are not spouses or heads of household.

[page 231]

6.39 - What was the nature of the union?Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Civil and Religious Marriage: A person who is married by civil and religious ceremony, even if it one of the parties was not present, but the marriage was done according to religious and civil law.
2 - Civil marriage only: A person who is married only by a civil union.
3 - Religious marriage only: A person who is married only by a religious union.
4 - Cohabitation: A person who lives with someone without being married in civil or religious union. Consider this option even for those who live in stable relationships with notarized contracts.


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6.40 - What is your marital status?Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Married: A person who has civil marriage status.
2 - Separated or legally separated: A person who is separated or legally separated.
3 - Divorced: A person who is divorced, by law.
4 - Widowed/widower: A person who has a deceased legal partner/spouse.
5 - Single: A person who is single.

[page 233]

Work and IncomeFor residents 10 years of age or older

The purpose of this section is:

  • To investigate the composition of the workforce in the country, distinguishing between job seekers and those who have jobs.
  • To identify jobs' main characteristics, such as occupation, position, employment status, working hours and to see trends in income levels of residents 10 years of age or older.

In the investigation of this section, you should consider the following periods of reference:
WEEK IN REFERENCE - 25 to 31 July 2010.
REFERENCE PERIOD OF 30 DAYS - 02 to 31 July 2010.
MONTH IN REFERENCE - July 2010.

To understand the questions in this part of the questionnaire, you will need to understand some concepts.
Are you ready?

Work
For the Census, the definition of work means the exercise of an economic activity: paid work, unpaid work and work in the production of goods for one's own consumption.

[page 234]

Now we should understand these concepts.

  • Paid work: is an occupation paid in cash, products, goods or benefits (housing, food, clothing, training, etc.), or as in domestic service, which can include payment in cash or benefits (housing, food, clothing, training, etc.).
  • Unpaid work: an unpaid job in the production of goods or services, helping in an economic activity, in the private sector, or in a household.
  • Work in the production of goods for own consumption: work in the production of goods, such as agricultural activities, livestock, forestry, vegetable or mineral extraction, hunting, fishing and aquaculture, intended only to supply at least one member of the household.


Attention to the guidelines below:
It is necessary to pay attention to certain activities that are defined in the Census, as work, but that cannot be understood as such by people who exercise it, such as unpaid work or work in the production of goods for own consumption.

Unpaid work as an economic activity of a household resident can occur in any private sector activity, although it is more commonly found in agricultural activities, livestock and fishing. For example:

1 - A wife may act as secretary without pay, at the law firm of her husband, and
2 - The children who live with a parent, who is a gardener, can help in the planting of vegetables as a worker without pay.


[page 235]

Plant cultivation, animal husbandry, fishing and plant extraction, in order to produce food intended for the consumption for household residents can be developed even in relatively small areas, as long as there is enough space, for example, to raise a few chickens or a small vegetable garden. If this production is exclusively for feeding household residents, it is production of goods for own consumption. However, if a part, even if small, is sold, becomes paid work.

On indigenous regions, due to cultural factors, there are more difficulties to recognize these activities as work and also to determine employment without a formal contract or on their own. The most common income comes from farming activities (commonly called fields), animal husbandry, fishing or plant (herbal) extraction and individual or group craftsmanship. Therefore, it is important to distinguish when the production of crops, livestock, fishing and plant extraction is intended only for household consumption or if it is used for sale or exchange.
Thus, you should observe the area in which you are conducting the interviews in order to ask the correct and most appropriate questions in terms of the region you are visiting.

[page 236]

During the week of July 25 to July 31 2010, for at least one hour:6.41 - Have you worked and earned cash, products, goods or benefits?
Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes - If a person has had a paid job for at least a full hour on the week of reference. Include in this option, a person whose work involves offering his/her services or waiting on customers or clients and, worked for at least a full hour on the week of reference, even if he/she did not have customers or clients.

2 - No- For a person who:
  • Did not have a paid job on the week in reference;
  • During the week of reference did not have paid work because he/she was temporarily away due: to vacation days, leave (paid or unpaid), voluntary absence, strike, temporary suspension of the contract, illness, bad weather conditions or another reason.

For example: a person was employed in a bank and, on the week in reference, did not work because of vacation days. For that person you must register option 2 - No, because he/she was working, but did not exert his/her function throughout the week of reference.

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During the week July 25 to 31, 2010:6.42 - Did you have a paid job in which you were temporarily away?

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes- For the person who had a paid job on the week in reference, but did not work even a full hour because he/she was temporarily away due to: vacation days, leave (paid), voluntary absence, strike, temporary suspension of the contract, illness, bad weather conditions, broken machinery, or any other reason that impeded her/him to work.
For example: a person was employed in a bank and, on the week in reference, did not work because of vacation days. For that person you must register code 1-Yes, because she/he has a job, but did not work during the week in reference.
2 - No - For the person who, on the week in reference, had no paid work.


[page 238]

In the week of July 25 to 31, 2010, for at least one hour:6.43 – Did you work without payment for a member of your household?

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes - For the person who, for at least a full hour on the week in reference, did unpaid work in order to help in an economic activity for a member of his/her household.
For example: A person lives with his/her father, who runs a bar. This person helps his/her father as a clerk at the bar every day for 2 (two) hours without payment. To that person, you should assign the code 1- Yes.
2 - No - For a person who:
  • Has not, throughout the week in reference, worked and has not received payment to help a household resident.
  • For example: A seamstress receives daily help from her daughter to do trimming. The daughter, who lives with her mother receives no payment, but she traveled and has not worked on the week of reference. For the daughter, select code 2 - No.

[page 239]

In the week of July 25 to 31 2010, for at least one hour:6.44 – Have you worked on a plantation, farming or fishing, only to acquire food supplies for the household's residents?
(Including hunting and plant extraction)

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes - For the person who worked for at least one hour, in cultivation, plant extraction, fishing, aquaculture, breeding or hunting animals intended only to acquire food supplies for at least one member of the household (i.e., production was not for sale or exchange).
For example: A person reported that in addition to housework, she/he worked on the cultivation of vegetables for household food supplies. During the week in reference, this person spent eight (8) hours working on cultivation of vegetables. For that person you must code 1 – Yes.
2 - No - For the person who, on the week in reference, had no job

.

[page 240]

Occupied person
To correctly complete the questions regarding the person who worked during the week in reference, you should understand the concept of enterprise.

Enterprise
An enterprise is a business, institution, entity, firm, etc. or even work without a specific space, but developed individually or with the help of others (employees, partners, unpaid household members).

An enterprise can be constituted by:

  • One establishment;
  • Two or more establishments, and
  • No establishment.

It is important to note first that a person with more than one job, or occupied by more than one business, may exercise:

  • The same occupation in both enterprises or not, and
  • Different occupations in different or similar enterprises

.

For example:
-A person was employed as an English teacher in two different schools. This person had the same occupation in two institutions of the same economic activity;


[page 241]

-A person was employed as a doctor in a construction company and also in a state hospital. This person had the same occupation in two enterprises of different economic activities, and
-A person was employed as a secretary in a departmental store and worked at her household, on her own, doing translation services from English to Portuguese. She was had different occupations in two distinct enterprises.
6.45 – How many jobs did you have?
1 - One
2 - Two or more

Attention- Criteria to define the main job on the week in reference:

1 – Highest amount of hours usually worked per week;
2 – Highest typical monthly income;
3 – Job that the person held the longest.

This question investigates the number of jobs, paid and unpaid, a person had on the week in reference. That is, in how many enterprises a person worked during a week.
In counting the number of jobs, you should include:

  • Paid work for at least a full hour a person had on the week in reference or if the person was temporarily away that week;


[page 242]

  • Unpaid work that a person had for at least one full hour on the week in reference.


You should not include in counting of work, production of goods for one's own consumption.

In counting the number of jobs you should know about some special cases.

  • Even if a person working on paid domestic work (i.e., laborer, maid, gardener, pool cleaner, etc.) is not tied to a specific establishment, this type of activity is counted as an enterprise, regardless of the number of units in which the person works.
  • Example: a person works Monday through Thursday as a maid in a family household, on Friday she cleans the apartment of another family. By convention, this person has a paid domestic job, he/she should be considered as employed in one job.
  • The condition of temporary worker in agriculture, livestock, forestry, vegetable or mineral extraction, hunting, fishing and aquaculture and auxiliary services in any of these activities, although he/she may work in more than one enterprise and/or for more than one employer on the week in reference, he/she should be considered as employed in one job.
  • Example: a person, during the week in reference, worked for three different employers as a temporary worker in the soybean harvest. This person should be considered as employed in one job.
[page 243]

  • If the person has more than one credential (or link) to teach in the same area (federal, state or municipal) in the public education, he/she will have as many jobs as are the credentials (or links) she/he has, even when she/he has worked in the same enterprise.
  • Example: a person, on the week of reference, had two separate credentials in the state-level educational system. In the first one, he/she was hired to teach at the elementary school and, in the second, to teach to youth and adult high school. This person should be considered as employed in two jobs.
  • If a person is self-employed or an employer, it is important to consider in defining the number jobs that he/she has, the economic activities that the person operated without the participation of members and those who operated in partnership with one or more individuals were distinct enterprises, may have the same economic activity or not.
  • Example: on the week in reference, the person worked at a restaurant in partnership with a friend (an enterprise). He was also working in another restaurant that he operated alone (an enterprise). This person should be considered as employed in two jobs.
  • In case that a person works on many economic activities that do not constitute a single undertaking or business, you should consider that the person works in more than one enterprise, when it is possible to separate each one: the earned income, revenue, expenditure and investment.


[page 244]

Questions 6.46 to 6.48 refer to the main or only work that the person had on the week in reference.

It is therefore important that you know what is considered as his/her main job.

In order to identify the main job during the week in reference, some criteria is needed. Remember that it is essential that you know what a main job is!

Criteria to define a main job during the week in reference

For the person with more than one job on the week in reference, his/her main job, whether paid or unpaid:

  • Is one in which the person regularly worked the highest amount of hours per week;
  • In case of equal number of hours usually worked per week, choose the one that usually provided the highest typical monthly income, and
  • Also in the case of equal income, choose the one in which the person held the longest by the last day of the week of reference.

Examples:

  • On the week in reference, a person had two jobs, one paid, in which the person normally worked 30 hours per week, and another without payment, which the person normally worked 20 hours per week. During the week in reference, the person was on vacation from his/her paid work, and therefore devoted 36 hours to work in the unpaid work. The paid work must be considered as the main one as he/she often worked more hours per week on it.
[page 245]
  • A person had two jobs, one paid and one unpaid on the week in reference. For the paid work the person worked normally 10 hours a week and the unpaid work the person worked 25 hours per week. This work routine was usual during the week of reference. The unpaid work must be considered as the main one as he/she often worked more hours per week on it than his/her paid work.
Attention!
For the person with more than one job, after applying the criteria and defining the main job, clarify with the person the following questions.

6.46 - What was the main duty your work required?
This question investigates the main duty a person had in a single job or main job during the week in reference.
The main duty that a work requires is the occupation, position, profession or activity that the person exercises.

If the person was temporarily away from paid work on the week in reference, the record must refer to the occupation that the person exercised regularly.

Some aspects should be considered to record the main duty:

a) The main duty should not be confused with professional training.


[page 246]

Examples:
  • A person trained in economics must be recorded as the manager of sales department, provided that it is the main duty he/she has at work,
  • A person trained in medicine should be recorded as a professor of higher education, provided that it is the main duty he/she has at work.
b) The main duty should not be confused with the professional category.

[Table with examples of professional categories and main duties, omitted]

c) Army, Navy, Air Force, Military Police and Firefighters must be registered by their rank (soldier, corporal, lieutenant colonel, general, etc.) and the military branch in which they work, regardless of their professional qualifications.
[page 247]

Examples:
  • A Military Police captain worked in the military as a doctor. This person must be registered as captain of the Military Police, and
  • A colonel in the Air Force worked as a pilot. This person must be registered as a colonel in the Air Force.
d) Heads and upper positions of government must be registered by name or position according to their work, regardless of their professional training.

One should be careful to adequately describe specific occupations in this group, in case that you record jobs with one word or in short form, as it can be confused with another occupational level.

Some examples of complete records are: state legislator, president of public policy, military, national consul, municipal secretary, diplomat, secretary of State, minister of State, etc.

For people employed in the public sector (federal, state or local) and that, during the reference period, were transferred to another sector, the record of occupation and activity will be the sector of origin. However, if the person was occupying a commissioned position, the record of occupation and activity will be the sector in which the person was transferred.

The occupation must be specifically recorded to enable accurate identification. Records such as a mechanic, (...)

[page 248]

(…) analyst, consultant, marketing, worker, operator, assistant, helper, machine operator, general assistant are generic and vague descriptions, since it is impossible to classify the person's occupation.

[Table with examples of general and specific categories, omitted]

[page 249]

Attention!
If a resident gives you a generic description, ask about the specific job he/she does. It is important that you record the job correctly.

6.47 - What was the main activity of the enterprise (business, firm, company, institution, organization, etc.) at your work?
This question intends to identify the main activity, i.e., the main purpose or main branch of the enterprise (business, firm, institution, company or entity) in which the person had worked on the week in reference.

For employees (with or without a contract, military or public service), record the main activity of the enterprise in which the person was hired or in which she/he works.

For employers and self-employed workers, record the main activity of the business.

For unpaid workers, record the main activity of the enterprise for which the person worked without payment.

For workers in the production of goods for their own consumption, record the main activity as dedicated to the purpose of producing food for own household consumption.

Question 6.46 asks about the occupation a person had on the week in reference, and now the following questions will ask about the activity. Do you know if the two are connected? Look carefully at the following explanation.

[page 250]

Attention!
The main duty or occupation is a characteristic related to a worker and the activity is a characteristic related to the enterprise where the person is employed or has his/her employees, as described before. Some occupations are typical of certain activities, but not exclusively. For example, a truck driver can perform his/her occupation in the city transportation system or in a different industry; a top-level nurse can perform his/her occupation in a hospital or a company outside of the area of health.

As a general rule for recording the activity

Record the activity of the enterprise (business, firm, institution, company or entity) to which the person is bound. In the case of an enterprise with more than one activity, the record must refer to the main activity, i.e., register only a single activity.

Examples:

  • A person works on a plantation of bananas and coffee, where the main activity is the cultivation of bananas. The record of the main activity of the enterprise should be banana plantation, even if the person's work was mainly on the cultivation of coffee;
  • A person is working in a factory of leather handbags and shoes, where the main activity is the production of bags. The record of the main activity of the enterprise should be manufacturing leather handbags, even if the person's work was mainly on the manufacture of leather shoes;


[page 251]

  • A person is working in an enterprise that developed computer programs and gave computer courses to companies, where the development of computer programs is the main activity. The record of the main activity of the enterprise should be the development of computer programs, even if the person's work was mainly linked to the courses given to companies;
  • A person is working in an enterprise that manufactured and had maintenance services for industrial machinery, where the manufacture of machinery is the main activity. The record of the main activity of the enterprise should be manufacturing industrial machinery, even if the person's work was mainly linked to maintenance services, and
  • A person is working in a federal government agency focused on the production of statistics. The record of the main activity of the enterprise should be the production of statistics in the federal public agency, even if the person develops their work, for example, in the printing area of the public agency.

In the case of activities carried out in educational endeavors, you must specify the level of education in which the enterprise works on (daycare, preschool, elementary, middle school, higher education). In the case of enterprises that had more than one level of education, record:

  • The level of education where the person works on, if she/he only has one job, and
  • The highest level of education of the enterprise, if the person works on an area that is linked to the whole enterprise.
[page 252]

Examples:

  • An elementary school teacher who worked at a school teaching classes from preschool to high school, the record should be basic education, since the person only worked at this level of education;
  • A janitor who worked in a preschool and elementary school that were in the same building, the record should be elementary school, and
  • A director of a school that offers vocational programs and higher education technology courses, the record should be vocational programs since he leads the vocational programs.

In the case of health areas the record must identify if the enterprise includes or not hospitalization.

In the case that an enterprise operates in different sectors, the record should be:

  • The main activity of the enterprise, in the case a person whose work was connected to the different sectors or activities of the enterprise, and
  • The activity of the enterprise in which a person works.

Examples:

  • A person with a partner operated an agribusiness enterprise which included the cultivation of sugar cane and sugar mill, but the latter was the main activity. The record of the main activity should be sugar mill

;

[page 253]

  • A person was employed as cane farmer in an agribusiness enterprise which included the cultivation of sugar cane and sugar mill. The record of the main activity must be cultivation of sugar cane because the person exercised his/her work on the farm, and
  • A person was employed as a pump operator at an oil refinery owned by a company dedicated to various other activities (extraction of petroleum, fertilizer manufacturing, etc.). The record of the main activity should be oil refinery, because the person exercised his/her work in an establishment of the company dedicated to petroleum refining.

Attention to the following situations:

a) a person is employed in a business that works for other companies, record the activity of the enterprise in which the person works, and not the business where the services were provided.
  • If a person is employed in a company of cleaning services in a public agency, the record must be the activity of the company in which he/she was employed, as an aid;
  • If a person is employed in a surveillance and security business and works on a bank vigilance, the record should be surveillance and security services;


[page 254]

  • A person was hired as a farm labor to work temporarily on a coffee crop, the record should be farm labor, and
  • A person was hired temporarily by a contractor as a telephone assistant, the record must be the activity of the company in which she/he had employment, i.e. temporary contract.
b) a person who worked for an enterprise that provided services to other enterprise, the record must be the activity of the enterprise in which the person is hired, and not the location where the service is provided.
Examples:
  • A person working at a company responsible for a coffee shop in a bookstore. The record of the main activity of the enterprise should be coffee shop, even if it operates within the bookstore;
  • A person working in an enterprise specializing in services for agricultural pest control. The record of the main activity of the enterprise services must be agricultural pest control, even if the person develop his work on farms, and
  • A person working in an enterprise that specializes in planting and harvesting agricultural products. The record of the main activity of the enterprise services should be planting and harvesting agricultural products, even if the person develop his/her work on the farm.


[page 255]

Attention!
Do not register company's name, initials, acronyms, etc.

It is essential that the record of the work place clarifies the purpose of the business, firm, company, institution or entity. Thus, you should avoid generic records. See the examples below.

[Table with examples of generic and specific records, omitted]

[page 257]

6.48 – In this job you were:
This question seeks to capture the occupational position and category of employment in the person's main job on the week of reference.

But what is "occupational position"?

Occupational position is the relationship between the person and the enterprise in which he/she works. The employee is a person who worked for an employer (individual or legal entity), being committed to fulfill a day's work and receiving a remuneration in cash, goods, products or benefits (housing, food, clothing, training, etc.).

[page 258]

In the occupational position an employee is:

  • A person who did military service for a salary;
  • A priest, minister of the church, pastor, rabbi, monk, nun and other clergyman;
  • A person working in housekeeping services with wages, or benefits in one or more households;
  • Apprentices and trainees receiving only learning or training as payment;
  • Persons employed only receiving (housing, food, clothing, training, etc.).

Depending on the situation, record:

01 - Employee with a formal contract: A person employed with a formal contract.
02 - Soldier in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Military Police or Fire Department: A person who serves in the Army, Navy, Air Force or Auxiliary Forces as Military Police or Fire Department, including the person who had obligatory military service.


[page 259]

03 - Employee of the civil services judicial branch in any instance (federal, state or local): A person employed at an institution, foundation, government agency, etc., or at the governmental (executive, legislative, judicial) branches no matter if it is at the local, state or federal level.
04 - Employee without contract: A person employed without a formal contract, who has not been in military services or does not work in any governmental institution.
05 - Self-employed: A person who works in his/her own business, alone or with a partner, without having employees, even if counting on help from an unpaid worker.
06 - Employer: A person who worked in his/her own enterprise with at least one employee.
07 - Unpaid worker: A person who, on the week of reference, worked to help household residents but did not received payment.


[page 260]

6.49 - How many people have you employed in this work?
If a person had more than one enterprise and more than one employee, you should count all employees in the multiple enterprises that were owned by the person on the week of reference.
If a person was a member of a cooperative enterprise you should not include him/her as an employee of the business in the cooperative.

Employees, should be:

  • Those who had a job only part of the week of reference, and
  • Those who have maintained a job, although they were temporarily away from work (due to vacation, leave, etc.) on the week of reference.

Consider the number of employees working in the enterprise, whatever the category of employment (with or without a formal contract) is. This count does not include business partners and unpaid workers.

Depending on the situation, record:

1- 1 to 5 people: When the enterprise had on the week of reference, one to five people as employees.
2- 6 people or more: When the enterprise had on the week of reference, six or more people as employees.

[page 261]

6.50- Were you a taxpayer of social security in any job you had during the week of July 25 to 31 2010?
For this question, consider as Social Security:

  • INSS (National Institute of Social Security);
  • Social Security Union Plan, and
  • Social Security from the state or municipality level.

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes, in the main job: A taxpayer of social security in the main job during the week of reference, including employees without a formal contract, or self- employed.
2 - Yes, in another work: A taxpayer of social security that during the week of reference paid his/her dues on the other work he/she had on the week of reference and which was not the main job.
3 - No: A person who did not pay taxes to social security institutes in any job he/she had on the week of reference.


[page 262]

Work Income

Employee

For employees, income is the net amount received in cash, products or goods from a job. Income received in the form of benefits or goods that are not reimbursed in cash, such as exchange of goods with the employer, housing, clothing, food stamps, transportation vouchers, training or workplace learning, education or day care paid directly by the employer, etc. should not be counted.

Gross income in cash
The gross income received in cash from work may consist of:

- A wage line;
- The sum of several items (wage or salary, bonus, allowances, compensation, bonuses, overtime work, benefits - transportation, food, etc. - paid in cash and other ways).

In the calculation of gross income, you should not exclude payments for administration purposes (such as social security, income tax, child support, union fees, retirement accounts, life insurance and health insurance, etc.).

For the person who was on a leave by the federal, state or local social security (...)

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(…), register his/her gross monthly income usually earned in cash (due to sickness benefit, assistance for accidents at work, etc.).

Gross income in products or goods
The gross income received in products or goods from working on the activities of agriculture, livestock, forestry, vegetable or mineral extraction, hunting, fishing and aquaculture, is computed by its value in money, excluding the amount for household consumption.

Self-employed and employer
For self-employed and employer persons, income can be in cash, products or goods. See the two items below.

Money Earnings
Money earnings are a fixed amount or a percentage of the profits of the enterprise, not excluding personal payments (social security, income tax, etc.). In the case that the enterprise is not well organized to determine total income from work you should identify revenue and expenditure (payment of employees, raw materials, electricity, telephone, equipment and other investments) and count the balance for enterprise income.

Gross income from seasonal (temporary production, i.e., that does not occur throughout the year) should be divided to calculate the monthly average value, actual or estimated (according to market value) that the person usually earned. In calculating the average, consider the (...)

[page 264]

(…) time that was devoted to seasonal production (12 months, six months, four months, etc.) that generated the income, products or goods.

Product or good earnings

Earning products or goods from the activities of agriculture, livestock, forestry, vegetable or mineral extraction, hunting, fishing and aquaculture, should be counted by its cash value as the difference between the value of products and goods for the market and expenses necessary for its production, excluding the amount destined for household consumption.

Now, read the questions and instructions needed to fill out the questionnaire.

Attention!
For the person who worked only part of the month of reference, record the value of his/her normal monthly gross income (in the case of the employee) or earnings (in case of self-employed or employer).

To the person (employee, employer or self-employed) that had variable income, record the value of the average gross income or earning in July 2010.

The record of a person's income or earnings, does not depend if the payment was actually made or not during the month of reference.

[page 265]

6.51 - In your main job, what was the monthly gross income (earnings) that you usually earned in July 2010?
Depending on the situation, record:

1 - In cash, products or goods: A person who was employed, employer or self-employed and received income in cash, products or goods from the main job. Select the range that corresponds to the income received in the main work and record the value of the usual monthly gross income (employee) or the value of regular monthly earnings (employer or self-employed).
2 - Only benefits (housing, food, training, etc.): A person who, in the main job, has been paid exclusively in benefits (housing, food, clothing, transportation, training, etc.), that is, was not paid in cash.
0 - No income: A person who did not get any type of income from the main job on the week of reference.


[page 266]

6.52 - In your other jobs, what was the monthly gross income (or earnings) that you usually earned in July 2010?
Depending on the situation, record:

1 - In cash, products or goods: A person who was employed, employer or self-employed and received income in cash, products or goods from secondary job. Select the range that corresponds to the income received in the secondary job and record the value of the usual monthly gross income (employee) or the value of regular monthly earnings (employer or self-employed).

2 - Only benefits (housing, food, training, etc.): A person who, in the secondary job, has been paid exclusively in benefits (housing, food, clothing, transportation, training, etc.), that is, was not paid in cash.

0 - No income: A person who did not get any type of income from the other jobs he/she has on the week of reference.

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Attention!

For the person who had more than one paid work on the week of reference, you should record the sum of monthly gross income of the usual work. The record of the amount of income should be done in Brazilian reais [Brazilian currency].

Working HoursQuestion 6.53 is intended to capture working weekly hours in the person's main job during the date of reference.

But what are working hours?
Working hours are those in which a person:

a) Works in the workplace;
b) Works outside the workplace on tasks related to his/her occupation. For example: a teacher prepares lessons and corrects tests in his/her household;
c) Stays in the workplace to perform his/her tasks, even without getting clients or customers;
d) Stays in the workplace, waiting without being able to perform his/her tasks due to machinery failure, accidents, lack of material or task assignment;
[page 268]

e) Works for preparation, maintenance and cleaning of work tools;
f) preparation time to elaborate programs, schedules, reports and forms related to work, including those from legal obligations, and
g) break periods at work, including breaks to drink water, coffee or tea, etc.

During working hours you should not include:

a) lunch or meal breaks, and
b) time spent commuting from home to work.
6.53 - In your main job, how many hours per week do you usually work?
_________________ Hours

Record the number of hours per week that a person usually works in the main job (on the week of reference).

The record must count full hours. For example, 40 hours and 55 minutes should be recorded as 40 hours, and 35 hours and 20 minutes should be 35 hours.

The usual working hours are those that a person spends at work. Therefore, this information is independent if the person worked during the week of reference.

[page 269]

In jobs in which working hours are very irregular, the hours usually should be counted by the average of total hours worked.

For people who began working on the week of reference, or shortly before, you should record the hours specified in the contract, verbally or written, or the hours that the person will work normally.

For example:

• a person was on vacation on the week of reference, but normally worked from 8 am to 5 pm with a lunch break at noon, from Monday to Friday. During his/her workday he/she used to just make a few short breaks (for coffee, drink water, rest and move around the workplace, etc.). For this person, you should record 40 hours.

For people without a job on the week of reference

Now, you will learn about the requirements for residents who were not working on the week of reference.
Pay attention to the instructions to fill in the last questions in regards to Work and Income!

[page 270]

6.54 - During July 2 to July 31, 2010, have you received assistance to get a job?1 - Yes
2 - No
The purpose of this question is count a person without a job on the week of reference and:

• did not have any work during the reference period of 30 days, but try to get a job within this period, and
• after losing his/her last job he/she had on the reference period of 30 days, try to get a job within this period.

Depending on the situation, record one of two options (yes or no).

But what does it mean to "try to get a job"?
Some strategies might be considered when a person try to get a job:

  • Consult employers;
  • Be examined for public jobs;
  • Apply for public jobs;
  • Consult an employment agency or labor union;
  • Consult the National Employment System – SINE (Ministry of Labor and Employment);
  • Place or answer advertisements;


[page 271]

  • Consulting a relative, friend or colleague;
  • Start his/her own business or become an employer, and
  • Do any other activity to get a job.

Consider also using the Internet as a way to find a job. For example, emailing a friend, sending CVs to employers through e-mail or registering as a jobseeker at an employment agency website on the Internet.

To fill in this question better, see the examples for each response option.

Example: a person worked until June 30, 2010. On that date, he/she resigned and began consulting agencies to get another job. In this case, record 1 - Yes

Example: a person worked in a factory for three years but was fired on June 5, 2010. He/she is still without a job, but he/she is not looking for a new one because he/she wants to wait for unemployment. In this case, register 2 - No.


[page 272]

6.55 - If you acquired a job, would you be available to work during the week of July 25 to 31, 2010?
The purpose of this question is to see if the person tried to get a job during the reference period of 30 days and that could have worked on the week of reference in a job that could be offered to him/her.

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - Yes: A person who, on the week of reference, was available to start a new job.
2 - No: A person who, on the week of reference, was unavailable to start a job.


Income from other sourcesQuestions 6.56 to 6.59 are intended to capture the usual income of residents 10 years of age or older who do not work.
In case of income, it is listed in each question and not paid on July for some reason, then record a monthly estimate of the amount the person should have received on that month.

[page 273]

Late or pending payments should not be counted in the monthly income.
If a person under 10 years of age receives some income then they must be registered in the questionnaire of his/her caretaker.

In July 2010, did you have a monthly income of:

6.56 - Retirement or pension from Social Security (Federal, State or local)?1 - Yes
0 - No

This item is intended to see whether, in July 2010, the person had an continuous monthly income from retirement or pension (provided that the person was the beneficiary) from Social Security, which may be from: the armed forces, retirement, pension, Social Security Plan of the Union or the federal Social Security Institute (National Social Security Institute - INSS), state or municipality, including the Funrural [Specific retirement money to people in rural areas].

[page 274]

6.57 – Welfare assistance or family scholarship program for the eradication of child labor?1 - Yes
0 - No
This question is intended to capture whether, in July 2010, the person had a monthly income from the Family Scholarship Program or Program for the eradication of child labor – PETI.

Let's learn about each source of income:

Family Scholarship Program
It is a federal program of conditional cash transfer, which benefits poor families.

Program for the Eradication of Child Labor - PETI
It is a federal program that aims to contribute to the eradication of all forms of child labor in the country, serving families whose children and adolescents are under 16 years old who work.

[page 275]

6.58 - Income from other welfare programs?1 - Yes
0 - No

This question is intended to capture whether, in July 2010, the person had a monthly income from welfare programs such as Benefit to Provide Continued Assistance - BPC-LOAS; unemployment benefits; assistance from a federal, state or municipal source; allowance or donation of indigents; food stamps; (pension plan); pension from social assistance; insurance company or pension fund as the beneficiary of another person (private pension); child support, scholarships and other programs.

Let's look at some of the welfare programs:

  • Benefit to Provide Continued Assistance - BPC-LOAS
  • Is a monthly salary to elderly people (65 years or older) provided by the Law of Social Assistance - LOAS. Elderly people that are disabled or unable to live independently, much less work, can get this benefit.
  • Unemployment
  • Social security benefits, guaranteed by the Constitution, which are intended to provide temporary financial assistance to workers currently unemployed

.

[page 276]

  • Allowance or donation of indigents: is the income received in cash by an indigent without repayment.
  • Child support: is the income received for children and/or ex-spouse support paid by former spouse.


6.59 - Other sources of income (savings interest, investments, rent paid, retirement or private pension funds, etc.).1 - Yes
0 - No

This question is intended to capture whether, in July 2010, the person that had other sources of income such as: rent, savings interests, investments, rent paid, partnership, copyright or any other type of income usually not included in previous questions.

Rent from financial investment refers to: a fixed interest on income (receipt and deposit, bills, bonuses, etc.), from shared investments, investment funds, equity funds, etc.

[page 277]

If you recorder one affirmative answer from questions 6.56 to 6.59, question 6.591 will be shown to complete - In July 2010, what was the total value of your income? Then, select the corresponding range and record the total value of income from retirement, pension, social programs, and investments from other sources that the person had in July 2010.

In the Basic Questionnaire, the section of Income also has a question, designed to capture the total value of monthly income that a person received in July 2010.

Income - Basic Questionnaire
For an individual aged 10 years or older

6.12 - What was the monthly gross income, that you usually earned in July 2010?
For the person who has not yet received his/her income for the month of July 2010, record the value that he/she is going to receive.

Depending on the situation, record:

1 - In cash, products or goods: The sum monthly gross income from: job, retirement, pension, rental, scholarships, unemployment, Family Scholarship Program, PETI, BPC, other welfare programs, savings interests, financial investments, etc.


[page 278]

2 - Only benefits: A person whose only income in the month of July 2010 was in-kind (housing, food, clothing, training, etc.) from work.
0 - No income: A person who did not have any income or benefit on the month of July 2010.

Work commute
For residents that have a job

This section of the questionnaire will contain questions about people's commuting to work in order to learn about the following objectives:

- Identify links between municipalities that constitute urban areas, allowing an integrated planning for public transportation to mobilize urban regions more efficiently.
- estimate an adequate need of public transportation according to its demand.
The following information refers to commuting for a single job or main job.

[page 279]

6.60 - In which municipality, state, or foreign country do you work?Depending on the situation, record:
1 - In own home: when a person works in his/her own home.
2 – Only in this municipality, but not in own home: when a person works in the municipality where he/she lives, but not in his/her own home.

Note that there are situations in which the person works close to his/her residence, requiring minimum commuting, for example, caretakers or doormen who reside in the building where they work, or household where they work, etc. Still, these commutes should be included in this option.

3 - In another municipality: when a person works in a municipality other than where he/she resides. Record the state and the municipality in which he/she works. If he/she does not know the state, select Do not know the state. If he/she does not know the municipality, select Do not know the municipality.
4 - In a foreign country: when a person works in a foreign country. Register the foreign country in which he/she works. If he/she does not know the country, record Do not know foreign country.

[page 280]

5 - On more than one city or country: when a person works in more than one municipality or country.

In the case that the person cannot answer the question, you, should click on item 3 - In another municipality, and select Do not know the state or foreign country.

6.61 – Do you return home from work every day?1 - Yes
2 - No

The purpose of this question is to separate people who actually do daily commute from home to work, or those who for example, remain at work or in another municipality during the week and return home only on weekends.

[page 281]

6.62 - How much time do you spend commuting from home to work?

1 - Up to 05 minutes
2 - From 06 minutes to half an hour
3 - Half an hour to an hour
4 - From one hour to two hours
5 - More than two hours

Check the usual time spent in commuting between the person's residence and their work place (only or main job). If the commuting occurs from school, the duration must correspond to that route. If the person uses more than one means of transportation to work, consider the sum of time spent.

[page 282]
[Review of Work and Income concepts, omitted]

[page 285]

Fertility
For female residents 10 years of age or older

The questions in this part of the questionnaire are intended to know the reproductive history of women through the number of children, and their survival, to carry out estimates of patterns and levels of fertility and mortality. This information provides the demographic parameters that are used in population projections conducted by IBGE.

Let's understand all the criteria and guidelines for the proper completion of questionnaires?

[page 286]

6.63 - How many sons and daughter have you had born alive before July 31, 2010?
1 – Had children born alive
___ Men
___ Women

2 - Had no children (alive)

To answer this question, you should consider as live birth, those which, after birth, regardless of the duration of pregnancy, showed sign of life (breathing, crying, movement of voluntary muscle contraction, heartbeat, etc.), even if he/she died thereafter.

Record by gender, the number of children born alive before July 31, 2010.

For example: if the person had two sons, both should be recorded in category 2 Men and 0 Women.
When the person had no children (alive) before July 31, 2010, mark 2- Had no children (alive).

6.64 – How many of your sons and daughters were alive in July 31, 2010?
1 - Children alive in 07/31/2010

___ Men
___ Women

2 – Do not know the number of children (men and women) alive in 07/31/2010

[page 287]

Pay attention to the instruction below!

  • If a person had children alive before July 31, 2010, record 1 - Children alive on 07/31/2010
  • Register by gender, the number of children who were alive on July 31, 2010.
  • When children who are alive are of the same sex, record 0 (zero) in the corresponding field of the opposite sex.
  • When the respondent has no children (alive) before July 31, 2010, record 0 (zero) in both fields.
  • When the person does not know how many children were alive before 31 July 2010, record 2 - Do not know the number of men and women alive on 07/31/2010.


6.65 - What is the sex of the last child born alive before July 31, 2010?
1 - Men
2 - Women


6.66 - What is the month and year of birth of the last child born alive before July 31, 2010? (If unknown, record child's age).
Month:
Year:
Age of the child on 07/31/2010:

Record the month and year of birth of the last child born alive before July 31, 2010.

[page 288]

In case that is not possible to obtain the month and year of birth and after exhausting all efforts, record the age that the child would have on the date of reference, and if he/she is alive or deceased.
If his/her age is less than 1 (one) year, record 0 (zero).

6.67 - Was this child alive on July 31, 2010?

1- Yes
2- No
9 Do not know

6.68 - What was the month and year that this child died?1 - Knows year and month or year only

____ Month
____ Year

2 - Do not know

Record the month and year of death. If the respondent does not know the month, record the year. If the respondent does not know the year, record 2 - Do not know.

[page 289]

6.69 - How many children did you have that were born dead before July 31, 2010? (7 months pregnancy or more without any sign of life at birth. Abortions not included)1 - Had stillbirth
____ Men
____ Women
____Total
2 - Has no child born dead
3 - Do not know


Consider as stillbirth a pregnancy with less than seven months and that, after delivery, the child did not show any evidence of life such as breathing, heartbeat, pulsation of the umbilical cord, etc.
Do not include fetal deaths (abortions, loss, etc.) that occurred with less than seven months of gestation, i.e., less than 28 weeks.
A child born alive, but died in the first hours of life, must be registered as a child born alive.

Record the number of children born dead before 31 July 2010, according to sex, leaving the total in blank.
Men ____ Women ____ Total ____
If the children that were born dead were of the same sex, record 0 (zero) in the opposite sex.

[page 290]

When the person does not know the sex of at least one of the children stillborn, you should record only the total.

The next question closes the section "Household Characteristics" and will be applied to all residents.

To all residents

B 6.13

6.70- Record who provided the information about this person: 1 - The same person
2 - Another resident
3 – Non-residents

Note: For option 2, a drop down menu will open the list of residents and you should mark the name of the person providing the information.

[page 291]

Mortality
This issue will be investigated only for Private Occupied Households whether permanent or improvised.

Goal
Obtain mortality rates in the country by sex and age.

B 7.01
7.01 - Between August 2009 to July 2010, did any person that lived with you die? (including newborn children and elderly)
1 - Yes
2 - No

If you checked option 2, end the interview.

B 7.02
7.02 - Name

Enter the first name of person(s) who died in the period in reference.

B 7.03
7.03- Month and year of death

select from the drop down menu the month and year in which the person died.

[page 292]

7.04 - Sex

1 - Male
2 - Female


7.5 - Age at death
Depending on the situation, record:

Years (1 year or more): Record, in years, age at death for people who were 1 year of age or older when they died.
In month (Less than 1 year): Record in months, age at death for people who were less than one year old when they died.

If the respondent does not know the age, record the presumed age of the deceased when death occurred.

Done! Now you know all the questions of the questionnaires and have learned the information and guidance necessary to complete each item!

[page 293]

Now, let's learn about the Collective Household Form in order to understand how to fill it out.

Understanding the Collective Household Form

By registering a Collective Household with resident in your handheld computer you will need to provide some data, filling in the corresponding fields in the Collective Household form.

The form contains:
  • An Identification of the Collective Household, and
  • List of Units with residents.
To identify a Collective Household, you will have to fill in the following data:

Head of Collective Household: Record the name of the person responsible for administering the Collective Household (or manager).
Name or identification of Collective Household: Record the name by which the property is known. Examples: Hotel Bandeirantes, Asylum Golden Age.
Phone: Check whether there is a landline or cellphone number and record the area code and phone number used by the Collective Household. If no phone, check "No".
In addition to the identification, you need to fill in the List of Units with residents.

[page 294]

To do so, you should consider:

A Family group in a Collective Household
A group of people who are related by kinship, residing in one or more units of the Collective Household;

An Individual in Collective Household
A person who resides in a Collective Household, and who shares the expenses with another person (with no relationship).

Now we will see how to fill out the List of Units with resident, consisting on the following data:

Name of Head of Collective Household or Individual Resident: Enter the first name and last name of the head of the family group or individual resident.

Identification of unit within the Collective Household: Record the identification of the unit occupied by the resident. Examples: room 1, bed 1, etc.

After you have recorded the information, click the Add button. If you want to exclude any unit listed, select the unit and click the Delete button.

How should the information be recorded in the List of Units with residents?

In each Collective Household record in the List of Units with resident, the name of the head of household for the family or the name of an individual resident , following the sequential order of the units, as in the criteria for Sector Coverage.

Remember that in the case of buildings with more than one floor, you should start from the top floor to the lowest, registering units clockwise.

[page 295]

When the family group occupies more than one residential unit at a Collective Household, you should make a single record in the List of Units with Residents, identifying the units occupied.

Having absent residents of a unit during your visit, this unit should not be recorded. You should return to the household during the collective collection as many times as necessary to include this unit and to conduct the interview.

How should the questionnaires be applied?
For collective households, there will be a questionnaire for each family group and one for every individual resident, as indicated by the model system, either Basic Sample questionnaire.
If the family group is composed only of persons under 10 years of age (usually orphans), the procedure is the same for individual resident, that is, they must be registered one by one in the List of Units with residents and each person should complete a questionnaire.

When you finish with the List of Units with resident in a Collective Household, select a unit, click the Next arrow, and then the following question will appear: Are all Residents, Head of household or Individual, were included?
- If the answer is No, the system reopens the List of Units with resident so that the other residents can be included.
- If the answer is Yes, you must select each resident either head of household and/or individual and then the following question will appear: Resident (name of resident) is an Individual in Collective Household?

[page 296]

- If the answer is Yes, the characteristics of the each resident should be included, according to the questionnaire indicated by the application (Basic or Sample).
- If the answer is No, the system will open the List of Residents with the name of the head of the family group to include other components of this group and then click the Next button to complete the characteristics of each resident.

Fieldwork Practice

[Figure of a map sector numbered and with street names]

After recording more addresses in Dr. Penna Street, André [the interviewer] turned right again and started the last side of his first block. This side belongs to Fabricio Pilar Street and André only had to confirm it.

The first unit found was the Hotel Salgado Filho. André followed this procedure: he confirmed the address and added some missing data, such as the modifier and the existence of identification information. He entered and asked for the hotel manager, identifying himself properly and explaining that he was the interviewer and was collecting (...)

[page 297]

(...) Census information. The hotel manager received him and made himself available to provide the necessary information.

As expected there were residents, , he recorded the establishment as a Collective Household with residents type "2 - Hotel, pension and similar." Thus, the system opened the identification for the Collective Household. André recorded the following information: Name of responsible - Mr. Augusto Branco, manager; collective household name: Hotel Salgado Filho, Phone: 33 1234-5678. After that, André sought for the residents to start collecting data. The family of José occupies two rooms in the hotel. In the first room live Mr. José and his wife, and in the second room, the nanny, Maria, and their son.
André recorded on the list of units with a resident:

For Mr. José his family

  • Name of the Head of the family group: José Moura.
  • Identification Unit within the Collective Household: Rooms 1 and 2.
  • Andre conducted the interview, selected by the system for the family group of Mr. José and to the nanny Maria
  • Name of Individual resident: Maria Nascimento.
  • Identification Unit within the Collective Household: Room 2.

Then André interviewed Maria, after the system selected a questionnaire.

[page 298]

As there were more residents to be registered at the hotel, André closed the records of this unit and moved on. In the same side, even in Fabricio Pilar Street, he found some vacant households, some occupied households and other establishments, and then he conducted interviews. When he reached the end of the side, he found that he had completed his first census of the block! That is, he was able to start the following block. He looked again at his paper map, and proceeded to the second block to be covered in his sector - the second block of the map. The first side was to be worked again in Dr. Penna Street. André went back and, as he had done all the time, ended this and all other blocks of his census sector with a work of extreme quality.
André has conducted a census of other sectors in his municipality and was recognized for having done an excellent job.

[Figure of an interviewer]

I'm sure you'll have much success as an interviewer of the Population Census 2010! Good job!

[page 299]

Remember!

You have learned how to do the interview, and how to establish a good relationship with the interviewee; it is important that you treat him/her with courtesy and respect. Also, you know some of the precautions to be taken in order to ensure the quality of information, such as interviewing the head of household, strictly following all instructions in your manual and asking the questions in the questionnaire as they are.

Also, you learned about the two questionnaires used in the Census - the Basic and the Sample. In this manual we based the instruction on the Sample questionnaire, because it is more extensive than the Basic Questionnaire. But over the content, all items in the Basic Questionnaire were also placed with the Sample questionnaire. These questionnaires have different themes, each with its intended purpose.

These two questionnaires will be opened only by the system when you register Occupied Private Permanent Households, Improvised Private Household or Collective Household with residents.

In the case of the Collective Household with resident, the system opens the questionnaire after the Collective Household Form is completed.

The Collective Household Form is the tool to record the information of the Collective Household residents. It contains in the identification of the Collective Household and List of Units with Residents.

[page 300]
Remember!

Before we close this manual, remember: that before the closing of the questionnaires, it is essential that all questions are answered for all residents listed in the List of Residents.
At the end of your manual, you will find a table with all requirements of the two questionnaires. Through it, you'll get an overview of the Sample and the Basic Questionnaires.
Do not forget that in both questionnaires there will be questions to skip or to move from, since everything depends on the situation of the interviewee. You will have the opportunity to check these practical steps during your training.

Now you know all the questions in the questionnaires. Before you finish reading the manual, solve exercises 32-37 of your study guide, which assess the sections on Marriage, Work and Income, Fertility and Mortality, and Collective Household Form.

[page 301]

Attention!
When closing the entire questionnaire on your handheld computer, the screen will display Closing Report of the Questionnaire for you to verify that all requirements have been properly completed. And this is not the only report to which you have access. Next, you will know all the reports that will facilitate your work.

Reports
When working in your Sector Coverage, you should consult the daily reports of the Data Collection. They will help you to check your work and update the data collection. To access the reports you should go to the first screen and then click on the Reports option.

[FIGURE OF A SCREEN SHOWING HOW TO ACCESS THE REPORTS]

To assist you in tracking your work a set of reports is available to give you the current status of the collection and to facilitate monitoring your work.

[page 302]

Attention!

You should consult the reports regularly to avoid unnecessary pendings.

Report Types

  • 01 - Progress Collection
  • 02 - Summary of Streets/Landmarks
  • 03 - Summary of Blocks/Sides
  • 04 - Summary of Addresses
  • 05 - Summary of Types
  • 06 - Summary of Questionnaires
  • 07 - Addresses Listing
  • 08 - Block/Side Listing
  • 09 - List of Households
  • 10 - Type
  • 11 - Pending Questionnaires - In person
  • 12 - Pending Questionnaires - via Internet


[page 303]

Now we will learn the details of each report.
Progress Collection - Allows you to control all the data collection in your sector. In this report, you can check:

  • Preview of Total Lists of Households;
  • Total of available addresses;
  • Total of confirmed addresses;
  • Total of Address not found;
  • Total of number of addresses included;
  • Total of Sites worked;
  • Total of pending addresses;
  • Total of private households;
  • Total of collective households;
  • Total of establishments, and
  • Last visited unit.
Summary of Households - Displays the total units - Not Started, Worked, Not Found, Change Name Spelling.
Summary of Block/Side - Displays the total blocks/sides - Not Started, In Progress, In Pending Progress , Completed, Not Found, and NAR.
Summary of Addresses - Displays the total addresses - Preview List, Added, Not Started, Completed and Not Found.
Summary of Types - Displays the totals for all types in this sector.

[page 304]

Summary of Questionnaires - Displays the total questionnaires for a sector, by type: Basic questionnaire in person, Sample questionnaire in person, Basic questionnaire via Internet, Sample questionnaire via Internet, Collective questionnaire in person and Collective questionnaire via Internet.
List of Addresses - Displays the list of existing units in the Sector.
List of Block/Side - presents a short list of blocks/sides, according to the progress of the collection.
List of Households - Displays a list of all addresses worked in the sector, sorted by street or block/side, or by unit number viewed in the order of the route.
Type - Displays all addresses and their classified type. In this report, selecting one or more types, will give you access to the desired address to make any the correction if needed.
Through this report, you can quickly locate on your handheld computer all addresses registered as closed to return to the household and conduct the interview with their residents, as well as to find and return to units with pending work.

Pending In person Questionnaires - Displays the list of addresses in which there is any pending questionnaire collected in person, and where you should return for the pending questions.
Pending Internet Questionnaires - Displays the list of addresses in which there is any pending questionnaire via the Internet, and where you should return for pending questions or for an in person interview.

From the initial screen on your handheld computer you have learned that the Census application, has the Functions, Collection and Reports icons.

[page 305]

Now, we should learn about the Backup operation.
Backup - is to ensure that the information that you collected, must, at least at the end of each day, be backed up, meaning that you create a copy of your work.
You must click on Backup option found on the household screen, then select the drive in which all information will be saved.

Closing the Sector
Upon completion of your work in a sector, you must perform an operation called Closing the Sector, which aims to identify possible inaccuracies and allows you to make the necessary changes.

Before confirming the closure of the sector, the application will perform checks to identify potential data inaccuracies and allow you to make the necessary changes.

By confirming the the closing of the sector, the system starts the process of verifying the data, which will check the following items.

  • The existence of sides not worked – it should not have a side that has not been worked. All sides should be in the Complete status.
  • The existence of pending sides - it should not have a side that is pending.
  • The existence of ongoing sides - it should not have a side that is in progress.
  • The existence of streets not associated to a side - each street should be associated with at least one side.
  • The existence of address with the same type of pending - there should be no pending status.


[page 306]

  • The existence of pending questionnaires - there should be no pending questions. Only ACS, ACM Coordinator or the ACR can close sectors with pending questionnaires.
  • After verifying the consistency of the data on the sector, a screen will appear to confirm the closing of the sector and then after another the screen displaying the closing of the sector successfully.


[Figure of screen closing the sector]

After confirming closure of the sector, a screen with the following text will appear - Sector was closed.

[page 307]

Important!

You must take all precautions to ensure that any pending issues in questionnaires (i.e. lack of some information of one or more residents of occupied households) are resolved in the shortest possible time. This means returning to the household where there are pending questions to supplement or amend the information needed. Importantly, pending status might prevent you from closing of the sector and thus also delaying the interviewers payment for his work.

All of these reports, therefore, play a key role in the progress of your work. Through them, you can see how your work and all the issues are.

Let's pause?
Think of everything you have studied and reflect on the content studied. Still some questions? List them in the table below, if necessary.
Remember: The classroom training is your opportunity to share information about everything you learned, both with your instructor and with other participants. So do not forget to bring your questions for everyone to discuss them.

[page 308]

Unit V - Special Situations
Rural Sector

You have learned to use all the concepts of the 2010 Census and complete all procedures of the sector coverage. However, for rural areas it is necessary that you learn specific information and other procedures, because of specific characteristics that this type of sector presents.

The drawing below shows the map, merely illustrative, with some elements that can be found in a typical rural sector, which may or may not be represented on your map on your handheld computer, as well as the paper map.

Look closely at the drawing.

[Figure of a map]

[page 309]

In the map you'll find several symbols displayed graphically, which represent items such as: roads, railways, rivers, lakes, etc. Note also that some of the units, locations and other elements are present with their name clearly identified on the map, while others show no text identifying them.
The limits in rural areas tend to use aspects of the visible landscape as landmarks for their definition, allowing you to be able to distinguish precisely where the sector ends or begins. The precise location of these elements is essential if there is, during the census, instances of double counting or omissions.
The graphical representation of the boundary of the Rural Sector must be faithful to the description of its perimeter. Below is the description of the map to identify, the lines and the elements that surround the sector.

Starting Point - Belmonte Road Bridge crossing the Roncador River.

Description of Perimeter- From the starting point, follow the Roncador River to the mouth of the Pombos Stream, from here it follow the line, then it goes to the Forest Road, following Belmonte Road, then it goes straight to the top of Blue Hill, this follows the Bom Sucesso Stream to the Roncador River and from this to the starting point.

There are still some sectors that have their boundaries defined by dry lines, that is, by imaginary lines that do not strictly follow elements (rivers or roads) visually recognizable in the landscape. We can check the map before the existence of a dry line that runs from the junction with Belmont Forest Road to the peak (the highest part or top) of the Morro Azul delimiting the sector.

[page 310]

[Figure of interviewer]

Use extra caution in these cases.

You also must understand correctly the symbols on the map. In the map there are various symbols:

  • () black rectangles - representing households and establishments that are present in the field and should be visited by you.
  • () () - representing schools and churches, respectively, despite having distinct symbols will also be visited by you.
  • (X) - on our map, this symbol represents the location of the units visited in the operation of the 2007 population count. This element might be useful in the field since the location is/was an existing unit in 2007.


[page 311]

Attention!

- Although the work with GPS in 2007, might not have great precision in location, which does not guarantee that the symbol, referring to the visible point on the map of your handheld computer, determines the location perfectly of the same unit.
- On the map, these elements are represented graphically and will not be displayed in the Map Sector you will receive at the time of collection.
- This representation is not intended to be faithful to the maps that you will work with during the collection, only serves to assist you on how to go through these types of sectors and identify natural or constructed elements to help you locate yourself in the sector.
- After a detailed observation of the elements that compose our map-example, let's go see how this sector is, in order to visit all the households and establishments.

[page 312]

But for this, you need to ensure good quality of the work of data collection by taking some precautions:

1 - Having the Sector Map, you must know its limits and identify the areas covered/enclosed by certain geographical features (streams, roads, mountains, etc.), to avoid missing the place and not working outside of your sector, and to allow you access to all units (households and businesses).
2 - Always use the best reference to identify the next unit to be visited; always ask how to get there in the last interview, remaining within the limits of the sector.
3 - Identify the portions of internal areas of your sector and go through each one continuously.
Important!
These procedures will facilitate the coverage of units to be registered, as well as the route and the commute time within the Census Sector.

Also in the map, you can identify the elements that make up two distinct internal areas, which are:
Area 1 - understood by the Roncador River, Belmont Road, Line Dry, in the right direction, the intersection of Belmont Road with Forest Road to the Morro Azul and Bom Sucesso Stream.
Area 2 - understood by the Roncador River, Pombo Stream, Line, Forest Road and Belmont Road.

[page 313]

Frequently you might get access to houses via the tracks or roads, many times not seen in the maps. Do not record dependent units on the households (pens, barns, warehouses, grain deposits, etc.).

[Figure of an interviewer]

To make sure you feel even safer when in the rural sector, we will explain in detail how you should proceed to cover all geographical areas previously chosen within our sector-i.e., completing the route the best way possible.

1. Locate yourself in the map and head to the starting point of the sector - Belmont Road Bridge over the Roncador River;
2. Follow the Belmonte road away from the edge of the sector, always alert to the existence of buildings in any one of its banks;
3. Register Unit 1 located on the roadside on your left, record and perform interviews with its residents. Remember to ask about the next building nearest to that;
4. Continue on the road and when you get to a fork in the road, take the path to the right, since we are initially interested in covering the whole area. And continue on Belmont Road;
5. Turn right on the road coming out of Belmont Road and follow through towards the center of our first area. Early on this way, register and make a census of Unit 2. Investigate what is the next unit to be visited;


[page 314]

6. If there is another fork in the road take the right side again. At the end of the path, record Unit 3;
7. At the end of the interview as the resident of Unit 3, about how to get to the house in the Roncador River that does not appear on your map, go there and make sure that the house is within your sector, if so, record it and conduct an interview of Unit 4. Look on your map that there is no marking from the census in 2007 for that unit, so then you can count the house with previous reference;
8. Once in Roncador River investigate the existence of other units within the first defined area, both at the banks of the Roncador River, and at the Bom Sucesso Stream;
9. Return to the fork road and take the other path to the left. There you must record and interview Unit 5;
10. Return to Belmont Road and head towards Forest Road. Record and interview Unit 6. Ask for the existence of some building within the first area in the vicinity of Blue Hill;
11. Working on the Area 2, conduct the interview in Unit 6 and ask for the existence of buildings nearby. Repeating the procedure for the second area, you might find Unit 7. Record it and interview the residents in Unit 7. Always ask about nearby units;
12. Return to Belmont Road and turn left on Forest Road, follow the edge of the sector (crossroad with the Line), looking for units within the sector.


[page 315]

Notice that there are two units at the roadside and because the unit are not part of this sector, you should not record them;
13. Go back through Belmont Road to the crossroad that leads to Area 2 and take the path that to Sereno Lake;
14. Record and interview the residents of Units 8-15, in that order. Do not forget to record non-residential units such as churches (Unit 11), schools (Unit 13), establishments: comerical, agricultural, industrial, etc.;
15. When you finish the interview in Unit 15, you were informed that there is a house on the edge of Pombos Stream, a fact that should be investigated. However, you should realize that this is outside the limits of your sector and therefore should not be recorded, so
16. Verify that there is no other unit to be recorded in this second area, before returning to the starting point to close the sector.


Important!
In rural sectors, unlike urban areas, you will cover and verify the existence of buildings on both sides, not just to your right.

[page 316]

Subnormal Cluster Sector
The Subnormal Cluster Sector often is a complex area due to its specific characteristics: high population density, irregular street layout, lack of regular addresses, bad conditions to access households and unsecure to perform the work.

The map of the sector often fails to faithfully reflect the reality of these regions, either due to the difficulty in producing the actual map or due to the complexity of these areas.

Unable to have a list of addresses or a mapping of the area due to short distance between buildings; the collection of clusters represents a challenge. In order to work on a subnormal cluster sector you must:

  • Identify the elements that allow the division of the area of the sector into smaller areas;
  • Conduct data collection in each of the parts;
  • Use widely reference points in order to facilitate a possible return to the addresses;
  • Rely on the information provided by residents about the existence of addresses known by the local population;
  • Incorporate in the map as much information obtained during the fieldwork to facilitate the return to any point of the sector;
  • Keep a detailed record of end point of each work day (indicating the last unit visited - appearance, number of floors, name of residents) in order to allow the full coverage, and
  • Make regular backups and transfer the information to minimize any problems with the equipment.


[page 317]

The following procedures should be considered:

  • Search along with the residents the most appropriate period for collection sampling, and
  • Obtain information on the existing access.

In crowded areas such as streets, sides and blocks where there is no organization you should record zero, unlike other sectors with block/side numbering, since it will not be necessary to obtain coordinates from the map.

[page 318]

You have reached the end of the interviewer's Manual! In it, you were introduced to concepts and information considered very important for the IBGE data collection. Now you should be ready for classroom training, carefully applying what has been learned here so you can perform your job in the 2010 Census successfully. Do not forget to ask your supervisor if you have any questions.

[Figure of people saying:]

Remember that your job in the 2010 Census is very important!

[page 319]

Annex
Table of sections, goals and questions for each questionnaire

[Tables from page 320 to 329, omitted]